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BullHorn Léman Manhattan Prep’s

December 2012

Education Knows No Borders IB Coming to Léman Manhattan

Léman Tasty Holiday Community Recipes from Bands Together the Chefs BullHorn September 2012 for Sandy Relief

The Writer’s Block: Features a Student BullHorn December 2012

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page 13

page 15

6 8 Techtonics Shake-

Scrapbook

page 12 page 26

Up Léman

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Healthy Holiday Recipes

Electing a President

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Composting

Mapping Broad Street

Contents

Hurricane Sandy Relief

December 2012

16 International Boarder’s 18 Perspective

20 21 Profile - Tina Lobel-

Writer’s Block

Reichberg

23 26

IB at Léman

2012-13 Calendar

page 21 page 18 2

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Letter from the Head of School

Global Citizenship Begins at an Early Age presented at the 92Y Wonderplay Conference on the topic “Global Citizenship Begins at an Early Age: What Does Global Education Mean to a Young Child?” The preceding article highlights the main points of the presentation which was based on the research and curriculum developed by Oxfam International. www. oxfam.org.uk

Academic Calendars SY 2013-14 & SY 2014-15 Regardless of whether we embrace it or ignore it, we are all global citizens. While this citizenship is automatic at birth, we do have the choice of being a contributing global citizen who revels in diversity and seeks solutions to the challenges facing our planet or a passive one who allows others to provide the answers. It is a decision we must make …to be a contributor or to be a victim. Enlightened global citizens understand that : • Decisions made by people in other parts of the world affect their lives, just as their decisions affect the lives of others. • Stewardship of the planet and concern for those who share it are essential to their survival. • Greater interdependency and growing demand for the world’s natural resources presents greater challenges to world peace. Educating our children to be responsible global citizens in this interconnected, shrinking world is the obligation of parents and educators working together. Students must be equipped with the right skillset, knowledge and values to ensure that they will be active participants in creating a sustainable, peaceful world, where poverty and its related issues are addressed.

Via a global curriculum, students become aware of how the world works and their roles in it. Just imagine what could be accomplished if we lived in world where social injustices were eradicated, diversity were truly valued, environmental sustainability were achieved and everyone were to take responsibility for his or her actions. At Léman Manhattan, thinking and acting ‘globally’ is ubiquitous to all grades and content areas as students develop critical thinking skills, gain empathy and the understanding that they can make a difference. Activities such as community service, fund-raising, UN Day and international days are a great start. As we work towards authorization as an International Baccalaureate World School, we take a giant step towards acknowledging the complexity of global issues and seeking their resolutions. Global citizenship starts at an early age. By encouraging our children to share their opinions and explore their own values, while respecting the values and opinions of others, we are creating a foundation for a contributing global citizen that lasts a lifetime. LMPS Head of School Drew Alexander, early childhood educator and speech languagepathologist Twylla Alexander and LMPS Lower School teacher Lenae Madonna recently

I am pleased to share the academic calendars for the next two school years. The calendars follow the direction provided by the LMPS Strategic Plan, which calls for the ‘creation of a school year calendar which maximizes opportunities for student learning.’ Specifically the plan increases the number of student attendance days from the current 166 to 176 over the next two academic years. As you review the calendars, you will see that the total number of student attendance days increases to 173 in the next school year and then an additional three days are added in SY2014-15. The increase is mainly a result of adopting the ‘Option A’ calendar proposed by the New York Guild of Private Independent Schools. Option A calls for three major breaks in the school year: the 2-week winter break, a 1-week February break and a 1-week April break. Option A breaks generally include those holidays, which are additional ones on the Option B calendar: President’s Days and the holidays associated with Easter. In addition to adding days to the school year for more formal learning opportunities, the shorter week breaks decrease the necessity to reteach material to the extent necessary following the longer 2-week spring break. Calendars can be found on pages 26 and 27.

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From the Head of Upper School Why the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program is the Gold Standard of International Education

Imagine if there was a program that was designed from the ground-up to inspire students to think in an international context, to deliver a rigorous college-preparatory curriculum, to foster critical thinking and risk-taking, and to require students to give back to their community. It exists. It is the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program and Léman Manhattan is currently in the authorization process to be an IB World School in New York City. The IB was originally founded in 1968 in Geneva, Switzerland as a non-profit educational organization, lead by the International School of Geneva and six other independent schools. From these modest beginnings, the IB has grown into an organization of more than 3000 schools in 144 countries, providing international education to over a million children around the world. The IB now consists of three programs: the Primary Years Program (PYP), the Middle Years Program (MYP) and the Diploma Program (DP). The DP 4

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is the most widely recognized university entrance qualification, accepted in thousands of universities in 168 countries. The IB Diploma Program curriculum model is based on six areas of learning and three “core” elements: Theory of Knowledge (ToK), the Extended Essay and Creativity, Action, Service (CAS). In each of the six areas, students take one subject at either Higher or Standard Level based on their areas of strength and interest. To be a full IB Diploma student, one must take three subjects at Higher Level and three subjects at Standard Level, and take ToK, CAS and write the Extended Essay. At Léman Manhattan Preparatory School, we plan to offer a full array of subjects in these areas. These include: English Language and Literature, Mandarin Chinese, French, Spanish, History of the Americas, Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS), Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematical Studies, Mathematics and Visual Arts. For those students who wish to take two sciences or two social science courses, they can replace Visual Arts with the additional desired course. Theory of Knowledge (ToK) is a university-style philosophy seminar course that examines the nature of knowledge itself: what is knowledge, how does it grow, what are its limits, who owns knowledge and what is the value of knowledge. ToK, “encourages students to share ideas with others, and listen to and learn from what others think.” There is no right or wrong answer to a ToK question; there is only a well-articulated argument and a weaker one. The Extended Essay is a 4000-word, university level research paper that is written by the student

over the two-year period with the assistance of an Extended Essay advisor (usually a member of faculty). Allowing the student to explore an area of interest in depth, the Extended Essay is a minithesis that is intended to teach students how to conduct in-depth research and develop high-level writing skills. An extended essay takes approximately 40 hours to write and culminates in the viva voce – an oral defense of the essay in the presence of the advisor. Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) is experiential learning that takes place outside of the classroom. CAS, “encourages students to be involved in activities as individuals and as part of a team that take place in local, national and international contexts.” The reflective nature of CAS allows students to delve into an area of passion and interest without the pressure of examinations or specific curricular requirements. Many people ask, “How is the IB different from an AP or other examinationbased program?” In short, the IB is not only a curriculum – it is a philosophy. Its aim is to develop the whole child in an internationally-minded context. At the end, IB students not only have a rigorous college entrance credential, they have a completely different way of looking at learning and the world around them. This is the difference IB can make, and Léman Manhattan is eager to set forth on this journey.


From the Interim Head of Lower School Reflections from the New York State Association of Independent Schools Conference

of their programs and are continuing to expand. However, as Mark pointed out in his opening remarks, there are critical, underlying skills essential for all students in our ever-expanding global world. He believes that these items should be the focus of the education that we provide. In addition, Mark also highlighted the need to teach integrity because, as he stated, “if it is not valued, the other skills do not matter as much.”

He identifies critical skills for students as: • Critical thinking and problem solving “We have to prepare our children not only for the 21st Century, but also for the 22nd Century,” said Mark Lauria, Executive Director of NYSAIS. Each year, the New York State Association of Independent Schools hosts a conference for Assistant Heads of School and Division Heads at Mohonk Mountain House in New Paltz, New York. While the focus of the conference changes on a yearly basis, the structure is consistent, with opportunities to hear about educational topics that all schools wrestle with and chances to exchange ideas about every aspect of our daily work. The focus of this year’s conference was Global Engagement and the innovative ways in which schools are promoting a world view for their students within the four walls of their buildings. We heard about school exchanges and trips, language and service learning, and global partnerships that connect students via technology. For many schools, these experiences are part

• Effective oral and written communication skills • Collaboration • Initiative and persistence • Imagination and curiosity • An ability to analyze information The keynote speaker at the conference was John Hunter, an experienced 4th grade teacher. John shared with us a game he created years ago for his students to address many of these key skills. He presented this game by showing his movie that documents how he wove in critical thinking and problem solving skills for his students. In order for the game to be won during the 8-week class simulation, students have to work together to solve a series of challenges to save the world, requiring a great deal of communication, collaboration, creative thinking and negotiation. You

can see an extended trailer for the movie, The World Peace Game and other 4th Grade Achievements, online at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=lCq8V2EhYs0 In hearing Mark’s comments and watching John Hunter’s full movie, I found myself thinking about opportunities we provide for our students at Léman Manhattan and how we approach these critical skills. We take our guidance from the strategic plan, and one statement in our mission supports this work. It says: “We equip young minds with the knowledge and skills they need to evaluate, compare and make thoughtful choices so they can become informed and engaged citizens of the world.” As educators, we employ a variety of methods for students to engage with and learn skills to use in different settings. We do this by providing opportunities to collaborate, share thinking both orally and in writing, arrive at answers through different methods, construct questions to guide learning, and encourage interests and curiosity about topics of study. Giving students the time, space and encouragement to use what they know so they can apply their skills to other problem-solving situations is at the heart of learning. As Léman educates students for the increasingly global world, we are teaching the skills in order to build relationships and make connections not only within our school community but also throughout the world.

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ScrapBook Volleyb a

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Micaela Yang (‘13) Commended Student in National Mer it Program

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Opening Cere


Middle School Visits the MET Composting Sale

High School at Camp Ramapo

Carnival Dunk Tank

The Rooftop Opens

First Day of School

Carnival The Techtonics Visit Scavenger Hunt First Day of School

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Performing Arts

wed on Sam intervie

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Fox 5 News

S C I N O T H C E T E TH P U E K A H N S A T T A H N A M N A LÉM

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T R E C N O C E H T

This fall, the Techtonics, an all male a cappella signing sensation, took Léman Manhattan by storm, working one-on-one with Meena Jahi’s middle and high school choral classes.

ready to take the stage with the Techtonics and preform Goyte’s “Somebody That I Used To Know.” The number was followed by a full concert by the Techtonics for the entire school.

“One of the philosophies I work to instill in my students is to find value in being an educated listener, and to understand and appreciate the ways a wide range of music can fit into their current and future lives. The Techtonics were a living, breathing, singing example for our students,” said Meena Jahi, Upper School Chorus Teacher. “The Techtonics also create their own arrangements, something I do with my students as well. This aspect provided a rewarding performance experience. Student saw firsthand how their skill-based class work equipped them to participate and make contributions during the workshop with ease, and perform confidently on stage with the Techtonics that very same evening.”

“It was an interesting and fun experience, where I learned a lot from incredibly talented people,” said High School Senior, Charis. “Being able to perform with them was an incredible experience for me.”

High School students labored for hours in individual tutorial and group sessions with the Techtonics. All their hard work paid off. By evening the high school chorus was

rary pop. Music theory and aural skills are taught through traditional methods such as written notation and the solfège system, as well as active games and movement akin to the philosophy of Dalcroze. Students explore music history through songs and units of study; these units have included “Thomas Morley and the Madrigal,” “Duke, Ella, Langston & Harlem,” and “Medgar Evers and the Music of the Civil Rights Movement.”

The Techtonics, formed in 2008 by Christan Carter and Ed Brightman, are the latest musical group to emerge from the Imperial College in London. They preform original arrangements of well-known (and some less well-known) rock and pop songs, balanced by occasional off-the-wall comedy numbers. In addition to special guest tutorials, students choosing chorus receive individual voice evaluations and are assigned personal and sectional goals every semester. As an ensemble, students receive vocal and choral technique training and apply their developing skills to a wide array of music from classical masterworks to contempo-

E C I T C A R P

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Chef Jenny Gensterblum's Favorite Holiday Recipe by Jenny Gensterblum, Chef

When you think about all of the good times you’ve had in life – whether it’s hanging out with friends, celebrating a special occasion, or getting together with family during the holidays, food is almost always an important component of the story. There is a great power in the comfort food can provide, and we all have a dish or flavor that reminds us of a specific moment in time. Being able to help create these memories is a huge reason that I am a chef.

Furthermore, giving, eating, and sharing food with others is an inherently social activity. Mealtime is also one of the only times people can sit down and relax together, making it the perfect time to talk with friends and family. The preparation of a meal also helps bring people together, even having the power to create traditions and bind generations together. I’ll never forget making hundreds of egg rolls with my mom when I was a child, just as her mother taught her, and just as her grandmother taught her mother.

Pan-Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Pancetta, Maple Syrup & Chilies Serves 6

Instructions

Ingredients

1. Heat a large non-stick skillet or cast iron pan on medium-high heat. Sauté the pancetta cubes until crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon to a paper-towel line plate. Set aside.

3 ounces pancetta, cut into small cubes 1 ½ pounds brussel sprouts, ends trimmed and halved 1 Thai chili, thinly sliced (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 teaspoon smoked paprika Salt and pepper to taste 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

2. Add vegetable oil to the rendered fat from the pancetta in the pan. Turn heat to high. Add the brussel sprouts, cut side down, in a single layer. Sprinkle sliced chillies, smoked paprika, salt, and pepper on the brussel sprouts. Once the cut side is golden brown, stir the brussel sprouts and reduce the heat to mediumhigh. 3. Add the water and cover the pan for approximately 2 minutes. Remove cover and continue cooking until brussel sprouts are tender and the water has evaporated. Stir in the pancetta and serve immediately.

2 tablespoon water

A perfect gift for the holidays is Chef Jenny’s first cookbook available at Blub.com! *All proceeds go to the Léman Community Association.

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Holiday Memories For me, Thanksgiving 2008 comes to mind—my first Thanksgiving in NYC. Prior to this particular turkey day, all others were spent with my immediate family or slaving away in a hot dungeon like restaurant kitchen. A small close group of friends took the place of my family

Health and Cooking by Tim Mangun, Chef

that year and the tiniest New York City apartment kitchen took the place of the usual restaurant kitchen. Furthermore, for the first time in my life, I was solely responsible for Thanksgiving meal. To this day I still remember exactly what I made- Braised short ribs, mushroom Par-

mesan risotto, roasted fall veggies with spiced pecans and pumpkin pie with a graham cracker crust. Cooking all that in New York City’s tiniest kitchen was quite the accomplishment. Needless to say, it was delicious!

Vegetable Meatless-Loaf Serves 6

2 tablespoons soy sauce

Ingredients

2 tablespoons honey

1 cup cooked brown rice

3 teaspoons fresh thyme, picked and chopped or 1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 cup cooked lentils

1 teaspoon dried sage powder

1 cup cooked barley 1 medium carrot grated

3 teaspoons fresh oregano, picked and chopped or 1 teaspoon dried oregano

2 stalk celery, finely chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

1 medium onion, finely chopped ½ red bell pepper, finely chopped

Instructions

½ cup panko bread crumbs, toasted and 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large pot, sweat off onions, carrots, peppers, and celery until onions are transparent. buzzed through food processor 1 egg ¼ cup tomato paste

2. In a large bowl, mash together, rice, barley, and lentils. Combine remaining ingredients and mix well. Season with salt and pepper as needed.

3. Brush loaf pan with oil and transfer loaf mixture to pan. Press down on mixture and pack in tight to ensure for even cooking. Place in oven and 4 tablespoons fresh Italian parsley, finely bake for approximately 40 minutes or until cooked through. chopped 4. Remove from oven and let stand for 10-15 minutes. Remove from pan and slice to desired size. Serve and enjoy. ¼ cup veg stock

Tips for Battling the Bulge During the Holidays by Jenny Gensterblum, Chef The holidays are very food-centric celebrations. While a bountiful holiday spread is a beautiful sight, we should all be responsible eaters this holiday season – our bodies will thank us! Here are some tips to help you avoid overindulgence this season:

off food for a little bit, you are less likely to nibble and nosh post-dinner. Be a Mindful Eater

Holidays are about gratitude and family. For every bite you take, you should be thankful for every person that was responsible for the meal: the Earth for Get Moving! providing the means to grow food, the Organize a fun activity for after dinner – farmer who tends to the fields, the parlike a card game, a game of football, or ent who works hard every day so your a walk in the park. If you take the focus family can afford to buy the ingredients,

and the family members who toiled all night and day to prepare the meal. Being a mindful eater is also about listening to your body. It will tell you when you are full, so listen closely! Besides, there is such a thing called palate fatigue. Your taste buds get tired if you eat too much of one thing. In other words, the first bite will always taste infinitely better than the last. Savor every bite!

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VOTE

Electing a President

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his fall under Mr. Johnson’s guidance middle school students were immersed in all things United States electoral. Mr. Johnson expertly wove current events into his history curriculum as his students listened to convention speeches, analyzed candidate and party platforms, created electoral maps, and participated in polling - all culminating with a class vote on Election Day.

“The ability to make an informed decision is more difficult and complex than a majority of Americans have time for today,” said Mr. Johnson. “The media needs to help

“We took the time out to do these lessons that wouldn’t naturally fall into the curriculum, because I felt strongly that the success of our country rides on an informed electorate,” said Mr. Johnson. “Ensuring that people value voting is essential to democracy.”

election would hinge on Ohio. Not because Ohio has an overwhelming number of electoral votes, but because the scenarios leading up to the election inferred it would be the tipping point state. Due to the nature of the Electoral College, a more accurate assessment of the prospects of each candidate is in the meta-analysis and polling models constructed to grant heavier weighting to Ohio Polls than national polls, although national polls cannot be excluded.” Polling Students were taught what political polls are, how they are conducted, and analyzed polling leading up to the election. They then wrote their own poll questions and conducted schoolwide polling related to key issues and fun facts. The results were then analyzed against the national polls.

Convention Speeches After listening to each candidate’s convention speech, students analyzed the content and rhetorical strategies of each speech. The goal of the assignment was to help students shake external influences from their parents or teachers and make the decision based on what they heard and saw from the candidates, focusing primarily on the key issues present in this year’s election. Analyzing the Platforms Whether the candidates vary dramatically or have similar views, it is essential that an informed citizen knows the facts before stepping into the polling booth. It’s not always easy to decipher between rhetoric and actual policy views. To navigate the chatter Mr. Johnson had his students complete two assignments in which they used the speeches, the New York Times, Washington Post and candidate websites to analyze the key issues in this year’s election, as well as write short candidate biographies. 12

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people make these choices in a responsible, comprehensive way. People need to be educated about a litany of factors related to Presidential elections.” Electoral Mapping Many students and frankly voters find it curious that politicians and the media pay more attention to certain states than others. To dive deeper into this issue students created an electoral map. They explored the intricacies of the Electoral College and importance of electoral votes. According to Mr. Johnson: “More than any other factor, the election comes down to the Electoral College math. There was speculation this year that the

“Polling can be an instructive way to gauge how successful candidates are at disseminating their messages. By teaching students how to read and write polls, they are performing the same type of data-driven analysis the campaigns are using to develop their ground games, advertising, and talking points,” said Mr. Johnson. Voting “It’s not just about this election; they are learning the qualities of selecting a strong government and a strong leader,” said Mr. Johnson. Tuesday, November 6, when parents took to the polls to vote, the middle school also cast a ballot, the results were the same.


Compost Sale Raises More Than $1000 For Feeding Children Everywhere Lead by Interim Head of the Lower School Rachel Griffin, Students Sold the Compost They had Created Over the Year for Charity

Léman Manhattan students put food waste to good use. Last month, the Lower School hosted a series of compost sales to promote sustainability and raise money for Feeding Children Everywhere, an international organization that provides healthy meals for hungry children. Over $1,000 was raised, enough to feed over 4,000 children around the world. Neighbors, business owners, and parents of students packed the ballroom the afternoons of October 1 through 5 to purchase homemade compost. The nutrient-rich material – created from food scraps and other cafeteria refuse – was sold in bundles ranging from $5 to $15.

Each package was accompanied by a bookmark filled with seeds, making it easy for community members to cultivate their own plants and keep the concept growing. “The compost sale was a wonderful opportunity for our students to learn a powerful lesson,” said Rachel Griffin, Interim Head of Lower School. “Composting scraps daily is such an easy, smart way to recycle waste – and in this case, feed hungry children as well!” As part of Léman’s forward-thinking curriculum, composting teaches students about the decomposition process,

sustainable agriculture, and social and environmental responsibility. Every spring, second and third grade students visit the nearby local Battery Park urban farm to gain hands-on experience growing their own crops. This complements their lectures on plants and agriculture, and gives students a first-hand look at the many processes that bring food to their table. Since the start of the school year, students have been separating their daily waste into bins that is then brought to the rooftop, where they rotate and mix the material into pure compost.

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8th Grade Writing Contest Léman Manhattan Preparatory School is partnering with Newbery Award and Printz Honor Award-winning author Jack Gantos to find New York City’s most talented eighth grade writers. Léman will award a full four-year high school scholarship to the winner of its inaugural Jack Gantos Writing Contest. “Léman values creative thinking in all areas of study. Creative writing, and writing well, are key components to both the literary arts and elegantly precise communication,” said Gantos, who serves on Léman Manhattan’s Advisory Board. Léman Manhattan encourages all New York City eighth-graders to submit an original short story or personal narrative by December 14, 2012. Jack Gantos – celebrated author of Dead End in Norvelt, Hole in My Life and Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key, among others – will select and announce the winners by January 15, 2013. The author of the top story will win a full four-year scholarship to Léman. Additionally, ten finalists will attend a writing workshop with Gantos and will be invited, along with their families, to a reception where they will receive a certificate signed by the award-winning author recognizing their participation and accomplishment. To be considered, entries must be 1,500-2,000 words, double-spaced and accompanied by a cover letter including contact information (for the student and the school in which they are currently enrolled), and reason for applying. Submissions should be mailed to: Drew Alexander, Head of School Léman Manhattan Preparatory School 1 Morris Street New York, NY 10004 For the rules and guidelines: www.lemanmanhattan.org/gantos

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A Lesson in Mapping First graders, led by their teacher Lenae Madonna, created a 3-D replica of their school’s neighborhood to emphasize their mapping curriculum. Mrs. Madonna and her first graders soon discovered that this project reached farther than mapping when science teacher Mr. Schmitz incorporated the project into his architecture curriculum. To learn more about this unexpected cocurricular opportunity we spoke with Mrs. Madonna. Where did the idea for recreating the streets surrounding the Lower School come from? The idea was new but the concern that maps are an abstract concept to young children was not. I always see confusion caused when children look at two dimensional maps and think North is always up and South is always down and felt as if most of the children didn’t really master the idea of cardinal directions. Seeing road maps, states, or countries on a map at this age does not really teach cardinal directions or provide information about the value of a map. I had this feeling that there was more we could do so I started thinking, “How could we make our map unit hands-on this year and real-world like our bridge unit?” All of a sudden I saw this picture in my head of kids cutting and taping buildings and making them from cartons. I thought, maybe we could create a map that they could actually “walk.” That’s when the idea of mapping our school community dawned on me. Soon after, I thought of possibly using

shoeboxes as a realistic vision of what we could accomplish in a short time. I went to a first grade team meeting with the idea of making maps more accessible to our young learners and the entire team loved the idea. The planning began. How did it help teach mapping skills? It helped teach mapping skills in so many ways. Firstly, we learned the many uses for maps. After we all took our children for a walk along our designated streets, (Ms. Whitney and Ms. Wald, Wall Street; Ms. Madonna, and Ms. Leveson Broad St. and Ms. Hopwood and Mr. Waters, Beaver St.) we had the children “draw what they saw.” This enabled them to think about buildings and streets and their locations to each other on a map. In addition, they learned about scale. But most importantly, it made the cardinal directions so much more concrete. If you walk out of Léman and make a left, you are going South. Right you are going North. If you keep going where will you end up? What other benefits did it serve? There were so many benefits besides mapping. Children worked together so beautifully, and learning how to work together in support of a team effort as well as individually was wonderful. They shared ideas and helped each other on their buildings. Their creativity was also amazing. One of the children in our class even made the security

right outside Léman, with dog and turntable, children in Ms. Whitney and Wald’s class made the most creative Trinity Church with cemetery, and trees lined Beaver Street that Ms. Hopwood and Mr. Water’s class created. When children are given a learning task that is meaningful to them, they embrace it. The other incredible benefit we witnessed was the visual thinking that was going on as children analyzed their environment outdoors. “I didn’t realize these buildings were so tall” many children said about the buildings on Broad Street. They noticed details that they had never seen and we discussed the needs of certain buildings in a community. We had an assembly that week and each teacher asked essential questions to the group to assess their learning. Having science right across the hall enabled most classes to see the 3D map. We have thoroughly enjoyed listening to the children of each grade going by and commenting on what they see. One second grader said, “Why didn’t we do this last year?” I’d hear Mr. Schmitz asking questions about our map and incorporating it into his lessons. This was so exciting because cross-curricular learning reinforces so many concepts. When learning occurs across subjects, it is deep and more generalized. Children practice transferring their knowledge from one to another.

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Nine Léman Students Travel to China for Spring break By Brylee Maxfield

International Boarding T

Léman Manhattan Junior and Boarding Student Hazan Sucu from Turkey Shares Her Firsthand Experiences

his summer was one of the turning points of my life. Léman Manhattan High School decided to choose one student from Turkey to study in New York for one year. So, I decided to give a try. In the end, I was accepted. Although the idea of living in New York was so shiny, I had some concerns such as being away from my family and friends and having a totally different curriculum from my own country. I was so sure that getting used to this place would take at least one or two months. However, my new life is totally far away from my concerns. My New York experience started like a fairy tale. For the first week, we only had some great trips and New York became my second favorite city after Istanbul. After the first week it was time for school! Day students were so different from the students in Turkey. 16

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Everyone was friendly to each other no matter what grade they were in. Also boarding students, including me, were welcomed even though it was the day student’s first international program experience. Teachers and students were so patient about our language difficulties, and they helped us whenever we needed it. Moreover, I had the opportunity to try new things here such as acting studio classes, clarinet lessons and also I could keep practicing volleyball and played on the school team. I think after being a part of school team I started to feel as if I am a real member of this group. This winter with the help of our music teacher Ms. Nowicki, I will be able to be a part of another group which represents this school band. Besides my school experiences, I had a lot of new cultural and daily life experi-

ences that I never had in Turkey. First of all Halloween is not celebrated in my country, and my first Halloween was pretty interesting. I bought a witch costume and joined to the school party. Secondly, I experienced a hurricane and it was unusual for me. I really felt sorry for the people and learned about a natural disaster first hand. Finally, I am so excited about my first Thanksgiving. As boarding students we will have a trip to Florida and even the idea of going to Florida makes me excited. To sum up, I had a lot of new experiences, I learned a lot about different cultures from My New York experience and it is really good to be a part of this program!


Living in the dorms is good. We help each other with homework and getting around New York City. We love to be with each other because we are the same age and in the same situation being away from home in a foreign country. — Wei, Sophomore and Candice , Sophomore from China

Everyone at Léman has been great. Everyone gets along with everyone else. It’s different from my school in Germany. It’s small and everyone is so friendly. — Pia, Freshman from Germany

It’s very comfortable here. The residential life people try to make it good for us. For example they take us on trips to six flags. They let us out on our own. The classmates are really friendly. The teachers are really friendly. — Hazim, Senior from Russia

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Léman Manhattan Community Demonstrates Its Best in Facing the Worst Stars of Hope for Staten Island

By Twylla Alexander

On October 28, we experienced a world where lives were halted by a surge of water so powerful that it left many people with little, or nothing. I wasn't expecting to do what we did in the Staten Island neighborhood of Midland Beach. As volunteers from Léman Manhattan Preparatory School, I thought we might drop off supplies, hand out water, sweep debris from sidewalks - important jobs, but nothing involving a mask, rubber gloves and an opportunity to walk in another's shoes. We gutted a home. Walter stood beside his front door as our group, mingled with volunteers from other organizations, hauled load after load of the soggy, dripping, muddy remains of his house to the street. "I'm overwhelmed," he said. "I've been working four days, but you guys have done more in two hours than I did that whole time. Thank you." I worked in the yard, with at least ten others, stuffing bags full of water-soaked baseball cards, balls, colored pens, a diary, teddy bear, books, shoes. . . clues to Walter and his wife, Margaret's, four children. . . all safe at a friend's house. Workers inside threw pots, pans, bathroom tile, shelving, sheetrock out windows, which we picked up and piled into more black bags. After about an hour, I stopped and stood among what looked like -- junk. None of it was salvageable, all would be crushed or carried away by sanitation trucks. But to Walter and Margaret, this "junk" had been part of their home. They

Hanging Stars of Hope By Charlie Hanson, 6th Grade The reason I went to Staten Island to Hang Stars of Hope was to help the people of Staten Island get a jump start on rebuilding their houses and other stuff they need to do. It was a good thing to do. It gave them the courage they needed to pull through this situation. The stars are a reminder that they need to look on the bright side, because there is going to be a bright side they just have to look for it. 18

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watched strangers tear it out, scoop it up, pull it across their muddy lawn, and toss it in a heap. Yet, it couldn't be helped; it had to be done. . . to move on. Easy words for me to write. I only walked in their shoes for three hours. As we were leaving, we asked Margaret for her cell number, so we could contact her later. Perhaps the school could help replace what their children had lost, what they might need as the weeks went on. She thanked us. We asked to take a picture with her so others could know their story. Walking back through the neighborhood to our cars, we began to notice brightly colored wooden stars attached to telephone poles. "The Stars of Hope are coming!" said one of the Léman teachers. "Stars of Hope?" I asked. "Students from our school painted them and will hang them all over this neighborhood and others, hard hit by Sandy. Children around the country paint them to bring 'hope and color' to devastated communities." More and more of them appeared the further we walked, and we smiled, knowing that stars would soon find their way to Walter and Margaret's street. Read more from Twylla’s Blog: newyorkcityreflections.blogspot.com I felt proud of myself and my brother for hanging stars. I knew we were doing something to help people feel better. I talked to people standing in the front of their houses. One person giving out coffee and chocolate milk said what we were doing was awesome. Another woman gave my brother and I Halloween candy and called my brother an angel. I would tell my classmates that it wasn’t hard to hang the stars. Anyone can do it and it felt really good.


Hurricane Sandy Called the most devastating tragedy to New York in recent history Amidst Disaster One Student Finds Praise for City Employees By Maddie Andujar, Freshman In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck a number of areas including the Caribbean, Mid Atlantic, and Northeastern United States. This was the second largest Atlantic hurricane in history, proceeded by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Its damages to the U.S. cost approximately $20 billion. Hurricane Sandy caused severe destruction to the New York City Transit, which after two weeks hasn’t fully recovered, despite the substantial effort of the transit recovery team. On Sunday, October 28, Mayor Bloomberg announced that he would shut down MTA train service in all five boroughs beginning at 7 PM. The reason for this was that the high level tracks in the system are limited; the MTA need to use both local and express tracks to store the trains making it impossible to continue any type of service to the public. This was a good call considering the fact that each train car costs about $1-1.5 million. Damage to this equipment would have significantly increased the cost and time it took to restore service. After the storm, it seemed that the “city that never sleeps” finally caught up on its sleep due to the fact that there was no power in the majority of the city. On Thursday, November 1st, bus service was somewhat restored, as well as trains in uptown Manhattan and the Bronx. From that moment on, transit was working from one section at a time, given that there was electricity in those areas. The MTA combined train service and free shuttle busses to areas that were severely affected by the storm. The 4 and 5 lines were the first trains to resume service between Brooklyn to Manhattan. Gradually other lines got partially restored. Coney Island, a Zone A location that was badly hit by the storm, got service partially restored on November 7th.

Throughout the whole Hurricane Sandy disaster, the MTA never failed to post accurate updates on their website (mta.info). This page illustrated which train lines had service along with their schedules and expected delays. The most helpful was the recovery map which displayed where the trains were stopping. The MTA, with their hard working crew members, shut down service in a timely fashion and worked even harder to restore service efficiently. They never failed to inform New Yorkers of their progress, giving us peace of mind.

How to Help New York Says Thank You www.newyorksaysthankyou.org. All donations are earmarked for the “Hurricane Sandy Relief Fund” and will go directly to relief and recovery efforts. They also offer on the ground volunteer opportunities. Please check their Facebook Page. We have had a long-standing partnership with this organization. Tunnel to Towers Foundation www. tunneltotowersfoundation.org. The money collected by this organization is going directly to help those affected by Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey. If you have any questions or would like to make suggestions please contact: Christine Karamanoglou at C.Karamanoglou@lemanmanhattan.org.

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Employee Profile

Tina Lobel-Reichberg Early Childhood Coordinator/Learning Specialist

IN HER OWN WORDS What is a an Early Childhood Development Coordinator? I oversee the Three’s through Kindergarten classrooms. I model developmentally appropriate activities and positive behavior management techniques, through daily contact with children and early childhood staff in the classroom. I provide opportunities and activities that encourage exploration, curiosity and problem-solving appropriate to the developmental levels of the children. It is important for parents to be aware of my position because I supervise and provide leadership and support for the early childhood staff and students. I maintain open, friendly, and cooperative relationships with each child’s family and encourage their involvement in the program.

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How do you work with children? I interact with students and teachers on a daily basis through classroom visits and direct instruction with students to help maximize instruction. We are working together to set high expectations, and ensure that each child is working to the best of his/ her ability. What are the most common issues you see? Throughout early childhood, children may experience separation anxiety, especially during the first few weeks of school. The teachers and I work as a team with families to ease the transition and feel enthusiastic about school.

Do you have recommendations for parents? It is important that parents support their child’s achievements and efforts. It is also essential that parents provide encouragement and assist if their child is having difficulties acquiring skills. It is crucial that parents work collaboratively with the school. Sharing information from home and listening to teachers’ suggestions make for an optimal learning experience. Building self- confidence and self-esteem is the key factor in helping children to persevere. Modeling appropriate learning behaviors is a great way to influence your child.


The Writer’s Block By BRYLEE MAXFIELD Illustrations by ELIZABETH SEGRELAWRENCE

Léman Manhattan Senior Elizabeth Segre- Lawrence publishes her first graphic short story. She shares how you can too.

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S

Senior and graphic artist and writer Elizabeth Segre- Lawrence, for the first time in her young career, has been published. Her graphic short story called “Sugar” will be featured in the pages of Seqapunch and sold online. “It’s pretty cool, actually it’s pretty great to be published,” says Elizabeth. “I have wanted to be an illustrator and writer for so long, to have both of my talents in a book and recognized as exceptional, makes me feel really good and confident about my future and my art.” For years, Elizabeth has self-published a diary comic and even begun to accumulate a following online. Her fascination with comics began when she was in the third grade. She first put pen to paper in the fifth grade, where she recounts sitting down for hours 22

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with a friend drawing together. “It’s a strange feeling. I can sit down for five or six hours straight drawing and it feels like no time has passed, says Elizabeth. “Even if illustrations or writing aren’t the fields of work I choose, I still want to draw and write for my entire life.” Whatever future profession she chooses, it’s clear her talents for illustration and writing are being noticed. Elizabeth, who publishes her graphic diary on Smackjeeves.com, has developed a following and even received

fan mail in the form of fan art. “One fan sent me a drawing of me with a note telling me how much they admired my diary. It was pretty cool. When I was going through a tough time one of my fans sent me a feel better drawing,” Elizabeth said. Despite her early success, Elizabeth, like most people, struggles with insecurity in her art. “With my comic diary, I always wonder will people like it? And because it’s about me, I question, will they like me?” She reflects. Not one to bask in hear early success, Elizabeth is on to the next project, self-publishing “Molz,” a plot driven comic. It is safe to say that “Sugar” is the first in a long line of successes for Léman’s talented, young writer and illustrator. The comic anthology featuring Elizabeth’s short story Sugar can be purchased for $10 at http://www.seqapunch.com.


Graphic NOVEL A graphic novel is a narrative work in which the story is conveyed to the reader using sequential art, either in an experimental design or in a traditional comics format. The term is employed in a broad manner, encompassing non-fiction works and thematically linked short stories as well as fictional stories across number of genres. Once largely ignored by libraries, graphic novels have gained respect recently in the literary world. Some historians date graphic novels as far back as Stone Age cave drawings. William Blake’s work “Marriage of Heaven and Hell” has even been argued to be a graphic novel, because of the inability to extract the images from the text to tell the story. Comics and long form comics also known as “graphic novels” gained popularity in the 1950s with such works as “It Rhymes with Lust,” the adult-oriented "picture novel" was a film noir-influenced slice of steel town life starring a scheming, manipulative redhead named Rust. Touted as "an original full-length novel" on its cover, it was 128-page digest. In 1992, writer and illustrator Art Speigelman’s “Maus” was the first graphic novel to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize. With the Pulitzer Prize , graphic novels gained the acceptance of academics. Along with other highly acclaimed graphic novels of the time, like “Watchmen” and “The Dark Knight,” “Maus” is said to have brought the term "graphic novel" and the idea of comics for adults into mainstream consciousness.

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LĂŠman Named International Baccalaureate Candidate School

Timeline

Finish Teacher Training Year 1 of IB Authorization

2012 24

2013

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Authorization as IB School Year 2 of IB Authorization

2014

First Set of Exams for 12th Grade

Begin Teaching Courses

2015

First Set of IB Exams for the IB Diploma Full Implementation

2016


Education Knows No Borders Now a candidate for the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme – recognized as the worldwide standard for academic excellence – we are enhancing and growing our program to offer the most cutting-edge education in New York City. “The IB Diploma Programme aligns with Léman’s mission to provide the highest caliber education and educate and empower students to be independent critical thinkers and responsible world citizens,” said Drew Alexander, Head of School, who has extensive experience as an IB World School administrator. “At Léman, we believe learning empathy and openmindedness is as important as learning calculus and history.” Implemented at more than 2,376 schools in 142 countries, the IB Diploma Programme is a dynamic, well-rounded, inquiry-based high school curriculum designed to challenge knowledge and equip students with the skills needed to succeed in college and life. Focusing on depth versus breadth of knowledge, the two-year advanced program consists of six courses – Studies in Language and Literature, Individuals and Societies, Mathematics, The Arts, Experimental Science, and Language Acquisition – along with a broad-based independent research essay,

community action service project and a Theory of Knowledge course. Together, these components make up a complete package that is designed to educate the whole student. The IB model focuses on the combination of knowledge, skills, and independent critical and creative thought to encourage students to make connections between areas of study. This aspect dovetails perfectly with our mission to promote intercultural understanding and respect. (By design, this paradigm isn’t exclusive to high school students; it begins early on at Léman, through programs such as Touchpoints, which, beginning in second grade, engages students from around the world in conversations about complex global issues.) “We believe that 21st Century learners should be caring, risk takers and critical thinkers who are able to take a problem out of context, make sense of it and act on it,” said Sarah Feldman, IB Coordinator for Léman Manhattan. “In the IB Programme, students don’t just learn the answers; they learn how to find the answers – and that’s essential to college and real world preparation.” Considered one of the most rigorous college and career preparation programs,

the IB is the “gold standard” for academic excellence for international school systems and universities across the world– even in the United States, where top tier educational institutions such as Harvard and The University of Pennsylvania seek Diploma Programme applicants. For globally mobile families, the IB provides consistency from one country to the next; and, for American students applying to university abroad, an IB diploma is universally accepted. “Léman Manhattan strives to inspire international-mindedness and the esteemed IB Diploma Programme reinforces this very core mission,” Mr. Alexander said. “At Léman Manhattan, we encourage young minds to see the world as their classroom because learning should be unrestricted by borders.” Although candidate status does not guarantee authorization, upon fulfilling the rigorous requirements outlined by the International Baccalaureate, Léman Manhattan will become one of a few IB World Schools in New York City. We expect to launch the diploma programme in our 2014-2015 school year. For more information about the International Baccalaureate, visit www.ibo.org.

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2013-14 School Calendar S

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December

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6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28

February

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March

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April

6 13 20 27

August September October

3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31 2 9 16 23 30

26, 27 New Hire Orientation 28-30 Full Faculty In-­Service 2 3, 4 5, 6 9 10

Labor Day – School Closed Full Faculty In-Service Rosh Hashanah – School Closed Open House Lower & Upper Schools Opening Day of School

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Columbus Day – School Closed

11 Full Faculty In-­Service No Student Attendance 27-29 Thanksgiving Break – School Closed 20

Winter Vacation Begins at 3:15 PM

6 20

Classes resume Martin Luther King Day – School Closed

1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28

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February Break Begins at 3:15 PM Classes Resume

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Full Faculty In-Service

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11 21

Spring Break Begins at 3:15 PM Classes Resume

3 10 17 24 31

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Memorial Day –School Closed

May

2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 30

June

1 8 15 22 29

7 14 21 28

2 3 9 10 16 17 23 24 30

Semester I Quarter I: September 10 - November 8 Quarter II: November 11 - January 31 26

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4 11 18 25

5 6 12 13 19 20 26 27

17 Students’ Last Day of School @ 12:00 PM 18, 19 Full Faculty In-Service 19 Faculty’s Last Day @ 12:00 PM

Semester II Quarter III: February 3 - April 11 Quarter IV: April 14 - June 17 * Grey shading indicates school is closed to students


2014-15 School Calendar S

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S 2 9 16 23 30/31 6 13 20 27

September

4 11 18 25 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30

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October

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1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

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November

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Winter Vacation Begins at 3:15 PM

December

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January

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Classes Resume Martin Luther King Day – School Closed

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1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

August

February March

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6 13 20 27

2 9 16 23 30

21, 22 New Hire Orientation 25-29 Full Faculty In-­Service 1 2 3 25, 26

Labor Day – School Closed Open House Lower & Upper Schools Opening Day of School Rosh Hashanah – School Closed

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Columbus Day – School Closed

11 Full Faculty In-Service - No Student Attendance 27, 28 Thanksgiving Break – School Closed

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

13 23

February Break Begins at 3:15 PM Classes Resume

3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27 31

7 14 21 28

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Full Faculty In-Service

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Spring Break Begins at 3:15 PM Classes Resume

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1 2 8 9 15 16 22 23 29 30/31

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Memorial Day –School Closed

May

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1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30

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5 12 19 26

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Students’ Last Day of School @ 12:00 PM

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June

Semester I Quarter I: September 3 - November 7 Quarter II: November 10 - January 23

7 14 21 28

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

18, 19 Full Faculty In-Service 19

Faculty’s Last Day @ 12:00 PM

Semester II Quarter III: January 26 - April 2 Quarter IV: April 3 - June 17

* Grey shading indicates school is closed to students

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41 Broad Street 1 Morris Street New York, NY 10004 Tel: 212.232.0266 Fax: 646.770.9577 www.lemanmanhattan.org facebook.com/lemanmanhattan 28

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BullHorn Magazine