Page 1

the

3% CONFERENCE

> SAN FRANCISCO, CA

OCTOBER 16 –17 2013


3%

“I LIKE TO

BLOW SHIT UP. ”

I am the Michael Bay of business. >

Cindy Gallop KE YN OT E SPE A KER

3


3% |

CONTENTS

06 > WELCOME 12 > SPEAKERS 18 > 50 THINGS 22 > AGENDA 34 > NOTES 40 > AWARD SHOWS

4


3%

C R EATED B Y M A RK E TO O N STUD IO S FO R TH E 3 % C O N FER E NC E

5


3%

WELCOME

6


FOREWORD | 3%

I am thrilled to welcome you to San Francisco, and to The 3% Conference. Last year’s inaugural event spawned a movement, and it’s been a wild journey—filled with road shows from coast to coast, a rapidly growing community across four social networks, insightful blog posts and op-ed pieces, optimistic shifts in our industry, as well as international interest and press about all our efforts. Every single one of you is key to supporting more female creative leadership in advertising. Whether you are male or female, junior or senior, ad or client side, you have the power to contribute to this groundswell movement in ways both big and small. Listen closely to the speakers. The 96 people taking the stage believe in our mission, and they have valuable insights to share about supporting gender diversity. And I encourage you to please speak up if you have questions or additional wisdom to share with our attendees. Lastly, when you hear an idea that you think may fly at your company, write it down. Page 18 is a running list of possible action items. Circle those actions worth raising at your agency or company. Add more as you hear them. And remember, the most important thing is this: pledge to turn inspiration into action. Person by person, company by company, we will drive the 3% number upward.

Kat Gordon > THE 3 % C O N F E RE N C E

FO UN DER

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3% | SPONSORS

THANK YOU

8


SPONSORS | 3%

4A’S ELEVEN INC. PIXINK MATERNAL INSTINCT DIGITAS ADOBE ROSETTA VML CHAORDIX UNDISCLOSED LOCATION THE ADVERTISING CLUB DDB MCCANN WORLDGROUP ARNOLD WORLDWIDE CP+B POSSIBLE SWIRL SAPIENTNITRO GOODBY, SILVERSTEIN & PARTNERS COMMUNICATION ARTS MISS REPRESENTATION WHITE BOOK AGENCY WELLS FARGO DUNCAN/CHANNON

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3%

“ THIS WAS OUR In many ways,

WOODSTOCK.

I have been to countless conferences where you were lucky if one or two of the speakers brought content and relevance. Here...every one of them did. It was the best conference I’ve ever attended. I’m proud to have been a small part of this unique happening.

> Tom Jordan T H E S F E G OT I S T

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3%


3% |

SPEAKERS

Cindy Gallop

> I FWERANTHEWORL D FOUNDER, CEO

Ignacio Oreamuno

> ART DIRECTORS CLUB E X E CUTIVE DIRECTOR

Cathy Campbell FR E EL ANCE CD

Alex Mahernia

> ROSETTA C CO, MANAGING PARTNER

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Heidi Taglio

> EL EV EN DIRECTO R O F H R , ASS OCIATE PA R TN ER

Ann Lehman

> SF DEPARTMENT ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN HUMAN R IG H TS SP EC IA L IST

DeeAnn Budney

> TH E HIVE A DVE RTISIN G FOUNDE R , C EO

Guy Kawasaki

> GOOGL E M OTO RO LA UN IT S PECIA L A DVISO R

Kammie McArthur > SW IRL C R EATIVE DIR ECTO R

Liz Gumbinner FR EEL A N C E C D

Paco Vi単oly > SQ UA RE

DESIG N DIR ECTO R

Ann Mack

> JWT DIRECTOR OF TR EN DSP OTTIN G

Debbi Vandeven > VM L CCO

Sara Rotman

> M O D C O C RE AT I V E FO UN DER , C E O , C C O

Jen Bhalla

> A M A ZO N A DV ER T I S I N G C R EATIVE DI RE CTO R

Nancy Vonk

> SW IM C O - FO UN DER


SPEAKERS | 3%

Janet Kestin

> SWI M CO- FOUN D E R

Ingrid Van Den Hoogen

Amy Winger

Kevin Burke

> V ML CH IEF S TRATEGY OFFIC ER

> VISA C MO

> BE VM O ! C MO

Sharon McIntyre

Anne Elisco-Lemme

Lori Magno

> SAP SV P OF PR OD UCTS & I N N OVAT I ON MA RKETING

> CH AORDIX CM O

Christina Knight

Wade Devers

> I N GO CR E AT I V E D I R E CTOR

Julie Gordon

> PI TCH CR E AT I V E D I R E CTOR

> ARNOL D WORL DWID E ECD

Sue Anderson

> CP+B EXECUTIVE CD

> D UN CA N / C HA N N O N C R EATIVE DIR ECTO R

Stacey Grier

> DDB C H IEF STR ATEG IC O FFIC ER

Carol H. Williams

> C HWA FO UN DER

Francesca Schuler

> D IGITA S BO STO N A SSO C IATE DIR ECTO R , C O R P O R ATE C ULTUR E

Jeffrey Huggins > P ROJ E CT P RO O F FO UN DER

Tracy Curtis

> W E LLS FA RG O SVP , R EG IO N A L P R ESIDE NT

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3% |

SPEAKERS

Ayesha Mathews

> PI XI NK CHI EF PIXEL BENDER

Mary Dean

Nina Kaufman

> TH E L EGA L E D GE PRESID EN T

Matt Rozen

Barbara Gorder

Helayne Spivak

Shelly Kramer

Jillian Maryonovich

> UNDISCLOSED LOCATION P R ESIDEN T

> K I CKSKIRT FOUNDER

> ADOBE GROUP MANAGER SOCIAL MEDIA

> V3 IN TE G RATE D M A RK E TIN G FO UN DER , C EO

Todd Wilms

Amy Cueva

Dawn Camardella

> SAP HE A D OF SOCIAL B U SINESS STRATEGY

Francesca Cohn

> B LT RECRUITING FOUNDER

14

> MAD*POW CH IEF E X P ER IEN C E OF F ICE R , FO UN DER

Cecilia Gorman

> OAKL EY IN C . DIRECTO R O F CREATIV E O P ER ATIO N S

> A RN O LD WO RLDW ID E VP C R EATIVE R EC R UITER

Stephanie Maillet

> C O N TIN UUM DIR ECTO R O F TA L EN T & DEVELO P MEN T

> VC U BRA N D C EN T ER DIR ECTO R

> O BA M A FO R A MER I CA LEAD INTERACTIVE DESIGNER

Serena Wolf

> WOLF CREATIVE COMPANY FO UN DER

Dorothy Urlich > HILL HO LIDAY

SVP , DIR ECTO R O F C R EATIVE O P E RAT I O NS


SPEAKERS | 3%

Gina Grillo

Shanteka Sigers

> THE ADVERTISING CLUB OF NEW YORK PR E SI D E N T , CE O

> SANDERS WINGO

Carl Settles

Rebecca Rivera

Susan Credle

Joyce King Thomas

> E 4 YOU TH, I N C. FOUN D E R

> LE O B U RN E TT USA CCO

Scott Stratten

> U N MARK E TI N G PR E SI D E N T

S VP ECD

> TH E 3% CONF ERENC E DIGITAL STRATEGIST

> MCCANN X BC PRES IDENT, CCO

Julie Vessel

> M ONO GROUP ACCOUNT D IR ECTO R

Sallie Mars

Vicky Wong

Jeff Miller

Barbara Lippert

> M C CA N N WO RLD GRO UP C H IEF DIVER SITY O FFIC ER , SVP

> SO C IA L G O O D N E SS C O - FO UN DER

Mimi Cook

> YO UN G & RUBICA M GRO UP CCO

Shasta Nelson

> G IRLF RIE N D C IRC LE S.C O M FO UN DER

> DA E P R ESIDEN T, C EO

> M E D IA P O ST EDITO R- AT- L A R G E

Vida Cornelius > G LO BA LHUE CCO

Yvonne Tally

> P O ISE D F ITN E SS OWN ER

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3% |

SPEAKERS

Dr. Romila Mushtaq

Sally Thornton

Jenn Maer

Kristi Royse

Amy Swift Crosby

Katherine Barr

Xanthe Wells

Rob Schwartz

Scott McAfee

PJ Pereira

Marti Barletta

Kimberly Pinkson

MI N D/BODY PH YSICIAN

> SMARTY FOU NDER

> SAN DERS WINGO MA N AGING PARTNER

Lynn Forbes

> WHOA! NETWORK CO- FOUNDER

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> FORSH AY FOUNDE R

> MOH R DAVID OW VE N TURE S GENERA L PA R TN ER

> ID E O DESIG N DIR ECTO R

> P ITC H EX EC UTIVE C D

> PEREIRA & O ’ D E LL CCO, CO - FO UN DER

> THE TRE N D SIG HT G RO UP

Siobhan Neilland

Katherine Wintsch

> ONEM A M A FOUNDE R

P R ESIDEN T, C EO

> THE M O M C O M P LE X FOUNDER

> K LR C O N SULT I N G C EO

> TBWA / WO RLDW I D E G LOBAL CREATIVE PRESIDENT

> ECO-MOM ALLIANCE FO UN DER

Heidi Swartz

> SWA RTZ C O M PA N Y P R IN C IPA L


SPEAKERS | 3%

Steve Hawley

Danielle Trivisonno

Jaime Robinson

James Robinson > TWO F IF TE E N EXECUTIVE CD

> W E STLA N D D ISTILLE RY CO-FOUNDER, DIRECTOR OF SALES & MARKETING

Toria Emery

Darren Morgan

Juliana Lukasik

Kate Ertmann

Erica Hoholick

Jeffery Tobias Halter

> POSSI B LE GROUP CD

> AD OB E CD OF COPY

Brynn Bardacke

> THE COCA-COLA COM PANY GLOB A L GR OUP CD

Alana Conner, PhD

> ALAN A CON N E R COMMU N I CATI ONS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGIST

> PEREIRA & O’DEL L EXECUTIVE CD

> GOL DEN STATE PREPARATORY ACA D E M Y H UM ANITIES TEACHER

> OGILV Y & M ATH ER GLOBAL MANAGING DIRECTOR

Daina Middleton

> GLOBAL PERFORM IC S CEO

> @ LA RG E F ILM S P R IN C IPA L , DIR ECTO R

> ANIMATION DYNAMICS, INC. OWN ER , P R ESIDEN T

Kelli Robertson

> YWO M E N P R ESIDEN T

> G O O D BY, SILVE RSTE IN & PA RTN E RS B R A N D S T R AT E GY O F F I C E R

Dianne Wilkins

Wendy Wallbridge

> C RITICA L M A SS CEO

> O N YO UR M A RK C O RP O RATE C OAC HING PRINCIPAL

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3% |

50 THINGS

50 THINGS You or Your Agency Can Do Right Now to Help Drive the 3% Number Upward

WORKPLACE CULTURE 01

02

18

Host a summer intern through MAIP (Multicultural Advertising Intern Program). Participate in the E4 Youth program, which exposes youth to advertising as a career choice.

03

Broaden the types of portfolios you review. Look beyond portfolio schools for juniors or hot-ticket names for seniors. Talent hides in surprising places.

04

Encourage your junior writers and art directors to build their books by doing volunteer work through the Taproot Foundation or other nonprofit organizations.

05

Host informal creative presentations within your agency (without any clients present). When the stakes aren’t so high, every creative can turn presentation experience into confidence.

06

Check to see how many women are on the board of your holding company. If there are none, or just a few, shoot the CEO an email with the following links: BIT.LY/ W SL J LR and BIT.LY/ ZXTVD I .

07

Encourage your CEO to make a public statement about his/her commitment to gender diversity, via a blog post, speech, op-ed piece, or annual report.

08

Skip the edible/drinkable/consumable gifts to clients this holiday season (believe us, they won’t mind) and opt for the incredible. Make a donation in their names to an organization that promotes gender equality or supports female empowerment, such as Equality Now or Tangible Hope.

09

Have your female CDs each pledge to jury one award show per year. See page 40 for an overview of industry award shows.

10

Have your female CDs pledge to speak at one conference every year.

11

Take a page from Edward Boches’ playbook and withdraw your participation from a conference panel that is all white men (unless you’re not a white man!).

12

Host an improv session at your agency to bolster the confidence of all creatives.

13

Take an inventory of your creative department and learn about your male/female ratio. Then set a goal to improve it. Declare it publicly, and report back on your progress publicly.


50 THINGS | 3%

14

Get to know WBENC (Women’s Business Enterprise National Council). Encourage and support women’s entrepreneurship. Seek business relationships with women-owned busineses and vendors, including micro-enterprises, and work with them to arrange fair credit and lending terms.

22

Consider the radical idea of not entering award shows at all. It will telegraph to your clients that every idea you sell them is 100% driven by their business goals, not from an agency agenda to win a future award. (Thanks to Ty Montague of co:collective for this little tidbit.)

15

Maintain ethical marketing standards by respecting the dignity of women in all sales, promotional, and advertising materials. Minimize or eliminate any form of gender or sexual exploitation in marketing and advertising campaigns.

23

Invite clients to your office expressly to discuss the issue of diversity and how you can both work together to support it.

24

If you see women sitting on the edges of the room— when there are seats at the conference room table—invite them to join you at the table.

25

If you have a hard stop at the end of the day— whether you’re a mother relieving a nanny or a man/ woman with a dog to walk or a triathlon to train for or a life to live—take a page from the smoker’s playbook. They don’t announce, cigarette in hand, “I’m going to go take a smoke break.” They just get on with it. Once you’ve alerted management to your schedule, live by it without apologizing for it every time you leave. (Thanks to Jen Stocksmith for this observation.)

26

State your agency’s commitment to diversity when pitching new business, and send a diverse team to present the work. Clients notice gender discrepancy. As Kim Getty of Deutsch told us when they were the fourth team pitching HP, CEO Meg Whitman looked at the almost all male line-up and exclaimed: “What is up with advertising? Don’t you have any female leaders?”

16

Consider amending your creative brief to include language that makes a dedicated commitment to a respectful depiction of women. This makes disrespectful work just as “off strategy” as other work that never makes it in front of the client.

17

Consider your production schedules. If you routinely create round-the-clock fire drills, take a step back. Would it hurt the campaign to add another day or two? Knowing that a more diverse team could service the project—and/or that your entire team will avoid burnout—it may be worth the extra time.

18

Working on emails late at night? Schedule them to be sent at 8:00 the next morning. Otherwise, you risk making your team think they should work whenever you work. (Thanks to Kathleen Hall of Microsoft for this little piece of brilliance.)

19

Designate one day of the month to be meeting- and email-free. Spend it evaluating how you work. A more efficient process improves the work.

20

If you are a manager, show your team that you have a life outside work. Take vacation days. Talk about hobbies. Leave early once in a while for an important nonwork event.

21

Enter work from all your teams into award shows, not just work from established hot shots.

HIRING PRACTICES 27

Revamp your recruitment ads: feature female managers (instead of stock photos of men), and send a message of innovation, vision, and enthusiasm.

28

Write your recruitment ads with an understanding of top items that motivate women in the workforce:

19


3% |

50 THINGS

making a difference, being challenged, believing in the company’s direction, a sense of satisfaction in their team, recognition. 29

Use the term “salary negotiable” in job postings. Women negotiate in equal numbers to men when they see this phrase. Otherwise, women are far less likely to negotiate a salary, which snowballs over years into a vast income gap.

30

Advertise job openings on

31

Implement a “no assholes” role and enforce it. (Thanks to Margaret Keene for this inspiration.)

32

Ensure equitable layoffs.

33

If you have a women’s initiative, include men in every meeting. Otherwise it’s an echo chamber.

34

Create a maternity policy.

35

Create a paternity policy.

36

Meet with pregnant employees before their maternity leave to jointly make a “job plan.” Like a birth plan, this is how you both envision/hope the coming months pan out for the employee.

37

42

State in your RFPs that you seek agency partners with diverse teams.

43

If your agency consistently sends all, or mostly, male teams to present work, express your concern.

44

Consider the value of diversity to your creative product in an era of real-time media. The opinion you didn’t get from a diverse creative team in the conception phase may cost you millions (and public embarrassment) when the public calls you out for being insensitive or clueless.

45

Amend your brand guidelines to include a section about diversity. Express your aim to feature diversity in your imagery that reflects the marketplace.

L EVOL EAG UE .C O M .

Consider extending return dates for new moms. Many babies don’t sleep through the night until four months of age. Demanding women back to work by eight weeks can set them up for a sleepdeprived nightmare possibly leading to a mass exodus of skilled employees.

38

Support access to child care, either by providing child care services, preferably on-site, or referrals.

39

Invest in professional development: public speaking, management skills, social media, etc.

40

Undertake concrete, verifiable actions to make professional and private life more balanced. Consider implementing and promoting a variety of flexible work options, including workforce exit and reentry opportunities, and support women returning to positions of equal pay and status.

41

Establish a clear, unbiased, non-retaliatory grievance policy that allows employees to comment or report on treatment in the workplace.

20

IDEAS FOR CLIENTS

3% COMMITMENT 46

Refuse to speak at conferences without at least 10% female speakers, ideally 20%.

47

Be vocal about it when you attend conferences that fall short, tweeting and posting your observations. Conference organizers need to know attendees value women on the power panels, not just on the “women’s panels.” (Thanks to Cindy Gallop for making this case publicly after Advertising Week 2013.)

48

Mentor someone (or several someones). Men: Be open to mentoring young women, no matter if others make suggestive jokes. Young women need your guidance more than you know.

49

Host a 3% Road Show in your city.

50

Follow The 3% Conference on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Lend your voice to the discussions. Join the community.


STUDENT ARTWORK | 3%

C R EATED B Y C HLO E C OTO ULA S A N D A N D RE W SA M P SO N FO R TH E 3 % C O N FER E NC E

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3% | AGENDA

AGENDA

22


AGENDA | 3%

Wednesday 07:45–05:00

REGISTRATION OPEN

08:15–05:45

RECHARGING ROOM OPEN

08:00–08:45

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

08:45–09:00

GENERAL SESSION

09:00–09:30

MORNING KEYNOTE

09:30–10:15

PANEL DISCUSSION

10:15–11:00

PANEL DISCUSSION

11:00–11:30

SPONSORED BREAK

11:30–12:45

FIRESIDE CHAT

12:45–02:00

LUNCH

02:00–02:45

GENERAL SESSION

02:00–02:45

AFTERNOON KEYNOTE

02:45–02:50

INTRODUCTION OF THE AFTERNOON BREAKOUTS

03:00–03:55

BREAKOUTS

03:55–04:05

GRAB-AND-GO SNACK BREAK

04:05–05:00

BREAKOUTS

03:45–04:45

SPEED MENTORING EVENT

05:00–06:00

GENERAL SESSION

05:05–05:50

CLOSING PANEL AND KEYNOTE

05:50–06:00

CLOSING REMARKS PRESENTATION OF 3 CHEERS AWARD REBRANDING FEMINISM WINNERS

06:00–07:30

COCKTAIL RECEPTION

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3% |

AGENDA

7 :4 5 –5 :0 0

R E GI ST RATION OPEN

8 :1 5–5 :4 5

R E CHA RGING ROOM OPEN

8 :0 0–8 :4 5

CON T I N ENTAL BREAKFAST > SPONSORED BY DIGITAS

8 :4 5–9 :0 0

GE N E R AL SESS ION

OPENING REMARKS Kat Gordon

> 9:0 0–9 :3 0

MOR N I NG KEYNOTE

BECindy A FORCE FOR CHANGE Gallop

> 9: 3 0– 1 0 :1 5

PA N E L DIS CUSS ION

ONE YEAR LATER Heidi Taglio, Kammie McArthur, Debbi

>

Vandeven, Ignacio Oreamuno & Ann Lehman MOD ERATED BY KAT GORDON

Never, ever underestimate the power of inspiration to create change. Hear from five panelists who have become agents of change as a result of the 3% movement. What will you take back from the 2013 event, and how might it be transformative for your agency. 10:15– 11 :0 0

PA N E L DIS CUSS ION

MAKER, MANAGER, CREATIVE GODDESS: WHICH DO YOU WANT TO BE? Liz Gumbinner, Sara Rotman, Cathy Campbell, >

DeeAnn Budney & Paco Viñoly MOD ERATED BY JEN BH AL L A

Creative directors come in many forms—some hands-on, some not. Which is right for you: serial freelancing, running a small agency of your own, scaling your agency fast, working on the client side, or reigning over the creative department at a big-name agency? Hear from CDs in each of these permutations and decide which best fits your personality and life goals. 11: 0 0– 1 1 :3 0

SPON SORED BREAK

ELEVEN AT 11

24

N OTES


AGENDA | 3%

1 1 :3 0–1 2 :4 5

FIR ESIDE C H AT

WHAT’S NEXT? CREATIVE TRENDS & ROLES Guy Kawasaki & Ann Mack >

IN TRO D UCTIO N BY A L EX MA H ER N IA SP O N SO RE D BY R O SETTA

Collaborative consumption. Appcessories. Responsive web design. Wearable devices. Which trends and technologies will captivate consumers over the next few years? Hear from two of marketing’s most revered trend watchers as they compare notes, make predictions, and challenge attendees to think ahead about things that may not even be on your radar yet. 1 2 :4 5–2 :0 0

LUN C H

2 :0 0–2 :4 5

G EN ER A L SESSIO N

2 :0 0–2 :4 5

A FTER N O O N K EY N OTE

BLOWING UP THE BUSINESS RULES THAT HOLD YOU BACK Nancy Vonk & Janet Kestin

>

There are seventeen sink or swim moments for women in business. And no one is better suited to teach them than Swim co-founders Nancy Vonk and Janet Kestin, former co-chief creative officers of Ogilvy Toronto, the dynamic duo behind the original Dove Real Beauty Campaign. They’ll name the seventeen rules covered in their upcoming book and explore in detail the two mustbreak rules most relevant to women in advertising. 2 :4 5–2 :5 0

IN TR O DUCTIO N O F TH E A FTER N O O N B R EA KO UTS > Kat Gordon

3 :0 0–3 :5 5

B R EA KO UT 0 1

BA LLRO O M

CMO ROUNDTABLE Kevin Burke, Francesca Schuler,

>

Ingrid Van Den Hoogen & Sharon McIntyre M O D E RATE D BY A MY WIN G ER SP O N SO RE D BY VML

CMOs are at the pinnacle of marketing on the “client side.” Wouldn’t you like to know what they look for in agency partners, what keeps them up at night, and which technologies and trends they’re most jazzed about? Moderator Amy Winger will uncover these truths...and more.

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3% |

3 :0 0– 3 :5 5

T ELE GRAPH HI LL

AGENDA

B R E A KOUT 02

IT SHOULD BE CALLED MATERNITY LEAVE, NOT MATERNITY EXIT Lori Magno, Christina Knight & Wade Devers

>

MOD ERATED BY ANNE EL IS CO-L EM ME

No single factor causes a greater exodus of highly skilled creative women from advertising than motherhood. Last year we heard from CD moms what the juggle is like. This year we’re shifting the conversation from “what it’s like” to “how it needs to change.” Agency owners, recruiters, ECDs, HR directors—this don’t-miss session will tell you how to retain female creatives through this important life transition in surprisingly simple ways. 3 :0 0– 3 :5 5

U N I ON SQU A RE

B R E A KOUT 03

WHAT’S A WOMEN’S ACCOUNT ANYWAY? Jeffrey Huggins, Julie Gordon, >

Sue Anderson & Carol H. Williams MOD ERATED BY STACEY GRIER SPONSORED BY DDB

Men working on makeup. Women working on sports drinks and car accounts. The best agencies know few categories are best serviced exclusively by men or women. Hear from creatives working on unlikely pieces of business and sharing stories of what’s working, what’s not, and how you can staff for success. 3 :0 0– 3 :5 5

HOWARD ROOM

B R E A KOUT 04

HANGING OUT YOUR SHINGLE Ayesha Mathews,

>

Nina Kaufman & Barbara Gorder MOD ERATED BY TRACY CURTIS SPONSORED BY WEL L S FARGO

What makes you a great creative doesn’t necessarily translate to being a great businesswoman. Learn from two small-agency owners about the left-brain part of life—forecasting, accounting, legal—and other minutiae of agency ownership. Plus, hear from a legal expert what to consider when setting up your own entity. A must-attend “look before you leap” session for any creative with dreams of going out on her own.

26

N OTES


AGENDA | 3%

3 :5 5–4 :0 5

G R A B - A N D- G O SN AC K B R EA K

4 :0 5–5 :0 0

B R EA KO UT 0 1

B A LLR O O M

SELLING WORK Helayne Spivak & Mary Dean

>

The most creative work doesn’t always get produced, and lesser concepts often get green-lighted. Why? Because even the best creative minds haven’t mastered the equally important skill of persuasive presentation. If you’ve ever “benched” yourself and let your partner or account director sell your work, think again. We’ll show you how to win the approval of clients and fill your portfolio with produced work that makes you proud. 4 :0 5– 5 :0 0

T E LE GRA P H HILL

B R EA KO UT 0 2

WORKSHOP: BUILDING A BRAND BY BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS Shelly Kramer, Jillian Maryonovich, >

Todd Wilms & Amy Cueva M O D E RATE D BY MATT R O ZEN SP O N SO RE D BY A DO B E

How can you help clients understand what it means to build a social business? At the same time, how can you develop your own brand and become a creative thought leader? It’s all about relationships. This panel will share their relationship-building experiences in advertising, politics, social media, and beyond. 4 :0 5–5 :0 0

UN IO N SQ UA RE

B R EA KO UT 0 3

ASK THE RECRUITER Serena Wolf, Francesca Cohn, Cecilia Gorman,

>

Stephanie Maillet & Dorothy Urlich M O D E RATE D BY DAWN CA MA R DEL L A SP O N SO RE D BY A R N O L D WO R L DWIDE

Ever wonder what agencies look for in creative hires? Find out from five women who have been on both sides of the hiring table. We’ll poll the 3% community in advance to surface the most frequently asked questions…and then we’ll answer them.

27


3% |

4 :0 5–5 :0 0

H OWARD ROOM

AGENDA

B R E A KOUT 04

INCLUSION: BEYOND DIVERSITY

>

Shanteka Sigers, Sallie Mars, Vicky Wong & Carl Settles

MOD ERATED BY GINA GRIL LO SPONSORED BY TH E AVERTIS ING CLUB OF NEW YO R K

Research proves that diverse teams outperform homo genous ones in creative problem solving. Yet there are very few creatives of color in our field. Progressive agencies are figuring out how to attract a diverse talent pool and creating inclusive environments that go beyond tokenism and produce winning results. 3 :4 5–4 :4 5

SU TTE R ROOM

SPE E D M ENTORING EVENT

A Rebecca SOCIALRivera GOODNESS EVENT & Jeff Miller

>

SPONSORED BY TH E 4A’S

The first event of its kind. Speed Mentoring is not networking with an agenda. It’s a way for creative directors to pay it forward and for up-and-coming creatives to learn from the best. How it works: 20 CDs and 20 creatives meet in a fast-paced setting to ask and answer burning questions and make meaningful, long-lasting mentorship connections. Are you a creative who wants to meet your mentor? 5:0 0–6 :0 0

GE N E R AL SESS ION

5:0 5–5 :5 0

CLOSI N G PANEL AND KEYNOTE

THE MOST CREATIVE WOMEN IN ADVERTISING Susan Credle, Joyce King Thomas >

Mimi Cook & Vida Cornelius MOD ERATED BY BARBARA L IPPERT

Few women have achieved “household name” status in the advertising world. These women are the exception. Find out how they got started in the business, what stumbling blocks they encountered on the way up, and what advice they offer young creatives about reaching their full potential. 5 :5 0– 6 :0 0

CLOSI N G REMARKS, PRES ENTATION OF 3 CH EERS AWA R D & R E B R ANDING F EM INIS M WINNERS > Kat Gordon

6:0 0– 7 :3 0

COCKTAIL RECEPTION > SPONSORED BY PIXINK

28

N OTES


AGENDA | 3%

Thursday 08:15–04:45

REGISTRATION OPEN

08:00–08:45

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

08:15–04:45

RECHARGING ROOM OPEN

08:50–09:00

GENERAL SESSION

09:00–09:45

MORNING KEYNOTE

09:45–10:30

PANEL DISCUSSION

10:30–11:00

FIRESIDE CHAT

11:00–11:30

BREAK

11:30–01:00

GENERAL SESSION

11:30–12:15

DISCUSSION PANEL

12:15–01:30

LUNCH

01:30–02:45

AFTERNOON KEYNOTE

02:45–02:50

INTRODUCTION OF THE AFTERNOON BREAKOUTS

03:00–03:55

BREAKOUTS

02:55–03:55

SPEED MENTORING EVENT

04:00–04:45

GENERAL SESSION

04:00–04:45

DISCUSSION PANEL

04:45–05:00

WRAP UP

29


3% |

AGENDA

8 :1 5–4 :4 5

R E GI ST RATION OPEN

8 :0 0–8 :4 5

CON T I N ENTAL BREAKFAS T

8 :1 5–4 :4 5

R E CHA RGING ROOM OPEN

8 :5 0–9 :0 0

GE N E R AL SESS ION

OPENING REMARKS Melanie Lundquist

> 9 : 00 – 9: 45

MOR N I NG KEYNOTE

QR CODES KILL KITTENS: A CAUTIONARY TALE FOR CREATIVES Scott Stratten

>

Location-based check-ins. QR codes. Sponsored tweets. With every new business tool comes misuse that alienates customers, disheartens employees, and can drive your clients’ business into the ground. None of us needs another list of what we should be doing. Scott Stratten, one of the top five social media influencers in the world, will tell us what not to do. 9 : 45 – 10: 30

PA N E L DIS CUSS ION

PROTECTING THE MUSE Shasta Nelson, Yvonne Tally & Dr. Romila Mushtaq

>

MOD ERATED BY JUL IE VESS EL

Your creativity is your currency—and needs to be routinely replenished. Yet so many creatives operate on a sleep deficit and a stress surplus. What toll do these behaviors take on your life and your livelihood, and how can you sneak in (and reap the benefits of) more movement, downtime, and friendship? Find out before you burn out. 10:3 0–1 1 :0 0

FI R E SI D E CH AT

WHAT A CREATIVE-FRIENDLY COMPANY LOOKS LIKE >

Sally Thornton & Jenn Maer

Bragging rights in agencies typically belong to those who work vampire hours and never cry uncle. Not anymore. Now the future is all about results, collaboration, and feeding the souls of creative folks by achieving a successful work/life blend. Hear from two experts about work/life success stories that are real and actionable. Before you assume “I could never pull this off at my agency,” let Sally and Jenn give you the tools and inspiration to make change happen.

30

N OTES


AGENDA | 3%

1 1 :0 0–1 1 :3 0

1 1 :3 0–1 :0 0 1 1 :3 0–1 2 :1 5

BALLROOM

B R EA K

ELEVEN AT 11

G EN ER A L SESSIO N DISC USSIO N PA N EL

CHANNELING YOUR INNER ENTREPRENEUR Amy Swift Crosby, Susan Credle & Katherine Barr

>

M O D E RATE D BY K R ISTI R OY SE

Entrepreneurs are those who identify a need and fill it. Creative folks are especially adept at this kind of noticing, formulating, and birthing. Unfortunately, many agencies just aren’t set up to harness entrepreneurial contributions. Learn how to build a business beyond the brief. 1 2 :1 5–1 :3 0 1 :3 0–2 :4 5 BA LLR O O M

LUN C H A FTER N O O N K EY N OTE

THE 97% SPEAK Rob Schwartz, Scott McAfee >

Jeff Miller & PJ Pereira

M O D E RATE D BY X A N TH E WEL L S

Male CDs weigh in on the need for more female creative leadership, share what they’ve witnessed in various ad agencies, and talk about ways we can all take on an active role in upping the number of female creatives. 2 :4 5–2 :5 0

IN TR O DUCTIO N O F TH E A FTER N O O N B R EA KO UTS

2 :4 5–2 :5 0

L IVE MUSICA L P ER FO R MA N C E > Alisha Zalkin

3 :0 0–3 :5 5

B R EA KO UT 0 1

BA LLRO O M

MARKETING TO WOMEN: BEST PRACTICES Marti Barletta, Kimberly Pinkson, Lynn Forbes,

>

Kat Gordon, Siobhan Neilland & KatherineWintsch M O D E RATE D BY SH A R O N MC IN TY R E SP O N SO RE D BY C H AO R DIX

Remember the old saying about not knowing which half of your ad budget is wasted? Well, if you don’t know how to market to women, it’s likely about 85% of your marketing budget is going down the drain. Learn best practices and emerging technologies from experts in green marketing, mom marketing, boomer marketing, and the social good movement.

31


3% |

3 :0 0–3 :5 5

T ELE GRAPH HI LL

AGENDA

B R E A KOUT 02

DISCUSSION PANEL: ON THE HOMEFRONT

>

Danielle Trivisonno, Jaime Robinson, James Robinson, Steve Hawley, Toria Emery & Darren Morgan MOD ERATED BY H EIDI SWARTZ

Married? Kids? Advertising’s unpredictable and often punishing hours can make it a challenge to hold down the fort at home. Hear how several couples manage to stay sane—on their own terms. This session may change how you run your household now but can also help single creatives see around a corner coming up in their lives. 3 :0 0–3 :5 5

U N I ON SQU ARE

B R E A KOUT 03

LEADING EVERY STEP OF THE WAY Juliana Lukasik, Kate Ertmann,

>

Brynn Bardacke & Erica Hoholick MOD ERATED BY S AL L IE MARS SPONSORED BY MCCANN WORL DGROUP

What happens when women manage all stages of the creative process, from concept inception to production/ on-set direction, post-production design, and implementation? Great things. Hear from this powerhouse team how women can take advantage of changes in the digital age, technology, and good old-fashioned networking to get ahead. And if you’re a manager, learn hiring techniques that will help you attract and support upwardly mobile women. 3 :0 0–3 :5 5

HOWARD ROOM

B R E A KOUT 04

ENGAGING MALE CHAMPIONS ...OR BECOMING ONE YOURSELF Jeffery Tobias Halter >

What are the three things you will never hear a man say about women? What leadership competencies do men value? What are the secrets to getting ahead that men know, and how can men champion more women in advertising leadership? These questions and more will be covered in this engaging and provocative workshop. Based on the ground breaking Catalyst Research, Women Take Care, Men Take Charge, Jeffery Halter, former Director of Diversity Strategy at The CocaCola Company, will help men and women uncover novel ways to grow the 3% number.

32

N OTES


NOTES | 3%

2:55–3:55 SUTTER ROOM

SP EED MEN TO R IN G EVEN T

A Rebecca SOCIALRivera GOODNESS EVENT & Jeff Miller

>

SP O N SO RE D BY TH E 4 A’ S

The first event of its kind. Speed Mentoring is not networking with an agenda. It’s a way for creative directors to pay it forward and for up-and-coming creatives to learn from the best. How it works: 20 CDs and 20 creatives meet in a fast-paced setting to ask and answer burning questions and make meaningful, long-lasting mentorship connections. Are you a creative who wants to meet your mentor? 4 :0 0–4 :4 5

G EN ER A L SESSIO N

4 :0 0– 4 : 4 5

DISC USSIO N PA N EL

BA LLRO O M

HOW WOMEN LEAD Alana Conner, Daina Middleton,

>

Dianne Wilkins & Wendy Wallbridge M O D E RATE D BY K EL L I R O B ER TSO N

Empathy, intuition, collaboration, the ability to read a room. Many of these “soft skills” are emerging as profoundly powerful in business today. Which women in your agency possess these gifts, and how can you put them to their greatest use? 4 :4 5–5 :0 0

WR A P UP

CLOSING REMARKS Kat Gordon

>

33


3% |

N OT E S

NOTES


NOTES | 3%

N EW C O N TACTS


3% |

N OT E S

NOTES


NOTES | 3%

QUOTES


3%

STAY CONNECTED

38


3%

> TWE E T TWI TTE R. C OM/3PERCENTCONF > POST FAC E B OOK . C OM/3PERCENTCONFERENCE > RE AD + SU B MI T 3 PE RCE NTC ONF.COM/BLOG > PI NTE RE ST 3 PE RC E NT CON FERENCE > HASHTAG #3 PE RC E NTC ONFS

39


3% |

AWARD SHOWS

COMMUNICATION ARTS

> COMM ARTS.COM /COM PETITIONS

Description

Gain worldwide recognition for your work by entering the most prestigious juried competitions in visual communications. Since 1959, Communication Arts has published the best in visual communications from around the world. Ask any creative director which competitions rank as the most influential, and they’ll place Communication Arts at the top of the list.

E N TRY DEADL INE T YPOGR APH Y: 09/6/13 I N T E R ACTIVE: 10/4/13 I LLUST RATION: 01/3/14 PHOTOGRAPH Y: 03/14/14

Categories, Entry Requirements & Fees T YPOGR APH Y: COM M ARTS.COM /COM PETITIONS/ TYP O G RA P HY I N T E R ACTIVE: COM M ARTS.COM /COM PETITIONS/ IN TE RACTIVE I LLUST RATION: COMMARTS.COM/COMPETITIONS/ ILLUSTRATIO N PHOTOGRAPH Y: COMMARTS.COM/COMPETITIONS/ P HOTO GRA P HY D E SI GN : COM M ARTS.COM /COM PETITIONS/DESIG N A DV E R T IS ING: COM M ARTS.COM /COM PETITIONS/ A DVE RTISIN G

Juror Requirements

Our juries are selected by our editorial staff based on numerous criteria with the goal of having as much diversity as possible. We first look to see who has a track record of winning in our competitions, since we think anyone capable of consistently producing award-winning work should also be able to recognize it. We also look at other competition juries to see who has judged other shows. We look at gender with the goal of having at least one third of the jury being women, which historically is the highest of any major competition. In the case of the advertising jury, which I think The 3% Conference is most interested in, we try to get as close to a 50/50 breakdown betweenjudges with a background in copywriting and those with a background in art direction. We also look for a good mix of representation from larger and smaller agencies, and geographic location. We always welcome suggestions for possible jurists via email to EDITORIAL @ COM MARTS .COM .

Volunteer Requirements

We currently do not have any volunteer positions available as the competitions are handled by our staff.

40

THE ONE SHOW > O N E C LUB.O RG

Description | O N E SH OW

The One Show, the premiere international advertising award show, sets the industry standard for creative advertising in print, television, radio, outdoor, innovative marketing, integrated branding and branded content. Each year, work is judged by an international jury of awardwinning art directors, copywriters, and creative directors. All finalists are published in the annual, “The One Show: Advertising’s Best Print, Radio and TV.” E N TRY D E A D LIN E 0 1 / 3 1 / 2 0 1 4

Description | O N E SH OW IN TER ACTIVE

Because the digital world moves too fast for a once-a-year deadline, One Show Interactive features a unique quarterly entry system. Each quarter, entries will be chosen to move on to the final round of judging where Pencil winners will be determined. Quarterly winners are assured placement in the One Show Interactive annual.

E N TRY D E A D LIN E 1 ST Q UA R TER : 0 7 / 3 1 / 2 0 1 3 2 N D Q UA R TER : 0 9 / 3 0 / 2 0 1 3 3 R D QUA R TER : 1 1 / 3 0 / 2 0 1 3 4 TH QUA R TER : 0 1 / 3 1 / 2 0 1 4

Categories, Entry Requirements & Fees O N E SH OW E N TE R.O N E C LUB.O RG/ IN FO RM ATIO N / E LIG I B I L I T Y O N E SH OW IN TER ACTIVE E N TE R.O N E C LUB.O RG/ CATE G O R I ES / O S I E N TE R.O N E C LUB.O RG / RE Q U I R EMEN T S / O S I

Juror Requirements

We accept jury nominations from the previous year’s jury and The One Club Board of Directors. The list is compiled along with bios, and then the Board of Directors votes on the final selection which will be put forward for the next year’s jury.

Volunteer Requirements

One Show does not offer any volunteer opportunities for the judging. We are always looking for part-time paid help from January through May.


AWARD SHOWS | 3%

CLIO

> CLI OAWARD S.CO M

Description

The CLIO Awards is the world’s most recognized international awards competition for advertising, design, interactive, and communications. CLIO maintains its original commitment to celebrate and reward creative excellence, while continuing to evolve with the industry to acknowledge the most current, breakthrough work.

Categories, Entry Requirements & Fees CLI OAWARD S.COM/ ENTRIES/M EDIUMS_ AND_ CATEGORIES.C F M

CAPLES AWARDS

> CA P LE S.O RG

Description

The Caples Awards, honoring the best in direct and interactive marketing around the world, was founded in 1978 by Andi Emerson, a direct marketing pioneer, in order to honor well-recognized copywriter John Caples. With international chairs in 50 countries, it is supported by industry agencies, clients, and suppliers; is run by industry volunteers; and is judged by more than 50 active, senior-level, international creative professionals. Over 200 creatives and marketers from around the world attend the annual awards presentation. E N TRY D E A D LIN E 1 0 / 1 4 / 1 3

Juror Requirements

To be considered for a 2014 CLIO jury, each nominee must hold a title of creative director or higher and have won at least one award in an international advertising competition. To nominate someone as a juror, visit CLI OAWARD S.COM/ JURIES/JUROR_ NOM INATION.CF M

Volunteer Requirements

Volunteers must be awards entries managers or staff directly associated with the entries submissions process.

> A B I LI T Y TO B E O NS ITE FOR 7 DAYS OF TRAINING AND JUDG IN G > W HI LE ON SI T E , ABIL ITY TO DEDICATE 100% OF YOUR TIME D U R I N G B USI N ESS H OURS TO TH E JUDGING PROCESS > W I LLI N GN E SS TO PARTICIPATE IN BRIEF ONL INE TRAIN IN G PR I OR TO A R R I VAL AT JUDGING > SHOULD BE TECHNOLOGICALLY PROFICIENT, ESPECIALLY WITH M AC > MUST B E N OMI NATED BY A FORMER JURY M EMBER > FOR MOR E I N FO RMATION ON VOLUNTEERS , PL EASE CONTACT B ROOK E B ARASCH AT BROOKE@CL IOAWARDS.COM.

Categories, Entry Requirements & Fees MEDIA.DMNEWS.COM/DOCUMENTS/52/2013_CAPLESENTRYKIT_V8_12871.PDF

Juror Requirements

Candidates for judges need to submit an application online that will be reviewed by a committee to determine eligibility. Candidates must have at least five years of hands-on experience as a direct marketing creative. Any judge that has a conflict of interest, including but not restricted to working for an agency that submitted that campaign, and/or involved with any aspect of the project, will not be allowed to judge that entry. Judges may move entries between categories if deemed unsuitable to one but appropriate for another. For more information on Caples judging 2013, please contact Nicole Marshall at N IC O LE .M A RSHA LL@D MN E W S.C O M or 646-638-6059.

CANNES LIONS

> CA N N E SLIO N S.C O M

Description

The Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity is the world’s biggest celebration of creativity in communications. As the most prestigious international creative communications awards, more than 34,000 entries from all over the world are showcased and judged at the festival, held during the third week of June in Cannes, France, every year. Winners receive the highly coveted Lion trophy, presented at four award ceremonies throughout the week. E N TRY D E A D LIN E EN TR IES O P EN FR O M 0 1 / 2 3 / 1 4

Categories, Entry Requirements & Fees CA N N E SLIO N S.C O M / AWA RD S/ E SSE N TIA L_ E N TRY_ IN FO .C F M

41


3%

4242


3%

THANK YOU

These folks deserve special recognition for making this event possible. If you see any of these names on a badge, shake that person’s hand for giving so much of themselves to the crusade.

Rebecca Rivera Karen Daitch Heidi Taglio Anastacia Maggioncalda Amanda Day Lauren Mounce Sallie Mars Susannah Sandow Ayesha Mathews Cindy Gallop Nancy Hill Serena Wolf Christie Cordes Barbara Gorder Paige Grossman Angela Dunkle Karen Moran Fred Schwartz Mel Hanson Jeanie Lytle Deepak Gulrajani Andrea Saparoff Rebecca Bedrossian Mindi Rosser Stefani Zellmer Carolynn Coal Susan Munro Marguerite Lutton Anna Casey Mary Anne Sacco And last but certainly not least: Gene Gordon Behind every determined woman is a man who has her back, believes in her, and doesn’t mind that the laundry isn’t folded.

43


3%


3%

“ THEY MUST ” BE SEIZED. Social gains are never handed out,

> Sheryl Sandberg

A U T H O R , “ L E A N I N : WO M E N , WO R K , A N D T H E W I L L TO L E A D ”

45


Everything you need to create anything. Adobe® Creative Cloud™ gives you all-new versions of your favorite apps like Photoshop® and Premier® Pro and ongoing access to new features and products as soon as they’re released. Store and sync your files, share folders, and plug in to the world’s leading creative community. It’s your entire creative world. All in one place.

Adobe Creative Cloud Learn more at adobe.com/go/creativecloud

© 2013 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo, Creative Cloud, the Creative Cloud logo, Creative Suite, Photoshop, and Premier Pro are are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.


THREE PERCENT HAS NEVER AMOUNTED TO SO MUCH. We applaud the incredible talent, leadership and success of today’s 3%. We’re committed to growing this number and honored to be part of such an important conversation.

vml.com


UP TO THE

Pitch.

THERE AREN’T MANY OF US. BUT WE’VE

Briefing.

AMONG DOZEN S of DUDES

YOU KNOW THAT. YOU’VE BEEN THE ONLY

Numbers


Recruiter | Lindsay.Vriavas@ddbcalifornia.com

JOIN US.

making every

UNTIL THEN, LET’S

count.

3 % is a number that S H O U L D and W I L L G E T


Reasons to work at Huge:

No. 2

Get paid for giving a shit. 14

400

one day by Huge employees

to sites created by Huge

Dogs brought to work in

Million monthly visitors

600

50,719

Employees worldwide

Job applicants since 2012

About us.

Capabilities.

Huge helps transform brands and grow businesses. Huge is a full-service

Analytics

digital agency that provides business strategy, design, marketing and

Audience Research

technology services to some of the world’s largest businesses and best-

Brand Planning & Development

known brands. We are known for successfully harmonizing user needs

Business Consulting

and business goals to create industry-changing digital experiences that transform brands, grow businesses and improve people’s lives. We have

Content Creation

been designing digital products and experiences for nearly 15 years.

Media Planning

Our work is used by 400 million people a month and generates over $16 billion in online revenue per year for our clients.

Product & Experience Design Social & Communications Technology Services

LA.

SF.

PDX.

BKLN.

ATL.

DC.

RIO.

LDN.

losangeles @hugeinc.com

sf @hugeinc.com

portland @hugeinc.com

brooklyn @hugeinc.com

atlanta @hugeinc.com

dc @hugeinc.com

rio @hugeinc.com

london @hugeinc.com

Make something you love™


Participation is the new brand.


My best of all possible worlds?

Pushing an agenda that represents the industry as a whole, not just half by gender. Not just half by race. Not just half by age or any other demographic. And, certainly not half by any business model you can name. That means we need to have as many diverse participants saying ‘yes’ or recommending others to participate on industry panels, at conferences or accepting speaking engagements.” Nancy Hill, 4A’s President-CEO


The 4A’s proudly supports the 3% Conference and its mission to increase diversity in creative roles in advertising.


This column uses only 3% of the available space on this spread. At first glance, there’s a feeling of loss and lack of balance. Then you see it for what it truly is: opportunity. A blank page just waiting to be filled. And filled it will be. Because great creatives never shy away from a blank page. And they never settle for the way things are.


1099919_09812 8.5x11 bw


2

1

w

Looking forward together with confidence

Build your financial future Reaching any goal is easier when you have a good plan. And a strong financial plan is built on solid financial decisions. With our customized tools and services, we can help you create your own road map to financial security. To schedule an appointment, simply go to wellsfargo.com/appointments, call 1-800-WELLS, or stop by any of our San Francisco Bay area locations and talk with a banker today.

wellsfargo.com Š 2013 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. Materials expire 11/1/13. (1099919_09812)


Lithographix

Lithographix is the premier offset and grand format printer in the west. Our clients include some of the top brands in the country. We provide superior quality eight color sheetfed and web printing, complete bindery services, and state-of-the-art prepress capabilities.

Susan Rosenberg Battat srosebattat@lithographix.com 415.215.1575 Lithographix.com


A n d re a S a p a ro f f M U S I C

A N D

S O U N D

D E S I G N

The 3% Conference would like to thank composer Andrea Saparoff for scoring the 2013 kickoff video. “I’m so passionate about this movement and I believe so strongly in Kat’s vision, that when she asked me to score last year’s 3% sizzle reel, I couldn’t say yes fast enough. I love being part of the 3% team and once again I’m thrilled to create original music that will help get everyone charged up and inspired to take action.”

A n d re a S a p a ro ff M U S I C

A N D

S O U N D

D E S I G N

A N D R E A @ SA PA RO F F M U S I C . CO M


DE SIGN E D A N D P RO D UC E D BY E LE VE N IN C .


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