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A wellness magazine from Bayhealth | SPRING 2020 | KENT–SUSSEX

Giving cancer a good dogfight


Sign up today to get news to your inbox Get the news you want right to your inbox when you sign up to receive Bayhealth’s e-newsletters: Community Health and Wellness, Here for You and Sussex County Spotlight. Each is sent to our subscribers monthly and features different content. Community Health and Wellness focuses on keeping you healthy with helpful tips, news about new services, videos featuring our doctors, and highlights about our classes and events. For those wanting to learn about new providers, Here for You provides a comprehensive list of our new medical staff members, showcases videos and features stories from our doctors. Sussex County Spotlight shines a light on all things related to our growth in Sussex County. This e-newsletter is packed with information about new services, new providers, events, and more. Visit Bayhealth.org/Stay-Informed to sign up for our emails. You will receive a follow-up email with a preference survey. Complete the email and we’ll send you the news you want — directly to your inbox.

Healthwaves is a quarterly publication of Bayhealth. The information is intended to inform and educate. It’s not a substitute for consultation with a physician. Always consult your physician for individualized care. Bayhealth complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. If you have questions, please call JoAnn Davis at 302-744-7405. Bayhealth’s TDD or State Relay number is 866-237-0174. TERRY M. MURPHY, FACHE President and CEO, Bayhealth

DANIELLE PRO-HUDSON Editor, Healthwaves

AMANDA DOWNES Writer, Healthwaves

JENNIFER MYERS Writer, Healthwaves

PAUL STECCA Designer, Healthwaves

Media Center Coordinator II, Bayhealth

Marketing Specialist, Bayhealth

Marketing Specialist, Bayhealth

J&P Stecca LLC

LEIGH ANN COLEMAN Photographer, Healthwaves

GWEN GUERKE Writer, Healthwaves

ALICE RAUSCH Contributor, Healthwaves

Web & Digital Marketing Specialist II, Bayhealth

Marketing Specialist, Bayhealth

AMANDA C. BOWIE Editor, Healthwaves

JESSIE DMITERCHIK Contributer, Healthwaves

BRANDON HOWIE Photographer, Healthwaves

Southern Region Strategy & Brand Program Manager, Bayhealth

Marketing Operations Manager, Bayhealth

Web & Digital Marketing Specialist, Bayhealth

Marketing Videographer, Bayhealth

PAMELA J. MARECKI Senior Editor, Healthwaves Assistant Vice President Marketing Communications, Bayhealth

To view Healthwaves online, visit: Bayhealth.org/Healthwaves

BAYHEALTH HOSPITAL, KENT CAMPUS

BAYHEALTH HOSPITAL, SUSSEX CAMPUS

640 South State Street Dover, DE 19901 302-674-4700

100 Wellness Way Milford, DE 19963 302-422-3311


IN THIS ISSUE... Feature story:

4G  iving

cancer a good dogfight

Pictured on cover: Royal Grant has a love of aviation. After his time in the Air Force, Grant eventually moved into commercial aviation. It was no surprise that, when he was diagnosed with cancer, Grant approached the challenge with an aviation mindset.

7 New Interventional Neurology program provides lifesaving care

18 Balancing the long days to becoming a doctor

8 Finding the right heart care while moving to a new state

19 A portrait of support for Bayhealth

10 Our young volunteers are making a big impact

20 Partnership brings additional specialty care closer to home

12 Stability and mobility — are they joined at the hip?

21 Outpatient palliative care program to open in Dover

14 Finding #motivation to make big changes

22 Bayhealth Annual Report

16 What’s hurting your eyes... and your ears

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23 Bayhealth Community Benefits Report

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Patient Story

Giving cancer a good dogfight Royal Grant has a personality and life story just as grand as his name. Grant was in college studying engineering when the Vietnam War began. His professors were so impressed with his knowledge base, they asked if he had any other aspirations. That’s when he decided to join the Air Force. At one point in his service, Grant

was stationed at Dover Air Force Base as an aircraft mechanic. After his service, Grant returned to Delaware. He spent his days building a house from scratch, by logging a piece of property and using the wood to build his home. He also raced in national sailing competitions and built an airplane.

Years later, Grant made the move into commercial aviation. Grant flew for the same aviation company for more than 30 years. He said there was “never a dull day.” He recalls flying everything from Kentucky Derby horses to hazardous materials. As flight engineer, Grant was able to continue flying past age 65, the

VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/CANCER TO LEARN ABOUT CANCER CARE AT BAYHEALTH.

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NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


federally mandated retirement age for commercial pilots. While he’s faced many challenges throughout his life, the biggest battle he’s faced began just a few years ago. It all started in early 2017 when Grant developed severe stomach cramps. It was initially chalked up to a bad stomach virus that was going around. When the cramps didn’t subside, further investigation revealed Grant’s colon was blocked. By the time Grant was in surgery, his colon had ruptured, which

led to increased risk of infection following surgery. Once his surgical team had started their procedure, they immediately noted other masses in Grant’s body. While his medical team was thrilled with how quickly he recovered from the emergency surgery, they also informed Grant about the next obstacle he would face: cancer. Grant was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer that had metastasized to his liver and lymph nodes.

“Royal had the most aggressive form of colon cancer,” said Grant’s oncologist at the Bayhealth Cancer Center, Priya Singh, MD. “Royal was evaluated at another institution for participation in a clinical trial. He elected to receive his therapy locally with us at Bayhealth, where he received advanced multidisciplinary clinical treatment in a caring and nurturing environment in his hometown.” — continued on page 6

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Grant learned from his medical teams that the average survival for his diagnosis is 36 months. “I told them it was the wrong answer for me because we were going to make history together and beat this,” he said. Grant’s nurse navigator at the Bayhealth Cancer Center was instrumental in making sure records were sent, questions were answered and appointments were properly scheduled. Grant first started his treatment at the Bayhealth Cancer Center at Milford Memorial before the move to the Bayhealth Cancer Center, Sussex Campus in Feb. 2019. “I’ve loved both facilities, but I can’t say enough about the new Cancer Center,” said Grant. Since his diagnosis, Grant has undergone more than 60 rounds of chemotherapy. “Royal accepted the most aggressive therapy option we could offer,” said Dr. Singh. “The therapies we offer to patients depend upon their health and other medical problems. It’s a very personal choice, but there was no doubt that Royal was ready for the challenge.” The intense chemotherapy regimen was tough on Grant physically. He described leaving the Cancer Center feeling as though he had the flu. “I’d be lying if I said it was pleasant

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initially, but I knew this was what I had to do,” said Grant. “You can’t rest when it comes to cancer. Cancer is, simply put, just terrible. But I was ready to fight. The truth is I attacked cancer with the lessons I learned from flying. I couldn’t have done this without my wife. She was my guiding light through this process.” Grant and his wife Susan have been married for more than 30 years. Their idea of dating was

team and his extensive support network of family and friends.” Grant believes his attitude has had a huge impact on his outcome. “It was crucial for me to let my medical team know I was determined to beat this,” said Grant. “My scans are now perfect. The entire cancer team approached this in such a great way. The nurses are mechanics; each day I told them that they were saving my life. Wherever those nurses are, that’s where I want to be.” Grant also changed his diet, and now has a daily smoothie consisting of more than a dozen healthy ingredients. Years after his initial diagnosis, Grant is beating the odds in so many ways. “Mr. Grant has had a great outcome and has beaten the odds for survival,” said Dr. Singh. “His case is one example of how we have advanced in oncology.”

building an airplane, restoring a sailboat and constructing a car. They actually married in the very house Grant built from the ground up. Close friends, along with Susan, accompanied Grant during his chemotherapy sessions. “Royal has a great attitude and a positive outlook,” said Dr. Singh. “He truly appreciates the care he received from the medical

Grant still receives chemotherapy and is deciding next steps for his treatment plan. “I know what a gift my life has been,” said Grant. “When we first started on this journey I didn’t know where this tunnel would lead. I can now say it has taken us to a very bright spot.” ■

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


Expanded Service

New Interventional Neurology program provides lifesaving care Bayhealth provides numerous interventional procedures, known for their patient benefits compared to traditional surgeries, and is proud to now add interventional neurology to the list. These minimally invasive techniques use catheters and advanced imaging to treat blood vessels of the head and neck. Led by Bayhealth Medical Director for Vascular and Interventional Neurology Sumeet Multani, MD (pictured below, center), who is board-certified in neurology and vascular neurology with an additional fellowship in neurointerventional surgery, the new program brings lifesaving care to patients with complex conditions, such as brain aneurysms or blood clots, or

carotid artery disease, who previously had to drive a distance for treatment. Dr. Multani is one of fewer than 500 physicians in the U.S. with training in this highly specialized field. The doctor inserts a catheter, typically through the groin or hand, and threads it through vessels to look inside the head or neck. An angiogram is a common test to view blood flow in the brain. “We can diagnose and address a wide range of abnormalities, including blocking a blood vessel to stop a brain bleed or prevent rupture, cutting off blood supply to a tumor or treating chronic nosebleeds,” said Dr. Multani. “Many acute stroke

causes can’t be identified without catheter-based studies, so this expands our diagnosis and treatment capabilities.” Most neurointerventions are performed at Bayhealth Hospital, Kent Campus with some available at Bayhealth Hospital, Sussex Campus. There’s generally less risk and faster recovery for patients, and attentive pre- and post-care is provided through Bayhealth clinics. “Even high-risk patients, instead of getting surgery with an incision through the head or neck, can now get stenting or coiling at Bayhealth and experience a significantly shorter hospital stay,” said Dr. Multani. ■

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Patient Story

Finding the right heart care while moving to a new state It can be daunting to face heart surgery. Joanne Beechey would know. Over the past four years, she’s had multiple procedures to address three different cardiovascular conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD), aortic stenosis and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). In the midst of this, she moved from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Delaware, so finding a medical system and doctors she could trust was of utmost importance. CAD is the most common form of heart disease in Americans. Aortic stenosis, a narrowing of the aortic valve, frequently occurs in conjunction with CAD in older adults. Despite an open-heart surgery only three years ago, Beechey was told she might need another procedure. Plus, the vessel bypass she’d previously had for her PVD, a common circulatory condition where plaque buildup restricts blood flow, was failing, causing her excruciating leg cramps. Exploring Bayhealth’s website led her to Interventional Cardiologist Roberto Scaffidi, MD, Vascular Surgeon Paul Fedalen, MD, and Chief Cardiothoracic Surgeon Gary Szydlowski, MD. Interventional cardiologists specialize in catheter-based methods to treat heart abnormalities. Some, like

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Dr. Scaffidi, also provide general office-based cardiology care and collaborate with cardiothoracic or vascular surgeons when surgery is required. Shared electronic health records and consistent communication between care teams provide a seamless patient experience.

“Her leg vessels were of secondary concern, so we shifted focus to that,” said Dr. Scaffidi. “In October, Dr. Fedalen performed a vessel bypass and I did stenting to improve the blood flow. She’d had a lot of difficulty getting around and noticed an immediate improvement afterwards.”

Beechey had heard about the transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure and liked using MyChart at her former doctor’s office in Pittsburgh. “There was an instant connection when I saw Bayhealth offered both,” she said.

Beechey is relieved to have more energy and mobility, and no longer needs oxygen therapy. “Finding new specialists isn’t easy. I lucked out,” she said of the Bayhealth physicians she found, noting they’re not only very thorough and good at what they do, but also personable with wonderful bedside manners. “The physician assistants and nurses were also terrific and answered all my questions. I was so impressed with everyone at Bayhealth — even the young woman from food services remembered me by name in the hospital. This is what good healthcare is supposed to be like.” ■

After relocating, her symptoms — extreme tiredness and shortness of breath — returned. A cardiac catheterization revealed Beechey’s heart murmur and aortic stenosis were now severe. She underwent a successful TAVR procedure by Drs. Szydlowski and Scaffidi in June 2019. “TAVR is a major advance, providing a less invasive surgical alternative to traditional open-chest surgery. We’re proud to be a regional leader with the program we’ve built here,” said Dr. Szydlowski. Bayhealth first offed the minimally invasive procedure in 2016. While it was recently expanded by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in lower-risk patients, Beechey’s conditions and past surgeries made her high-risk.

DOVER

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


PITTSBURGH

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Our Community

Our young volunteers are making a big impact Volunteers are an integral part of Bayhealth. Our volunteers assist in all facets of the hospital, from greeting guests at the front doors to making blankets for newborn babies. While Bayhealth has hundreds of adult volunteers who donate their time year-round, we also have a special group of student volunteers who join us for the summer months to get hands-on experience while volunteering at Bayhealth.

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While student volunteers typically donate a few hours each week, several volunteers from the last cohort went above and beyond, giving more than 100 hours during the summer months.

and the Neuro Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Kethri wants to be a neurosurgeon, and especially enjoyed her time in the Neuro ICU interacting with staff and patients.

Akuti Kethri is a senior at Caravel Academy in New Castle County. She volunteered three days each week in Day Surgery, the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU)

“When I was in the Neuro ICU, the nurses made sure I had a hands-on experience. It was an education unlike anything I’ve experienced,” said Kethri.

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


“Even interacting with the patients was wonderful. They became my cheerleaders and encouraged me to continue on this journey. It solidified that I want to go into neurosurgery.” Hunter Gondeck is a junior at Polytech High School. He volunteered two to three days each week in the Progressive Care Unit (PCU) and the PACU. Gondeck also wants to pursue a career in healthcare. “Interacting with the patients is everything. The nurses are always taking care of patients, and always ready for everything,” said Gondeck. “After this experience, I know for certain I want to be an emergency department nurse, and I can’t wait to come back this summer so I can get more hands-on experience through this program.” In additional to employees, both Kethri and Gondeck said the other volunteers were immensely helpful. “The hospital volunteers are so great,” said Gondeck. “You become part of their family, and they truly looked out for us. Everyone just wanted to make sure we had a great experience.

I hope I’m able to eventually work here and be part of this community.”

Here’s the data behind the dedication of our Bayhealth volunteers:

Volunteer Services Manager Carrie Hart says the program is a success thanks to the dedicated students who come to Bayhealth.

109,905

“While every year we have great student volunteers, this past summer was unlike anything we’ve ever seen,” said Hart. “In all, four different student volunteers donated more than 100 hours each. That commitment is amazing to see.”

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Overall, both student volunteers say they would enthusiastically suggest this program to any classmates or peers. Gondeck already plans on returning this summer, and Kethri is hoping to do the same depending on where she lands up for college. “For anyone in high school considering this program, my advice is to do it,” said Kethri. “The summer I spent here was so worthwhile. I learned so much about working in a hospital and what patient care is. This program is unlike anything else I could have experienced.” ■

VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/VOLUNTEER TO LEARN MORE ABOUT STUDENT AND OTHER VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT BAYHEALTH.

HOURS LOGGED

FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE EQUIVALENCY

285

ACTIVE ADULT VOLUNTEERS

52

ACTIVE STUDENT VOLUNTEERS

91

OLDEST VOLUNTEER

16

YOUNGEST VOLUNTEER

38

PET THERAPY TEAMS

$2,794,884 OVERALL VALUE

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Stability and mobility — are they joined at the hip? According to an old song, the hip bone comes after the thigh bone and before the back bone — or reverse in verse two. The song isn’t wrong, but that particular anatomy lesson should suffice for the average, bendy third-grader only. Hip functionality can get a bit more complicated as one ages, making it important to understand more about what’s really going on in there. Physical Therapist Josh Smith, PT, DPT, MDT, shares a more in-depth look at what the hips are made of, the causes and symptoms of dysfunction, and ways to restore hip health. As one of the largest and most dynamic joints in the body, the hip is designed to both stabilize and mobilize the lower extremity — a challenging set of expectations because, generally, stable things aren’t very mobile, and mobile things aren’t very stable. COMPOSITION OF THE HIPS The hips, like many of the other joints in the body, are made up of three basic structures — bones, muscles and nerves — each of which plays a role in stability and mobility. Beginning with the bones, the thigh bone, or femur, runs from the knee to the pelvis. The north end of the femur is the femoral

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head — the “ball” component of the ball-and-socket hip joint. The acetabulum, a part of the pelvis, is the socket. The skeletal chain of the hips continues with the sacrum, which is the bone that supports the lower, or lumbar, spine. The bones are the foundation of the entire hip operation. The muscles of the hips are attached to and woven around the bones. Each muscle has a different responsibility in the continuum of stability and mobility. Some are primarily stabilizers, some are primarily mobilizers and some are expected to do both. The nerves, which extend from the lumbar spine and connect to the muscles, are like the electrical wiring of the hips. Their job is to transfer signals from the brain that tell the muscles to stabilize and/or mobilize the bones. Two additional structures that play vital roles in overall hip function are ligaments and cartilage. They work behind the scenes to cushion and support every movement, much like shock absorbers on a vehicle. DYSFUNCTION IN THE HIPS When the structures of the hips are in optimal condition, it’s safe to assume that the balance between

stability and mobility is near perfect. But this is rarely true. Structural damage and imbalance in the hips can have many causes, but the most common causes are lifestyle and habits. Too much movement throughout the day can be just as damaging to the hips as too much idleness, Smith explains. Someone who is on their feet all day puts loads of pressure on their joints, which can cause inflammation and degeneration, whereas someone who sits more often is likely to suffer from weakness and damaging compression. Similarly, habits like slouching or carrying a heavy load can also damage the structures of the hips. No matter the cause, when the hips — and therefore the balance between mobility and stability — are compromised, adverse symptoms usually follow. Aches, pains and tightness in the hips and groin are some of the more obvious symptoms. However, hip impairment is also known to manifest in places like the knees, lower back and even the feet. Additionally, more serious and painful conditions, like arthritis, bursitis and tendonitis, can develop over time if the hips are not addressed.

VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/OUTPATIENT-THERAPY TO LEARN ABOUT THE OUTPATIENT REHABILITATION SERVICES THAT BAYHEALTH OFFERS.

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


IMPROVING HIP HEALTH Given the complexity and connectivity of the hips, knowing what’s impaired and what to treat can be tricky. Sometimes the symptoms are a direct indicator of the problem, but other times pain in one joint can be caused by impairment in another. For this reason, it’s important to consult a physician or physical therapist at the onset of symptoms in the hips or peripheral joints. Identifying the problem early and treating the source is the best and quickest way to promote healing and restoration. However, Smith notes that it’s safe to address the everyday aches and pains at home with low-impact strength moves and gentle stretching, being sure to target the entirety of the hip region to promote balance. For strength, he recommends moves like the glute bridge, donkey kick, side leg raise, and superman. When stretching, ease into the movement and take care not to hurt yourself. Another great way to promote healing in the hips is to simply become more aware of lifestyle and habits and to make healthy adjustments. Over time, small changes can have a big impact. Whether you’re working solo or with a professional, the goal in treating the hips should be to restore the balance between stability and mobility. And always practice patience — the damage didn’t happen overnight, so the healing won’t either. ■

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Our Community

FINDING #MOTIVATION TO MAKE BIG CHANGES For the past year, Bayhealth’s Marketing Communications team has been hard at work on a social media campaign called #Motivated. The campaign focuses on small changes everyone can make to live a healthier life. While many people make New Year’s resolutions each year, the reality is these promises are hard to keep. The #Motivated campaign is a small reminder that each week offers a new opportunity for a fresh start. Each month, followers are asked to share their experiences on their journey to health and wellness. One committed follower is Bayhealth Administrative Assistant Nicole Garland. At the beginning of 2019, Garland made the decision to completely change her lifestyle. She cut out all

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processed sugars and foods. She also added in more activity each day. Over the last year, Garland has shed nearly 80 pounds, and continues to find success.

“Towards the end of 2018 I realized I was the heaviest I had ever been. I was in pain from the extra weight and I knew I needed a change,” said Garland. “I’ve been trying to diet since my mid-twenties and it never worked. This time it was all about eating right and exercising.” Garland has discovered a host of natural sweeteners she uses to replace sugar and has found fun ways to stay active. Over the summer she kayaked often and also does yoga and resistance training three to five days each week. “My friends and family have been such a great support system. I couldn’t do it without them,” said Garland.

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


She also points to her flexible eating plan as a measure of her success. “I don’t want to be hungry, so I definitely eat. The difference is now I’m eating fruit, vegetables and lean meats. My family and I still eat out; I just make sure to pick an entrée with protein and vegetables.” Garland says she can see and feel the difference. “I can walk now and not get winded. I did a 5K with no problems. For the first time in a long time, I didn’t get a lecture about my weight when I went to the doctor. I’ve also seen great improvement in my blood sugar. While I was bordering on diabetic, I’m now in a very normal range. I was on cloud nine to see how the changes are paying off,” she said. Connecting with others has been instrumental to Garland’s success. She believes it can help others too. “Social media was such a great way for me to stay motivated throughout this journey,” said Garland. “I loved when I saw Bayhealth’s #Motivated campaign. I enjoy sharing my success with others. I’m feeling so good and I want other people to feel this good too. Don’t struggle alone. Join this campaign and we’ll all do it together.” ■

Our #Motivated campaign has been such a success — and we couldn’t have done it without you! Between active community members and our own Bayhealth team members, the engagement has been incredible. Here are a couple of our most successful posts from the past year. Remember to check in each Monday to see how you can participate. Don’t forget — it doesn’t have be about big resolutions. There are small steps we can take each day to live a healthier life.

MAKE SURE TO LIKE BAYHEALTH ON FACEBOOK OR VISIT FACEBOOK. COM/BAYHEALTH TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR #MOTIVATED CAMPAIGN.

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Health & Wellness

WHAT’S HURTING

YOUR EYES... Some people may wonder about the impact of extended daily use of computers, cell phones and tablets on their eyes. After all, many people’s employment is screen-based and so many are addicted to their smartphones and devices. Ophthalmologist Karen M. Rudo, MD, offers some tips on how to reduce screen-associated eye strain, while researchers continue to debate whether the discomfort of eye strain is linked to long-term damage.

• If your eyes feel tired while working on the computer, simply close your eyes to allow your eyelids to disperse tears — moisturizing your eyes. • Staring at a screen all day? Your eyes will probably start to feel dry, and when you look away from the screen, objects might appear blurry. That’s your body telling you that it’s time to take a break because your blink rate slows immediately when you start looking at a screen.

• Adjust cell phone settings to tone down the blue hue associated with disrupting sleep patterns. Glasses that block blue light are also available but tend to be more beneficial for people under age 50. •G  ive your eyes a rest using the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s 20-20-20 formula: Every 20 minutes take a 20-second break. Look away from the screen at something that’s 20 feet away.

AND YOUR EARS Did you know that 48 million people in the U.S. have trouble hearing in one, if not both, of their ears? Noise is everywhere we go — work, school, traffic, home, and more. Bayhealth Primary Care Physician Joseph M. Parise, DO, says everyday things are damaging our ears. Here’s what Dr. Parise wants you to know about ear damage and hearing loss. • Hearing loss can be hereditary, but in other cases environmental factors play a role.

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• Sound levels are measured in decibels (dB). Continued exposure to noise that is more than 85 dBA (adjusted decibels) will cause loss of hearing. • Simple daily activities have higher adjusted decibels than you realize: Normal conversations measure at 60 dBA, a hair dryer measures 60–95 dBA and heavy traffic measures at 85 dBA.

• The National Institute of Occupational Safety reports that for a sound level of 115 dB, the limit for exposure is 28 seconds. This means that after one minute of a typical rock concert you’re risking permanent hearing loss. •Q  uite often, people don’t feel the warning signs of hearing damage like pain or ringing in the ears until it’s too late. In fact, if loud noises don’t bother you, you may already suffer from ear damage.

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


• If problems with eye or neck strain persist, one option — particularly for someone needing readers or bifocals due to age-related farsightedness — may be special glasses for computer use only.

If you can’t hear someone from three feet away, feel pain, hear buzzing, or have difficulty speaking, you may have hearing damage. • The key to preventing hearing loss is to decrease the sound of noises when you can. This may mean cutting back on using loud machines or using headsets less often. ■

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Balancing the long days to becoming a doctor In July 2019, a cohort of 11 third-year medical students from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) began their core clinical rotations at Bayhealth. Each medical student will complete 11 different rotations throughout a one-year journey. As a student, the third year of medical school entails shadowing physicians in different specialties to gain a better understanding of the different types of medicine to practice as well as to gain a better understanding of themselves personally and what best aligns with their interests. One of PCOM’s third-year medical students, Dionandre King (pictured below, right), has just completed a cardiology rotation at Bayhealth Cardiology

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Consultants on Bayhealth’s Kent Campus. King followed Roberto Scaffidi, MD (pictured below, left), who specializes in interventional cardiology, for one month. During that month, King joined Dr. Scaffidi on multiple occasions in the cardiac catheterization lab to observe dye being placed in the heart. King explained that his cardiology rotation with Dr. Scaffidi helped reinforce knowledge he had learned previously by applying it to real patient cases. While learning through core clinical rotations are vital for training to become a physician, a balance must be maintained between the professional and personal lives of medical students. King has turned to his love of running as a coping mechanism

for the long days at the hospital that begin as early as 5:45 a.m. “Being here in cardio and seeing the importance of exercise when it comes to the cardiovascular system, I try to run to maintain my overall physical and mental health,” King said of how he manages the stress of long days in the clinical setting. King is just one of the 11 medical students learning in the clinical setting at Bayhealth. The students will complete the year at the end of June 2020. The hope is that Bayhealth will appeal to the students and encourage them to apply for a residency once the residency programs at Bayhealth begin in July 2021. ■


Our Community

A portrait of support for Bayhealth C.F. Schwartz Toyota President Robert A. Schwartz has always been a part of the Dover community. He was born at Kent General Hospital, as were all of his children and most of his grandchildren. Over the past several decades, his family has owned many businesses in Dover, including a liquor store and a pizza restaurant. They also had a Chrysler-Plymouth dealership and sold International Trucks for 50 years. Schwartz is pleased that Bayhealth has also evolved within the community. It’s one reason he started making donations to the organization. “Bayhealth is a big part of the community and it continues to grow, and I want to help. It amazes me how many buildings in Dover are Bayhealth, not just the hospital,” he said. “I’m very proud of what’s going on at Bayhealth. It’s wonderful that the hospital has a cardiac unit,” continued Schwartz, who said he had no choice but to go north after a cardiac event 28 years ago. “The closer you can be to your family, the better.” He also appreciates Bayhealth’s recruitment of high-caliber doctors. “This means you can still bring up your children in a smaller community but have big-city care,” he said. Schwartz says he especially

admires Bayhealth’s “patients first” approach. “I had to get a kidney stone blasted and from the minute I walked in the door, I was treated as though I was a king,” he said. “I also like that I can go to the [Outpatient Center] and get my scans done. You can get in and out quickly and they’re always willing to accommodate you.”

C.F. Schwartz Toyota, as well as Schwartz and his wife Joanne, have made several generous donations to Bayhealth. His daughter, Linda Schwartz-Chi, has also played a big role in the generosity. This includes gifts to the cardiovascular and oncology service lines and supporting the Charitable Golf Tournament each fall. ■

TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN MAKE A DONATION TO BAYHEALTH, VISIT BAYHEALTHFOUNDATION.ORG OR CALL 302-744-7015.

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Partnership brings additional specialty care closer to home The exterior work on the new Nemours Sussex Campus building located directly across from Bayhealth Hospital and Outpatient Center, Sussex Campus is complete. The finishing touches are being put into place on the main entrance area, and work is underway on the interior office spaces for both Bayhealth and Nemours. Nemours duPont Pediatrics and Nemours SeniorCare will occupy the first floor of the facility. Pediatrics services will include primary pediatric care; specialty care: allergy, audiology, behavioral health, cardiology, endocrinology,

gastroenterology, general surgery, neurology, orthopedics, otolaryngology (ENT), pulmonology, urology, and weight management; therapy services: physical, occupational and speech therapy; and diagnostic services: EKG, ECHO, EEG, spirometry, X-ray, and ultrasound. Nemours SeniorCare will provide dental, vision and hearing screening for eligible residents. Coming in 2021, a pediatric urgent care will also open in the Nemours space. The medical office building will allow Bayhealth to locate more physician practices in one convenient location. On the

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second and third floors, Bayhealth will house a variety of physician offices, including Women’s Care and Maternal-Fetal Medicine services. Bayhealth Urology, Otolaryngology (ENT), Endocrinology, Bariatrics, Primary Care, Wound Care, and Dermatology will also be offered on site. The café on the first floor of the Nemours Sussex Campus, Kaisy’s Delights®, is already open to the public with limited hours. The facility is expected to open for healthcare services in fall 2020. ■

OPENING FALL 2020


Expanded Service

OUTPATIENT PALLIATIVE CARE PROGRAM TO OPEN IN DOVER Bayhealth will expand its palliative care services program this spring when an outpatient palliative care program opens at 103 Wolf Creek Blvd., Suite 2 in Dover. The program has continued to grow since it launched in the inpatient setting at the Kent Campus in 2016 and at the Sussex Campus in 2017. Patients will soon have access to half-day clinics on Mondays and Thursdays. Any hospital provider and community physician can refer patients to the program. Palliative care is medical care for patients suffering from the pain and symptoms stemming from a serious illness. Palliative care isn’t hospice, nor is it end-of-life care. Rather it’s a service that aims to help quell a patient’s suffering and improve the quality of their life regardless of the stage of the illness. More specifically, palliative care provides relief from symptoms such as pain, shortness of breath, loss of appetite, difficulty sleeping, and fatigue. It also helps patients better understand their condition and choices and improve their ability to live their life.

“We’re incredibly proud of the growth we’ve seen with palliative care at Bayhealth,” says Nurse Practitioner Theresa LatorreTegtmeier. “This is a much-needed service that we’re providing to our community, and it ties into our strategic goal of growing and developing quality programs across the region.” There are several patients in the community who are chronically ill. This is precisely why Director of Patient Care Services Sharon Urban says outpatient palliative care is a needed service. “People are living longer, but at the same time so many people are living with chronic diseases and are chronically ill. We’re here to help

them manage their symptoms and live the best life they can. It’s wonderful that we’re able to offer this to the community,” Urban said. “With this change, we’re offering patients the ability to continue care outside of the hospital. Currently there’s a lack of resources in the community, and we’re hoping to fill that hole with our resources,” says Clinical Nurse Specialist Jessica Taylor. In the future, the Palliative Care team, which also includes Nurse Practitioner Suzette Flores, plans to provide outpatient services in Milford. ■

TALK TO YOUR PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN TO SEE IF YOU’RE A CANDIDATE FOR PALLIATIVE CARE AT BAYHEALTH. VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/PALLIATIVE-CARE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

HEALTHWAVES SPRING 2020

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BAYHEALTH ANNUAL REPORT PATIENT CARE STATISTICS

FISCAL 2019

FISCAL 2018

105,181

101,692

ED Visits Births

2,195 2,303

Outpatient Visits

510,975

498,338

19,844

18,963

304,438

297,161

1,416,000

1,318,300

16,167

15,663

5.0

5.1

Unreimbursed Care

64.8 M

62.3 M

Total Net Revenue

677.8 M

615.8 M

Patients Admitted* Diagnostic Imaging Procedures Laboratory Tests Operations Performed Average Length of Stay

*Includes Inpatient Rehabilitation, excludes nursery and neonatal ICU

PAYOR MIX STATISTICS

■ MEDICARE/MEDICARE MANAGED CARE: 49.25% ■ MEDICAID/MEDICAID MANAGED CARE: 20.21% ■ BLUE CROSS: 14.50% ■ COMMERCIAL/MANAGED CARE: 8.39% ■ COMPENSATION: 1.39% ■ TRICARE: 3.47% ■ PRIVATE PAY: 2.79%

FINANCIAL STATISTICS

22

FISCAL 2019

FISCAL 2018

Net Patient Service Revenue

662,580,167

599,865,136

Other Operating Revenue

15,268,552

15,907,538

Total Revenue

677,848,719

615,772,674

Less: Operating Expenses

633,769,593

571,929,348

Operating Income

44,079,126

43,843,326

Other (Investment) Income Net

26,133,780

25,373,430

Reserve for Future Improvements

70,212,906

69,216,756

Total Capital Expenditures for technology improvements, 115,732,003 equipment replacement, construction, and other building renovations

139,090,289

NEED A DOCTOR? VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/FIND-A-DOCTOR OR CALL 1-866-BAY-DOCS (229-3627).


COMMUNITY BENEFITS REPORT At Bayhealth, we want to help the members of our community live their healthiest lives. We accomplish this by providing our community the tools and support needed to make meaningful changes. We are pleased to announce that Bayhealth provided more than $150 million in community benefits in our 2019 Fiscal Year.

COMMUNITY SERVICES ■ Community Health Improvement Services

$3,106,186

■ Health Professionals Education

$4,235,675

■ Subsidized Health Services

$29,015,628

■ Research

$1,762,594

■ Financial and In-Kind Contributions

$1,471,060

■ Community-Building Activities

$4,021,231

■ Community Benefit Operations

$56,711

Total

$43,669,085

Grand Total (Benefits and Services)

$150,122,192

COMMUNITY BENEFITS Financial Assistance (charity care at cost)

$15,752,634

Government-Sponsored Healthcare

$77, 713, 011

Bad Debt (at cost)

$12, 987,462

Total $106,453,107

2019

VISIT BAYHEALTH.ORG/PUBLICATIONS TO SEE OUR FULL COMMUNITY BENEFITS REPORT.

HEALTHWAVES SPRING 2020

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Healthwaves Spring 2020  

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