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( A D V A N C E D )


contents: advanced design a italy study abroad: new school of making _ 4-19 ITALY JOURNAL _ 20-27 advanced design b downtown tampa CONCEPT tower _ 28-37 911 memorial _ 38-47 u.s.f. maritime museum _ 48-63 advanced design c el barrio de colon | havana cuba _ 64-99 coursework DESIGN BUILD | NOAH NOTHING HOUSE _ 100-103 ybor new+electric | design development _ 104-111 codeS.L.A.H. | DIGITAL FABRICATION _ 112-115 NEW LIGHT RAIL _ 116-121 competitions/freelance urban symbiosis | urban land instutute _ 122-129 into usf PROPOSAL _ 130-141 S.A.C.D. Award assemblage _ 142-143

Š l e o n a r d o m o r a n t i n | s u m m e r 2 0 1 1 school of architecture + community design u n i v e r s i t y o f s o u t h f l o r i d a

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( A D V A N C E D ) DESIGN p o r t f o l i o o f l e o n a rd o m o r a n t i n


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new school of making FLORENCE , i t a l y abroad advanced design a | summer 2010 5 weeks | professor: steve cooke


Project:

The Firenze New School of Making Location: Piazza mentana Florence, Italy Site Area: 20,000 sq. ft. Building Area: 35,000 sq. ft.

Nestled in Florence, the Piazza de Mentana is nothing short of a glorified parking lot. With historic sites such as Ponrte Vecchio, the Academia, Duomo and precious sculpture such as the David by Michelangelo in close proximity the goal first became to create a viable public space anchored by a New School of Making. The New School of Making is is post-graduate institution intended to inspire, teach, and serve an interface for craftsmen of any trait. While situating the building it was important to still allow the defining characteristics of the piazza to take precedent. Themes of transition, movement, and activity coexist with tranquility, and a space at rest. This modern intervention is intended to serve as a mirror of nostalgia. The stark difference between the old and the serves as a barometer to truly gauge how far we have come from the Renaissance.

site forces

The design of the school strives to create visual and spatial linkage between student and administrative components. All spaces collapse on one central atrium, no different than most Italian Piazzas. Circulation and transparency create opportunity for coincidence, mimicking a day walking the streets of Florence.

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existing conditions


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FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1. lobby/reception 2. cafe/pastry shop 3. outdoor seating area 4. research retail area 5. product design workshop 6. media space 7. media space 8. small format print room 9. mechanical 10. restrooms

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1. library 2. studio 3. office/critique 4. print/lounge 5. restrooms 6. custodial 7. lecture 8. adaptive use 9. exterior balcony

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 1. library 2. studio 3. faculty offices 4. mechanical 5. print pickup 6. restrooms 7. custodial 8. lecture 9. adaptive use 10.exterior balcony

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN 1. administrative reception 2. office 3. breakroom 4. media rooms 5. print center/mechanical 6. restrooms 7. custodial 8. conference room 9. outdoor terrace 10. thesis/professional studios


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PIAZZA DEL MENTANA

Situated in the southwest quadrant of the plaza ,the New School of Making aids in stimulating the space between the residential and educational realms. Furthermore, the public aspect of the institution is accentuated creating an engaging urban fabric. The interior atrium of the school echoes the design principals of the piazza.

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spatial section


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labiblioteca (the library)


florence hillside view of duomo watercolor 5�x 10�

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L’Italia giornale (italy journal) advanced design a study abroad summer 2010 | professor steve cooke

host university florence university of the arts |

5 weeks


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rome florence san gimignano cinque terre pisa siena verona burano murano venice vicenza brion

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While visiting countless historic sites in Italy it was ver y important to capture the uniqueness of each. Familiar with Ancient Roman, and Rennaissance architecture, the goal became to capture an understanding of the space that couldn’t be explained in a manuscript or text book. With a design project in Florence on the horizon, our journal entries became a crucial reference to understand implicit Italain design principles. The journal entries helped develop a deep understanding and memor y of each space. In fact these skills became paramount when the use of digital media was prohibited in many of the churches and buildings. The piazza provided a unique vantage point and understanding of the public realm. Ultimatley this documentation ser ves as link to specific memories of each space.


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A VERTICAL PULSE

CONCEPT TOWER DOWNTOWN TA M PA , f l o r i d a a d v a n c e d d e s i g n b | f a l l 2 0 1 0 4 w e e k s | p ro f e s s o r r i c k r a d o s


Project:

A vertical pulse (Speculative office tower) Location: downtown tampa, Florida

Site Area: 57,500 sq. ft. Building Area: 720,000 sq. ft. (48 story x 15000 sf) As a cultural, historic, and business district, Downtown Tampa is transitional district in essence. The integration of mixed-use office towers has grown to accommodate a plethora of commuting workers, often leaving the impression of desolate streets. The execution of a new mixed use office tower will be A chance to turn the tables. The lower mixed use plaza will be chance to create a sense of place, one that promotes activity and interaction. With Gaslight Park and Franklin St. Mall in mind the aim is to create pedestrian environment that embodies both core essence of each. Resulting in the idea of creating commercial activity while attaining an outwardly focused environment. As we shift to a macro-scale, the priority shifts to the Tampa skyline and creating a prominent icon that gain interest on a global scale. After thorough consideration of the problems, goals and objectives the response is to create a “Vertical Pulse” for Tampa. The concept arises from a need to set a precedent for pedestrian activity around office high-rises in the Downtown, Tampa Area. Beginning at grade level the aim is promote interaction at the pedestrian level. By elevating several commercial functions the ground level will be available for active use, becoming a place for exchange, conversation, and rest (mobile market venders, green space, multi-use functions). This language should manifest itself within the tower as well. Through the placement of dedicated community spaces in the tower, the iconic nature of the building will simply be a by-product of the inhabitant. In other words it is the balconies, atrium, terraces, and community spaces that result in a richer, diverse form. This building shall become a vertical vessel highlighting nodes of social activity throughout the structure. This “Vertical Pulse” will provide all users a sense of awareness and social consciousness that only a high-rise can provide.

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site: downtown tampa, florida


GROUND PLAN

SECTION VERTICAL LINKAGES

1. grand lobby 2. reception 3. leasable space 4. service corridor 5. security office 6 communications room 7. fire and safety room 8. staff facilities 9. service bays 10. loading areas 11. covered drop off 12. plaza area 13. fire exits 14. storage. 15. vault 16. break room 17. employee lockers 18. central receiving 19. park side leasable space


GO A LS + OB J E C TI V E S

After reviewing the problems, issues, and priorities of an office/commercial building, the following frames the a set of goals and objectives the to be accomplished for successful building design: 1. Establish a dialogue between Gaslight Park and existing site. -Minimize the building footprint on the south side of the site

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Integrate an open space at street level, suggesting a continuation of the park. -Integrate vegetation and shading features to provide comfort in the public space. 2. Create the iconic building for Downtown, Tampa. -Design a building exceeding 569 feet in height, creating the tallest building in Tampa. -Create dynamic exterior condition for the tower component (will aid to reduce heat gain). 3. Design will provide visual connections to exterior environment as well as the building itself. -All skin system(s) will be a direct response to the view provided, (i.e. shading system will also serve a “visual filter� to less desirable views). -Cavity will be recessed along east and west perimeters, allowing visual ties to be made within the building itself, while creating more views. -Design in a fashion that allows reveals the different scales of function provided (retail, entertainment, office etc.). 4. Create commercial uses/spaces that are beneficial to the public and office tenants. -Amenities shall include retail, entertainment, and educational uses, promoting activity during nonoffice hours. -Elevate educational (i.e. daycare) components thus increasing safety and ease of access for working parents in office tower above.

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4 1. parkscape Intend to focus on the park to the south. 2. atrium node A series of ten floors repeat to form a central atrium, balconies are added to connect to the environment while still at an local scale. 3. PULSE TYPE Common tower plan adaptive to interior buildouts and alterations. 4. SKYSPACE Plan altered to maximize panoramic views of Downtown Tampa

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911memorial N ATIO N AL M ALL , WA S H I N GTO N , D . C . a d v a n c e d d e s i g n b | f a l l 2 0 1 0 2 w e e k s | p ro f e s s o r r i c k r a d o s


Project:

911 MEMOrial Location: national mall, washington, d.c. Site Area: 309 ACRES Building Area: 8000 sq. ft.

The basic program requirement for this sketch project is to design a monument memorializing the September 11, 2001 attack on the United States of America. A primary design goal of this project is to explore the implicit functions of memorials and monuments by an exploration of their intent and the manner of their manifestation. 1.How can a monument give light to the indirect effects of 911? 2.How can a monument inspire a nation to move forward? 3.How can a monument memorialize fallen heroes while acknowledging the current heroes and many more to come? 4.Why does the site of National Mall)bear so much significance? Design Philosophy: The acts of September 11th, 2011 shed light on the past, present, and future in the deepest sense of the phrase. The war on terror cannot be captioned in years, thus evoking a thought of timelessness. The intent of this memorial isn’t to simply engrave al list of fallen soldiers, nor mark an end of a war. Instead the goal is to dedicate a emotion evoking piece to promote feelings of hope and reflection. From the shadows of the night to the brightness of a clear horizon the structure reinforces the notion of extremes. From the open sky to the compressed procession, or cold concrete to blooming cherry blossoms, the feeling of difference is present. The feeling of losing a loved one cannot generalized, nor should a memorial. For the set of conditions design are intended to accentuate these opposites. The events on that day of distress in September puts our values in perspective. We can cherish the memories we once had, and hope for a brighter day.

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TRANSVERSESECTION

GROUNDSCAPE_PLAN 1. approach/exit + 9’0” 2. the tribute 3. reflection pool 4. entry/exit

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LONGITUDINALSECTION

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1.GROUNDSCAPE define deliniate refine 2.LAKE VIEW LOOKINGWEST

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U.S.F. Maritime museum bayboro harbor, st. Petersburg florida a d v a n c e d d e s i g n b | f a l l 2 0 1 0 8 w e e k s | p ro f e s s o r r i c k r a d o s


Project:

U.S.F. Maritime museum Location: bayboro harbor st. petersburg, Florida Site Area: 252,000 sq. ft. (5.78 acres) Building Area: 73,000 net sq. ft. / 110 gross sq. ft.

The basic program requirements for this project includes a three dimensional master plan for the general site area and the design of maritime museum with both outdoor wet, and indoor dry exhibits. The project will be located on the outer edge of the Bayboro Harbor peninsula in St. Petersburg, Florida, and is a joint venture of The State of Florida, the University of South Florida (both of who currently occupy the peninsula) and the Maritime Museum Foundation. This project will supplement and expand the marine research and education activities currently being carried on by USF and the state at this location. Having researched and analyzed the current state of the Bayboro Harbor Peninsula it is evident that the area has defined itself as a marine science sector. With the integration of a maritime museum the question consequently becomes, how can a marine science buildings and a new maritime building coexist? The root of the answer lies in the ability to bridge the gap between institutional, public, and recreational use. 1.Maritime museum shall establish a relationship between the land and the sea. -Incorporate water into the museum / museum into the water. -Strengthen path to docks and wet slips. -Incorporate sea infrastructure into the museum (sea walls, docks, wet slips) -Integrated an adaptable in water exhibit along the waterfront. 2.Revitalize public access in/to Bayboro Harbor. -Increase public access/paths to the peninsula. -Museum shall carve an exterior public space. -Incorporate public amenities into the site. 3.Create a lively public “courtyard” encompassed by the new museum. -Use courtyard to differentiate museum and public functions -Pedestrian path from site shall terminate at the proposed “courtyard”. -Space shall be oriented to the water. 4.Establish a distinguishable icon. -Maritime museum shall have a night presence. -Maritime museum shall reveal grand scale of exhibits along waterfront. -Materials used shall provide a contrast between the existing buildings.

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GROUND LEVEL PLAN _0. parking _1. entry lobby _2. ticketing + checkroom _3. large craft exhibits _4. Changing exhibit _5. outdoor Exhibits _6. wet slip exhibits _7. meeting rooms _8. restaurant / Café -9. kitchen / prep area 10. museum gift shop 11. shared storage 12. research library 13. visitor restrooms 14. staff restrooms / lockers 15. central shipping / recieving 16. custodial space 17. central custodial 18. central communications 19. gallery storage 20 transformer vault 21. main electrical 22. fire safety room 23. emergancy generator room 24. air handling unit room

SECOND LEVEL PLAN _1. AdMINISTRATIVE RECEPTION _2. OFFICES _3. CONFERENCE ROOM _4. CONVENTION ROOM _5. LIBRARY OUTDOOR SEATING _6. CAFÉ OUTDOOR SEATING _7. ADMINISTRATIVE LOUNGE _8. RESTROOMS _9. CUSTODIAL 10. SERVICE AHU/ELECT.


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THIRD LEVEL PLAN

FOURTH LEVEL PLAN

FIFTH LEVEL PLAn

ROOF PLAN

_1. ARTIFACTS EXHIBIT _2. MODELS EXHIBIT _3. NAUTICAL ARTS EXHIBIT _4. MICRO EXHIBITS/VIEWING AREAS _5. OUTDOOR VIEWING _6. RESTROOM _7. CUSTODIAL _8. SERVICE AHU/ELECT.

_1. OUTDOOR EXHIBIT SPACE _2. SMALL CRAFT EXHIBITS _3. NAUTICAL ARTS EXHIBIT _4. SKY MEZZANINE _5. MEZZANINE _6. RESTROOM _7. CUSTODIAL _8. SERVICE AHU/ELECT.

_1. GALLERY LOUNGE _2. ARTIFACT GALLERY _3. RESTROOMS _4. CUSTODIAL _5. SERVICE AHU/ELEC.

_1. OBSERVATION DECK _2. SERVICE SYSTEMS

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2. SMALL SCALE EXHIBITION AREA views contextualize many of the exhibits.


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MARITIME COURTYARDspace defining exhibits, circulation, and views

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MASTER PLAN STRATEGY 1. drop-off, parking (overhead) 2. new maritime research center 3. schematic maritime museum

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SPATIAL SCALE VARIATIONS 62


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El Barrio de Col贸n h a v a n a , c u b a

adv anced de s i gn c | s pr i n g 2 0 1 1 16 weeks | distinguished professor: jan wampler


Project:

A Village in the city Neighborhood redevelopment Location: El barrio de colón, havana, cuba Team: Leo Morantin Josh Deacon Derek Pirozzi

With the current dilapidated state of Colon, there was an opportunity to introduce bold ideas for the future of Havana once the embargo is lifted. The class pushed the boundaries of urban design, introducing bold concepts for improvement. The studio focused on the conceptual aspect of urban design, and stressed the transition of scales. Our group chose to address lack of public space by beginning with carving out a substantial open space through the heart of the barrio. Overpopulated already, there was also a need to inventively create vertical density while considering, stainability, feasibility, and social interaction

Why is this place?

El Barrio de Colón Havana is a moment captured in time. The people, the culture, and the existing contextual conditions have been left for a new generation to re adapt and rehabilitate. Such unaffected nostalgia is nearly impossible to locate in a global culture consumed with commercial and economical charge. The yearning for a respect of the past and its often idealized form drives the new conditions of a revitalized Havana. A history, the character, an ambiance almost seems to be palpable when experiencing the existing countenance of Barrio de Colon. This is a place which is truly “real” and exposes that reality with a celebrated demeanor. Nothing is fake. Nothing is taken for granted. This is a province where each corner has a history which dictates and chronicles the narrative of a country who has seen a life time of turmoil. This is the truest state of “real” that something could ever wish to be. An architectural appreciation for what once was can become a daunting task. It is an obligation that we begin to effect the immediate in a manor that is as much about what is “real,” as the remaining so that the new architectural vocabulary is not an intrusion, but instead a benefactor which advocates the rich character that is the place. There is a marriage there, a union which can only survive through the benevolent juxtaposition of the old and new. The environment is then embellished by a completeness that has been enhanced from a layering of an architectural vocabularies. The result becomes a space not about an architecture of arrogance, imagery, or ornamentation, but instead about the spirit of the place. This is an architecture of virtue, an architecture of merit.

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La Plaza de Col贸n The primary design move was to address the absence of public space in the existing Barrio de Col贸n. Increasing the vertical density throughout the project boundaries allowed for the presence of a central plaza serving as the epicenter for the neighborhood.


lessons from Quito, ecuador

Unable to visit Havana, Cuba the class used a trip to Quito, Ecuador to serve as a case study for a Spanish colonial city. This blessing is disguise provided an understanding of the public space and rich Spanish (south American) culture. The public spaces are saturated with activity, with a healthy ratio of young to old, movement to rest, and variety. These clues from Quito helped the group understand the essence of a lively, viable, and successful public space in latin culture.

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LA PLAZA DE COLON CENTRAL PLAZA The current lack of open public space stresses the need for a central core. Lined with commercial, entertainment, and residential usage the plaza strives to create a set of interlocking activities. The signature cultural center and hotel tower provide a balance between international and local interest. The vertical edge along the perimeter of the plaza creates a new condition for the city of Havana. Our proposal seeks to invigorate the imagination as what Havana can be once the embargo is lifted. Furthermore the plaza intends to draw on existing imprints of the site using former spaces the dictate the placement new landscape, water, and surface features. **The three dimensional aspect of urban design was emphasized in this studio through the use of models as process. Unconventional models such as the found object model reinforced the various scales of interest. 1. plaza groundscape study 2. Intensity of public space 3. creating a center- new vs. old 4. waterfront dialogue 5. found object model (printer and fax) addressing multiples scales and uniqueness

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ELEVATED SPACE DISTRIBUTION Defined elevated shared space and vertical space between buildings create a new network of space and visual relationships. New structures above allowed public spaces to occur at the pedestrian level. . el mercado (the market) The market is an essential component of Hispanic culture. Carved out of the plaza, the market creates the groundscape. Space begins to be delineated by shade, time, and elevation change. The vacant space provided creates an opportunity for vendors, leisure, and interaction amongst the community. Due to the vertical nature of the city spaces between, spaces between work accordingly. 1. Elevated structure study. Design goal was to used exterior circulation and minimize impact onexisting footprint 2. Elevated space allocation 3. Section Model. Plaza de Colon market (open to water. 4. Final Model (walnut representing new structure, chipboards represents existing buildings modified to create public space.

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EL CENTRO DE COLON Denser towards the middle, the barrio center is full with entertainment, commercial, retail, office space, residential, live work, and educational use. The underground water retainage aids to hold as much runoff as possible. The residential sectors of the barrio starts to define the traditional scale of the site while creating an interactive edge condition for the main plaza.

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1. Plaza schematic with residential reconfiguration studies. 2. Shared space opportunities. 3. Found object model. Creating a range of scales and open space conditions. 4. Preliminary plaza integration. Creating a “public cavity� centrally located in the barrio, encompassed by vertical development. 5. Final proposal.(aerial)

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HOUSINGCharacter While researching the current state of the barrio, the lack of public space called for a new approach of placing public space. The vertical stitching approach starts link new and old buildings in a lateral and vertical manner. The open spaces with in each block create an intimate scale of social space, a place for conversation and encounters.

1. sectional facade study 2. groundscape relation to skyline 3. the space between residential sectional study 4. elevated social networks diagram

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HOUSINGCharacter

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THE THREE DIMENSIONAL COURTYARD

As the central space became more defined,it was evident that the same attitude may be introduced to the smaller scale areas. The three dimensional courtyard is sculpted from the altered block configuration. The buildings above are able to create a sense of enclosure at ground level, while carving a social space between the building. The rooftop network created promotes communication, health and opportunity.


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The residential component of the project consists of reconfiguring the existing blocks, maintaining the footprints of the buildings with the exception of buildings removed to create public space. Consequently the square footage removed will be replaced with a new layer of development. 1. residential quad-plan typology 2. residential interblock relation 3. residential quad linkage opportunities 4. “skyspace� residential schematic 5. residential circulation axonometric 6. schematic housing section/plaza interaction 7. street perspective looking towards plaza above.

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WATERFRONT POTENTIAL The waterfront presence of the Barrio presents an opportunity to create an environment suitable for the ever-present water interaction of urban culture. The waterfront presence creates an educational, industrial, and social opportunity for the people of the Barrio de Colon. The goal then becomes to extend the main plaza space to the water, thus defining the unbounded nature of the public realm. 1. Potential pedestrian level ope green space 2. Schematic Section- Waterfront Industrial/ Educational Facility 3. Schematic Plan- Plaza Extension to water

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source photos courtesy of fadi sheikh-kahlil


potential


The first day westarted to attached furring strips to the bottom o worked on sanding and sealing siding.

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We continued to work on furring strips and vent along the inner spray painted the exterior black . Aligned siding to nail to furring strip, difficulty along edge ending Finished siding on the roof and removed scaffolding. We also r Monday Josh and I had to removed previously completed furrin side of the building 2/1/10 Made the wall for right side of the entry. 103 Âź “ panel for roof. flashing for clerestory windows, great difficulty to turn a corner w 2/3/10 We spent most of the day redoing mistakes. Completed framin room lobby ) had to be removed to insert hurricane clips, attach 2/8/10 Roofers arrived today and installed the sheet metal along roof e ricane clips into the interior hall. 6 nail per clip, 4 per side. I got efficient. Applied Tyvek onto wall with staples. Jean and Jessi in preparation for concrete. I learned how to connect the framin 2/10/10 Josh and Eli worked on the framing for windows and put weath along, it is actually enclosed now. We had redo flashing again a ing on side is complete. I worked on the roof and secured the S 2/15/10 First concrete section of the entry was poured today. We ahd to cut sip panels. We will need to continues to pour concrete pad 2/16/10 Pored to third concrete pad today after working on the formwor 6â€? backed. Once we actually started pouring it seemed to go f 2/22/10 Mary, Laney, and I worked on the formwork for pantry exit stairs dirt significantly. After completed 12 bags were used. I had to r . We bagan to moved material around in preparation for framng 2/24/10 Jean and Sean worked on perlins for ceiling above main hall an ing. Josh and Laney assembled while Mary and I cut and mea tainer and unveil the skylights. Much concrete blocks, sheet me thermoblock to interior framing. We had a visit from a church me 3/1/10 Laney and I emptied pantry shipping container and continued to very efficient. We proceeded to complete framing and work on tainers we had to cut down spacers to hold framing stationary. 3/15/10 First day back from spring-break . Entry door was installed and to the rear was also installed. We started on framing for the com framing for the pantry . 3/17/10


of the entry roof, worked on scaffolding, other group front edge of the roof. Applied venting material stapled the

at window. Nearly no margin for error ! removed the formwork off of the entry concrete bench. ng strips and inserted weathering strips to top entry and left

. Laney and I cut S.I.P. panel to fit. Continued to work on with flashing but eventually we got the hang of it.

ng for entry wall (by fountain). Framing exterior wall (bathh Tyvek sheet, realign wall and roof.

edges “Prattco Roofing and Sheet Metal”. We install hurto use the pneumatic hammer made the process very ica cut siding for the back side. Gravel for entry was put in ng to the shipping container.

her strips in. The bathroom lobby seems to be coming above the entry and mount additional furring strips . SidS.I.P. panels to the shipping container

o move the rocks in closer to the entrance. Josh and Eli ds one a day and eventually the handicap ramp .

rk for quite some time we had the dismantle it and move it fast due to the collaborative effort.

s and poured the concrete stairs. We had to build up with relocated 12 bags of concrete to rear shipping containers g.

nd entry. Josh, mary, Laney and I worked on pantry framasured. Mary and I cleaned above computer shipping conetal, tarp, and trash was moved. Jessica was applying ember and she seemed rather impressed (good feeling)

o frame. Working with the container clean made working the connection between the framing and shipping con-

d perlins for the ceiling completed. The sliding glass door mputer room. Laney and I worked on the portion wall

George brought the welding machine and a large shipment of 2x4’s / 1x8 cedar. The electrician passed by to survey the place. Formwork for Gloria office first concrete wall was discussed and started. 3/22/10 Laney and I worked on framing for concrete wall. ( see sketch). 3/29/10 Laney and placed “ground nuts” into all of the electrical boxes. “Rick” the electrician (30 year veteran) consulted us and had us take down all of the overhead electrical boxes. This was due to a change in lighting design, now only one box is needed per row. We all also worked on getting the north wall ready for roof support plates. Hurricane straps had to be removed the support penetration. Twan and I cut down 2”x6”’s down for the inserts. Again the “REFABRICATION” of this wall taught us how to prepare walls to hold loads, even if it meant repeating previously done work. 3/31/10 Today we worked on electrical. We ran “homeruns” (wires to the electrical panel). Overhead wire ran was 10 gauge. Holes needed to be cut into framing. I worked with Eli and Laney while Mary worked on the shear bracing over the interior entry. Mary and Jean Maurice climbed into the trusses to run power for future lighting. Electricians DJ and Rick were a huge help. George and Sean welded the fixtures for more shear bracing. I learned how to use a “rotosplit”. Formwork for second concrete wall is erected. The first one had air pockets but it added a rich quality , I hope it doesn’t get covered with mortar. The blue cable ran was for data (internet, phone, etc). The 110 cable has three wire (black, green, and white), while the 220 has four wires. Josh and installed cable connectors on all of the boxes. At the beginning of the day inspectors passed by the church and stumbled on the site. The will probably be responsible for our framing inspection. 4/5/10 Wiring is “done” for the most part. Laney, Josh, and John worked on fastening wires in to wall. Second concrete wall is and drying. I had to remove wiring ran to the roof (potential roof lighting) due to water-proofing problems. The house across the street has been demolished (what a beautiful site). We also anchored several wall into the shipping container and poured another concrete wall. Sean and Stan worked on securing tension anchors to the north wall while Mary secured the overhead wiring with zip ties. Josh and I cut PVC pipe to feed wire through the concrete walls. Eli and Twan worked on the trimming for the exterior of the shipping containers. We had a discussion about the entry space and treatment of the siding and windows. Fadi jack hammered for over an hour to make way for exterior wiring (underground). We also worked on sealing all the windows, making spacers for brackets. 4/7/10 Second concrete wall is officially done, and formwork for final concretes wall is erected. We ran into problems running the wire into the concrete wall, some concrete seem to spill into the PVC pipe. After some time chiseling away we eventually got the wire through. We poured the final concrete wall, while George cut holes in to the shipping container floors. Josh and Sean worked on the framing for over Gloria’s concrete walls. The pouring was rather efficient Mary operated the mixer, Eli and Twan poured the bags in, Laney handed me the concrete buckets while I poured the concrete into the formwork. The roofers were outside working on the roof membrane, (roll on adhesive. Steel beams for the north wall arrived at the end of day, Eli and I moved the beams (four total). 4/12/10 We worked on installing siding in the entry partition wall. We came to consensus on the design and there will be no windows (thankfully). Mary and I installed while Laney cut . 4/15/10 Today Eli, Mary, Laney and I worked on cutting steel beams for north overhang . Holes needed to be cut corresponding to the steel plates. Two typed of bits need to be used, one to start in and another to widen. 4/19/10 The day mostly consisted of finishing up projects I actually hammered back all of the exposed nails from the siding installation. Laney and I had to remove all of the sawdust from the containers, install covers and pull wires from electrical in the concrete wall.

noah nothing house

of caring and teaching c o n s t r u c t i o n 1233 short 30th st, tampa fl 33624 d e s i g n b u i l d | s p r i n g 2 0 1 0 professor stanley russell | 14 weeks


D E SIG N BUIL D SPRING 2 0 1 0 PHASE 3 102


cut-away corner detail

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ybor new + ELECTRIC

G a l l er y ( R E V IST E D ) design development | summer 2011| professor john mckenna


Project:

NEW ELECTRIC GALLERY (revisited) Location: ybor city, tampa, florida Site Area: 3,042 sq. ft. Building Area: 8,5ww00 sq. ft. Serving as both a bar and new electric media gallery, the new+electric serves both the public and private realms. Due to the narrow width of the site, the designed called for strong sectional exploration and concise form decisions. The concept of the building arises from the rational duality that defines Ybor city as both a contemporary and and historic place.

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SCHEMATICDESIGN


MAKING IT WORK DESIGNDEVELOPMENT

The intent of this course was to development a previous project. With design decisions already made the challenge was the incorporate the various building systems into the design. The infill project required great coordination due the limited footprint laterally and vertically. The municipal aspect of Ybor city aided in incorporating fire safety, plumbing and electrical systems. This exercise was a rude awaking. The development of a project greatly relies on the accuracy of the initial design decisions, and that is the aspect of the class that has been instilled in my mind. Design development should not deter from the transmittal of a concept, instead decisions can be made the reinforce a concept both poetically and realistically. ELECTRICALSYSTEM

PLUMBINGSYSTEM

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CIRCULATION


FIRESUPRESSION

FIRESUPRESSION

FIRESUPRESSION

PLUMBINGSYSTEM

ROOF

STRUCTUREDIMENSIONING

STRUCTURECONCEPT

HVACSYSTEM

STRUCTURE


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TEAM C O D E S . L . A . H . ( S T E P A H N I E - L E O - a d a m - higor ) digital fabrication | spring 2010 | professor mark weston


Projects:

Code one & CODE THREE Type: Panelizing surface & PAPER SCULPTuRE Team Blog: http://codeslah.blogspot.com/ Team: LEO MOrantin ADAM NAKagoshi Higor Arruda Stephanie Herring The goal of this course was to understand the basic principals of digital fabrication. Code One serves as an attempt for the group to get familiar wit program like Rhinoceros and Grasshopper. These parametric modeling programs not only allowed the group to create unique object digitally, but actually aided in creating laser files for the fabrication of the objects. Code one is simply a triangulated penalized surface. A Grasshopper script was used to produce the tab in order to assemble the surface. Derived from Code One, Code three is a populated 3-D surface. The three dimensional aspect of the form made it exponentially more difficult to assemble. Exceeding 2000 unique pieces, the paper sculpture required all of the group members for assembly. This introduction to the world of digital fabrication went a long way. It began with arbitrary shapes, eventually we learned how to control parameters and control the end result.

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Code one


Code three


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NEW LIGHT RAIL i275 CORRIDOR Hillsborough area regional transit competition

TAMPA , FLORIDA i n t e r s t a t e 2 7 5 fall 2010 all school charette|2 weeks


Project:

NEW LIGHT RAIL i275 CORRIDOR Location: INTERATATE 275, BIRD ST. EXIT, TAMPA, Florida Site Area: 40,000 sq. ft. Building Area: 9,000 sq. ft. Team: leo morantin jay powell fadi sheikh kahlil PROPOSAL PHILOSOPHY The green space above the roof of the structure maintains the ecological balance in the surrounding area upon arrival. Passengers are welcomed by the iconic structure with it’s tranquil bends and folds produced by the natural surroundings. Northbound passengers are directed to the main open structure and southbound passengers are welcome by an alcove structure reflecting the main space. Passengers arriving at the station in motor vehicles can safely and efficiently park at the designated spaces at the existing Tampa Dog Track parking facility. The pedestrian friendly controlled routes will direct passengers crossing Lamar Avenue to and from the terminal safely. Passengers may also secure bicycles at designated bicycle racks within the vicinity of the main terminal. The design idea of the structure is to illustrate that not only is it ecologically responsible to travel by light rail, but the structure itself is reproducing this idea in a unique architectural form. The Bird Street station is not only an iconic ecological structure. but a hub for the local community. The station will import and activate local businesses and develop a sustainable economy in the local community. Passengers of the station will also be educated in the advantages of traveling via light rail by digital displays in the station while waiting for scheduled arrivals and departures. The Bird Street Station represents an architectural structure that will activate new businesses, education local community and promote ecological awareness

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1. 2. 3. 4.

main en t r y (u p p e r d e c k) view fro m s ou t h b ou n d i 2 7 5 ligh t ra il tr ack v ie w station w a itin g are a /a r r i v a l

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4


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urban Symbiosis

u r b a n l a n d i ns t i t u t e c o m p e t i t i o n

2011 GERALD D. HINES STUDENT URBAN DESIGN COMPETITION

m o u n t r a i n e r , s e at t l e w a s h i n G t o n spring 2011 | faculty sponsor:trent green | 2 weeks


Project: urban symbiosis: mount rainier village center Location: Mount Rainier, Seattle Washington Site Area: 28 ACRES (REDEVELOPMENT) Sponsors: Trent Green U.S.F. Associate Professor Joel Cantor CEO at Cantor + Partners LLC Graduate Interdisciplinary Team: Leo Morantin | Architecture Joanne Fiebe | Urban Design Alana Brasier | Planning + Policy Higor Arruda | Architecture Chris Sands | Real Estate

FUNCTIONAL STRATEGY

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T ransit A cce s s + Pede s t r i an S y s t e ms • Un i v e r sal l y d e sig n e d , c o m p le t e s t r e e t s f o r a ll r e s id e n t s a n d v is it o r s • A c c e ss t o an d wit h in t h e n e ig h b o r h o o d t h r o u g h a n in t e r c o n n e c t e d s ys t e m o f m a s s tra ns i t, s treets , an d p e d e st r i an p a t h wa y s • A c c e ss t o a v ar ie t y o f c o m m e r c ia l n e e d s • E m p l o y m e n t c e n t e r in c lo s e p r o xim it y t o t h e t r a n s it s t a t io n Jo b C reatio n + N e i g h b o r h o o d S ta b i l i t y • I n c r e asi n g t h e de n s it y o f t h e t o wn c e n t e r wit h a m a jo r e m p lo ym e n t c e n t e r will ju mp- s ta rt j ob growth • Lar g e b u si n e sse s a r e u s e d t o a n c h o r t h e t o wn c e n t e r a n d d r a w v ia b le s m a ll o f f ic es a nd bus i nes s es • O p p o rt u n i t i e s fo r in c u b a t o r b u s in e s s e s a r e p r o v id e d b y p r o m o t in g a f f o r d a b le r e t a i l BUILT FORM + N ATUR AL F EATUR ES • C o n n e c t an d e n h a n c e t h e O lm s t e d B r o t h e r ’s g r e e n wa y s p la n t o r e a c h b e yo n d t he nei ghborhood center • Pr o g r am t h e g re e n wa y c o n n e c t o r wit h d iv e r s e u s e s t o a c t iv a t e c o m m u n it y s p a c es a nd compl ement t h e n e i g h b o rh o o d ’s c u lt u r a l d ive r s it y • St o r m - w at e r m a n a g e m e n t is im p r o ve d b y u s in g o p e n b io - s wa le s c o n n e c t e d t o an ecol ogi ca l roundab o u t , g re e n r o o f s wit h d ir e c t e d r u n o f f , a n d p e r vio u s p a v e m e n t • C o m m u n i t y g ar d e n s b r in g o p p o r t u n it ie s f o r u r b a n a g r ic u lt u r e , wh ic h c a n b e u s e d by l oca l res i dents an d re st au r an t s N e ig h bo rh o o d Vi ta l i t y + D i ver s i t y • Mi x e d u se s fo s t e r e c o n o m ic g r o wt h • A ffo rd ab l e h o u s in g p r o v id e a ll in c o m e le ve ls t h e o p p o r t u n it y f o r a d e q u a t e h o u s ing • C e l e b r at e t h e c o m m u n it y’s d ive r s e c u lt u r e s b y p r o v id in g p r o s p e c t s f o r lo c a l b u s ines s es • Li v e / w o r k sp ace p r o m o t e s e n t r e p r e n e u r s h ip a n d a f f o r d a b ilit y • A c t i v i t i e s t h at ca t e r t o t h e yo u t h in t h e Ne ig h b o r h o o d • Un i v e r sal D e si g n e le m e n t s t h a t in t e g r a t e d is a b le d p e r s o n s in t o t h e Ne ig h b o r h o o d

PARTNERSHIP STRATEGY: PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP STRUCTURE

plaza detail plan _1. _2. _3. _4. _5. _6. _7 _8.

LANDMARK “ FLATIRON ” BUILDING ART SPACE VILLAGE CENTERWWW PLA Z A MT. BAKER STATION FRANKLIN STATION STORMWATER AERATION CENTER ROUNDABOUT TRANSIT CENTER GARAGE AND BUS TRANSFER STATION

ethnic restaturant row plan _1. _2. _3. _4. _5. _6. _7 _8. _9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

ama z o n fulfilment center / tech o ffice l a r g e f o r m at r e ta i l lowe’s superstore bio-swale bike lane e t h n i c r e s ta u r a n t r o w j a zz a l l e y senior housing small local businesses GREEN PLOTS PLAYGROUND GREENWAY CONNECTOR BIKE RENT


_1. MT. BAKER STATION _2. TOWN CENTER PLAZA _3. TRANSIT CENTER GARAGE _4. BUS TRANSFER STATION _5. TRAFFIC CALMING ROUNDABOUT _6. FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL _7. S. RAINIER BLVD. _8. MLK BLVD. _9. WHOLE FOOD GROCERY _10. DEPARTMENT STORE _11. SPORTING GOODS STORE _12. ELECTRONICS STORE _13. LOWES _14. AMAZON FULLFILLMENT CENTER _15. AMAZON TECH OFFICE _16. RENTAL LOFTS _17. RENTAL LOFTS _18. SENIOR LIVING _19. PLAYGROUND (2-12YRS) _20. GARDEN PLOTS _21. ETHNIC RESTAURANT ROW _22. BIKE RENTAL _23. GREENWAY CONNECTOR _24. JAZZ ALLEY _25. ENTERTAINMENT _26. COMMUNITY CENTER _27. COMMUNITY WORKSHOP _28. WINTER GARDEN

MASTER PLAN MT. RANIER VILLAGE CENTER SEATTLE, WASHINGTON


1 2 3

phase 1 | 1-5 YEARS

phase 2 | 3-7 YEARS

Phase 3 | 5-10 YEARS

A n int egrated redeve l o pm ent strate gy a i med at m axi miz ing the potentia l o f c o m m u n ity deve l o p m ent and transit th ro u gh th e c reatio n of a l i va b le, affordable, and su sta inabl e tran s i t v i l l age. A s trategy th at rea l iz e s th e ph y s i ca l , f unct i onal, and so c ia l re l atio n sh ips be t ween : C o mmun i t y and t he lar ger u rba n c on t e xt • Pl ace-m aking and qualit y of l i f e • E con omic develo pment a n d c om m u n i t y prospe ri t y • J ob crea t ion and family st a bi l i t y • Ph ys i cal co ndit ions and su st a i n a bi l i t y • Paths of mov ement and fu n c t i on a l orde rs • V i s u al charact er and pla c e i de n t i t y • V i tal i ty and jo ie de ver ve

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COMPETITON BOARDS: TEAM 1979

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I N TO U . S . F CENter proposal Spring 2011 | 4 Weeks University of South Florida School of Architecture and Community Design S.A.C.D. Design Workshop Robert MacLeod | Director Dr. Levent Kara | Lead Designer/Assistant Professor Graduate Student Design Team: Leonardo Morantin + Derek Pirozzi


Project:

INTO™ U.s.F. Proposal

Location: Unviersty of south florida campus tampa, Florida Client: U.S.F. Provost’s Office/into U.S.f. Site Area: 14,000 sq. ft. Building Area: 43,000 SQ.FT. Design Team: Levent Kara (Lead Designer) Leo Morantin + Derek Pirozzi

u.s.f. tampa campus

Into is a world renown international foreign exchange institution. The recent expansion to the University of South Florida ignited a series of schematic design submittals including residence, classroom, and administrative building concepts. The second phase of this design exercise entailed defining a potential host building for the organization at the University of South Florida. The building would replace the deteriorating Life Science building, and expand the development centered around the

existing conditions

University’s entrance. The building’s volumetric silhouette clearly identifies the classroom, study, office and cafe spaces while focusing on the main atrium circulation. This addition would only be the first phase of a project that has the potential to create an identifiable node on campus. PROGRAM: GROUND FLOOR - M ul t i -Purpose Class room 650 -C omp ut er Lab 7 50 -L i b rar y 1200 -O f f i ces 5@ 1 00 (50 0) -O f f i ces 3@ 1 50 (45 0) -C onf erence Room 4 00 -O f f i ces 3@ 2 00 (60 0) -G r oup Of f i ce 3 @4 00 (12 00 ) -S tud ent Lounge Area 10 50 -C af e 1400 -R e cep t i on 14 00 -A u di t ori um 24 00 SECOND FLOOR -C l assrooms (adaptive) -1 8 @ 450 (81 00 ) -C omp ut er Lab 7 50 -L e a rni ng Lab 9 00 -O f f i ces 3@1 00 (30 0) -S ma l l Grou p Office 2 50 -S tud ent Lounge Area 10 50

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THIRD FLOOR - C l assr o o m s (ad ap t i v e ) - 18@450 (8100) - C o m p u t e r L ab 750 - L e arn i n g L ab 900 - O ffi c e s 3@100 (300) - S m al l G ro u p O ffi c e 250 - S t u d e n t L o u n g e A re a 105 0 FOURTH FLOOR - C l assr o o m s (ad ap t i v e ) - 9@450 (4050) - C o m p u t e r L ab 750 - F ac u l t y O p e n O ffi c e A re a 2 @ 2 0 0 0 ( 4 0 0 0 ) - O ffi c e s 5@150 (750) - O ffi c e s 4@250 (1000) - S m al l G ro u p O ffi c e s 4@2 5 0 ( 1 0 0 0 ) - S t u d e n t L o u n g e A re a 850 - C o n fe re n c e R o o m 400 TOTAL: 43, 000 NET S Q. FT. 60, 000 GR OS S S Q. FT.

2 1

3 4

proposed site plan

PROPOSED PLAZA SITE PLAN

1. C E N TE R 2. P LA Z A 3. FU TU RE U N IVE RSITY C OLLE GE BU ILD IN G 4. FU TU RE RE SID E N C E H A LL


MAIN ENTRY


G 02

EAST ELEVATION 134

GROUND FLOOR PLAN A. Multi-Purpose Classroom B. Computer Lab C. Librar y D. Offices (100 sq. ft.) E. Offices (150 sq. ft.) F. Conference Room G. Offices (200 sq. ft.) H. Group Office (400 sq. ft.) I. Student Lounge Area J. Cafe K. Reception L. Auditorium SECOND FLOOR PLAN A. Classrooms (Adaptive) B. Computer Lab C. Learning Lab D. Offices (100 sq. ft.) E. Small Group Office (250 sq. ft.) F. Student Lounge Area G. Storage H. Vending Machines


03 04

THIRD FLOOR PLAN A. Classro ms B. Computer Lab C. Learning Lab D. Offices (100 sq. ft.) E. Small Group Office (250 sq. ft.) F. Student Lounge Area G. Storage H. Vending Machines

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN A. Classro oms (Adaptive) B. Computer Lab C. Faculty Open Office Area D. Offices (150 sq. ft.) E. Offices (250 sq. ft.) F. Small Group Offices (250 sq. ft.) G. Student Lounge Area H. Conference Room


SCHEMATIC SECTION STUDIES 1. EAST -WEST SECTION: THROUGH INTO USF CENTRAL PLAZA AND FUTURE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE BUILDING 2. NORTH-SOUTH SECTION: THROUGH INTO USF CENTRAL PLAZA AND FUTURE RESIDENCE HALL 3. NORTH-SOUTH SECTION: THROUGH FUTURE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE BUILDING AND RESIDENCE HALL

1

2

3

NORTH ELEVATION 136


EXTERIOR SCHEMATIC (VIEW LOOKING SOUTH)


1

POTENTIAL SPACES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

in to p ro p os al (m a in a tr i u m s p a c e ) residenc e h all lou n ge ( p l aza vi e w ) in to p ro p os al (s k y - l o u n g e vi e w ) u n ivers ity college c on f e re n c e b u i l d i n g residenc e h all (c o m m o n s p ac e )

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3

4

5


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AWARDED*

Independent Project: 2011 S.A.C.D. Faculty / Alumni Awards With the addition of several new awards (Emerging Architect, Distinguished Alumni, and Service), it is important for students to give back in the truest meaning of the phrase. Fusing hand woodworking with digital laser layered engraving, allowed the design award design to be easily mass-produced and customized. This project was a simple way to give back to the school and perhaps can build a tradition of student crafting the annual awards. This practice allows each award to bear a uniqueness and echo the skills that have come to define our school.

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*As a student who has been blessed enough to receive awards in the past, I find it extremely important to give back in any way possible. For it is because of guidance and opportunity that students excel. We have obligations and requirements, yet these tasks are only a minimum. Whether it be crafting an award or helping move a desk, we as future architects we must think outside of ourselves.


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thank you.


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printed,crafted, and bound by:

l e o n a rdo

m or a n tin

advanced design portfolio | summer 2011 school of architecture + community design university of south florida


) D E C N A V D A (

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Leo Morantin [Advanced Design Architecture Portfolio]  

2012 USF SACD Outstanding Design Porfolio Award Recipient. This is my pre-thesis portfolio submittal featuring Advanced Design, Elective, an...

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