Spa Business issue 2 2021

Page 70

FIRST PERSON

PHOTO: ©MARKUS SUNDSTRÖM CRÉPIN

If you’re in Stockholm, take time to add this to your itinerary Japanese rockery and you’re provided with a detailed written and verbal explanation of a naked cleansing ritual, as is the onsen tradition, which takes place in the changing rooms. The ritual takes place across 50 ablution areas that are cleverly designed around courtyards and terraces, to withstand the volume of business. During COVID spacing is controlled through signage and continual reminders of the maximum number of people permitted in any space. After washing, the baths await. You enter a warm, high-ceiling courtyard dotted with small bathhouses that surround pools to give a village feel. Each bathhouse is different but the overall simple design showcases stone, 70 spabusiness.com issue 2 2021

wood and water and accentuates the play on light and sound. There are many options for quiet relaxation, from lounging on heated ganban yoku slabs to soaking in a tub on a moss-covered outdoor terrace with the undisturbed sounds of water, bird song and wind rustling through the pine and birch trees. Inside, the atmosphere could have been improved with more eastern style music rather than the generic, melancholy spa background tracks. Similarly, some dining options are more reflective of Japan while others aren’t. The snack bar by the entrance to the baths serves only Japanese food, handmade for us (although service was slow) and we abandoned the classic

PHOTO: ©YASURAGI

The simple design showcases stone, wood and water

The spa hotel is part of the Nordic Hotels & Resorts collection