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Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . The

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Gateway to. . . . . . . . . . . .

Northern Namibia

The further north one travels through Namibia, the greener the countryside. Life on the vast plains of these essentially agricultural regions depends on the seasonal efundja, the floods that feed the rivers, and the flat, shallow depressions called “oshanas”. The most spectacular sunsets and palm lined horizons can be found in this region. The expansive flat plains of northern Namibia are characterised by intermittent stands of tall, graceful Makalani palms, and large deciduous Marula trees with dense, spreading crowns. Both these trees fulfil a pivotal role in the subsistence, lifestyles and culture of the local communities. The majority of the inhabitants of the northern regions makes a living from subsistence farming. They are born traders who offer their goods in cuca shops and stalls along the side of the road, or in open markets. Over the past few years, however, the northern towns have undergone immense growth in various sectors of the economy. You will find first-world shopping centres, sporting the trendiest international anchor tenants. Modern infrastructure and world-class amenities and services have found their way to the north and considering the fact that 80% of Namibia’s population live in the north of the country, it stands to reason that business investment and development will follow suit. We hope this book inspires you to experience the cultures, traditions and people of the north. Furthermore, we aim to highlight investment potential of each area and to showcase existing businesses that are already involved in advancing this region to improved sustainability. We hope to see you here soon! “A shared journey lights the way”

DISCLAIMER: Extreme care has gone into supplying correct and accurate information for the publication. However, no liability can be accepted by the publisher for any errors or omissions (E. & O.E) that may have occured. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. © Legends of Africa

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ContentsContent s Magnet Bureau de Change

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Inside Front Cover

Namibia Airports Company

Pg 2-3

The Four Owambo Regions

Pg 6 - 14

Oshana Region

Pg 16 - 20

Mayor’s Foreword

Pg 21

Ongwediva Town Council

Pg 22 - 27

Ongwediva Annual Trade Fair

Pg 28 - 29

Ongwediva Accommodation Section:

Pg 30 - 33

Ongwediva Commercial & Industrial Section:

Pg 34 - 54

Oshakati Town Council

Pg 56 - 57

Oshakati Accommodation Section:

Pg 58

Oshakati Amenities & Services Section:

Pg 59 - 61

Oshakati Commercial & Industrial Section:

Pg 62 - 65

Ondangwa Town Council

Pg 66 - 68

Ondangwa Accommodation Section:

Pg 69 - 70

Ondangwa Amenities & Services Section:

Pg 71 - 73

Ondangwa Commercial & Industrial Section:

Pg 74 - 77

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ContentsContent s Kunene Region Scents of Namibia Opuwo Town Council Opuwo Accommodation Section: Opuwo Amenities & Services Section:

Pg 78 - 83 Pg 84 - 85 Pg 86 - 87 Pg 88 Pg 90 - 91

Omusati Region Okahao Town Council Omusati Accommodation Section:

Pg 92 - 96 Pg 98 - 99 Pg 100-101

Ohangwena Region Ohangwena Accommodation Section:

Pg 102-106 Pg 108-110

Oshikoto Region

Pg 112-116

Otjizondjupa Region: Accommodation

Pg 117

Desert Air

Pg 118-122

Categorical Listing....................................................................Pg 123 Alphabetical Listing..................................................................Pg 124 Northern Map

Fold out back flap

Back Flap - Peralin Paints Back Cover - Pennypinchers Timbercity Bookmark - Magnet Bureau de Change

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION . . More than half of Namibia’s inhabitants live in the Ohan. . gwena, Omusati, Oshana and Oshikoto regions. The . . largest of these, Oshikoto, contains what is arguably . . . . Namibia’s top tourist destination, the internationally . . famous Etosha National Park, and the two intriguing . . ‘bottomless’ lakes, Otjikoto and Guinas. . . .. These regions are bordered in the north by the .. Kunene River, with Angola on the other side; in the .. .. west by the Hartmann and Baynes mountains and .. the Skeleton Coast Park; in the south by the Kunene .. Region, traditionally referred to as Kaokoland .. and Damaraland; and in the east by the Kavango, .. Caprivi and Otjizondjupa regions. After the capital .. Windhoek, this region has the largest urban con.. 6

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Lake Otjikoto

centration of people in the country. With a total surface area of just over 56 100 km2, the major portion of these so-called Four O Regions consists of communal farming land, that is land where there is no individual ownership or boundary fences, and where the majority of the inhabitants makes a living from subsistence farming. The best time of the year to visit the Owambo regions is April and May, after the rains. By this time the roads are suitable for driving on, the heat of the summer has abated, and the wetlands still host many water birds, such as cranes, storks, ducks, herons and small waders.


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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HISTORICAL BACKGROUND . . Prior to independence in 1990, this part of the country In the pre-colonial structure of Owambo society there . . . . was called Ovamboland. Today it is loosely referred to was a king and headmen in each of the eight Owambo . . as Owambo. According to the 2011 population census, groups. Judicial powers were vested in village and re. . the Omusati Region with 243,166 people had the larg- gional courts, with the highest court being the Supreme . . est population; the Ohangwena Region with 228,384 Court of the King, where the King is assisted by his . . the second largest; the Oshikoto Region with 181,973 headmen. This system reflects influences from the great . . . . the third largest; and Oshana with 176,674 the smallest. mediaeval states of central Africa characterised by the . . While the majority of Namibia’s Owambo live in these sacred king having almost unlimited power. . . four so-called O regions, many have migrated south. . wards to other parts of the country. . . These days only three of the Owambo clans – the . . .. Since 1870, following the advent of the Finnish Mission Ndonga, Ngandjera and Kwaluudhi – still recognise .. in Owambo, and subsequently the Roman Catholic and their kings and are ruled by chiefs-in-council. The others .. Anglican churches, Christianity has played a major role have a system of senior headmen forming a council and .. in the lives of the Owambo people. Today more than administering their tribes by joint action. An important .. half of the population has some link with these denomi- function of these officials is the regulation of the system .. .. nations. The Finnish Mission Church developed into an of land ownership. About a quarter of the Owambo re.. independent Owambo/Kavango Church, which also has gions has been claimed by individual landowners, each .. adherents among the Kavango people of the north-east. occupying farms of several thousand hectares. .. The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TWO VALUABLE TREES . . The expansive flat plains of Owambo are characte. . rised by intermittent stands of tall, graceful makalani . . . . palms, and large deciduous marula trees with dense, . . spreading crowns. Both these trees fulfil a pivotal . . role in the subsistence, lifestyles and culture of the . . . . local communities. .. .. The makalani palm (Hyphaene petersiana) has large .. .. fan-like leaves and fruits resembling spherical brown .. nuts. Sap is tapped from the growing tip of the stems .. of these palms and left to ferment into a potent drink .. called palm wine. The fruit of the makalani palm .. .. takes two years to mature, and has a white, bony .. 8

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Makalani Palms

kernel. Referred to as vegetable ivory, its hard kernel is suitable for carving small ornaments, such as distinctive and decorative buttons. These are sold to tourists as souvenirs by roadside vendors; to traders to be featured in formal and informal jewellery; and in functional items like key rings and bottle openers. The carved nuts usually depict animals – elephant, rhino, giraffe, gemsbok and springbok – or topical themes such as the Namibian flag and domestic scenes. They are also sold at craft markets such as the Namibia Craft Centre in Tal Street in Windhoek, and make attractive gifts for tourists to take home as souvenirs.


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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The huge spreading marula, Sclerocarya birrea, is an . . important fruit and shade tree for human and animals . . alike. The fruit is nutritious and high in vitamin C. It is . . eaten fresh, while the juice is drunk unfermented as a . . . . beverage, or fermented to make wine, which may be . . further distilled to make brandy. Oil expressed from . . the kernel, which is edible, is protein-rich and eaten . . with porridge, and also used for cooking, dressing .. leather, in cosmetics and as an insecticide. The wood .. .. is used for carvings, the branches for fire-sticks, and .. the leaves and bark medicinally. Elephants are par.. ticularly partial to the bark and fruit of these trees. .. .. THE LIFE-GIVING CUVELAI SYSTEM .. .. Life on the vast plains of these essentially agricultural ..

Marula Tree

regions depends on the seasonal efundja, the floods that feed the rivers, and the flat, shallow depressions called oshanas. A memorable sight is when they light up with copious growths of white lilies soon after the rainy season has commenced. The origin of these waters is the highlands of Angola. After a long journey southwards, the Cuvelai River disperses its contents into many channels, covering the sandy flats of southern Angola and spreading into northern Namibia to form a large expansive delta of rivulets and oshanas. These provide drinking water to humans and animals, protein in the form of fish and a habitat that supports large numbers of aquatic birds.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OWAMBO TRIBAL AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE . . Having a common origin and culture, the people living . . . . in central northern Namibia and southern Angola . . migrated southwards from the Great Lakes in East Africa . . to settle between the Kunene and Okavango rivers in . . about 1550. Today four of these groups live in southern . . Angola in the Cunene Province, and eight are spread . . across northern Namibia. . . . . . . Of the eight Owambo tribes, the Kwanyama is the lar. . gest. The others are the Ndonga, Kwambi, Ngandyela, . . Kwaluudhi and Mbalanhu, and the two smaller ones, . . the Nkolonkadhi and Unda. The Owambo languages, . . which are closely related to one another and are Bantu . . in origin, are commonly understood by Oshiwambo . . . . speakers, with Kwanyama and Ndonga having been . . developed into written languages. . . .. The most striking feature of the traditional Owambo so.. cial system is the predominance of matrilineal descent, .. which determines the laws of inheritance and succes.. sion, as well as post-marital residency. In recent years, .. .. as a result of external factors such as the Christian doc.. trine, migrant labour and economic independence, .. there has been a distinct shift towards a patrilineally .. organised society. .. 10

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ECONOMY AND LIFESTYLES . . Traditionally Owambo houses are shaped like ronda- party since independence in 1990. . . . . vels, usually encircled by palisades, and often con. . nected by passages. The complex usually contains cattle Nowadays Owambo women, who traditionally cultivated the land and raised the children, are earning . . kraals, and is surrounded by cultivated lands. . . an income through home industries such as pottery, . . The Owambo practise a mixed economy of agriculture, basketry, dressmaking and woodcarving, and are in. . cultivating mainly mahangu (a kind of pearl millet), sor- creasingly entering the labour market as nurses, clerks, . . ghum and beans, and farming with livestock, mainly shop assistants and teachers. . . cattle, supplemented by fishing in the oshanas. They . . utilise traditional land according to the traditional right For many years they harvested the fruit of the marula . . of occupation usually acquired by paying the ‘owner’ tree, extracting the oil and using it as a taste enhancer in . . . . of the ward with cattle. Although subject to the laws of traditional chicken and mahangu dishes, and cosmeti. . the people, grazing and utilisation of veld and bush pro- cally as a moisturiser for their skins. Today the oil of this . . ducts are communal. As is borne out by the more than traditional African food source is being processed and . . 10 000 stalls, cuca shops and locally-owned shopping exported as a high-value ingredient for overseas cos. . complexes in the northern regions, the Owambos are metic products. Namibia is the first Southern African . . born traders. country to export marula oil to Europe. . . .. Many Owambo people work in other parts of the coun- Community-based tourism in the four north-central .. try. For example, the workforces in today’s mining and regions provides an opportunity to meet these friendly .. fishing industries consist primarily of Owambo people. and courteous people. Here visitors can experience .. .. They are also well represented in the civil service and the local culture, taste the food and visit the traditional .. have always played an active role in politics. SWAPO homesteads. Travelling through the area can be done .. (South West Africa People’s Organisation), started as a with ease, as there is a comprehensive network of well.. non-violent pressure group referred to as the Owambo maintained tarred roads and accommodation facilities .. People’s Organisation, and has been Namibia’s ruling to suit all preferences and pockets. .. The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Himba IN OWAMBO . . The Himba, Tjimba and other Herero people who . . inhabit Namibia’s remote north-western Kunene Re. . . . gion are also found living in scattered settlements in . . the Four O Regions, especially Omusati, Oshana and . . Ohangwena. . . . . By tradition Himba are semi-nomadic pastoralists who . . . . tend to trek from one watering place to another. They . . seldom leave their home areas and maintain, even in . . their dress, a tradition of their own, on which other . . cultures have made little impression. They have lived . . a relatively isolated existence for many centuries. Due . . .. to their tall, slender and statuesque appearance, the .. Himba have been much publicised in books and ma.. gazines, and are renowned for their proud yet friendly .. bearing. .. .. .. They live in simple, cone-shaped structures of sap.. lings, bound together with palm leaves, and plastered .. with mud and dung. The men build the structures, ..

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while the women mix the clay and do the plastering. A fire burns in the headman’s hut day and night, to keep away insects and provide light and heat. A family may move from one home to another several times a year to seek grazing for their goats and cattle.


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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Typical Ovambo Rondavels . . . . . . . . Himba men, women and children wear body adorn- are used to hang the baskets in their dwellings. Bowl. . ments made from iron and shell beads. The women shaped baskets are made and used for winnowing the . . . . especially are noted for their sculptural beauty, en- grass seeds collected from ants’ nests. . . hanced by intricate hairstyles and traditional adorn. . ments. A traditional Himba woman spends as much as MAHANGU FESTIVAL AND . . three hours a day on her toilette. After she has bathed, . . she anoints herself with her own individually prepared CHAMPIONSHIP . . annual festival, locally referred to as Oshipe, and . . mixture of butterfat, herbs and ochre. This mixture not This held after the harvest in August/September, is hosted in . . only protects her skin from the harsh desert sun, but . . also keeps insects away and prevents her body hair the region of the Overall National Crown Champion, . . from falling out. She uses another mixture of butterfat, which includes all the northern and north-eastern re. . fresh herbs and black coals to rub on her hair, and gions, where mahangu (pearl millet) is the staple food . . many. The festival creates a platform for mahangu .. ‘steams’ her clothes regularly over the permanent fire. for farmers to share ideas, motivate each other, and en.. .. Himba women produce finely woven baskets with gage in healthy competition while showcasing their .. beautiful sculptural shapes that were traditionally products. Important topics of discussion include the .. used to store milk or fat. In many areas they are still improvement and modernisation of mahangu produc.. by introducing new technologies and cultivation .. used for this purpose. Shapes vary from a bottle with tion methods, and by improving soil fertility. The festival is .. a neck and narrow mouth to a deep pail. Most have .. a leather handle with iron-beaded decoration, which organised by the Namibian Agronomic Board. .. The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE ORNAMENTAL EKIPA . . . . As they have done for thousands of years, Himba men . . and women wear large numbers of necklaces and arm . . and leg bracelets made from ostrich eggshell beads, . . . . grass, cloth and copper. Iron-oxide powder with its . . shiny effect is worn like western glitter, while ochre . . mixed with fat is rubbed into the skin to give it a . . warm terracotta glow. The large white shell worn on . . the breast by Himba, Owambo and Herero women is . . called the ohumba. . . . . The item that has become especially valued by collec. . tors, crafters and jewellery manufacturers is the ekipa, . . an ornamental button made from ivory or bone. These . . . . interesting artefacts were worn by Owambo women . . in earlier times, displayed down their backs on two . . leather straps hanging from the waist. The number of . . ekipas worn gave an indication of the woman’s status . . and the wealth of her husband. . . . . Ekipas were traditionally carved into oval, round, . . square, multi-cornered or oblong forms with a raised .. centre, resembling a tiny beehive or rounded pyramid. .. They were usually engraved with a border in different .. .. geometric patterns around the outer edge. Some were .. crafted from hippopotamus tooth or bone, and less .. frequently from vegetable ivory. .. .. Today ekipas are sought-after items that have become .. intrinsically and unmistakably Namibian. .. 14

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Himba woman wearing an Ekipa


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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maroela Mall . . . . . . . . OSHANA REGION . . . . The name of this region derives from its most promi- a high-quality trunk road. This also facilitates the trans. . nent landscape feature, the shallow, seasonally inun- portation of freight. . . dated depressions referred to as oshanas, and which . . underpin the local agro-ecological system. Although Mahangu is the principle staple crop grown in Oshana. . . communications are hindered during the rainy season, However, the soil is exhausted over much of the central . . . . the fish that breed in the oshanas provide an important area and requires substantial fertilisation to maintain reasonable productivity. Cattle do well here and herds . . source of dietary protein. . . are extensive. The southern portion of Oshana is an ex. . The regional borders of Oshana are Ohangwena in the tensive savannah plain stretching as far as the Etosha . . north, Oshikoto in the east, Kunene in the south and Pan, but the generally high salinity of the soil and water . . Omusati in the west. It is one of only three regions in render it unsuitable for grazing or cultivation. . . Namibia that have neither a coastline nor a foreign bor. . . . der. In 2011 the population in the Oshana Region was . . counted as 176,674. .. .. The two main centres of the Owambo regions, Oshakati .. and Ondangwa, are in the Oshana Region, with .. Oshakati regarded as the capital. The smaller town .. of Ongwediva lies in between. Air Namibia conducts .. .. flights to and from Ondangwa, twice daily, seven days .. a week. The area is far more densely populated in the .. north, which is linked to Tsumeb and other regions by ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OSHAKATI, ONDANGWA AND ONGWEDIVA . . . . The Oshakati-Ongwediva-Ondangwa complex has ex- contribute to the improvement of all-weather air and . . perienced dramatic urban growth in recent years and transport. Reasonably good hospitals are situated at . . forms an important commercial and potential industrial Oshakati and Onjiipa, the latter supporting a num. . focus. As a whole, it is home to the second-largest popu- ber of clinics. Although both primary and secondary . . lation concentration in Namibia after Windhoek, but it schools are spread across the region, they are not suf. . lacks basic infrastructure and most of the services and ficient to service the population. . . . . facilities normally found in urban areas of this size. The . . majority of businesses in northern Namibia are located The Oshakati Omatala open market is the largest in . . here, providing a significant amount of employment. The Namibia and a big tourist attraction in the north. The . . complex plays an increasingly important commercial role Tulipamwe Sewing Project in the main street of . . in the north and has considerable industrial potential. Oshakati – conspicuous due to the vibrant pink fabrics . . display – is an ideal place to learn about traditional . . Owambo’s two main centres, Oshakati and Ondan- on Oshiwambo attire and buy unique clothing. . . gwa, are bustling towns with the same informality and . . . . happy-go-lucky character as urban centres throughout The Ongwediva Trade Fair has been held annually .. much of Africa. Their main streets are lined with a hap- since 1995. In addition to an array of local stands, it .. hazard arrangement of residential houses and shops, also hosts exhibitors from Botswana, South Africa, .. and the traffic varies from donkey carts to the latest in Ghana, Kenya and Zimbabwe. Situated across the road .. luxury four-wheel-drive vehicles. from Ongwediva Medi Park is Bennie’s Entertainment .. Park and Lodge, a popular meeting place that provides .. Both towns have airstrips that handle medium-sized leisure activities in many forms. Ongwediva hosts two .. .. airplanes in daylight only and carry passengers as well modern shopping malls that feature an assortment of .. as air cargo. The establishment of a control tower may retail outlets and fast-food restaurants. .. The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CRAFT-MAKING IN OSHANA . . Onyoka are traditional necklaces made from mussel- some 55 km south-east of Ondangwa. Here well-craft. . . . shell beads. These artefacts play a prominent role ed and creatively decorated paper is hand-made by a . . in the handcrafted ornamentation that Oshiwambo twelve-member co-operative, using stalks and leaves . . women wear, especially on festive occasions. For ex- of mahangu (pearl millet), a staple in north-central . . ample, newborn babies are welcomed into the world Namibia. Recycled paper is added to give the paper . . with a string of onyoka, and throughout their lives, a lighter colour. Once the paper is made, it is silk. . . . Oshiwambo women wear the necklaces when at- screened with African designs by the San Ekoka artist . . tending occasions such as weddings, christenings and group. This exceptional product range includes book. . funerals. marks, cards, notebooks, conference folders, loose . . . . An innovative craft-making development established sheets of paper and magnetised fridge notepads. . . . . relatively recently in the Oshana Region is the Ndili.. mani Pottery Group, managed by women who use In Oniipa (just outside Ondangwa), craftspeople at .. clay collected from the oshanas in the flood plains the Dorkambo Teppiche Co-operative produce hand.. close to this ingenious underground pottery studio. woven carpets from 100% pure karakul sheep wool. .. The pots can be bought at the Tulongeni Craft Market The town also hosts the historical Onandjokwe Lu.. .. on the northern side of the Omuthiya village, 90 km theran Hospital, named after its first female nurse, and .. south of Ondangwa. built in 1911 by the Finnish Missionary Society. It is .. still in use today, serving as the primary health-care .. The Onankali-Omahangu Paper Project is located facility for the Onandjokwe District. .. 18

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOURIST ATTRACTIONS IN OSHANA . . . . In close proximity to Ondangwa, at Olukonda, is the Grass Plains. Visitors are treated to traditional Owam. . oldest building in northern Namibia, the Nakambale bo food, music and dancing. . . Mission House. Built in the early 1870s by Finn. . ish missionary Martti Rautanen, the property also TUITION IN ENGLISH, . . . . houses the oldest church in the north, the Nakam- MATHEMATICS AND BRAILLE . . bale Church, built in 1889, flanked by the Nakam- The Nghuoyepongo literacy programme, providing tu.. bale Cemetery, where Rautanen, some of his family ition in English, mathematics and Braille, is presented .. .. members, and a number of traditional leaders were from a location just north of Ondangwa. Most mem.. laid to rest. bers who are part of the Nghuoyepongo programme .. .. .. From Olukonda, excursions can be undertaken to suffer from a disability. After classes, members of the .. sites of interest such as Oponono Lake, Omandongo group weave baskets, which are sold at the annual .. Mission Station, Onoolongo Cattle Post and Ombagu Ongwediva Trade Fair that takes place in August. .. 20

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n behalf of all inhabitants of Ongwediva,

it is indeed an honor and privilege to welcome all our visitors and potential investors to the investment destination, our beautiful locale. Those visiting Ongwediva for the first time, I trust that you will greatly enjoy the hospitality of the town and you will be presented with many business opportunities. Ongwediva is situated in the northern part of Namibia where a large part of the population is concentrated, therefore giving access to a large market size and purchasing power. Ongwediva is also in close proximity to Southern Angola which offers an attractive market for various goods and services. Ongwediva Town Council has an important role to play in attracting and promoting business development and Council has done so by providing an enabling environment for economic development, in which businesses can thrive and visitors presented with the sense of belonging. With Ongwediva Annual Trade Fair taking place annually, during August, I am happy to invite you to come and experience this great exhibition which provides both visitors and exhibitors with a platform to network and produce lasting valuable relations being business or pleasure. Ongwediva Town will always have something for everyone. Once again, I welcome you to Ongwediva and enjoy the hospitality of our people, being it for a day or for many years to come.

Jason Asino MAYOR OF ONGWEDIVA

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The town of Ongwediva is considered the service hub of the Northern regions of Namibia. The town is situated in Oshana Region, 90 km south of Angola and 30 km from Ondangwa Airport. When you are travelling from Etosha it is a distance of 140km and a further 180 km to Ruacana Falls. Ongwediva’s greenery reflects the warm and welcoming attitude of its people and it incorporates an exclusive blend of urban- rural serenity and vibrant

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town life. The different cultures are part of the rich diversity on offer within and around the surrounding boundaries of the town of Ongwediva. Ongwediva was established in year 1992, by then most of the industrial and commercial opportunities were already taken by neighboring towns. Ongwediva then settled to attract professional service providers to steer the town into becoming the service hub of the northern region for which the town has

come to be known. The town is home to a diversity of cultures with a vibrant life style as the town attracts young to middle age personalities through its different educational centers. As a Local Authority, Ongwediva is mandated by the Local Authorities Act, Act No. 23 of 1992 (as amended) with the provision and maintenance of municipal services and the facilitation of economic development.


The Ongwediva Open Market: Established in year 2000, the Ongwediva Open Market provides a conducive environment to traders with the following facilities; Lockable kiosks, braai area, sitting facilities, display area, paved floors, adequate ablution fa-

The town of Ongwediva has come to be known for the following Strengths; Good infrastructure, financially accountable, Teamwork, Well established Local Economic Development Policies, Good relations with stakeholders; Stable political climate, Cultural diversity. In our Strategic Plan the following Strategic Themes stand out; • Build Ongwediva Town Council Capacity • Build Relations • Develop the Community • Develop the Local Economy • Develop Physical Infrastructure • Create Sustainable Success & Impact

cilities. This contemporary market that offers a wide variety of opportunities is home to 51 tenants who offer traditional products. Namibian dishes as well as Western cuisine and products are also on display at this market. Council has made provision to expand the market in 2013/2014 financial year, and the process to extend the market is underway.

.............................................

Our Mission: Ongwediva Town Council commits itself to: Promote the social & economic development of Ongwediva; creating a conducive environment for trade and investment; offering avenues of strategic networking and efficient service delivery.

. . . . . ............................

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Our Vision: Ongwediva, the Attractive, Quality Town of Choice in Northern Namibia.

. . . . . ............................

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STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN Ongwediva Town Council in its quest to develop and grow the town as the service hub of the

Extension 19: This extension is also planned as a high income residential area with 270

northern regions has availed land for the follow-

erven

ing projects:

Efidi Proper: Planned as middle income residential area wit 324 erven

An eighteen (18) holes Golf Course & Estate development: This development targets the up market residential development and it

residential are with 321 erven •

contains 197 erven. •

Extension 18: This Extension is planned as a high income residential area with 329 erven

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Efidi Extension1: Planned as middle income Oshiko Build Together: Planned as low income residential area with 250 erven

Expansion of Town lands with an area of 3 100 HA.


SOCIAL EMPOWERMENT • ONGWEDIVA SOCIAL HOUSING SCHEME Ongwediva Town Council has as an obligation towards social empowerment and has developed the Ongwediva Social Housing Scheme. These are facilities provided for the public at a minimal rental fee. So far twenty four (24) houses have been completed at an amount of N$ 6, 970 000 which Council received from the Build Together Programme. • ONGWEDIVA RECREATIONAL PARK Situated on the eastern side of town, the recreation site is a popular retreat for Ongwediva residents as well as tourists. Although not fully developed, this site offers a natural aroma where one

can listen to the birds and marvel at the traditional way of living just across the nearby village. This park will be fully developed in the year 2017. More recreational points are planned in the future and they serve the purpose of unwind for the residents and visitors to the town. Coordinates: Country: Namibia Administrative Division: Oshana Area Total: 8 917,9341 Ha Population: 19 300 (Namibia 2011 Census) Time Zone: South African Standard Time (UTC+1)

Ongwediva Social Housing Scheme

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• SAM NUJOMA MULTI PURPOSE CENTRE

information on behavior and diseases, alcohol

Ongwediva Town Council fully understands its so-

abuse and passion killing.

cial responsibility and has thus established the Sam

Community wellness and care; through this pro-

Nujoma Multi Purpose Centre as its social arm. At

gram the center provides physical, emotional as

this centre a number of programmes are carried out that are to the benefit of the community. Among the activities is the; After school program – this program provides or-

well as spiritual support to sick patients residing in Ongwediva. The community also enjoys treatment referral, clinical as well as hygienic support

phans and vulnerable children of Ongwediva with

through this program. The Center also offers rental

free meals, psychosocial, care & educational sup-

of office space, computer classes (these are free

port.

to orphans) and it runs a sewing project for a

Behavior change and communication program;

group of women who generate income through

with this program the community is provided with

their products.

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STRATEGIES PURSUED

ted competent assets (personnel) who continue to steer the town into a meaningful direction.

Ongwediva has tried and continue trying to deliver and reach its desired position by pursuing certain strategies. One such strategy was to invest in proper town planning in terms of basic services and road infrastructure which finally at-

ONGWEDIVA OFFERS Once you are in Ongwediva you are sure to enjoy services from the following service providers: •

Service stations,

Shopping centers for your convenience,

to mould the well known Ongwediva Annual

Medical facilities,

Trade Fair which has aggressively marketed the

Commercial banks,

locality Ongwediva and its services. Ongwediva

Primary and tertiary education facilities,

Town Council has as part of its strategies attrac-

Entertainment centres, etc.

tracted investments. Another strategy used was

CONTACT DETAILS Tel. +264 65 233725 | Fax. +264 230521 | sshidute@otc.com.na www.ongwediva.com.na | P/Bag 5549, Ongwediva Crn of DR. Libertine Amathila and Mandume Ndemufuyo Street

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ONGWEDIVA ANNUAL TRADE FAIR (OATF) - THE FLAGSHIP OF NAMIBIA’S EXHIBITION INDUSTRY Ongwediva Annual Trade Fair (OATF) is a leading

sure from all quarters for the expansion of the fa-

trade and exhibition event on the Namibian Busi-

cilities, a project that has been vigorously pursued

ness Calendar. It is also the single biggest event

over the past fourteen years.

in Northern Namibia that draws exhibitors, business personalities, government leaders and visitors

The Trade Fair, as the name indicates, is annual-

from all corners of the country as well as across the

ly held at the modern Ongwediva Trade Centre

boundaries of Namibia.

which first hosted the WIB SADC Exhibition in 2000. Ongwediva Trade Fair Centre, by virtue of its stra-

The first OATF was opened in the year 2000 by the

tegic location, excellent infrastructure, services

Founding President of the Republic of Namibia, His

and facilities, offers a conducive environment for

Excellency Dr. Sam Nujoma. Since then, the fair

national and international business forums and ex-

has grown in leaps and bounds with growing pres-

hibitions.

CONTACT: SALOME SHIDUTE OR RUTH UUSIKU Tel +264 65 23 0191 ongwetradefair@iway.na

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OATF is a great event to explore the full potential of trade, business and investment opportunities that Namibia and the rest of the SADC Region offers. The prospects of regional economic integration, a subject of interest in the Region, call for proactive initiatives to boost cross border investments and OATF therefore serves as an ideal platform to advance the regional objectives. Ongwediva Annual Trade Fair is proudly sponsored by MTC. Don’t miss out on the Ongwediva Annual Trade Fair (OATF) during the last week of August every year.

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Ongwediva Accommodation

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Ongwediva Accommodation

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“YOUR FAR AWAY HOME” Looking for a place like home? Mango Guesthouse offer affordable single, double & family rooms. A scrumptious breakfast included for double & single rooms. • Tea and coffee • Restaurant and Bar - now fully operational! • Wireless internet • Swimming pool • Digital satellite television • Well ventilated and fully air-conditioned rooms Tel: +264 (0)65 231 688 • Cell: +264 (0)81 124 5657 / (0)81 124 5434 Fax: 088 631 303 • mangoguesthouse@gmail.com No 4415 Lommel Street, Ongwediva • www.mangoguesthouse.com

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Mazizi Lodge offers you the quiet country ambience and it is situated along the Ongwediva/Ondangwa road, 21km from Ondangwa and 6km from Ongwediva, Ohakweenyanga village. Ten standard rooms fully equipped with private toilet and shower, TV, fridge and air –conditioner plus five big family rooms fully equipped. Come and enjoy the personal touch in a family friendly atmosphere coupled with tranquility and bird life with lots of plants. Other services offered; catering service, landscaping & nursery. For event planning, you relax and we do the rest for you. Tel:+264 (0)65 232 142 / Cell: +264 (0)81 245 5605 / Fax: +264 (0)65 230 529 E-mail: SJEgumbo@gmail.com

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Ongwediva Accommodation

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At Pandu’s Bed & Breakfast we offer 14 self-catering units with air conditioning and television facilities. Each unit also contains a fully stocked bar fridge. We offer various types of rooms; not all units are thatched. We are located on the Main Road between Ondangwa and Ongwediva, just after the UNAM HP Campus and just before the Select service station. Tel: +264 (0)85 585 889 • Fax: +264 (0)65 232 073 Cell: +264 (0)81 142 2874 • pandusaccomodation@gmail.com P.O. Box 8838, Ongwediva, Namibia

4 Travelling to Ondangwa, Ongwediva and Oshakati can be a long and gruelling experience – especially by road. This is when one truly appreciates the quiet-cool-peacefulness of a cared-for garden with large shady trees and bright colourful flowers. Spacious en-suite single and double rooms each with TV, air-conditioner, mosquito net, fridge and coffee or tea waiting in the restful shade of the numerous large trees that fill the garden. You can also enjoy the wide variety of birds including guinea fowl and doves while having your breakfast or viewing the beautiful sunset. Tel: +264 (0)65 231 049 • Cell: +264 (0)81 124 9109 GPS: 17°46’56.82” S • 15°45’11.45” E info@sevenvalleys.info • www.sevenvalleys.info The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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Oshakati

Mandate: Oshakati Town Council is being guided by the Mandate of Local Authority as provided in Section 30 of the Local Authority Act, (Act 23 of 1992) as amended subject to part VI up to part XII of 2000, which includes; provision of portable water, sewerage systems and drainage, cemeteries, streets and public places, housing schemes, immovable properties of Local Authority Council, valuation of ratable and non-ratable properties within the local authority area.

Mission: Oshakati Town Council exists to offer quality and affordable services to the residents through integrity and honesty by ensuring that the town is habitable, prosperous and industrialized in a sustainable manner.

Vision: To be the commercial and residential capital of the north, driven by quality service rendering and best customer service.

Local Economical Development: Oshakati is strategically located in the centre of the North. It is known by the name Oshakati shaNangombe and caters for the four northern regions and other neighbouring regions such as Kavango, Zambezi and Kunene.

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Major development in the town •

• •

• •

• • •

Oshakati has several shopping malls and complexes - Game and Etango shopping mall. Yellow & Mvula M’nyango shopping complex among others. Magistrate and High Court Financial institutions – First National Bank, Standard Bank, Bank Windhoek, Nedbank, Agri-Bank and Bank of Namibia Government institutions – different ministries State Owned Enterprises- NBC, Road Authority, Social Security Commision, GIPF, NHE among others. The town has the intermediate State Hospital – Oshakati Intermediate Hospital which is referral hospital for the northern regions University of Namibia – OSHAKATI CAMPUS


Oshakati

Capital/Developmental Projects • • • • •

Servicing of land for residential and business purposes Formalization of informal settlements New townships establishment Upgrading of road, water and sewerage networks Creation of recreation parks

Mayor of Oshakati: His Worship Onesimus Shilunga Deputy Mayor: Honourable Ndamononghenda Hamunjela Chief Executive Officer: Mr Werner Iita Contact Details Tel: +264 (65) 229-500 Fax:+264 (65) 220-435 Oshakati Town Council 906 Sam Nujoma Road, Civic Center, Oshakati info@oshtc.na | www.oshtc.na

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Oshakati Accommodation

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A very warm welcome, to Namibia lodge 2000 & Safari, offering you pristine nature of Uukwangula ambience. Come and enjoy remarkable & breathtaking viewing of the sunrise & sunset as well as ‘endless horizons’ of the Lutshetshete Pan. Our friendly staff will ensure that your stay with us is indeed worth your while. • Team building facilities • Dining out • Bar • Sleep in our spacious, private & comfortable rooms • Conferences: workshops / weddings / mini meetings • Photography & print • Business centre with wifi • Ice blocks • Meat cutting and many more • Private lounge and swimming pool. Oshakat West, 5km Okahao Road, en-route Omugulu-Gwobashe Tel: +264 (0)65 220 853 / Fax: +264 (0)65 220 469 • Cell: + 264 (0)81 281 8722 admin@namlodge.com • www.namlodge.com

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Ondangwa

Ondangwa is one of the oldest historic towns in the North Central regions of the country. The town was established as a missionary center in the 1800’s. After that it became known as an assembly point, as people flocked to Ondangwa to look for employment in the Southern towns, including South African mines in the late 1950’ and 1960’s. Due to its central location, the town was later used by the South African Army as their administrative centre up until Independence, and thus the only Airport of international standard in the entire North of the country is to be found here in Ondangwa.   Ondangwa continued to be an administrative centre from independence until 1992 when the

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new regional structure was designed by the current government, proclaiming it as a town in 1992 under the Ministry of Regional Local Government and Housing and becoming an autonomous town in 1998. Currently the town has seven elected councilors and between 60 full time staff members, headed by the Chief Executive Officer. Ondangwa is located in the Oshana Region which is the most populated area of the country. This beautiful town is situated on the main road to and from the North, offering an airport and a train station and it is only 60 km away from the Namibian-Angolan border.


Ondangwa

Ondangwa town caters for more than half of the population of the Oshana and Oshikoto regions in terms of shopping and other vital services. The town has a population of about 30 000 residents, but this figures increases more than double during the day as many people do come for shopping and other services in town from the nearby villages. The business and economic sector of Ondangwa is still in its growing stage compared to other towns within the region. More than 50% of the economically active population is employed in the agricultural sector. From the Council’s point of view, businesss opportunities could be in the following sectors:

There are a few industrial developments in the town such as the Northern Tannery, manufacturing leather from hides and skins from local abattoirs, Ondangwa Plastic Converters manufacturing plastic tanks and other plastic products India Namibia Plastic Technology offering advice and technical support for upcoming manufacturers in plastic technology, Namib Foam manufacturing mattresses and all other foam related products and many companies manufacturing building materials such as bricks, stones and concrete for construction purposes, Chem Paints manufacturing different kinds of paints. The recent opening of Gwashamba Mall has created a great outlet and opportunity for shopping lovers and the retail industry as a whole.  

INDUSTRY The industry sector of Ondangwa is underdeveloped despite its location and and the close proximity of the town to neighboring country Angola.

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Ondangwa

TOURISM, ART AND CULTURE Tourism is not yet fully developed in Ondangwa. The town is mainly providing accommodation establishments for local travellers. Although there are possibilities to develop tourist attractions in Ondangwa, such as Eco Tourism, Culture Tourism and Art and Craft Centres, this has not yet been exploited.

HOTEL & ACCOMMODATION Ondangwa does have high traveler statistics from other parts of the country but very low figures from travelers abroad that come and stay in and around town. Places such as Ekamuti Lodge, Ondangwa Town Lodge, Ondangwa Airport Lodge and Ondangwa Rest Camp are a hit to local visitors. However, establishments need to adapt to more modern and market relevant pricing and marketing structures.

tap a potential market that could provide good returns on investment.

Vision Management and staff members of the OTC demonstrate their sense of purpose through their vision and wish to translate their mission into meaningful results using their vision listed hereunder. To become the an effective engine of sustainable development.

Mission   The mission statement of the OTC, defines the nature and core purpose of this town council: To govern and administer local affairs of the inhabitants of Ondangwa town through planning, coordination and partnership in the delivery of urban services towards socio-economic development and improved quality of life.

LEISURE, RECREATION AND ENTERTAINMENT Ondangwa, with its growing population of working youth and young adults lacks entertainment facilities, clubs and restaurants. Young people mostly go to nearby towns for social engagement over weekends. Establishing more businesses that host events on a regular basis could

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CONTACT US: Tel:+264 65 240101 | Fax:+264 65 240453 Ondangwa Town Council Private Bag 2032, Ondangwa E-mail: marketing @ondangwatown.com www.ondangwatown.com


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Ekamuti Lodge and Conference Centre in Ondangwa, offers a new world of conference possibilities with the state-of-art facilities. The lodge has an auditorium for 1200 delegates, convention space for 600 delegates, Wi-Fi internet access, a gym and a massage parlour. The lodge has 40 clean upmarket en-suite bedrooms, with air conditioning and flatscreen TV. Enjoy a drink in one of our two bars after which you can enjoy a delicious meal in our restaurant. We can’t wait to welcome you at Ekamuti Town Lodge! Tel: +264 (0)65 246357 • Fax: +264 (0)65 246 311 • Cell: + 264 (0)81 127 2566 Ondangwa • P.O.Box 23128, Windhoek • ekamuti@jandpgroup.biz

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Koonyaka Guesthouse offers 23 air conditioned double rooms, all equipped with television sets. Furthermore we offer a public bar and VIP Bar and Lounge to relax and unwind after a busy day. Our conference facility can accommodate up to 150 people. Our restaurant and swimming pool are near completion. We are located on the main road “Aakwenyanga” between Ondangwa and Ongwediva, about 2 km from the Oshiko road block.

Tel: 065 238 094 • Cell: 081 292 6585 / 081 403 1351 Ondangwa • kquesthouse@iway.na

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KUNENE REGION . . . . The Kunene Region in north-western Namibia is bor- hinders agriculture, it is one of the wildest and least . . . . dered by the Kunene River in the north (forming the populated regions in Namibia. It is relatively under. . boundary between Namibia and Angola); the Erongo developed compared to the rest of the country. . . Region in the south; the Etosha National Park and . . Omusati, Oshana, Oshikoto and Otjozondjupa re. . gions in the north-east; and the Atlantic Ocean in the The landscape in this rugged region varies from . . mountain ranges, extensive valleys seasonally cov.. west. The 2011 census enumerated the population in ered in undulating expanses of golden grass, dry riv.. the Kunene Region as 86,856. Opuwo is the largest er courses, and the coastal Namib Desert. It is much .. town in the region and serves as its capital. sought-after by four-by-four enthusiasts because of .. .. The region is still commonly referred to by its pre-in- the rough terrain and for its spectacular scenic beau.. .. dependence names of Kaokoland or Kaokoveld. Due ty. Moreover, Kaokoland is home to the nomadic and .. to the remote setting, inaccessibility of its mountain- much-publicised Himba people and imposing fea.. ous terrain, and the dry climate that significantly tures such as the Epupa Falls. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EPUPA FALLS . . . . The Epupa Falls, known as the Monte Negro Falls in . . Angola, are located 135 km (84 miles) downstream .. .. on the border of Angola and Namibia. They are cha.. racterised by a series of drops, totalling some 60 me.. .. tres over a distance of about 1.5 km, with the greatest .. single drop being 37 metres. The name ‘Epupa’ refers .. .. to the spray from these gushing falls, and originates .. from the language of the Himba people. ..

With impressive sunsets and a magnificent array of bird life, visiting the Epupa Falls is a highlight when exploring the Kunene Region. Spectacular rock formations with rich textured colouring are set off by a variety of trees, including the stately baobab. Birdlife ranges from the African fish eagle to kingfishers. Due to the specialised nature of this steep riverbank habitat, the Epupa Falls harbours several endemic fish and other aquatic species.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OPUWO . . . . The capital of the Kunene Region is Opuwo. During . . the apartheid era when Namibia – referred to then as . . South West Africa and administered by South Africa . . as a mandate or Bantustan – Kaokoland was intended . . . . to be a self-governing Himba homeland. However, . . an actual government was never established. Never. . theless, like other homelands in the then South West . . Africa, the Kaokoland Bantustan was abolished in . . May 1989, at the beginning of the transition of Na. . . . mibia towards independence. .. .. The name Opuwo was given to the settlement by the .. legendary commissioner of Ondangwa, Hugo Hahn, .. who came in search of land to build an office. Upon .. .. his arrival, he asked local headmen to give him land .. for this purpose. The headmen gave him a small plot, .. and when they tried to give him more land, Mr Hahn .. responded: “Opuwo (it’s enough for me). I don’t want .. 80

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any more land.” The local residents of Opuwo called it Otjihinamaparero at the time, and some still call it that. First-time travellers could well drive right through Opuwo without even being aware they were driving through a town. For those who do stop, one of the first things they are likely to notice is the large number of churches, a characteristic of many towns and settlements in Namibia. Another surprise would be that Opuwo is not inhabited exclusively by Himbas, but is a melting pot in its own right, as it is also home to Hereros, especially those belonging to the Tjimba or ‘antbear’ tribe, Owambos, a smattering of Portuguese (who trekked from Angola to Namibia in search of a safer place to live during the civil unrest of the mid-1970s), and even small communities of former South Africans.


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Most people in Opuwo live on the outskirts of town . . in informal dwellings they have built themselves. . . A captivating feature of the town is the incidence . . . . of locals dressed in traditional Himba attire, espe. . cially the women with their leather headdresses . . and body adornments made from animal hide, iron . . . . and shell beads. Herero women wearing their tra. . ditional ‘Victorian’ attire are also seen here, their . . extraordinary headdresses with two curved exten. . .. sions on either side symbolising cattle horns. There .. is usually a brooch between the ‘horns’, often with .. matching brooches worn on their scarves. .. .. .. Opuwo is a place that seems to have evolved at .. random. The buildings and grounds are positioned .. .. in a haphazard way between open spaces of arid ..

land amongst large irrigation ditches with no bridges over them. One of these complexes, which now functions as the school, was part of the defence force basis during the war years. South of Opuwo, near Warmquelle, the small settlement of Sesfontein – its name derived from the six fountains that have their source in the vicinity – is well worth a visit for its historical significance. Almost a hundred years after it was first built, the historical monument, originally a police outpost, was reconstructed and equipped to accommodate tourists. The palm trees at the fort were planted by the German police officers stationed at Sesfontein to combat weapons smuggling and elephant and rhino poaching.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE PEOPLE OF THE REGION . . . . The well-known author and traveller Lawrence G Green also visited Sesfontein, or Zessfontein, mean. . Green visited Kaokoveld and the Skeleton Coast ing water from six fountains. Situated on the south. . in the early 1950s with what was later to become ern border of Kaokoveld, it was the lost world of . . . . known as the Carp Expedition. He gives an account ‘Shangri-La’ of the Khoikhoi. In early days two . . of his experiences in his famous book, Lords of the Khoikhoi groups, the Topnaar and Swartbooi, lived . . Last Frontier. at Sesfontein. The Topnaar were also called !Nara. . nin, after the !nara melon that was then their staple. . . . . The base camp for the explorers was at Orupembe, For this reason they were looked down upon as being . . ‘the place where the plains begin’, about 65 kilome- almost like hunter-gatherers. . . tres from Rocky Point. From there the party went on . . . . to meet the Tjimba people at Otjiu on the banks of . . the Hoarusib. The Tjimba were impoverished Herero . . who were no longer part of the large and wealthy . . families and clans. They are said to have migrated to . . the Kaokoveld from the north. They lost their cattle . . .. and became hunter-gatherers of such food as they .. could find. Because they dug for their food like ant.. bears, they became known as the Tjimba or ‘antbear’ .. people. Other Herero, who managed to retain their .. cattle, moved further south and became known as the .. .. Himba or ‘boasters’. The difference between the Tjim.. ba and the Himba is therefore one of possessions, the .. Himba having the cattle with which to boast. .. 82

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE HIMBA . . . . The most represented ethnic group in the Kunene Re. . gion is the Himba, a nomadic people who still live . . according to ancient customs and traditions, eking . . out an existence by farming with cattle and goats. . . . . Visiting a Himba settlement to photograph these true . . denizens of the desert has become one of the main . . targets for visitors to the Kunene Region. . . . . . . In the Himba social structure the women are respon. . sible for milking the cows, and taking care of the . . children. They tend to perform more labour-intensive . . work than men, such as carrying water to the village . . . . and building homes. Men handle the political tasks . . and legal trials, and herd and slaughter cattle for spe. . cial occasions. . . .. Members of an extended family typically dwell in .. .. small, circular hamlet of huts and work shelters that .. surround the ancestral fire and a central livestock en.. closure. Both the fire and the livestock are closely .. tied to the Himbas’ belief in worship of the ances.. .. tors, the fire representing ancestral protection and the .. livestock allowing ‘proper relations between human ..

and ancestor’. Traditionally both men and women go topless and wear skirts or loincloths made of animal skins. Adult women wear beaded anklets to protect their legs from venomous animal bites, and are famous for rich red colour of their skins. This is created by the mixture of butterfat and ground red ochre that they rub over their bodies as protection against the rigours of the sun, symbolising earth’s richness and the blood of life, and reflecting the Himba ideal of beauty. Renowned for their tall, slender physique and the beauty of their sculptural features, Himba women are much sought-after by photographers and artists. Himba hairstyles indicate age and social status. Children have two plaits of braided hair. From the onset of puberty the girls’ plaits are moved over their eyes, and they can have more than two. Married women wear headdresses with many streams of braided hair that are coloured and shaped with the butterfat mixture. Single men wear one plait down the back of their necks, while married men wear a turban of many butterfat-soaked plaits.

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Opuwo

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Opuwo

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Opuwo

O

puwo is the capital of the Kunene Region. It has a popu-

lation of 15,000 people and is situated in the North-West of Namibia, 720 km from Windhoek. It is the gateway to the fascinating Himba people and the famous Epupa Falls. The area is rich in mineral deposits and boasts beautiful landscapes. Opuwo was only officially declard as a town in November 2000. In the olden days the mail between Opuwo and Ondangwa was delivered by a runner once a week and inhabitants still used the old manual exchange telephones. The nearest bank was 300 km away in Oshakati and only in the 1990’s television, FM radio and automatic telephone systems were introduced. Nowadays Opuwo has modern communication systems, commercial banks and shops as well as many tourist attractions. Regional offices of most government ministries are also represented in Opuwo. The annual Opuwo Trade Fair is an important event on the calendar of Opuwo Town Council. Being held at the end of May, this event has attracted over 100 exhibitors in the past and provides an opportunity for economic growth of Opuwo by attracting investors and new business ventures to the Kunene Region. Tel: +264 (0)65 273 007 • Fax: +264 65 273 250 • www.opuwo.info

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Opuwo

• VISION: To be the leading and a well-developed town in Namibia with modern infrastructure and skilled human resources, providing excellent services. • MISSION: Opuwo Town Council is committed to meet and exceed its communities’, stakeholders’ and visitors’ expectations, within the constraint of resources and to allow full participation of all, with the aim to unleash their potential in a responsive and environmentally friendly manner. We are the gateway to the famous Epupa Falls, beautiful landscape, rich mineral deposits and boast a rich and unique indigenous culture. Mayor - Cllr Tuarungua Kavari (Swapo) Deputy Mayor - Cllr Rebbeca Iipinge (Swapo) Chairperson Management - Cllr Rex T. Sheehama (Swapo) Dep Chair Management - Cllr Anna M Engombe (Swapo) Member of Management - Cllr Licius Mupya (NUDO) Additional member - Cllr Uaurikua C. Kakuva (DTA) Additional member - Cllr Katahunda S Matundu (DTA) CEO - Mr. Alphons Tjitombo

Mayor - Cllr Tuarungua Kavari Deputy Mayor - Cllr Rebbeca Lipinge

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Opuwo Accommodation

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The OHAKANE Guest House in Opuwo, Kaokoland offers you: • Luxury accommodation with air-conditioning • Full board and bar service in a relaxed atmosphere • Guided tours take you off the beaten track on excursions to Himba villages • Guided 4x4 camping trips • Transportation and tour-guide service for fly-in visitors • Our experienced guides will show you the harsch beauty of Kaokoland and its fragile environment in fully equipped 4x4 vehicles.

Tel: +264 (0)65 273 031 • Fax: +264 (0)65 273 025 ohakane@iway.na

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The lodge is situated on a hilltop with breathtaking views overlooking a valley with magnificent sunsets and offering 360° view of the surrounding area. The lodge offers 21 luxury twins rooms, 1 luxury double room, 3 sets of twin inter leading rooms (6 rooms) and 12 standard twin rooms. Rooms have en-suite bathrooms and are fitted with air conditioners. The lodge have an excellent bar and restaurant where guests can enjoy mouth watering meals, a private lounge next to the wine cellar offers a relaxed atmosphere and place to enjoy an evening with friends. Opuwo Country lodge offers 12 large camping sites. All the camping sites have 220v electricity, ablution facilities with hot and cold water, barbeque area and wash up facilities. Reservations Tel: +264 64 418 661 • Reservations Fax: +264 64 405 596 Lodge Tel: +264 65 273 461 • Lodge Fax: +264 65 273051 • reservations@opuwolodge.com www.opuwolodge.com • GPS: 18° 2’ 40.2” Latitude, 13° 49’ 59.9” Longitude.

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Opuwo Amenities & Services

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Opuwo Amenities & Services

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OMUSATI REGION . . . . The Omusati Region in north-western Namibia is Namibia due to the location of the primary view. . . . bordered by the Kunene River and Angola in the points. Since the volume of the Kunene River fluctu. . north, the Kunene Region in the south and west, ates significantly from season to season, the actual . . the Oshana Region in the east and the Ohangwena width and volume of this feature varies greatly. De. . Region in the north-east. In the 2011 census, the pending on the time of year, visitors can choose to . . population in Omusati was counted as 243,166. The participate in adventure activities such as white-wa. . . . region is characterised by the mopane tree, omusati, ter rafting and canoeing, and, if really lucky, could . . after which it was named, and is home to the famous even spot a crocodile in the process. . . Ruacana Falls. . . . . The river has been harnessed for hydroelectric pro. . ONE OF THE LARGEST duction immediately above the falls. During the dry . . FALLS IN AFRICA season the water is syphoned off entirely and the falls .. .. Situated 135 km upstream from the Epupa Falls in run dry. From roughly December to June, the annual .. the Kunene Region, the Ruacana Falls is one of the rains provide sufficient water for the hydroelectric .. largest waterfalls in Africa, both by volume and by project, and in the remaining months of the year the .. width. It is 120 metres (390 feet) high and 700 me.. tres (2,300 feet) wide when in full flood. Shaped like falls return to their impressive natural state. .. .. a wide semi-crescent, the falls straddle the border of The Kunene is suitable for white-water rafting and .. Angola and Namibia, and are listed as being within canoeing – but beware of the crocodiles! ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RUACANA TOWN, DAM AND ETUNDA . . . . Located on the banks of the Kunene River, Rua- 240 megawatts. . . cana is known for the picturesque Ruacana Falls .. nearby, and for its underground hydroelectric plant Situated near Ruacana is the government-suppor.. that is linked to the nearby dam across the border ted irrigation scheme on the farm Etunda, extending .. .. at Calueque in Angola. In 1988, during the Ango- over 600 hectares (1,500 acres). It was established .. lan Civil War, the dam and pumping station were in 1993. Half of the farm is commercial irrigation .. bombed in a Cuban air strike. A few years later the land, while the other half is allocated to 82 small.. .. facility was partially repaired and today NamPow- scale farmers. Maize, wheat, watermelons, bana.. er operates three turbines producing a maximum of nas and other crops are cultivated at Etunda. .. The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam Nujoma . . . . . . BIRTHPLACE OF NAMIBIA’S FOUNDING FATHER . . . . Samuel Daniel Shafiishuna Nujoma, the first Presi- After a fellow worker was sent home without com. . dent of Namibia, was born in the Omusati Region. pensation following a serious injury, Nujoma tried to . . He led the South-West Africa People’s Organization form a trade union for railway men, but was then dis. . . . (SWAPO) in its long struggle against South African charged from the railways. He subsequently worked . . rule and took office as President when Namibia ob- as a clerk and a store assistant. . . tained independence on 21 March 1990. . . In the late 1950s he helped establish the Ovam. . . . Sam Nujoma was born on 12 May 1929 as the eldest boland People’s Organization, the forerunner of the .. of eleven children from Helvi Mpingana Kondom- South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO). .. .. bolo and her husband, Daniel Uutoni Nujoma, in He went into exile in 1960 and was named presi.. the Etunda village in the Ongandjera District, the dent of SWAPO after it was founded on April 19 of .. Omusati Region of today. He spent his early years that year. In 1966, after several years of fruitlessly .. tending the family’s few cattle and goats. His primary petitioning the United Nations to compel South Af.. .. education began at night school, and he left school rica to release control of South West Africa, SWAPO .. at age 16 to become a railway dining-car steward. embarked on an armed struggle. .. 94

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . While SWAPO’s guerrilla force, the People’s Libera. . tion Army of Namibia (PLAN), failed to liberate any . . . . territory, it succeeded in focussing international at. . tention on Namibia. In 1973 the UN General Assem. . bly recognised SWAPO as the sole legitimate repre. . . . sentative of the Namibian people, and in 1978 the . . Security Council adopted Resolution 435, which set . . .. out terms for eventual Namibian independence. This .. was finally accepted by South Africa in 1988. In Sep.. tember 1989, after nearly 30 years in exile, Nujoma .. .. returned to Namibia to lead SWAPO to victory in the .. UN-supervised November elections. On the day of .. .. Namibia’s independence, March 21, 1990, Nujoma .. was sworn in as president. ..

Although often accused of being a Marxist, Nujoma professed himself drawn more to the pragmatism of Scandinavian democratic socialism. In 1994 he was re-elected president, and in 1998 the SWAPOcontrolled parliament agreed to amend the constitution, allowing Nujoma to run for a third term. The move drew international and domestic criticism, but Nujoma easily won re-election in 1999. He later announced that he would not run for a fourth term, and in 2005 stepped down from office, allowing for a peaceful transfer of power to his democratically elected successor, Hifikepunye Pohamba (SWAPO). Nujoma bowed out as president of SWAPO in 2007.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UUKWALUUDHI, OMUGULUWOMBASE AND . . . . OMBALANTU . . A good opportunity to learn about Owambo culture From here, visits can be arranged to the historical . . firsthand is by visiting the Uukwaluudhi Traditional Omuguluwombase, where the guerrilla warfare . . . . Homestead and Museum at Tsandi. Uukwaluudhi, waged by SWAPO forces for Namibia’s indepen. . one of very few traditional kingdoms still in exis- dence was launched. . . tence, is the former home of King Josia Shikongo . . . . Taapopi, which falls within the Uukwaluudhi Con- The main attraction at the Ombalantu Baobab Heri. . servancy. Worlds apart from European palaces, the .. royal homestead is a typical Owambo homestead, tage Centre is the huge baobab tree estimated to be .. around 800 years old that served as a post office, .. surrounded by a mopane-pole palisade. This African- chapel and hiding place during tribal wars. The site, .. style palace offers a comprehensive cultural experi.. ence, incorporating the customs, beliefs and accom- located in Outapi, also offers the Ombalantu Baobab .. modation style of the Oshiwambo-speaking people Tree Campsite laid out under the tree, and a small .. .. into the royal residence. Local crafts of the area can kiosk, craft centre and facilities .. be bought at a craft shop. for day visitors. .. 96

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Okahao Town’s vision is to be an economically and

provided for by two commercial banks namely: First

socially stable town.

National Bank and Standard Bank. Two fuel filling sta-

Proclaimed as a town in 2005, Okahao town is located at about 75km west of Oshakati (Oshana region), 25km east of Tsandi and 55km south of Outapi.Okahao is an emerging small town that is indeed a strategically located urban centre with various economic development potentials. Okahao is the commercial

tions cater for the transport industry in and around town. Okahao Town is looking forward to various new upcoming developments including private clinics, medical centre, schools, a hotel, a guesthouse, ser-

centre for the entire Okahao and Otamanzi constitu-

vice station, business complexes and various gov-

encies with a combined population of about 31 000

ernment institutions.However, a wide range of un-

people, making it the preferred centre for modern

tapped investment opportunities still exist in Okahao,

commercial and administrative services.

ranging from Furniture retail businesses, Commercial banks, Industrial related businesses, Vocational Train-

Okahao town stands in the shortest route from the

ing Centres, Supermarket chains, Fitness and Health,

north-eastern towns to the Kunene region, via Os-

Information and Communication

hakati – Okahao – Omakange – Opuwo roads. In ad-

Technology

dition, access to Outapi (Omusati region’s commer-

and many others.

cial and administrative capital) is eased by a 55km tarred road via Tsandi and a direct 40km gravel road. Relative to its age and size, Okahao town boasts various economic activities comprising of formal and informal trading, transportation, technical workshops and construction businesses. The majority of the working class however is employed by various ministries and public institutions in town such as the district hospital, schools and other government agencies. Banking services are

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businesses,


CONTACT US: Tel. 065 252204/5 Fax. 065 252201 info@okahaotc.com.na www.okahaotc.com.na Like us on Facebook: Okahao Town Council

Education and Health

rant, a craft shop, braai area, camping area and

Okahao town has one primary school, one junior

ablution facilities. The site is therefore without doubt,

secondary school (privately owned), a combined

a must visit.

school and two secondary schools with both junior and secondary school phases. In addition to its gov-

Other interesting sites to visit in town are Ombupupu

ernment owned district hospital, the town also has a

magic pond and Okandambo. The magic pond is

private medical practice and pharmacy. The hos-

historically attached to the Ongandjera kings’ lin-

pital serves a wide community range in the entire

eage, and in the past believed to possess supernat-

constituency and beyond.

ural powers that required certain rituals to be performed before fetching water from it. Okandambo

Tourism and Hospitality

is a small well where, according to Ongandjera his-

Okahao is home to one of the National Heritage

tory, activities and proceedings of electing a new

sites in the region, the Okahao Baobab Heritage

king used to take place in the olden days. Even

Site. This huge tree was previously used as a tortur-

though it has lost its original appearance, Okan-

ing place for locals by the South African colonial

dambo is still visible and interesting to visit. Accom-

troops, the history that led to its national recogni-

modation in Okahao is currently catered for by two

tion. Notwithstanding the history of the tree, the site

establishments:

is one of the best developed National heritage sites

Ongozi Guest Lodge

in the area. In its naturally welcoming environment,

and King Uushona

the site features various structures. There is a restau-

Bed & Breakfast.

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Omusati Accommodation

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Uukwaluudhi Safari Lodge, north of Etosha National Park in the arid Kunene region, offers travellers a chance to follow Black Rhino on foot, and see the wildlife of the Kaokoland. Accommodation… include eight well-appointed Meru tented units, all en-suite with views over the Uukwaluudhi plains, accommodation includes breakfast and dinner. Activities... the lodge offers early morning sunrise game drives, Rhino tracking on foot, guided hikes, afternoon sundowner game drives, hot air balloon flights at sunrise over the beautiful Uukwaluudhi reserve. Facilities... restaurant with individual tables, bar, lounge, small curio shop and swimming pool, all in perfect harmony with the natural surroundings. Reservations: Tel: +264 64 418661 • Fax: +264 64 405596 • Lodge: Tel: +264 065 273 504 or 273 Cell: + 264 81 319 6585 • reservations@uukwaluudhi-safarilodge.com • www.uukwaluudhi-safarilodge.com

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Ruacana Accommodation

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Ruacana Eha Lodge in northern Namibia is a natural gateway to the wonders of the Kaokoveld, the Etosha National Park, the Epupa falls and the vibrant African culture of the Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions. This glittering oasis in the rugged landscapes, offers relaxation, conferencing and opportunity to come face-to-face with forgotten Africa. • 21 Double en-suite air-conditioned rooms • 1 Family suite • Tea & coffee facilities • Restaurant • Lounge with bar • Swimming pool • Gym • Volleyball & squash courts • Landing strip with transfers • Campsites with own braai facilities. Hot water, electricity, showers & toilets.

Tel: +264 (0)65 271 500 • Fax: +264 (0)65 270 095 PO Box 62, Ruacana, Namibia • info@ruacanaehalodge.com.na • www.ruacanaehalodge.com.na

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OHANGWENA REGION . . . . This region is bordered in the north by Angola (the cattle farming and the small-scale cultivation of ma. . Cunene Province in the west and the Cuando Cu- hangu, a kind of pearl millet. Although the inhab. . bango Province in the far north-east); in the east by itants of the region depend on rain-fed agriculture, . . the Kavango Region; in the south by the Oshikoto other crops could be established here under inten. . . . Region; in the south-west by the Oshana Region; sive cultivation. . . and in the west by the Omusati Region. It extends . . over 10,706 km2, and according to the 2011 census, The main settlements in Ohangwena straddle the .. is populated by 245,446 people. The town Eenhana well-maintained paved road from the Angolan .. border to Ondangwa, where it joins the Oshakati.. serves as its capital. .. Tsumeb trunk road. The eastern part enjoys good .. The northern and western parts of the region are the grazing land, but the shortage of water and poor .. most densely populated. The predominant activities communications render it uninhabitable. A recently .. .. practised by the people in Ohangwena are essen- completed tarred road from Onhuno to Okongo has .. tially a subsistence form of agriculture, comprising increased the agricultural potential of the area. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF EENHANA . . . . The Eenhana Heroes’ Memorial Shrine represents a In 2007 on Heroes’ Day – a public holiday that is cel. . monument to the history of Namibia’s liberation strug- ebrated annually on 26 August to mark the beginning . . gle. It acknowledges the courage of the combatants of the armed struggle in the Namibian War of Inde. . that made up PLAN – the People’s Liberation Army of pendence – the Eenhana Heroes’ Memorial Shrine . . . . Namibia (PLAN), which comprised Namibians from was inaugurated by the incumbent President of Na. . different parts of the country – and of the civilians mibia, Hifikepunye Pohamba. . . who supported them. .. .. A mass grave pertaining to Namibia’s liberation strug.. gle unearthed at Eenhana is one of the largest to be .. discovered in the country. Following independence .. in 1990, the Namibian Government resolved to build .. .. a shrine here, so that the remains of fallen sons and .. daughters of Namibia could be reburied in a dignified .. and respectful manner. .. The Gateway to Northern Namibia

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ongula Village Honestead Lodge . . . . . . PRESIDENT POHAMBA’S INAUGURAL ADDRESS . . . . “The remains we have buried here today belong to warfare – especially the Third Convention relative to . . sons and daughters from different parts of Namibia the Treatment of Prisoners of War and the Fourth Con. . who fought under the banner of SWAPO. I believe vention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in . . that the shrine we have built here at Eenhana should Time of War – were simply non-existent. . . . . be seen as representing the reburial of the remains of . . our fallen comrades from all over Namibia. “As a result, they committed heinous war crimes . . . . “The armed struggle for Namibia’s freedom and inde- against our people, regardless of whether they were . . pendence was at the centre of our strategy to termi- armed combatants or civilians, men or women. Our . . people were murdered, tortured, held in solitary con.. nate the foreign occupation of our motherland. We finement and injected with poison. Some were simply .. knew that we were fighting a vicious enemy that had .. no regard for the laws of warfare, human rights or hu- thrown into the Atlantic Ocean after they had been in.. man dignity. Throughout the armed liberation strug- jected with poisonous chemicals. Those heinous acts .. gle, South Africa’s apartheid regime disregarded all of abuse of human rights were carried out among oth.. .. international protocols and conventions regarding the ers, by the notorious architect of chemical warfare for .. conduct of warfare. To them, the Geneva Conventions the apartheid regime, Wouter Basson, who became .. of 1949 and their protocols regulating the conduct of known as Dr Death, and his cohorts. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “Unlike the apartheid regime, which disregarded inter. . national conventions and protocols, SWAPO and the . . cadres of PLAN conducted the war efforts according to . . the provisions of international law. The enemy soldiers . . who were captured by PLAN combatants were treated . . . . humanely. One such case involved an enemy soldier . . by the name of Johan van der Mecht who was cap. . tured at Elundu on 18 February 1987. The discovery of . . the mass graves here at Eenhana and elsewhere further . . highlights the brutality of the apartheid regime, which .. .. the people of Namibia fought against for 24 years. .. .. “Today we are confronted, once again, by the hor.. rors perpetrated against our people at the hands of the .. apartheid regime. Many sons and daughters of Namib.. .. ia, cadres of PLAN, today lie in unmarked graves. It is .. even more painful to note that some of those who fell ..

in battle were not buried; their remains are still lying somewhere in the valleys, forests and hills within Namibia as well as beyond its borders. We are, however, consoled by the fact that today we have carried out a dignified reburial of our heroes and heroines whose remains were discovered in mass graves here at Eenhana and in surrounding villages. “I believe that the shrine we have built here at should be seen as representing the reburial of the remains of our fallen comrades from all parts of Namibia. The shrine should therefore not be regarded as a regional project. Consequently a decision was also taken that, should further remains of our heroes and heroines of the liberation struggle be discovered in future, such remains would also be reburied at the locality where they were found.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ongula Village Craft Shop . . . . . . . . COMMUNITY PROJECTS IN OHANGWENA . . When travelling from west to east in the top reaches manufactured and sold at the centre. . . . . of the country, the Omauni Community Campsite . . provides a simple base and overnight option. Situ- Situated at the Lutheran church grounds of the old . . ated in the north-eastern corner of the Ohangwena Finnish mission in Engela, about 50 km north of . . Region, it lies approximately 70 km from Okongo Ondangwa in the Oshana Region, is Nghuoyepon.. .. and 240 km from Rundu, accessible from the C45 go, a basket-weaving group that involves mainly .. gravel road linking the north-central and Kavango people who are visually impaired. The activities .. regions. of the group are centred on a literacy programme, .. where members learn Braille, English and mathe.. The Community Forest at Omauni covers an area of matics. When the lesson is over, they weave baskets, .. .. 750 km2, with a campsite located in the Centre for which are sold at the annual Ongwediva Trade Fair .. Sustainable Forest Management. Rustic furniture is presented in Ongwediva in the Oshana Region. ..

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Eenhana Accommodation

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Monte Carlo Guesthouse Eenhana offers a combination of luxury accommodation at affordable prices. Accommodation consists of single rooms, double rooms and family rooms each with en-suite bathroom/showers. Rooms are equipped with air-conditions, television ,Dstv, fridge and work tables. Breakfast is included in all our rates. We offer conference facilities. There is secure parking and 24 hour security. For a warm experience where nature meets modernity visit Monte Carlo Guesthouse. Our friendly team is prepared to welcome you. Visit us to see what makes us unique.

Tel: +264 65 221541 • Fax: +264 65 222255 • Cell: +264 812304915 • Cell: +264 812984642 nhindacc@iway.na • Eenhana

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Oshikango Accommodation

14 Oshikango Country Lodge is a 10 roomed thatch-roofed establishement offering comfortable, accommodation, excellent cuisine, an indoor and large outdoor lapa-bar, swimming pool as well as regular night time entertainment. All our airconditioned rooms are en-suite and include television with DSTV and Angolan channels. A beautiful atmosphere to wine and dine, food is A la carte with Portuguese cuisine with dash Greek flavors. With excellent wine consisting of different type of Portuguese and South African wines of your selection. Situated on the main road of Oshikango about 1 km to the border. Tel: +264 (0)65 264 650 • Fax: +264 (0)65 264 840 info@oshikangocountrylodge.com www.oshikangocountrylodge.com

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Ongula Accommodation

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Situated in the heart of Owamboland, a stone throw from Ondangwa north of Etosha National Park, you are invited to experience our local traditions! Built alongside a live homestead, 4 luxury Rondawels (African-style round huts) accommodates 8 guests offering exclusivity and the luxury of home, while participating in local chores, delighting in local culinary dishes and drinks and learning local arts and crafts. This is your introduction to our world and life-style! Ongula Village Homestead Lodge is dawn of tourism in the North – Central Region beyond Dunes and Wild-life.

Reservations +264 (0)61 250 725 • Lodge +264 (0)65 264 555/ +264 264 565 Cell: +264 85 625 6551 • GPS: 17º44’43”S 16º8’33”E info@ongula.com • ongula@resdest.com • www.ongula.com

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Ongula Accommodation

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OSHIKOTO REGION . . . . The Oshikoto Region in north-central Namibia is best The two areas have important cultural and historical . . known for the scenic beauty and abundance of game links in that the Ndonga people have extracted copper . . that can be viewed in the internationally famous at Tsumeb since the earliest times. A trunk road con. . . . Etosha National Park, while two intriguing features, nects these two areas. . . Lake Otjikoto and Lake Guinas, are found in the area . . south-east of Etosha. Tsumeb was the main city in the Oshikoto Region un. . . . With Omuthiya as its regional administrative cen- til 2008, when Omuthiya was instated as its capital. The Eenhena, Ondangwa, Oshakati, N’ giva and On. . . . tre, Oshikoto borders on the Ohangwena, Oshana, giva airports service Omuthiya. Tsumeb is neverthe. . Kunene, Otjozondjupa, and Kavango regions. In 2011 less considered as the gateway to northern Namibia, . . the population counted in the Oshikoto Region was especially because of its proximity to the famous Eto. . 181,973. . . sha National Park. . . .. Cattle farming and mining are the major source of live- The Nakambale Museum is a community-based tour.. lihood for the people living in this region. It is home .. to the Ndonga people, who are known for produc- ism institution established at Olukonda in 1995 by .. ing rings and other tools made of copper. In terms of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Namibia (ELCIN). .. agriculture, Oshikoto is divided into the northern and It offers exhibitions on the premises of the National .. .. southern areas. In the north agriculture is the main Monument, where the Nakambale Church was built .. focus and source of the economy, while in the south in 1870 when the first Finnish missionaries settled in .. economic activities include mining and cattle rearing. Owambo. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ECONOMY AND INFRASTRUCTURE . . . . Mahangu (pearl millet) is the principle crop in the . . north of the region, while cattle are reared in the . . Mangetti and the Tsumeb districts. . . . . . . Although the Tsumeb Mine has only a limited life . . span, combined with the associated support indus. . tries and services, it provides a boost for the commu. . nal areas of the region. . . .. .. Communications are good in much of the region, .. with a paved trunk road running across, linking it to .. the south and north of the country. While the national .. microwave network terminates at Tsumeb, telecom.. munications are now carried across the region and as .. .. far as Oshakati by means of a newly laid fibre-optical .. cable. ..

Nakambale Museum

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE ETOSHA NATIONAL PARK . . As part of an area that extended westwards to the At- cal vernacular as the ‘great white place of dry water’, . . lantic coast, today’s Etosha National Park was origi- makes the Etosha game-viewing experience unique. . . . . nally proclaimed in 1907 as Game Reserve No 2 by . . the then German Governor Frederich von Lindequist. A series of waterholes along the southern edge of . . With subsequent additions it became the largest game the pan guarantee rewarding and often spectacular . . reserve in the world, covering a vast area of ±80 000 game viewing. In good rain years the pan fills with . . km2. For political considerations its size was progres- water draining southwards from Angola via a delta. . . . sively diminished, until by 1975 it had been reduced like system of shallow rivers and oshanas, drying out . . by 77% to its present surface area of 22 912 km2. Yet it in the winter to become an austere expanse of white . . is still one of the largest game reserves in Africa. In Sep- cracked mud, shimmering with mirages and upward. . tember 2007 the centennial of the Etosha National Park spiralling dust devils. . . was celebrated at Namutoni, the easternmost resort. . . No less than 114 mammals species are found in Eto. . . . Etosha owes its unique landscape to the Etosha Pan, a sha. Of these several are rare and endangered, such . . vast shallow depression of approximately 5 000 km2 as black rhino and cheetah, and the lesser-known . . consisting of saline desert, savannah and woodlands, black-faced impala, which is endemic to north-wes. . a feature that forms the heart of the park. Once part tern Namibia and south-western Angola. Other large .. .. of a large inland lake fed by rivers from the north and mammals in the park include elephant, giraffe, blue .. east, it dried up 120 million years ago as continental wildebeest, mountain and plains zebra, hyaena and .. drift changed the slope of the land and the course of the trio of ‘big cats’ – lion, cheetah and leopard. Ante.. the tributaries. For the greater part of the year the pan lope species range from kudu, gemsbok and the large .. is a bleak expanse of white, cracked mud that shim- and stately eland, to the diminutive Damara dik-dik. .. .. mers with mirages on most days. Seeing vast herds of Smaller mammals include jackal, bat-eared fox, honey .. game against this eerie backdrop, referred to in the lo- badger, warthog and the endearing ground squirrel. ..

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Of the 340 bird species that occur in Etosha, about . . one third are migratory, including the European bee. . . . eater and several species of wader. Larger birds are . . ostrich, kori bustard and greater and lesser flamingo, . . tens of thousands of which congregate on the pan to . . breed during a good rainy season. Ten of Etosha’s 35 . . raptor species are migratory. The ones most common. . . . ly seen are lappet-faced, white-backed and hooded . . vultures, while sightings of Cape, Egyptian and palm. . nut vultures have been recorded. The eight species of . . owl include four species of nightjar, the pearl-spotted . . owlet and the southern white-faced scops-owl. . . . . . . In the dry season, which extends over the greater part . . of the year, Etosha’s animals and birds are dependent . . on about 30 springs and waterholes. These provide . . excellent game-viewing and photographic opportuni.. .. ties. Before setting out it is advisable to enquire from .. camp officials about present game movements. Dur.. ing the rainy season, especially, the bird life at the .. main pan and Fischer’s Pan provides a top viewing .. experience. The regulation that visitors – once outside .. .. the rest camps – may not leave their vehicles, is strictly .. enforced. Etosha’s vegetation varies from dwarf shrub ..

savannah and grasslands, which occur around the pan, to thorn-bush and woodland savannah throughout the park. Eighty per cent of all Etosha’s trees are mopane. West of Okaukuejo is the well-known Sprokieswoud, Phantom or Fairy Forest, the only location where the African moringa tree, Moringa ovalifolia, grows in a flat area. Etosha is open throughout the year and is accessible by tarred roads via the Andersson Gate on the C38 from Outjo, the Von Lindequist Gate in the east from Tsumeb on the B1, the Galton Gate in the west from Kowares on the C35, and the King Nehale Gate located on the Andoni plains just north of the Andoni waterhole, which provides access from the north-central Owambo regions on the B1 from Onyati. All gates are open from sunrise to sunset and traffic in and out of the King Nehale Gate is managed on the same basis as at the Andersson and Von Lindequist gates, although visitors staying within the park need to plan ahead to reach their accommodation establishments before sunset.

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OLUKONDA . . . . Olukonda, the place of the first missionary station for . . . . the Owambo people, was founded in 1870 by Finnish . . missionaries, and was referred to as ‘the capital of the . . north’ in colonial times. In the 1880s Martti Rautanen, . . nicknamed Nakambale, became missionary at Olu. . . . konda and initiated the building of a church in 1889, . . and a missionary house in 1893. Both the church and . . the mission station buildings are still existent, and . . . . were declared as the Olukonda National Monument . . in 1992. The church, although no longer in regular . . use, is occasionally used for wedding ceremonies. . . . . Rauttanen and his family are buried nearby. Close to . . the National Monument there is a rest camp, which .. was financed by the Government of Finland. .. .. .. OTJIKOTO AND GUINAS .. LAKES .. Visitors to Namibia who are qualified divers can join .. .. club members on a journey of underwater exploration .. to view these two subterranean lakes. A rare, mouth..

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Lake Otjikoto

breeding species of tilapia or dwarf bream is found in both these interesting curiosities. A unique underwater dumping site located 24 km north-west of Tsumeb in the Oshikoto Region had its origins in 1915 when retreating German forces dumped their military equipment into Lake Otjikoto during the South West Africa Campaign. Many years later it was discovered by members of the Windhoek Underwater Club, who realised that the armaments and weaponry dated back to the First World War. What’s left of these interesting relics can be inspected by qualified divers. Today the majority of the armaments are on display in the Tsumeb Museum. The 130 metre-deep Lake Guinas, which lies northwest of Otjikoto, is noted for its beautiful setting and the dark inky-blue colour of its water. However, since it is on a farm, permission to view it needs to be obtained from the owner.


Otjizondjupa Accommodation

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We offer you reasonably priced accommodation consisting of 48 Standard and Luxury rooms, 2 refreshing swimming pools with surrounding thatched roofs, a restaurant, bar, 2 conference venues, internet facilities and a campsite for our adventurous guests. Peace Garden Lodge offers a typical Namibian and African decor, styled with thatched roofs and well spaced rooms to give you a more private stay. All our rooms are suited with: En-suite bathrooms • Air Conditioner • Satellite TV (DSTV) • Fridge • Coffee facilities • Telephone Tel: +264 (0)67 243 648 • Fax: +264 (0)67 243 749 Located 7km before the town of Grootfontein peacegardenlodge@iway.na • www.peacegardenlodge.info

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Desert Air

11 January 2013. The mercury is touching the 34°C

spoken of for many years to come!

mark on the thermometer. Almost no wind… One of our Aero Commanders, a Cessna Caravan and two

Upon the arrival of the passengers, they are greeted

Cessna 210’s are fuelled up, and ready for the day that

with a big smile and their pilots are eager to give them

lies ahead. Passengers, however, have just phoned our office to notify that they might be a little bit late. No problem for the pilots, as a quick phone call to the Tower will extend our flight plans for another 30mins. Our office quickly notifies the destination’s pick up

a hand with their luggage. A detailed pre-take-off briefing is given on all the exciting scenery they might see on their way to Opuwo. The routing for today, after a visit to the Himba’s at Opuwo, a fly-over past the Rua-

to let them know that there has been a slight delay.

cana Falls, a quick fuel stop at Ondangwa, and then a

Pilots are ready and all-too-eager to meet the new pas-

final visit at Oshivelo. Weather in Nambia has got a

sengers. The possibility is always there that after this

mind of its own and no matter what the forecast says,

meeting and flight, a friendship will start that will lead

the Met office rarely seems to get it right. We have load-

to a lot of fond memories, a Namibian adventure that

ed extra fuel, just in case the weather deteriorates and

will never be forgotten and an experience that will be

we need to divert to the planned alternate.

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With engines coming to a roaring start, we are cleared for taxi to the runway in use. Keeping the density altitude in mind, little wind and the weight that was loaded on board; we push the throttle to unleash every stallion in the engine to pull the weight that forces the nose of the aircraft to point towards the blue skies. The Cessna’s climb out at a graceful angle, giving a view of Windhoek that only a lucky few have seen before. The Aero Commanders shoot past at steady climb of 2000 feet per minute, reaching 28 000 feet above sea level in no time at all. The whole flight is calm, the sun warm from the east and there is not a cloud in sight. The earth below is green and lush, the Omaruru riverbed creates a distinct line from North East to South West, the Brandberg is a glowing red to the west of track and to the far north, one can begin to make out the Groot Berge with their flat tops. Breath taking… The sounds of camera shutters fill the cabin and the cool air coming out of the air vents brings a soothing respite to the heat. As a pi-

lot, one cannot help but worry about the width of the doors upon exiting the aircraft after landing, because the smiles are too wide to fit through the doors. Arriving at Opuwo, a “runway inspection” is done to ensure that there are no animals on the runway. The locals around the airfield also understand that this means they have to stand clear and assist in getting the animals off the runway, as this manoeuvre indicates to the people on the ground that we are coming in for landing. With the vehicles waiting on the ground to transfer the passengers to the local Himba kraals, the aircrafts come to a halt in perfect formation, making sure that the propellers are stopped over a clean, hard patch of ground to ensure there will not be any propeller damage from stones being picked up due to propeller vortices on shutdown. The cabin doors swing open, filling the cabin with the smells of the African bush. Slowly, the “Opuwo fog” (dust) dissipates, exposing the mountains that, just a few minutes ago looked so small from the sky.

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The passengers are greeted with an ice cold refreshment and a firm, friendly handshake. They are then helped into the cool, air-conditioned bus and taken to meet the mysterious tribe that not many people have encountered. They will see their day-to-day struggles and way of life, untouched by the pressures of the rest of the world and with no inclination to change their habits to fit in with the rest of us. Peaceful and friendly people, living their entire lives with purely that which Mother Nature throws at them. After a quick scrumptious lunch at a lodge close by, the next leg will mainly consist of a low level flight over the Ruacana falls and then setting course South East to Ondangwa where we will fill up our aircraft for the legs that still lie ahead. For this time of year, it is the rainy season in Namibia and this means that the Ruacana falls should be a very impressive sight – even more so, from where the birds fly free. Because the flight is now conducted at midday, we will fly at reduced power settings to ensure that the

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“potholes” we go through will not be as noticeable as when flying at “maximum cruise power settings”. As we approach Ruacana, you will see – almost like a mini Victoria Falls – the water splashing up and creating a light fog cloud over Nampower’s Hydro Electric facility. A comfortable turn is flown over the Ruacana Falls to show our passengers just how big the wall, over which the water flows, is. A full 360 is done to ensure the best pictures to show the friends and family when they are home again. After thumbs up from all the passengers, the nose is pointed to the East, South East towards Ondangwa and a little bit of altitude is gained to get to cooler air. Landing at Ondangwa’s almost-3km-long asphalt runway is a breeze and halfway down the runway, power is actually added, to get to the end of the runway as the Aero Commander, Caravan and 210’s are capable of landing much shorter. The runway is vacated and the aircraft taxied straight to the fuel bays where the Aero Commander and


Caravan will quench their thirst with JetA-1 and the Cessna 210, Avgas. At the terminal, a quick visit to the loo and then back to the aircraft. Walking past the new terminal which is being built, one cannot help but think that this building will be spectacular once completed. With aircraft refuelled, taxi clearance is given to take off from runway 08, right hand out and then straight to Oshivelo. Oshivelo’s runway is situated just to the north of Mokuti and to the east of the Etosha Pans. This runway was a very busy airfield in the Border War and was built to last for many lifetimes. Unfortunately, the vegetation has other ideas and the runway is quickly overgrown - and with vegetation, comes animals. The pilots are well aware of the hazards and are trained to handle anything that Africa can throw at them. Upon arrival, the Aero Commander does a low runway inspection to clear off animals that could possibly be close to the runway, and because he is much faster than the other aircraft, he

calls his fellow aviators on the radio to tell them that the runway is clear for landing. Runway inspection done, a “tear drop” pattern is flown, gear out, flaps out and the passengers are informed that they will be touching down in less than a minute. Safety belts are tightened and the approach for landing is stable and smooth. On touch down, the propeller blade angles are changed so that instead of “pulling” the aircraft forward, they now create a “push force” that causes everyone to be pushed into their safety belts and allows the Aero Commander to come to a stop in a very short distance. This is a capability of the Aero Commander that will make any aviator’s jaw drop. Runway is vacated on the eastern side and everyone gets out, camera in hand so that the landings that follow can be recorded so that later tonight around the camp fire with a cold beer in hand, one can have a good giggle at the landing of no.3 which seemed to be very bouncy. And a new nick name is given to that pilot – Captain Kangaroo.

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Every runway and flight over the Namibian soil has a story to tell, something to remember and a sense of “home� when thinking back to that time when

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you flew there. Only a few people in the world have been lucky enough to experience it: a truly amazing adventure. The questions is: Are you ready for it?


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . Listing of Categories . . . . Hut No. Accommodation Page . . 7 Ekamuti Town Lodge 69 . . 1 Etuna Guest House & Tours 30-31 . . Koonyaka Guest House 70 . . 8 . . 2 Mango Guest House 32 .. 5 Mazizi Lodge 32 . . 13 Monte Carlo 108 . . 6 Namibia Lodge 2000 & Safari 58 . . Ohakane Guest House 88 . . 9 . . 15 Ongula Village & Homestead Lodge 110 . . 10 Opuwo Country Lodge 88 . . 14 Oshikango Country Lodge 109 . . 3 Pandu’s Bed & Breakfast Pensaõ 33 . . Peace Garden Lodge 117 . . 16 . . 12 Ruacana Eha Lodge 101 . . 4 Seven Valleys Guesthouse, The 33 . . 11 Uukwaluudhi Safari Lodge 100 . . . . . . Amenities & Services . . Ados Accountants 59 . . Bank Windhoek 47 . . Desert Air 118-122 . . Development Bank of Namibia 34 . . 59 . . Family Optometrist . . Far North Namibia & Cheetah Car Hire 35 . . FNB Namibia 15 . . Formula Courier Services 59 . . Kaokoland Butchery 90 . . 90 . . Kaokoland Cell & Electronics . . Kaokoland Restaurant 90 . . Kapia Optics 71 . . Magnet Bureau De Change Pty Ltd FIC / 36-37 .. 38 .. Makalani Real Estate 39 .. Maroela Mall .. Multichoice Namibia 40-41 .. Namibia Airports Company 2/3/73 .. Namibia Breweries 91 .. Northcote Private School 72 .. 28-29 .. OATF ..

Page

Okahao Town Council

98-99

Ondangwa Town Council

66-68

Ongwediva Medipark

42

Ongwediva Town Coucil

22-27

Optic Exclusive Ondangwa

71

Optic Exclusive Ongwediva

42

Opuwo Town Council

86-87

Oshakati Pharmacy

60

Oshakati Town Council

56-57

Rennies Travel Namibia

44

Silver Wolf Spur

44

SME Bank

45

Torga Optical

61

University of Namibia

46

Yap Gym / Yap Health & Fitness

47

Industrial/Commercial Auas Motors Ongwediva

48

Build It Ondangwa

75

Build It Oshana

52

Direct Auto Parts

62

Erongo Commercial Vehicles

48

Fanny’s Motor Repairs

49

Global Glass Aluminium & Hardware

49

Greg’s Motor Spares

63

M & Z Motors

76

Millenium Refrigeration & Electrical Services 50 Omhalanga Mills

51

Omudhingoloko Refrigeration Supplies

77

Ozzy’s Auto Repairs

64

Pennypinchers Timbercity

53/BC

Peralin Paints (PTY) Ltd

54/BF

PRC Tuning

50

Professional Vehicle Repairs

51

Trans Namib Holdings Ltd

74

Water Engineering Africa

64

Windhoek Hire Sales & Services

65

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . ..

. . . . . . alphabetical listing . . Page . . Ados Accountants 59 . . 48 . . Auas Motors Ongwediva . . Bank Windhoek 47 . . Build It Ondangwa 75 . . 52 .. Build It Oshana . . Desert Air 118-122 . . Development Bank of Namibia 34 . . 62 . . Direct Auto Parts . . Ekamuti Town Lodge 69 . . Erongo Commercial Vehicles 48 . . Etuna Guest House & Tours 30-31 . . 59 . . Family Optometrist . . Fanny’s Motor Repairs 49 . . Far North Namibia & Cheetah Car Hire 35 . . 15 . . FNB Namibia . . Formula Courier Services 59 . . Global Glass Aluminium & Hardware 49 . . 63 . . Greg’s Motor Spares . . Kaokoland Butchery 90 . . Kaokoland Cell & Electronics 90 . . Kaokoland Restaurant 90 . . 71 . . Kapia Optics . . Koonyaka Guest House 70 . . M & Z Motors 76 . . . . Magnet Bureau De Change Pty Ltd FIC / 36-37 . . Makalani Real Estate 38 . . Mango Guest House 32 . . 39 . . Maroela Mall . . Mazizi Lodge 32 .. Millenium Refrigeration & Electrical Services 50 .. Monte Carlo 108 .. 40-41 .. Multichoice Namibia .. Namibia Airports Company 2/3/73 .. Namibia Breweries 91 .. 58 .. Namibia Lodge 2000 & Safari .. Northcote Private School 72 ..

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Page

OATF

28-29

Ohakane Guest House

88

Okahao Town Council

98-99

Omhalanga Mills

51

Omudhingoloko Refrigeration Supplies

77

Ondangwa Town Council

66-68

Ongula Village & Homestead Lodge

110

Ongwediva Medipark

42

Ongwediva Town Coucil

22-27

Optic Exclusive Ondangwa

71

Optic Exclusive Ongwediva

42

Opuwo Country Lodge

88

Opuwo Town Council

86-87

Oshakati Pharmacy

60

Oshakati Town Council

56-57

Oshikango Country Lodge

109

Ozzy’s Auto Repair

64

Pandu’s Bed & Breakfast Pensao

33

Peace Garden Lodge

117

Pennypinchers Timbercity

53/BC

Peralin Paints (PTY) Ltd

54/BF

PRC Tuning

50

Professional Vehicle Repairs

51

Rennies Travel Namibia

44

Ruacana Eha Lodge

101

Seven Valleys Guesthouse, The

33

Silver Wolf Spur

44

SME Bank

45

Torga Optical

61

Trans Namib Holdings Ltd

74

University of Namibia

46

Uukwaluudhi Safari Lodge

100

Water Engineering Africa

64

Windhoek Hire Sales & Services

65

Yap Gym / Yap Health & Fitness CC

47


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127


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Gateway to Northern Namibia - the official guide  

A publication featuring the northern regions of Namibia, including Omusati, Oshana, Kunene, Ohangwena and Otjikoto. Each region highlights...

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