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WELLNESS

LIVING WELL Wellness communities are on the rise, as developers, investors, consumers, and even governments are starting to see the benefits of creating and living in spaces dedicated to health. Jane Kitchen takes a closer look at wellness communities in Asia – a region that’s primed for growth

IMAGE COURTESY OF MIR

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ellness, it seems, has permeated every corner of our consciousness these days, so it’s not surprising that the idea of living somewhere that has our health – both physical and mental – front of mind is increasing in popularity. ‘Wellness communities’, as these places have become known, are on the rise; real estate firms, investors and the public are starting to see the benefits – both financial and physical – of creating and living in areas with a dedication to health. “We have evolved our conversations from places we would like to visit, to places we may now work, play, heal, learn – and ultimately live,” says Mia Kyricos, chair of the Global Wellness Institute’s Initiative on Wellness Communities, who is also senior vice president, global head of wellbeing for Hyatt Hotels. The Global Wellness Institute (GWI) has estimated wellness real estate to be a US$134bn sector that’s growing at a rate of 6 per cent a year – and predicts that it will jump to US$180bn by 2022. The first-ever dedicated research report on the subject was released in January 2018, and GWI senior researchers Ophelia Yeung and Katherine Johnston called the report “the most important research we’ve undertaken.” “It’s not just because it’s a hot new industry market – but because it’s about where and how we live,” explains Johnston. “Collectively, we must shake up our thinking: healthy homes are as important as immunisations; parks, paths, and plants are as beneficial as prescriptions; friends and neighbours are far more important than Fitbits. All the industries continued on page 112

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CLADmag 2018 ISSUE 4

Profile for Leisure Media

CLADmag issue4 2018  

CLADmag issue4 2018