HCM Handbook_2019

Page 58

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Active EDUCATION Physical activity boosts wellbeing, social inclusion, attainment and employability. Vince Mayne from the British Universities & Colleges Sport (BUCS) calls for Higher Education to provide more opportunities for students to get active

“M

ens sana incorpore sano” – a healthy mind in a healthy body is a well-worn and hackneyed phrase but one that couldn’t be more true given the results of the British Active Students Survey. According to the 2017-18 report – the biggest of its kind to date, with 6,891 students responding from 104 Higher Education (HE) institutes across the UK – students who are more active through playing sport or using the gym (or even better, by doing both!) have better scores on a host of measures, including better mental wellbeing, perceptions of attainment and employability, and social isolation. With 2.4 million students at university across the UK, these HE environments can play a key role in encouraging and educating their students to meet the recommended levels of physical activity. This support will shape their activity habits for later life, helping to reduce adulthood

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HCM Handbook 2019

BRITISH ACTIVE STUDENTS SURVEY 2018 6,891 students

ACTIVITY TYPE Just Gym

36% 62%

18%

2% responded with other options

Just Sport

21%

ACTIVE vs INACTIVE CMO Guidelines: Adults should undertake at least 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity physical activity

Modal age: 20 years

15+84+1 1%

Higher EducationPostgraduate

15%

Both

Neither

9%

53%

Higher EducationUndergraduate

84%

Further Education

BARRIERS TO ACTIVITY No barriers to activity:

13%

22%

Biggest barriers: Too busy with studies

76%

Too expensive

23%

Too busy socialising

23%

Feeling worthwhile 7.3

6.4

Life Satisfaction

7.1

6.2

Happiness

6.8

5.8

Anxiety*

4.3

5.1

*scored using an inverse scale

40%

Inactive <30 min

7%

ATTAINMENT

EMPLOYABILITY Confidence of finding a job within 6 months of graduating:

High 95%

Low 5%

High 84%

Low 16%

very or fairy confident

22.3

20.5

SWEMWBS is a scale used to measure mental wellbeing by asking the level of agreement with positively worded statements e.g. ‘I’ve been feeling useful’. The maximum score is 35 and a higher score represents higher mental wellbeing.

8%

14%

53%

Active students rated themselves higher for teamwork, analysis, communication and drive

Average hours studied per week: 30+ hours

Average SWEMWBS score:

not at all/ lack confidence

65%

MENTAL WELLBEING

Questions were scored from 0 (not at all) to 10 (completely):

53%

Fairly active 31- 149 mins

Grade expectation for students at university:

High: 1st/2:1 Low: 2:2/3rd

PERSONAL WELLBEING

Active 150 mins+

SOCIAL ISOLATION Questions were ranked from 1 (‘never’) to 5 (‘always’): % answering usually or always to these ‘I feel …’ questions

Left out

9%

21%

People barely know me 16%

31%

Isolated from others

11%

22%

People are around me but not with me

14%

27%

For more information and to be notified when the full report has been released, please email the ukactive Research Institute: research@ukactive.org.uk

inactivity, alongside associated benefits such as reduced access to primary healthcare, better mental wellbeing and improved long-term employability. Evidence from Sport England’s Active People Surveys also shows that those who attend HE have greater lifelong participation levels than those who don’t attend university. Starting university is, of course, a key transition for many people and can also carry its own specific challenges, such as managing one’s own finances, cooking and cleaning. These are new experiences for some young people. On top of this, many students may also be away from their traditional support networks of family, friends, teachers or team-mates for the first time – and this can have serious impacts on their ability to cope and consequently their overall sense of wellbeing. This is even more reason for students to improve their wellbeing and feelings of inclusion by playing sport and/or using a gym. www.HCMhandbook.com