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LEONARDO RODRIGUEZ


LEONARDO RODRIGUEZ leo9690@gmail.com 714.600.9756


RESUME OBJECTIVE

Full-time entry-level position

EDUCATION

California Polytechnic State University (GPA: 3.45)

EXPERIENCE

Cadiz Design Studio - Summer 2011

SKILLS

Rhino Revit Sketchup Autocad Illustrator Photoshop Indesign Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)

ACHIEVEMENTS

D3 Natural Systems 2012 Competition - Sepcial Mention Leading Edge Competition Challenge 2, 2009 - Honorable Mention 1st place Cal Poly Architecture/Engineering Collaboration Bridge Studio Gordon Stafford Scholarship in Architecture Recipieint - 2008 - present Sam Walton Community Scholarship Recipient Design Featured in Archinect Design Featured in Archdaily


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. TOYO ITO EXHIBIT 2. MOCK-UP 3. MUSEUM OF CHADO 4. UNIDENTIFIED 5. OBFUSCAPE 6. SILVERLAKE TANGO


TOYO ITO EXHIBIT Studio: ARC 103L Date: Spring, 2009 Recognition: Fall Interim, 2009

The purpose of the project was to design a small, 3-level exhibit for a given architect. The design is derived from Toyo Ito’s use of visual continuity through perspective in his U-House project. The majority of the house’s spaces along the curved side of the house bleed into each other, with no clear boundaries between one space and the next. The design for the exhibit attempts to reinterpret the idea of visual continuity through a different method. All the components within the exhibit are treated as a single entity. The focus was mainly on the circulation of the exhibit. Rather than having multiple floor plates held up by walls with adjacent stairs for circulation, each component is treated as a continuation of every other part. The floor begins to fold and lift up to create a ramp leading to the next level. The ramp itself begins to fold along its sides and lift up to create the walls of the exhibit. The folding technique is also applied to create permanent display stands for Ito’s work.


Visual Continuity through Perspective


Circulation

First Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor

Fourth Floor


Exhibit Displays


1� Scale Model


MOCK-UP Studio: ARC 103L Date: Spring, 2009 Recognition: Fall Interim, 2009

The project is a further exploration of the exhibit design. The goal of the project was to design a full-scale mockup based on the ideas of the exhibit. Integration of the different parts of the mock-up was accomplished through lines as opposed to folding planes. Each component, floor, stair, elevated platform, wall and cantilever were not treated as solid planes but instead were broken down and composed of smaller linear members (2x4’s and steel tubes). This break down into these smaller components allowed us to introduce a new technique in addition to the fold: the flare. The floor begins to fold up and flare in order to create multiple treads leading up to the elevated platform. The top of the adjacent wall also begins to fold and flare in order to create a cantilever over a portion of the mockup.


Axonometric


Detail 1

Detail 2

Exploded Axonometric


1� Scale Model


Full Scale Mock-Up


MUSEUM OF CHADO Studio: ARC 202L Date: Winter, 2009

The design for the Museum of Chado began with a plaster-pouring exercise. Initially the plaster exercise was approached as a subtractive operation, in which volumes were subtracted from the rectangular volume. The final plaster model had three large voids which were interconnected by a series of channel voids. This model was then inverted so that what was solid became void and what was void was solid. The result of this operation became three floating volumes with corridors running in between them. The floating volumes became the gallery spaces, while the corridors became the circulation that ran through the galleries. The structural eccentricity of the museum was resolved through a structural skin. Structural members run along the museum’s edges, triangulating the façade. In between the structural members run horizontal slats, which help manipulate light entry on the open areas of the museum.


GALLER CIR

IES

CU

LAT

ION

GALL

CIR

CIR CU

LA

CU

TIO

NC

LA

ERIES

IRC

TIO

ULA

N

TIO

N

S E I LER

GAL

Parti Diagram

Circulation


Structural Skin UP

UP

UP

UP

DN

DN

DN

DN

Permanent Gallery

Workshop

UP

UP

UP

Men’s Room

DN

DN

UP

Cafe

Women’s Room

UP

Reception

Storage

UP

Lobby

Temporary Gallery

DN

Temporary Gallery

Mechanical/ Electrical

Store

Coat Check

Women’s Room

Ceramics Workshop

Cafe Kitchen

Men’s Room

Pvt. Office

Exhibition Prep. Shop

Open Offices

Staff Room

Community Room

Conference Room

Exhibition Prep.

DN

DN

DN

DN

Permanent Gallery

UP

Permanent Gallery

UP

UP

UP

Fourth Floor Third Floor Second Floor First Floor Basement


Cross Section

Longitudinal Section


UNIDENTIFIED Studio: ARC 499 Date: Spring, 2012 Recognition: D3 Natural Systems 2012 -­Special Mention Fall Interim, 2012 Published in Archdaily, Archinect

Above all, the project deals with loss of identity. Nearly 500 immigrants lose their lives crossing the U.S. – Mexico border every year. Many of these individuals are never identified and as a result their bodies cannot be returned to their families. The project itself is composed of two parts: a bio-crematorium and a memorial. Since the project deals with loss of identity, the building itself takes on multiple identities of its own; it is both crematorium and memorial, but also becomes a vantage point, safe haven, point of reference, and monument. Organizationally, the two parts of the project are stacked on top of each other; an 80-foot tower above an underground crematorium that contains the entrance into the tower. Two axes are laid over the crematorium: a natural axis, which is the river, and a man-made axis, which serves as entrance into the crematorium. As bodies proceed through the crematorium, they travel through the man-made axis, where they are prepared, cremated, and finally the remaining ashes are taken to the natural axis to be washed away by the river.


Two Axes

Tower Form


Tower Engraving

Panel Structure


Cross Section


Underground Plan


OBFUSCAPE Studio: ARC 405L Date: Fall, 2012 Recognition: Winter Interim, 2013 Displayed at RELIER Exhibit

The goal of the project was to design a museum for the Los Angeles Red Car. The project began with an image of decaying wood from a train shed. This photograph was then traced to produce a pattern of lines. The resultant pattern was then mapped using cotton; cotton was pulled apart and to vary its fiber density in response to the density of the lines in the drawing. What resulted was an abstract object that had a foggy quality to it. The goal then was to capture this foggy quality through an architectural material. The lines from the tracing were then remapped with glass pieces. The varying angles of the extruded glass created complex reflection patterns. The complex and overlapping reflections obscured any object placed in the center of these glass extrusions, keeping the essence of the fog. The museum houses four trains, with reflective glass scattered around each of the trains. The glass extrusions reflect images of the trains throughout the museum. These glass extrusions served not only as reflective surfaces, but also display cases. Five different glass typologies were developed: train enclosures, towers, corridors, voided towers, and stands.


Decayed Wood

Line Pattern

Cotton Mapping

Glass Extrusions

Process


Roof Plate Manipulations LANDS

CAPE A

LANDS

CCESS

CAPE A

MA

IN

EN T

MA

IN

EN RA TRA NC NC E E

CCESS

Floor Plate Manipulations


Roof Plate

Voided Towers

Building Envelope

Display Walks Display Glass

Columns

Display Towers

Floor Plate

Display Cases


10 1

4

3

2

6

7

5 8

9

Floor Plan


SILVERLAKE TANGO Studio: ARC 406L Date: Winter, 2013

The Silverlake Tango Performance Center is an exploration of solid void relationships. All intimate spaces, including the milonga dance spaces were treated as the poche. The art galleries are the public program that are subtracted from the solid. The project is the result of conflict of interests between the desire to approach the tango spaces in a very traditional way (small, dark, intimate spaces) and looking at the project in a modern way (exposing the dance to the general public). Surface became the mediator between the two. Translucent surfaces were used on the walls of the art galleries so that the public could read the shadows of people dancing behind the gallery walls in the dance spaces. The public begins to get a sense of the intimacy of the dance as they travel upward in the art galleries. The angled voids created a large amount of dead space wherever they broke the building’s floor plates. Parts of the floor plates immediately below the art galleries were omitted or dropped for functional purposes. What resulted were some of the most dynamic spaces within

the building. It made sense that we place the dance floors in these spaces. Suddenly we had double height dance spaces with art galleries cutting through the upper portions of the space. For this project there was an emphasis on hand-drawn representation. All of the drawings and renderings were done by hand.


Scheme 2

Scheme 4

Final Scheme

Void Scheme Variations


retail

retail DN UP

UP

bar deck

OTB

DN

OTB

OTB DN DN

bar alcove

discussion area / lounge

Level 2 Floor Plan


theater

offices

ticket booth / coat check

DN UP

milonga

M

DR

W

rehearsal / black box

Level 3 Floor Plan


Section 1


Section 2



Leonardo Rodriguez Portfolio