CLADmag issue4 2018

Page 99

PHOTO: ROBERT PUPETER

The rooms at the youth hostel in Bayreuth, Germany, are custom built for sharing

In response, an intelligent wall system has been designed, with modular, contemporary, custom built-in furniture. These three dimensional wall modules facilitate different room configurations through partially rotating beds, creating options for two, four or six bed rooms. The design is solid and functional: wood, concrete floors, brightly coloured infills and strong graphics. The façades are highly insulated and renewable energy is used as millennials want to see more than just a nod towards being green. Tobias Wallisser

FLEXIBILITY George Yabu, co-director of Yabu Pushelberg, says people want freedom and flexibility and to feel less constrained by the hotel experience: “People are looking for less formal spaces to sleep, engage and work in interchangeably. Ultimately, travellers are looking for flexibility in having their needs and wants met.”

CLAD mag 2018 ISSUE 4

This means many traditional offerings need to be reconfigured. Guests want charging ports and free WiFi, vegan food options and sustainable products. “ The hotel business centre is another superfluous feature for millennials. Phone-based technology means the business centre is now often just a printer in a communal area,” says Koo. “There is also less interest in the traditional threemeal restaurant. Trendy and healthy food options available day or night are appreciated. Social dining and happy hours are enticing.” The US’s 80 million millennials are set to overtake the baby boomer generation as the most populous generation at some point in 2019, according to Pew Research. Meanwhile in China, there are an estimated 400 million millennials. With millennials spending more on travel than any other generation, hotel operators must respond to the needs of this experience-thirsty demographic. ●

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