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OUR FIRST CSR REPORT

A guide to a better world

2010 - 2011


It’s a guide

4

It’s a company transition It’s a business case

8

16

It’s a social commitment

22

It’s an environmental strategy It’s a GRI and audited report Bopro in numbers GRI Content Index

26

30

36

38

Bopro CSR Report / 3


It’s a guide A guide to a better world in the real estate and construction sector A source for growth The transition to climate neutrality is a business case with a global impact. It’s an immense challenge and a source for growth for the real estate and construction sector. Not so much a threat, rather something that offers us opportunities. We see more managers being concerned with sustainability and closing loops, and a growing awareness that all aspects of sustainability must be addressed in the business plans (Social, Environmental, Economic). Entrepreneurs no longer limit the social dimension to society alone. Not only the environment-related risks but also opportunities are charted. The context is global. We must therefore remodel our approach on an internationally accepted and recognized basis.

College of Europe – Bruges (photo Sara M. Peeters)

4 / Bopro CSR Report

Offering more openness and sharing our progressive views is necessary. The use of standards such as Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), International Sustainability Alliance (ISA) and the British Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) are examples of first steps towards an open innovation and cooperation with cen-

tres of knowledge, clients, partners and suppliers throughout Europe. Other labels (GRA, LEED, DGNB,…) will develop and challenge the existing trends. It is our firm belief that, this way, we can only increase the crisis-proof character of the company and enterprises. Offering more openness will increase mutual trust, necessarily for gathering the courage to initiate corporate changes at the right time, to offer new products and services and to consume (less) in a sustainable manner.

How do we achieve more openness? First and foremost we try to make Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as real as possible. We want to align the dynamism within our own organisation with the expectations of our stakeholders. Our stakeholder dialogue will have a positive impact on the improvement of the performances of our clients and their products, seeking together a maximum contribution to climate neutrality.

A transition for Bopro? The world is changing. This change entails certain risks whereby Bopro focuses mainly on the opportunities. We advise our clients in the real estate and property sector both on technical and economic matters. In Belgium today we talk of a push and shove market: the property market is shrinking because of the credit crunch (the


We want to make a positive contribution towards more sustainable housing and mobility and do business in a socially responsible manner Peter Garré Managing Director Bopro

most serious risk) and that results in fiercer competition and, thus, increased price pressure. Where, three years ago, our clients were focussed on short term buying and selling properties, the emphasis now lies increasingly on advisory services in the long term value of properties for property investors and corporate end-users. Project management is and remains our main activity from now on, however, reformed on the model of ‘a sustainable approach’.

Our mission is clear: Bopro, with its services in the real estate and construction sector, aims to be a guide along the way towards a better world based on responsible management and on the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) values for all its stakeholders. As a cleantech company, we want to make a positive contribution, within our sphere of influence, towards more sustainable housing and mobility and to do business in a socially responsible manner. We build a relationship of trust with our clients and stakeholders over the long term through delivering services that contribute to a better world and thereby create unique client value. Our products and services lead to sustainable solutions in an integrated manner and support our credibility.

Bopro is a pioneer in environment-technical audits on existing real estate in Belgium. This has led to an expansion of our activities, such as BREEAM Assessments and Audits. Bopro is increasingly looking across borders and our clients are becoming more international, more ‘European’ players. BREEAM is an ideal international standard for a European approach. Climate change is an international problem after all. Bopro is a strong advocate of knowledgesharing with its stakeholders. But does a company that shares its knowledge not surrender its economic lead? Or does it thereby retain its role as leader on the way towards the next innovative products? As “Guide to a Better World”, we made the choice to share our knowledge with our stakeholders to lead them along the path of transition towards climate neutrality. Internationalisation can also mean the expansion of Bopro into other countries, but this doubtlessly also entails a risk. Growth has always been our ambition. How will we realise this: internally or externally, in partnerships,… ? You will certainly read this in our next report.

In the reporting period covered by this report, determined efforts have already been made as regards both property (CO2 neutral head office in Gent) and the first steps towards a sustainable mobility policy. The result is that Bopro reached this target by the end of 2011. We must now perpetuate this target or do even better over the next two years. Bopro shall remain committed to the established corporate context of responsible management, building on its progressive views. Our ISO 14001 certification and the present CSR Report in accordance with GRI– CRESS is an important first step. We are ambitious, we are hopeful, we walk our mission... Meanwhile, enjoy the Report! Peter Garré Managing Director, Bopro

Bopro aims to be a climate neutral company by 2020. We shall try to achieve this by making use of the prevailing technological possibilities and corporate and societal views, but at all times as an “early adaptor” in support of our strategy. Bopro intends to reduce its C02 emission by 30% of the levels reached in 2009, by the end of 2013.

Bopro CSR Report / 5


Life is what happens when we do other things John Lennon

Bopro’s CSR report Since our services impacts simultaneously on economic, social and ecological aspects we have opted to bundle the three areas in our reporting. The outcome is an integrated report covering our financial results with their economic impact as well as the non-financial results with their social and ecological impact. We consider the CSR report as a ‘driver’ for innovation and performance enhancement helping us to develop this integrated business model and thus to reinforce and further execute our mission.

ard and with the associated “Construction and Real Estate Sector Supplement” (CRESS) principles applicable to our sector. It was made possible through interviews and workshops with all staff and management, as well as the voluntary assistance of some of our clients. This integrated report is not only a management guide for sustainable development and innovation, it is also a tool for transparent communication with all of our stakeholders.

The report was drawn up in accordance with the “Global Reporting Initiative” (GRI) standReporting period Non-financial part:

calendar year 2010-20111 – next report in 2014

Financial part:

calendar year 2011 – interim online report in 2013

Boundary of the report Bopro nv: the parent holding Bopro PM&QS nv: the entity for all management and consultancy services except property management Bopro RES bvba: the property management entity The results of the impact on our clients and their products are not yet included in this first report. Bopro already has a substantial database of KPIs concerning sustainability parameters but is eager to develop this further. Through ongoing quality control on the collected data we aim to benchmark and communicate reliable key figures by the next report.

Froissart 95-99 – Brussels

6 / Bopro CSR Report


Materiality matrix From the Construction & Real Estate Sector Supplement (CRESS) we identified five key areas with a ‘material’ sustainable impact: • energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions • material and water use • natural ecosystems • waste • impact as an employer and in the supply chain The employer’s impact for Bopro is specified through: • our consultants assessing and certifying buildings according to the BREEAM assessment and certification methodology • our project managers managing the new

built projects and renovation schemes in a way the sustainable goals set by the clients are met • our managers rolling out the improvement plan in order to enhance the sustainability performances of assets, building management and operational use of the buildings Bopro defines its materiality or most important sustainability aspects based on: • our business strategy • external stakeholder consultation, through informal meetings and more formal quality analysis • the nine Key Performance Indicators of the International Sustainability Alliance (ISA) Benchmark launched in October 2011

• “Bopro as a sustainable organisation”, a result of internal stakeholder consultation on Bopro’s role as a consultancy company in sustainable development. This includes maintaining a sustainable social approach (an attractive human resource policy, training, learning and development programmes, diversity and good career opportunities) and an ambitious internal environmental policy (CO2 reduction, mobility, sustainable procurement policy,…) This resulted in a two-fold, fully integrated sustainability management approach represented by the following “Materiality Matrix”.

Materiality matrix Bopro

EC

EC

Risk assessment, Liquidities and Long-term value of buildings Laws and regulations (INT)

Formation of partnerships

STAKEHOLDERS Knowledge sharing

Important for stakeholders

PR

SO Responsibility in care sector

LA

EN

LA

Participatory decision-making

EN

EN

Energy/GHG Water Waste management

EC

Bopro as good employer (training, career opportunities,...)

Attract new financiers and investors

EN HR Sustainable acquisitions policy

Mobility, carbon footprint, employees,... (INT)

Important for Bopro Stakeholders HR

Human rights

Core future growth areas PR

Product responsibility

SO

Covered by Bopro core activities Product responsibility

EC

Economic

To be covered by Bopro Sustainability policy EN

Environmental

LA

Labour practices & decent work

Bopro CSR Report / 7


It’s a company transition Services From property management to advisory in sustainability Bopro was founded 23 years ago as a ‘pure‘ project management company for commercial real estate. It has since grown to become a solid reputable firm specialised in management and consultancy services throughout the real estate and construction sector.

Liquidity Long Term Value Risk Assessment

Its activities were extended to include property management, quantity surveying, technical due diligences, health and safety coordination, building surveying, real estate advisory and sustainability consultancy. As a project and cost manager, Bopro supervises large-scale and complex real estate projects. Permanent development of our management tools guarantees our objectives on timing, budget, quality and sustainability. In 2009 Bopro launched a major transition. Bopro discounted the property and facility management activities, representing 20% of the turnover, and developed a new service around sustainability. This new service is not only a consequence of our beliefs, mission and strategy; it also fits in with our ‘life cycle approach’. We not only manage the initial investment cost, but include the optimisation of the ‘running costs’ as one of the key issues. Working towards a balance between social, ecological, and economic aspects is a serious challenge for any real estate project.

8 / Bopro CSR Report


Reylof - Gent

An assessment of the performances of a new construction being established or an existing portfolio charts the risks and opportunities. Improving the performances lowers the operating costs and increases the lettability, leading to fewer vacancies and an increase in the long-term value of the property. Managing an entire real estate portfolio in an integrated and sustainable way will increase the liquidity (being able to sell the property at the desired price at the desired time).

Towards Bopro real estate advisory The real estate market know-how of JeanPaul Ducarme and Alain Van Houtte, both managing partners, strengthens our service in corporate real estate, strategic portfolio and sustainable investment advisory activities. Bopro helps its clients to structure and market real estate developments and transactions.

Towards quality improvement and further professionalisation Implementing international quality standards and the use of internal quality audits on our reports started in 2011 and will continue to contribute to the further professionalisation of our services. We strive for continuous improvements. In 2012 and 2013 Bopro will further align its products and implement and actively maintain the ISO 9001 quality management system.

Towards internationalisation Although our activities in 2010–2011 were situated mainly in Belgium, we are now taking our first international steps: we conducted sustainability assessments and real estate advisory services in Luxembourg, France and Sweden. Bopro also has various cooperation links with foreign partners.

Bopro CSR Report / 9


Structure Bopro nv is a non-listed privately owned company with a corporate governance structure.

To focus completely on its core activities, Bopro decided to outsource the management of its ICT environment and to engage an external accountancy office to assist with the financial process.

In 2010, the decision was made to discontinue the property and facility management activities of Bopro Real Estate Services bvba. This decision led to an adjustment of the number of staff members. In late 2010, all remaining staff from Bopro nv were transferred to Bopro PM&QS nv so that, from 2011 onwards, all staff members operate within a single company. These changes obviously weighed on the figures for personnel turnover which reached a peak in 2010 but restabilised in 2011.

Human Resources matters are managed internally. Bopro implemented a bottom-up decisionmaking process for all staff related issues. Through workshops and consultation, new policies and processes are developed, in an open and participatory manner. Additionally, each month a “staff forum� is organised where strategic developments are explained and relevant topics discussed. These also serve to further consult staff in an open atmosphere.

In times of crisis, cutbacks are too often made on training and education. Bopro has continued to engage highly trained staff and offers training in order to remain innovative. At Bopro young qualified candidates are given the opportunity of a first work experience under the aegis of experienced colleagues.

Internal communication is further supported through the Bopro intranet.

Bopro has a low rate of absenteeism due to illness, barely 0.92% of sick leave days were recorded in 2011.

Board of Directors

Managing Director

HR

Finance

Environment / CSR

Operations Director

10 / Bopro CSR Report

Sales Director

Real Estate Advisory

Operations Manager 1

Sales

Managing Partner 1

Operations Manager 2

Marketing

Managing Partner 2

Operations Manager 3

Communication


f.l.t.r. Johan Verbeke (Operations Manager) - Alain van Houtte (Managing Partner) - Peter Garré (Managing Director) Jean-Paul Ducarme (Managing Partner) Peter De Durpel (Sales Director) - Stefaan Martel (Operations Director) - Arnold Schautteet (Operations Manager)

Board & Management Board of Directors Bopro nv Bopro nv applies the rules of corporate governance in accordance with the suggestions of managers��� institute Guberna2. The rules of corporate governance must always be checked for their applicability within the organisation and according to the circumstances in which a company finds itself. To add to its independent expertise, Bopro has engaged external directors. Each independent director has its specific expertise: Chairman Ivan De Witte in the development and growth of service-provider organisations, Paul-Yvon Billiet in the financial and international field and Philippe Janssens as a real estate expert. There is also the tendency to keep the directors well informed and more involved in major aspects of day-to-day management so as to be able to take the right decisions. The Board of Directors obtains its information through quarterly reports drawn up by the management. These reports not only cover the latest financial results (turnover and productivity figures) but also the social and ecological progress of the company.

Bopro’s Board of Directors meets four times per year. During the shareholders’ Annual General Meeting recommendations are made for the long-term strategy.

Bopro management From 2011 onwards Bopro consolidated all of its activities and supporting processes into Bopro PM&QS nv. Its balance sheets and statement of results should therefore accurately reflect our operational activities. The leadership of the management team and the steering and control of the supporting processes fall within the competences of Managing Director Peter Garré. Marketing, communication, and sales activities are led by Peter De Durpel, Sales Director. Operational activities are headed by Operations Director Stefaan Martel, assisted by Operations Managers Johan Verbeke and Arnold Schautteet, each in charge of a multidisciplinary team. The management is also assisted by Managing Partners Jean-Paul Ducarme and Alain Van Houtte. Their knowledge of the (inter) national real estate market strengthens Bo-

pro’s business development and growth in real estate advisory services. The operation and decision-making competences of the Board of Directors and the management are evaluated on an economic, ecological and social level. On the ecological side this evaluation is based on the external environmental audits, on the economic side by the company auditor and, on the social side, by means of internal stakeholder consultations. Unlike most other companies active in the real estate and construction sector, Bopro has a good gender balance among its staff. We are pleased to confirm the trend that increasing numbers of women (35% in 2009 to almost 43% in 20113) feel attracted to Bopro’s sustainable strategy. It is Bopro’s ambition to continue this gender balance to the highest levels of decision making.

Bopro’s gender balance 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% Women

20%

Men

10% 0%

Ivan De Witte

Paul-Yvon Billiet

Philippe Janssens

2009

2010

2011

Peter Garré

Bopro CSR Report / 11


Stakeholder mapping Stakeholder involvement and consultation has been an essential exercise for Bopro in the past two years, as the company has been repositioning more and more towards “A Guide to a Better World” using environmental assessment methodologies such as BREEAM for sustainable building assessment, certification, and improvement, without losing touch with our core business activities in project management and consultancy services. The outcome of the identification, mapping and ranking of Bopro’s key stakeholders was based on the Mitchell, Agle & Wood methodology. This resulted in 17 stakeholder groups: 9 priority, 4 secondary, 4 tertiary. Both current and future stakeholder groups that will gain power and influence were taken into account for the stakeholder analysis, since Bopro is operating in a fairly new but also international and rapidly evolving market. This way, Bopro can prepare as much as possible for various potential future scenarios.

Power 11. NOOs

Bopro’s stakeholder process consists of: • understanding the real estate context in which Bopro operates and its impact as a consultant • evaluating Bopro’s various stakeholder groups and their expectations and interests • mapping the highest-priority issues and expectations of Bopro’s key stakeholders

Our objective for the next CSR report is the further development of a more structured approach for stakeholder dialogue, with regular communication actions directed towards themes of relevance to stakeholders, as included in the materiality matrix via formal meetings, client satisfaction surveys,…

8a. Belgian Press 13. Gents Klimaatverbond

Legitimacy

7. Research groups

10. Academics

3. Bopro shareholders/owners 4. (International) competitors

12. Suppliers

5. Existing clients 6. New stakeholders/investors 9. Local inhabitants around buildings 16. Professional associations

14. Legal and regulatory bodies

8b. International press

15. Public authorities, Society in general 17. Bopro Board of directors 1. Potential future employees 2. Present employees

Urgency

Core stakeholders Organisational stakeholders Project/asset stakeholders

12 / Bopro CSR Report


MIVB/STIB – Brussels (photo Sara M Peeters)

Bopro CSR Report / 13


Innovating companies are aligning their efforts in CSR with their business strategies. Luc Van Liedekerke, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Universiteit Antwerpen

Offices & Mobility Registered office Gent

The Mechelen Office

Mobility

From its services as sustainability consultant Bopro is very much aware of the impact its own activities can have on the immediate environment and our society. Bopro therefore decided to move its headquarters from a “car location” to the Gent city centre. A city that equally sets sustainability as a spearhead for its policies.

Bopro’s operational office in the industrial area of Mechelen Noord, Zandvoortstraat 27, is retained for the projects on the Antwerp–Brussels axis and beyond. Due to its proximity to the E19, the building serves as a good base for staff travelling to their projects by car. In terms of accessibility by public transport it currently lacks a frequent bus service (De Lijn) outside peak hours. Nonetheless, an increasing number of staff use their foldable bikes to travel to and from the office, in combination with public transport.

Bopro is fully committed to company mobility in accordance with the STOP4 principle. Stimulating the use of public transport is combined with “walking” and “pedalling”. For this purpose Bopro provides each staff member with a foldable bicycle and refunds all public transport fees.

After its thorough renovation, Bopro moved into the historic 17th-century building in the autumn of 2010 on the Oude Houtlei 140, property of GG05 nv. This sustainable transformation resulted in a CO2 neutral office building where the features of historic merit remain untouched. Through an economic and ecological feasibility study the investment and operating costs and their return effects were mapped for the long and the short term. Attention was paid to a high degree of insulation and air seal, installation of solar boilers, use of geothermics combined with low temperature underfloor heating, a very efficient building management system, balanced ventilation, maximum use of sustainable, environmentally friendly building materials, LED lighting, Cradle2Cradle carpets, water recovery for the sanitary facilities, … Bopro also chose 100% locally sourced renewable energy from Ecopower.

Since the autumn of 2010, 100% renewable energy (AlpEnergie from Electrabel) is used on the premises and active measures are taken to reduce our energy use to a minimum.

Awards

March 2011: BREEAM Commercial Europe Award “Froissart 95- 99” in the category “Offices” for best Design and Procurement Assessment June 2011: Havelaar *** March 2012: BREEAM In-Use award winner 2011 “Oude Houtlei” The assessment of the Bopro head offices in Gent resulted in an Excellent rating (with a score of 73,76%) and the BREEAM Award in 2012 in the category BREEAM In-Use.

14 / Bopro CSR Report

In 2011, Bopro started to work on its mobility policy, implemented and carried by the staff. This policy shall, to a large extent, help us reduce our CO2 emissions even further. Since August 2011, Bopro started to take daily measurements of its consumption for both offices. Based on these, targets were set for the following year.


Infrax HQ – Torhout (photo Sara M. Peeters)

Bopro CSR Report / 15


It’s a business case Financial report In 2009, the Board of Directors decided to place the operational activities, which had previously been placed in various companies for reasons for historic external growth, in the company Bopro PM&QS nv. These annual accounts are representative of the financial performance of Bopro and as such are included in this report. Bopro’s annual accounts are audited by the controller, Mr Ronald Van den Ecker who is a partner at Ernst & Young, as is apparent from his report dated 27 April 2012 which has been added to this report.

Sustainable financial report The bank crisis of 2008 turned into an economic crisis in 2009 and had a negative impact on the activities in our sector.

Vlaamse Opera – Antwerp (photo Sara M. Peeters)

16 / Bopro CSR Report

Real estate and the construction sector are capital-intensive sectors which are particularly susceptible to fluctuations in interest rates and the amount of loan capital available. On the other hand, lags behind the general economic barometer which is shown by our turnover in 2009 and 2010.

The projects started in 2008 were continued in 2009 but new projects were postponed so that in 2010 our turnover fell by 4.2 % compared to 2009. At the end of 2010 and during 2011, the degree of activities recovered so that we were able to achieve a turnover growth of 12.6%. In 2012, there is once again great economic uncertainty and the consequences of a possible Euro crisis are still insufficiently known. Moreover, governments have to make serious cuts in spending to balance their budgets. We expect turnover to stagnate in 2012; this will depend on the evolution of the debt crisis and its impact on the economy recovery. In 2010 and 2011, we invested 2.5% of our operational costs a year in product and market development in the area of sustainable management in construction and real estate. In 2012, we will continue to invest 5% of our operational costs in product development and training.


Sustainable Financial Report In k€

Prognosis 2012

2011

2010

2009

4300

4303

3820

3986

Operating charges

4172

3595

3981

Renumerations

1581

1167

1394

Depreciations

101

37

37

Operating profit

155

243

121 103

Operating income (70/71)

Equity

276

221

Debt payable> 1 year

none

none

Total liabilities

2026

1581

1382

Income taxes

72

108

61

Economic value retained

54

118

34

10%

9.5%

10.5%

0%

12.6%

-4.2%

EBITDA % Growth

Operating Income (k€)

Equity (k€)

5000

300

4500

250

4000

200

3500

150

3000 2009

2010

2011

Prognosis 2012

100

2009

2010

2011

EBITDA % 15%

10%

5%

2010

2011

Prognosis 2012

Bopro CSR Report / 17


Oude Houtlei – Gent (photo Sara M. Peeters)

Economic sustainability Health and well-being As part of its sustainable strategy Bopro attaches great importance to health and well-being on construction sites and in the buildings in use. Bopro was one of the pioneers of the health and safety coordination on temporary and mobile sites. This activity legally determined by Royal Decree based on the law on health and safety coordination at work of 4 August 1996, include the aspects of health and well-being during the lifecycle of the project/building. Through the sustainability assessments we also raise the safety and well-being of projects/buildings in which we are involved, to a higher level. In 2010, Bopro succeeded in favourably influencing the aspects of health, safety and well-being of the projects and buildings in 46% of all its contracts. In 2011, this share was already up to 66%.

Our indirect impact Bopro is concerned about climate change and continued availability of our natural resources. Bopro wants to make a relevant contribution to solutions for these problems: • through organising and participating in lectures and seminars; • as a working member of organisations such as the Gents Klimaatverbond, the International Sustainability Alliance or the Belgian Sustainable Building Council; • through the daily sharing of knowledge with our clients, suppliers and all other stakeholders; • through a sustainable and holistic project management approach of new build projects and renovation schemes; • as a pioneer in conducting BREEAM assessments and audits in order to be able to certify sustainable projects or buildings; • through developing innovative sustainable improvement plans and contributing to the reduction of the CO2 emissions of buildings and mobility. Bopro encourages developers, investors and corporate end-users, designers and builders to organise and manage projects in a sustainable and socially responsible manner.

18 / Bopro CSR Report


Product segmentation 2010-2011 Audit-Certification Real Estate Advisory

Cost Consultancy

Sustainable construction site management, examples. • safe access through clear signs • separation of waste • measurement of energy and water consumption • measurement of CO2 emissions • use of recyclable or Cradle2Cradle materials • use of managed raw materials and resources • use of ecological paints • use of renewable sources of energy • encouragement of use of public transport

Project Management incl HSC

Building type segmentation 2010-2011 Retail & Leisure Offices

Care

Residential & Schools

A sustainable project & cost manager Bopro pursues its mission and vision of sustainability in all its management and consultancy activities. The pie chart, showing the product segmentation over 2010 and 2011, indicates that project management is still the most important activity within Bopro. Advisory services on sustainability are a growing activity. In 2011, this activity, which only started at the end of 2009, already represented 15% of our total turnover.

Market segmentation 2010-2011 Corporate End Users

Real Estate Professionals

Public Authorities

Bopro CSR Report / 19


Interim Certificate

Final Certificate Excellent 3%

Outstanding 1% Pass 2%

Outstanding 0% Pass 15%

Good 25% Excellent 26%

Very Good 47% Good 35%

Very Good 46%

Real estate advisory

Auditing and certification Bopro started with the execution of the first BREEAM Europe Commercial5 Assessment: for the renovation of an office building in the FEDIMMO portfolio in rue Froissartstraat 95-99 in the Brussels European District. This project won the 2011 BREEAM Award in the Category Offices in Continental Europe by way of recognition for best assessment. By late 2011 Bopro had already registered 10 new buildings or renovation projects as assessor. Two of which received an interim certificate and two a final BREEAM Commercial certificate. One of them, the office project ‘Science Montoyer’, was the first building on the European continent to achieve a BREEAM Excellent final score. Our assessments have made an essential contribution to optimise the sustainable performance of these. Bopro achieved for each project the initial goals set at the pre-assessment stage. However, the average ratings for projects in Europe show that the target levels of ambition are not always achieved. These pie charts are based on the list6 of certified projects published by BREEAM on 31.12.2011. One of the major challenges in the real estate sector is increasing the longevity of the existing building stock, regardless whether they are offices, retail buildings or logistic facilities. Here again, Bopro is doing pioneering work in Continental Europe. With more than

20 / Bopro CSR Report

200 BREEAM In-Use7 certificates issued over the period 2010-2011, Bopro has already made an appreciable contribution in the ‘sustainability’ of existing real estate. The BREEAM In-Use questionnaire set is currently being adapted to create an international version of the scheme. This will provide a level of comparability from country to country. It will make use of the European EPC framework. This option will be available in 2012. Bopro is part of the international research group working out this new scheme. In 2010, Bopro started performing BREEAM In-Use Assessments and Audits. It is a method to assess the sustainability of existing real estate. In 2011, Bopro further developed and implemented strategies to improve the performances. Further implementation continued after thorough exploration of the market and in line with our acquired knowledge on the subject. A majority of companies in the top 10 of the Belgian real estate investors has already been advised through Bopro’s sustainability activities. The growth of the relative turnover in these sustainability activities is therefore strong: • 5% in 2009 • 10% in 2010 • 15% in 2011

In 2011 Bopro started new services: corporate real estate, strategic portfolio and sustainable investment advisory. Bopro helps real estate developers and investors to structure and market real estate developments and transactions. Bopro also facilitates real estate transactions between investors and corporate end-users.

Our economic 20122013 ambitions It is our ambition to grow in a continuous way in all three services lines: project and cost management, real estate advisory and auditing & certification. The assessment, auditing and certification services will be internationally extended throughout Continental Europe. Our policy objectives commit us to making these specific sustainability activities account for more than 20% in 2012 and 2013. All our project and cost management services will be offered with respect for the sustainability principles in all nine sections of BREEAM: management, land use and ecology, energy, water, waste, materials, pollution, transport, health and well-being. The BREEAM In-Use assessments executed in 2010-2011 should lead to the roll out of improvement plans for at least 70% of the buildings audited. New portfolios are to be assessed and audited.


Bopro demonstrates its capacity to work as a relevant partner with a high level of expertise, credibility and reactivity. Christophe Garot Synergy & Expertise Director Unibail-Rodamco

All audits - average % score on issues at Asset 100% 80%

70.8% 64.7%

60%

53.7%

57.4%

45.8%

40% 20%

18.6%

21.9%

18.2%

0% ENE

HWE

LUE

MAT

POL

TRA

WAS

WAT

All audits - average% score on issues at Building Management 100% 80%

71.5% 59.2%

60%

50.7% 34.3%

40%

23.7%

20.9%

20% 0.5%

0% ENE

HWE

LUE

MAN

MAT

POL

WAT

Bopro CSR Report / 21


It’s a social commitment The values of an RICS regulated firm As an RICS regulated firm (2011), Bopro adheres to the international rules of conduct and the professionalism of the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors Golden Standard. As such all management and staff adhere to these rules, when executing tasks and in the communication with its stakeholders. Obtaining the RICS Regulated Firm label requires strict observation of the RICS values and rules. This status reinforces Bopro’s recognition and presence among its stakeholders and in its projects. RICS Rules of conduct • act honourably and with integrity • be open and transparent in your dealings • be accountable for all your actions • know and act within your limitations • be objective at all times • always treat others with respect • set a good example • have the courage to make a stand • comply with relevant law en regulations • avoid conflicts of interest • respect confidentiality The RICS Rules of Conduct are implemented in the integral structure of our organisation. They also form part of the annual individual appraisal of the employees. One of the requirements that any RICS Regulated Firm must satisfy, is the formulation

22 / Bopro CSR Report

and, of course, application of a complaints procedure for its stakeholders. Bopro treats every complaint as an opportunity for improvement of its services. Client satisfaction is key for Bopro: • as part of the “client intimacy” approach of the organisation • in the believe that satisfied clients will create more business However, the many actions around client satisfaction in 2010 and 2011 were not always formalised but resulted from direct and informal contact: a feedback moment during execution by the project leader, on conclusion of (a phase of) a contract by the sales director or account manager, informally at an event by the management of Bopro, … At the end of each assignment we offer our clients the option to sign a “Certificate of Correct Execution”. These certificates are used to support bids for public calls for tenders. We are proud to say that in 97% of cases, the client signed the certificate. Bopro, however, seeks to go further to determine the degree of client satisfaction. We have put together a questionnaire for use as a guide for formal evaluation talks that each project leader or account manager will have with his respective client from 2012 on (periodically and/or on completion of a contract). The answers to these questions and the client’s specific comments form the report or record of each project’s evaluation review.

A strategic resource policy As a management and consultancy company, Bopro’s employees are the human capital. Bopro upholds an HR policy that is focused on skills and competences. Bopro underlines the importance of lifelong learning and has launched an ‘internal employee skill’ vs. ‘market demand green skills’ mapping project in order to support its current and future employees in their career path. This aims to ensure career development as well as responding to the growing market needs in “green” consultancy and management skills. Bopro’s activities are labour- and knowledgeintensive. Our team has to be highly skilled and autonomous and must be capable of managing complex projects for the benefit of our clients. As ambassadors they propagate the strategy and philosophy of responsible management towards all our stakeholders. Each of them has to be a leader in his field of expertise. Bopro’s employees develop the necessary competence and knowl­­­­ e­d­ge through a combination of on-the-job training and theoretical internal or external courses. Our competence management is designed to give all personnel the opportunity to cover a wide variety of business activities and to develop the necessary general skills to manage all kinds of projects. Our more experienced managers help building these skills within the younger members of our team. The manager’s role is to detect training


Fire Brigade Station – Antwerp (photo Sara M. Peeters)

Bopro CSR Report / 23


A confused person will question everything and this will lead to change. Joost Vandecasteele

needs and set up development plans in consultation with their team members. Regular workshops are organised with all personnel about the sustainable strategy and value proposition of Bopro in the market. These workshops create a common language and make it possible to evolve to an aligned organisation in the near future. The organisation also embraces external knowledge and people are encouraged to follow external courses. Bopro booked an average of 1.94% training hours in 2011 as against ‘only’ 0.44% in 2010. As we said, we walk our mission. Bopro organises a yearly performance management process. At the beginning of the year each employee receives his/her annual productivity targets. These targets are monitored on a monthly basis by the operations managers who will make a final evaluation at the end of each year and issue a formal appraisal to each team member. The objectives tend to be SMART and set

KPIs that encourage the right attitude among staff in line with Bopro’s strategy. These targets are not only financial but also include qualitative and environmental criteria. In 2010 about 60% of the employees working in our company for the past year, received a formal appraisal; in 2011 we reached 89%. Bopro has also developed a competence management system. Only skilled employees can perform well and meet their objectives. Staff skills are therefore reviewed regularly, at the end of an important project, before promoting an employee, or on the employee’s request. Incentives are linked to both company and individual performances over the last calendar year.

Supporting good causes Bopro supports surrounding local & international social issues. Bopro has been supporting the international Haïti Lavi8 for two years now after the earthquake in January 2010. In 2010, Bopro also donated twenty-five laptops with software and carry bags to a hospital project in Africa via the non-profit organisation Memisa9 in cooperation with Maria Middelares General Hospital Gent. At a local level, we support the Festival Foundation10 working alongside Kinepolis, with the Shanti Shanti children’s choir project and the “Vlinderconcerten”, concerts for children with visual impairment. Each day Bopro also shows its commitment to developing countries with the purchase of products bearing the Fairtrade label. In 2011 Oxfam Fairtrade recognised Bopro for this by awarding us the Havelaar11 with three stars. Although no formal policy is as yet in place, Bopro aims to develop an employee volunteering policy, allowing its employees to engage in community activities with local NGOs, schools,…

deSingel – Antwerp

24 / Bopro CSR Report

Partnerships At a local level, Bopro not only offers its financial support but also wishes to do its bit in the transition towards an ecologically and socially responsible society. We do so through taking part in certain local initiatives, in Gent and Mechelen, but also increasingly at an (inter)national level. Bopro is a partner in the Gents Klimaatverbond12 and supports the initiatives from its own sustainability strategy. Together with the other partners, our actions, within our particular sphere of influence, are helping to create a more sustainable, environmentally friendly city. In Mechelen Bopro is a member of non-profit organisation VZW Industrie Mechelen Noord13 to contribute towards a liveable, safe, pleasant Mechelen Noord industrial zone. Bopro takes an active part in the annual meetings with the local companies in order to keep up social contact with our “neighbours”. Bopro also serves on expert panels in the Flemish Government “Transitiemanagement Duurzaam Wonen en Bouwen” project or DUWOBO14. The mission was to provide the impetus for a fundamental transition towards a daily practice of living and building that follows principles of sustainable development. The project, seen through the so-called transition arena, has since generated a sustainability objective for Flanders by 2030. At an international level Bopro became member of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Belgium15, in 2011. This organisation promotes discussion on town planning, meetings between the public and private sector and organises a forum for social consultation on land use.


Screw business as usual. Let’s do it. Sir Richard Branson

Knowledge-sharing Bopro frequently shares its knowledge and experience in various open forums, for social organisations, care providers and professional associations:

For the Eiland Zwijnaarde project Bopro started up the feasibility study of a sustainable regional economic site using the “Duurzaamheidsmeter Gent voor Economische sites”.

Some examples: • presentation for various OCMWs – public social welfare centres – (in cooperation with ECOBOUWERS) on sustainability in the care sector • presentation for the Confederatie Bouw East Flanders Division on sustainable building and construction • academic seminar for the members of the BVS–UPSI on BREEAM • cooperations with DUWOBO for sustainable building and construction • strong involvement in and active contribution to the Gents Klimaatverbond • lectures at Antwerp Management School for upcoming Masters in Real Estate • …

Sustainability assessment methods will also be used on the further area development of Park Ragheno Mechelen.

In all our projects we work towards balancing a respect for the existing heritage value and achieving a progressive solution for the development. Projects such as Hotel Reylof and the renovation of our company headquarters in Gent are good examples of this.

Impact on local communities BREEAM Communities16 helps planners and developers to improve, measure and independently certify the sustainability of proposed projects at the planning stage of the development process.

Our Social 2012-2013 ambitions Our HR policy will focus on: • Our mission as a “Guide to a Better World” • Productivity in a changing world and services • Our clients’ interests at a strategic level We are also developing a formal means of gauging and keeping track of the satisfaction among our stakeholders via consultation, events, workshops and seminars. For the further development of our approach to sustainable local development Bopro also aims to implement the BREEAM Communities method in certain pilot projects. Even if our ambitions are not yet fully realised Bopro has a strong commitment to ensure our projects have a positive social impact. Our commitment to the local community is important and we want to develop more initiatives. In 2012, we aim to develop, within the context of our projects and project teams, community engagement and consultation.

In our drive to improve the sustainability of the built environment there is increasingly a greater focus on communities. There is particular initiative to ensure local amenity and proximity between home, work, places to learn, play, shop and recreation, without having to drive (too) long distances..

Van Zuylen – Bruges (photo Sara M. Peeters)

Bopro CSR Report / 25


It’s an environmental strategy ISO 14001 Bopro obtained the ISO 14001: 2004 certificate in the summer of 2011 by which we commit ourselves to the continuous improvement of our environmental management system to prevent pollution of the environment. In doing so, Bopro respects the applicable environment laws and regulations and all other relevant requirements. Bopro developed an environmental care programme underlining the reduction of its carbon footprint. The following aspects are being monitored, measured and evaluated: • The premises: The buildings in Gent and Mechelen have been adapted and will be futher developed in an integrated approach with the objective of reducing CO2 emissions through actions on energy efficiency and water consumption.

26 / Bopro CSR Report

• Mobility: The means of transport must be used according to the STOP principle. The company cars are selected for best-possible “ecoscore” taking account not only the CO2 emissions but also of discharge of fine dust and noise production. • Waste: All our company processes are rigorously evaluated with objective of reducing the generation of waste. Bopro’s environmental management system focuses not only on our staff but also expects our suppliers and service-providers to take on a similar proactive approach to manage and reduce their environmental impact. The development of a sustainable purchase policy is a good example of its practical rollout. CO2 emissions from transport, the supplier’s commitment to the environment, specific sustainable product criteria and the price are taken into account. Companies that do not have an environmental or sustainability policy can sign the Bopro Environment Charter. In agreeing to work within our environmental charter they will use the most sustainable technologies in the execution of their contracts, observe the laws and regula-

tions on the environment, apply the STOP principle for mobility and reduce waste. Bopro also considers its clients as an integral part of sustainable business practice. We continue to inform and involve our clients, raising awareness, towards a sustainable environment. The Bopro Environment Committee steers these processes. The committee consists of the Managing Director, the Operations Director and the Environmental Officer and meets once a month to discuss general and specific environmental issues. The Environment Committee reports directly to the Board of Directors. Environment is a regular item on the agenda of Bopro’s Board of Directors. Twice a year the Board of Directors reaffirms the organisation’s commitment in a director’s assessment. Every nine months Bopro’s environment management system is subjected to an external follow-up audit. The certificate must be renewed every three years.


deSingel – Antwerp

Bopro CSR Report / 27


2011

2010

2009

Evolution (2009-2011)

122.81

134.80

176.54

-30%

Building water intensity (m³/m²/year)

0.25

0.32

0.25

-1%

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity from buildings (kg CO2/m²/year)

7.27

15.85

24.79

-71%

Building energy intensity (kWh/m²/year)

Carbon intensity 2009 versus 2011 2009

2011

Unit

Evolution

31.48

20.38

g CO2/€

-35%

2.20

1.60

kg CO2/u

-27%

2,559.78

1,732.82

kg CO2/FTE

-32%

Emission/ turnover* Emission/ total hours performed* Mobility intensity km/FTE**

(*) related to our own buildings (**) FTE calculated based on hours performed

If we look at the share of Bopro’s activities under Bopro PM&QS nv, we can take pride in presenting a 35% reduction in CO2 from zero point 2009 to 2011. These figures reflect our way towards our ultimate objective: climate neutral by 2020!

A CO2 reduction commitment Bopro The period 2009 to 2010 at Bopro brought significant change in our awareness and approach to the environment and sustainability. During this period we began to measure our carbon footprint. The year 2009 was taken as zero point and is the basis for our upcoming objectives, namely 30% reduction of our CO2 emissions per g CO2/€ turnover by 2013. These objectives were calculated based on simulations to reduce CO2 emissions. Our ultimate objective is CO2 neutrality by 2020 with a residual value of 10%. The year 2010 was a period of transition. There were internal structural reforms with the necessary adaptation in housing. That is why we do not have any clearly developed measurement results for that period. With our ISO 14001 certification in 2011 we started to take daily measurements of our consumptions (water, gas, electricity, and waste). Mobility is also subjected to measurements, with evaluation of the recording of mileage travelled by staff for business purposes being our scope.

28 / Bopro CSR Report

For the coming report period 2012 and 2013 we wish to study mobility in more detail. With the expansion of our activities at international level we also note that the CO2 emissions for international moves has increased, while the CO2 emissions for national transport are considerably reduced. To measure the CO2 emissions, Bopro uses the emission factors calculated in accordance with the Bilan Carbone® method, version 6.1, of June 2010. The adaptations in housing and the switch­ over to 100% renewable energy led to a considerable reduction of our CO2 emissions. To such an extent, in fact, that as far as housing is concerned we only needed to make investment improvements (solar panels, switchover from natural gas to renewable energy). For that reason Bopro is now aiming at the other CO2 guzzlers instead, namely our mobility.

The International Sustainability Alliance17 (ISA) is a global network of leading real estate organisations such as developers, owners, occupiers, property investors. Its aim is to bring together a worldwide membership of leading commercial organisations with substantial property interests, dedicated to achieving higher sustainability in the built environment. Bopro is a founding associate member of ISA in 2010 and became an ISA Portfolio member for Belgium and Luxembourg in 2011. Bopro therefore motivates its clients to provide the necessary information for the further updating and expansion of the data in the ISA database. The more information the database contains, the more accurate the benchmarking results that Bopro can offer its clients. The first ISA benchmarking report was published in October 2011.

Clients: our influence – The ISA Benchmark

Bopro’s Managing Director has a seat in the ISA Quality Assurance Committee to ensure the quality and verifiability of the published data in the system.

As mentioned earlier, Bopro encourages its clients to monitor, to analyse and to optimise so as to reduce their environmental impact.

ISA maps out 9 KPIs: • total indirect energy consumption • total direct energy consumption • building energy intensity


Since Bopro introduced us to BREEAM as a sustainability certification system during the design of the new hospital, we pay more attention to sustainability in our decision processes. Elie Vanderbauwede Technical Director AZ Maria Middelares vzw

Kop van Kessel-Lo – Leuven (photo Toon Grobet)

• on-site renewable energy generation by volume • total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight • total direct and indirect greenhouse gas intensity from building energy • total water withdrawal by source • building water intensity • total weight of waste by type and disposal method The results of the impact on our clients and their products are not yet included in this report. Bopro already has a substantial database of KPIs concerning primary energy consumption, water consumption and the use of renewable energy, but is eager first to develop it further and conduct an internal quality control on the collected data in order to benchmark and communicate reliable key figures for the next report. Before 2011, there was little formal record of waste management. Retaining a record of waste management only concerned companies in which waste processing was contracted out to an external partner, whereby the manner of processing and the quantities of processed waste is documented. There is still work to be done in the “sustainability shop”.

Our environmental 2012-2013 ambitions Our core ambition for the next report period is to reach our target of 30% reduction of our CO2 emissions in g CO2/€ turnover over the period 2009-2013. Bopro keeps its focus fixed on investment in green and sustainable mobility. We have established a mobility policy which includes initiatives such as; energy-saving vehicle fleet, new company bicycles for all staff and the further application of the STOP principle. Besides mobility Bopro intends to apply the economically and ecologically most responsible technologies and work towards continuous improvement so as to manage and use its property to maximum possible effect. Bopro’s ambition is to become a carbon neutral business practice by 2020. We aspire to extend this for all our business partners including our client base. In its project management contracts Bopro aims to calculate the CO2 emissions linked to the production and execution of the works. In 2012 this method will be developed further to comply with internationally certified standards, ap-

plied to 5% of the construction costs of our projects. In 2013 Bopro wants to increase this share to 10%. The calculation of the CO2 impact will allow us to manage the CO2 emissions during the design and execution phase and give our clients well-founded advice regarding the CO2 emissions over the entire lifecycle of their buildings complying with EU regulations.

During the operational phase Bopro will also look to calculate the CO2 benefits for the improvement projects. In 2012 this method will be developed further in accordance with international standards and be applied to 10% of the projects. By 2013 Bopro aims to increase this percentage to 20%. The calculation of the CO2 impact will allow us to give our clients well-founded advice concerning the possible CO2 benefits during the operational phase.

Bopro CSR Report / 29


It’s a GRI and audited report The core content of the Bopro sustainability report was identified in a workshop with the CSR Ambassador Group consisting of Bopro top management and key employees. The members of the “Bopro CSR Ambassadors Group” were selected based on their experience and role within the Bopro team. Ernst & Young facilitated the workshop by assisting in the review, selection and application of relevant GRI indicators, a selected part of which was consequently chosen to report on in our first integrated report. The workshop was prepared by a pre-selection of 33 indicators, which were discussed in a later phase with the CSR Ambassador Group. Out of the 33 pre-selected GRI indicators, a total of 26 were chosen for final reporting, 18 of which were estimated as core material for Bopro by the workshop participants. With this method of reporting Bopro will be able to respond to the B-level GRI reporting criteria. The GRI Content Index on page 36 gives the full reporting for each indicator.

30 / Bopro CSR Report

GRI Application level Bopro opted to work towards GRI level B+ for its sustainability report. The B+ level requires reporting on a minimum of 20 performance indicators with at least 1 indicator from each Protocol Set of the Construction and Real Estate Sector Supplement (CRESS). Bopro applied the ‘Guidance on Defining Report Content’ to the development of the report. To demonstrate that our report is based on verifiable findings the items marked with a √ in the GRI Content Index were submitted for verification by the external auditor, Ernst & Young Réviseurs d’Entreprises, represented by Mr Harry Everaerts. Bopro chose Ernst & Young as our external audit consultant based on their experience in both financial and sustainability reporting. Ernst & Young have been our financial auditors for many years, so it seemed only logical to call on their expertise for the sustainability report as well. The Audit Report is included in the present CSR Report.


Exos – Leuven (photo Toon Grobet)

Bopro CSR Report / 31


Financial Audit Report

32 / Bopro CSR Report


Bopro CSR Report / 33


CSR Audit Report

34 / Bopro CSR Report


Footnotes There has since been a change in entity structure from 2010. 2009 and 2010 form the baseline years for most data and information.

1

GUBERNA: www.guberna.be

2

Employees and consultants

3

STOP principle :

4

S : Stappen (walking) T: Trappen (pedalling) O: Openbaar vervoer (Public transport) P: Privé vervoer (private car) BREEAM Europe Commercial is an assessment method that can be used in the design, construction, initial occupation, and refurbishment stages of a building’s life cycle. www.breeam.org

5

www.breeam.org

6

BREEAM In-Use is a scheme that helps building managers to reduce running costs and improve the environmental performance of existing buildings. www.breeam. org

7

Haïti Lavi: www.1212.be

8

Memisa: www.memisa.be

9

Festival Foundation: www.festivalfoundation.eu

10

11

Fairtrade Havelaar: www.fairtradeatwork.be/nl/de-havelaar

Gents Klimaatverbond: www.gentsklimaatverbond.be

12

VZW Industrie Mechelen Noord: www.industriemechelennoord.be

13

Transitiemanagement duurzaam wonen en bouwen: www.duwobo.be

14

Urban Land Institute Belgium: www.uli-europe.org/content/uli-belgium

15

BREEAM Communities: www.breeam.org

16

The International Sustainability Alliance: www.internationalsustainabilityalliance.org

17

Bopro CSR Report / 35


Bopro in numbers Our people 2010

2011

2009

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women/men*

43%

58%

37%

63%

35%

65%

Gent

50%

50%

33%

67%

Mechelen

33%

67%

40%

60%

People

Region* Mechelen

45%

59%

Gent

55%

41%

36.3

39.25

40 plus

35.0%

45.1%

30 plus

27.5%

29.4%

20 plus

37.5%

25.5%

Age groups* Average age

Contract type** limited duration indefinite duration

2.6% 100%

97.4%

40 plus

18.18%

33.33%

30 plus

18.18%

16.67%

20 plus

63.64%

50.00%

40 plus

30.00%

47.62%

30 plus

30.00%

23.81%

20 plus

40.00%

28.57%

Starters*

Leavers*

Sickness** % sick leave

0.88%

0.96%

1.21%

0.81%

Training** Average work hours dedicated to training *consultants & employees **employees only

36 / Bopro CSR Report

1.94%

0.44%


Diversity in governance bodies 2011 Women

2010 Men

Women

As already mentioned Bopro is evolving to a positive gender balance amongst its employees. It is our ambition to continue this to the highest levels of the decision making governance bodies.

Men

Board of Directors 40 plus

100%

100%

100%

100%

30 plus 20 plus Management 40 plus 30 plus 20 plus CSR Ambassadors Group 40 plus

11%

30 plus

11%

na

na

na

na

78%

20 plus Environment Committee 40 plus

67%

30 plus

33%

20 plus

Our planet 2011

2010*

2009**

Evolution 2009-2011

kg CO2

GJ

kg CO2

GJ

kg CO2

GJ

kg CO2

GJ

Electricity***

0

384

4,308

301

10,573

404

-100%

-5%

Natural gas***

8,562

1,481

8,159

1,351

13,526

2,345

-37%

-37%

Water

0

123

99

Waste****

41

-

-

Company mobility, domestic*****

59,285

134,659

106,773

-44%

Company mobility, international

2,702

2,363

630

329%

Carbon footprint

70,590

149,612

131,601

-46%

Building energy intensity (kWh/m²/year)

-100%

2011

2010

2009

Evolution 2009-2011

122.81

131.89

176.54

Building water intensity (m³/m²/year)

0.25

0.32

0.25

-30% -1%

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity from

7.27

15.85

24.79

-71%

buildings (kg CO2/m²/year)

The reduction of 46% of the total CO2 emissions between 2009 and 2011 is equal to: • • • •

406,732 km by car with an average emission of 150 g CO2/100 km 16 cars with an average of 25,000 km/ year and an emission of 150 g CO2/100 km 21 round-trips Brussels – New York by airplane 27,732 bags of garbage of 20 kg or 27 loaded garbage trucks

* In 2010 Bopro’s offices were located in Mechelen and Aalst. In November 2010 the renovated office in Gent opened. ** In 2009 Bopro’s offices were located in Mechelen and Drongen. *** The 2009-2010 electricity and gas use for Aalst and Drongen are based on an extrapolation of uses in Mechelen. The higher electricity and gas use for 2011 is explained through • a larger total area office • a colder winter in 2011 • electricity uses for heating at the Gent office **** Bopro began to weigh its own waste in July/August 2011. No data is available for the period before that. The stated number of kg for 2011 is therefore an average taken from the available figures over the year. ***** The domestic mobility is based on estimated car use. Known mileage of company cars used and estimated home-work travel plus private foreign journeys subtracted. Mileage of private vehicles was added to the total. Conversion factors to GJ 1 kWh electricity 1000 m³ natural gas

0.0036 GJ 39.01 GJ

Due to an error in the 2010 energy consumption data on pages 28 and 39 (EN3, EN4 & EN16), we refer to the above correct figures in this online CSR report.

Bopro CSR Report / 37


GRI Content Index STANDARD DISCLOSURES PART I: PROFILE DISCLOSURES 1. Strategy and Analysis Nr

Description

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

1.1

Statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organization.

Fully

4-5

1.2

Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities.

Fully

4-5

Reason for omission

Explanation

Reason for omission

Explanation

Reason for omission

Explanation

2. Organizational Profile Nr

Description

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

2.1

Name of the organization.

Fully

10

2.2

Primary brands, products, and/or services. Operational structure of the organization, including main divisions, operating companies, subsidiaries, and joint ventures. Location of organization's headquarters. Number of countries where the organization operates, and names of countries with either major operations or that are specifically relevant to the sustainability issues covered in the report.

Fully

Oude Houtlei 140, 9000 Gent

Fully

Belgium, Luxembourg, France & Swe9 den

Nature of ownership and legal form.

Fully

2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6

Bopro nv

Fully

8-9, 18-21

Fully

10-11

non-listed privately owned company NV - Naamloze Vennootschap

14

10

2.8

Markets served (including geographic breakdown, sectors served, and types of customers/ Fully beneficiaries). Scale of the reporting organization. Fully

2.9

Significant changes during the reporting period regarding size, structure, or ownership.

Fully

10, 14

2.10

Awards received in the reporting period.

Fully

14

2.7

19 11, 16-21

3. Report Parameters Nr

Description

3.1

Reporting period (e.g., fiscal/calendar year) for information provided.

3.2

Date of most recent previous report (if any).

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer Page non financial: calendar year 2010-2011 Fully 6 financial: calendar year 2011 Not na

3.3

Reporting cycle (annual, biennial, etc.)

Fully

3.4

Contact point for questions regarding the report or its contents.

Fully

39

3.5

Fully

6, 30

Fully

6

Fully

6

Partially

10

Fully

throughout the report

Not

3.12

Process for defining report content. Boundary of the report (e.g., countries, divisions, subsidiaries, leased facilities, joint ventures, suppliers). See GRI Boundary Protocol for further guidance. State any specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report (see completeness principle for explanation of scope). Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations, and other entities that can significantly affect comparability from period to period and/or between organizations. Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including assumptions and techniques underlying estimations applied to the compilation of the Indicators and other information in the report. Explain any decisions not to apply, or to substantially diverge from, the GRI Indicator Protocols. Explanation of the effect of any re-statements of information provided in earlier reports, and the reasons for such re-statement (e.g.,mergers/acquisitions, change of base years/ periods, nature of business, measurement methods). Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary, or measurement methods applied in the report. Table identifying the location of the Standard Disclosures in the report.

3.13

Policy and current practice with regard to seeking external assurance for the report.

3.6 3.7 3.8

3.9

3.10 3.11

Does not exist

first report

na

Does not exist

first report

Not

na

Does not exist

first report

Fully

36

Fully

30

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

Fully

10-11

Fully

11

Fully

11

Fully

10-11

Not

na

Fully

22

Fully

11

Fully

4-5, 11, 22-24, 26

Fully

11, 22-24, 26

biennial

6

4. Governance, Commitments, and Engagement Nr 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8

4.9 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 4.16

4.17

Description Governance structure of the organization, including committees under the highest governance body responsible for specific tasks, such as setting strategy or organizational oversight. Indicate whether the Chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer. For organizations that have a unitary board structure, state the number and gender of members of the highest governance body that are independent and/or non-executive members. Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide recommendations or direction to the highest governance body. Linkage between compensation for members of the highest governance body, senior managers, and executives (including departure arrangements), and the organization's performance (including social and environmental performance). Processes in place for the highest governance body to ensure conflicts of interest are avoided. Process for determining the composition, qualifications, and expertise of the members of the highest governance body and its committees, including any consideration of gender and other indicators of diversity. Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct, and principles relevant to economic, environmental, and social performance and the status of their implementation. Procedures of the highest governance body for overseeing the organization's identification and management of economic, environmental, and social performance, including relevant risks and opportunities, and adherence or compliance with internationally agreed standards, codes of conduct, and principles. Processes for evaluating the highest governance body's own performance, particularly with respect to economic, environmental, and social performance. Explanation of whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization. Externally developed economic, environmental, and social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which the organization subscribes or endorses. Memberships in associations (such as industry associations) and/or national/international advocacy organizations in which the organization: * Has positions in governance bodies; * Participates in projects or committees; * Provides substantive funding beyond routine membership dues; or * Views membership as strategic. List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization.

Not

na

Fully

4-5, 20

Partially

25-29

Fully

24

Fully

12

Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage. Fully Approaches to stakeholder engagement, including frequency of engagement by type and Not by stakeholder group.

12

Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement, and how the organization has responded to those key topics and concerns, including through its Not reporting.

38 / Bopro CSR Report

Reason for omission

Explanation

Does not exist

Does not exist

na

Does not exist

na

Does not exist

ambition for 2012-2013 no topics have been raised through stakeholder engagement


STANDARD DISCLOSURES PART III: PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Economic Nr EC1 EC2 EC3

Description

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, Partially and payments to capital providers and governments. Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization's activities due Fully to climate change and other sustainability issues. Coverage of the organization's defined benefit plan obligations. Not

EC4

Not

EC5

Significant financial assistance received from government. Range of ratios of standard entry level wage by gender compared to local minimum wage at significant locations of operation. Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locaEC6 tions of operation. Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management and all direct employees, EC7 contractors and sub-contractors hired from the local community at significant locations of operation. Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for EC8 public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement. Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent EC9 of impacts. Environmental

Not

Nr

Description

Page

Website

Audited for the year 2011

Website

Audited for the year 2011

16-17 4-5, 20-21

Not Not Partially

14, 25

Partially

18-19

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

EN1

Materials used by weight, value or volume.

Not

EN2

Percentage of materials used that are recycled and reused input materials.

Not

EN3

Direct energy consumption by primary energy source.

Fully

2011: 1,481 GJ / 2010: 1,186 GJ

x - Bopro in numbers

EN4

Indirect energy consumption by primary source.

Partially

2011: 384 GJ / 2010: 239 GJ

x - Bopro in numbers

CRE1

Building energy intensity.

Fully

EN5

Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements. Not Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and Fully reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives. Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and reductions achieved. Not

EN6 EN7 EN8

Total water withdrawal by source.

Not

EN9

Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water.

Not

EN10

Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused.

Not

CRE2

Building water intensity. Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas. Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas. Habitats protected or restored.

Fully

EN11 EN12 EN13 EN14 EN15

Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.

Not

CRE3

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity from buildings.

Fully

CRE4

Greenhouse gas emissions intensity from new construction and redevelopment activity.

Not

EN18

Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved.

Fully

EN19

Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight.

Not

EN20

NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and weight.

Not

EN21

Total water discharge by quality and destination.

Not

EN22

Total weight of waste by type and disposal method.

Not

EN23

Total number and volume of significant spills. Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally. Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by the reporting organization's discharges of water and runoff. Land and other assets remediated and in need of remediation for the existing or intended land use according to applicable legal designations. Initiatives to enhance efficiency and mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation. Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category. Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for noncompliance with environmental laws and regulations. Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organization's operations, and transporting members of the workforce. Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type.

Not

EN27 EN28 EN29 EN30

Not

EN17

EN26

28

Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversity. Not Number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in Not areas affected by operations, by level of extinction risk. Partially

CRE5

14, 19-20, 28-29

Not

Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.

EN25

Not

EN16

EN24

28

2011: 70,590 kg CO2 144,105 kg CO2

/ 2010:

x - Bopro in numbers 28 14, 26-29

√ x - Bopro in numbers

Not Not Not Not Not Not Fully

14, 28-29

Not

Labor Practices and Decent Work Nr LA1 LA2 LA3 LA15 LA4 LA5 LA6 LA7 CRE6

Description Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region, broken down by gender. Total number and rate of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender, and region. Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations. Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by gender. Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. Minimum notice period(s) regarding significant operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreements. Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs. Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of workrelated fatalities by region and by gender. Percentage of the organization operating in verified compliance with an internationally recognized health and safety management system.

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

Website

Audited for the year 2011

Fully

10-11

x - Bopro in numbers

√ % of women

Fully

10-11

x - Bopro in numbers

10

x - Bopro in numbers

Not Not Not Not Not Partially Not

Bopro CSR Report / 39


LA8 LA9

Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist Not workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases. Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions. Not

LA10

Fully

24

LA11

Average hours of training per year per employee by gender, and by employee category. Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings. Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, LA12 by gender. Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category LA13 according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity. Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men by employee category, by signifiLA14 cant locations of operation. Human Rights

Partially

22-24

Fully

24

Nr HR1 HR2 HR3 HR4 HR5 HR6 HR7 HR8 HR9 HR10 HR11

Description Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements and contracts that include clauses incorporating human rights concerns, or that have undergone human rights screening. Percentage of significant suppliers, contractors and other business partners that have undergone human rights screening, and actions taken. Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained. Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken. Operations and significant suppliers identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights. Operations and significant suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labor. Operations and significant suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labor. Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization's policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations. Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken. Percentage and total number of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews and/or impact assessments. Number of grievances related to human rights filed, addressed and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms.

Partially

x - Bopro in numbers

√ x - Bopro in numbers

Not

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

Website

Audited for the year 2011

Page

Website

Audited for the year 2011

Website

Audited for the year 2011

Not Not Not Fully

0, no discrimination

Not Not Not Not Not Not Not

Society Nr

Description

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

SO2

Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs. Operations with significant potential or actual negative and positive impacts on local communities. Prevention and mitigation measures implemented in operations with significant potential or actual negative impacts on local communities. Number of persons voluntarily and involuntarily displaced and/or resettled by development, broken down by project. Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption.

SO3

Percentage of employees trained in organization's anti-corruption policies and procedures. Not

SO4

Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption.

SO1 SO9 SO10 CRE7

SO5

Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying. Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related SO6 institutions by country. Total number of legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly pracSO7 tices and their outcomes. Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for nonSO8 compliance with laws and regulations. Product Responsibility Nr PR1 PR2 PR3 CRE8 PR4 PR5 PR6 PR7 PR8 PR9

Description Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures. Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomes. Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements. Type and number of sustainability certification, rating and labeling schemes for new construction, management, occupation and redevelopment. Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labeling, by type of outcomes. Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction. Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship. Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by type of outcomes. Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data. Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services.

40 / Bopro CSR Report

Not Partially

25

Not Not Not Not Partially

24

Not Not Not

Reported Cross-reference/Direct answer

Page

Fully

18

Not Not Fully

20

Not Fully Not Not Not Not

22, 25


Colophon Contact CSR: Peter Garré – Managing Director E-mail: peter.garre@bopro.be Mob: +32 475 28 21 72 Stefanie Geens – Environmental Officer E-mail: stefanie.geens@bopro.be Mob: +32 478 478 043 www.bopro.be This CSR report was printed on 100% recycled and FSC certified paper, using vegetable oil inks. Using blind press and line grids in this report for photos and titles reduces the ink use during printing. Design: www.lemento.com


www.bopro.be


CSR Report Bopro 2011