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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

Presents:

Supervisory / Team Lead Training 103

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

Supervisory / Team Lead Training 103 Participant Resource Guide Revised 2012 by LEGACY SCS ©2009 by LEGACY SCS

For more information on LEGACY SCS Organizational Development and Leadership Training, contact: LEGACY SCS Organizational Development 99 Bow Street Suite 300 W Portsmouth, NH 03801 Phone: (603) 422-0777 Fax: (603) 422-7337

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS Expectations The 5 A’s of LEGACY Training •

Attend every session. If there are extenuating circumstances that will keep you from attending a session, it is your responsibility to seek out a team member and have them share with you the learning from the session you missed. Missing a session is not an excuse to not be able to learn and apply the materials that were covered.

Actively participate. Talk with the facilitator and with your teammates. Ask questions. Offer ideas from your experiences. Make suggestions on how to apply the material. This does not mean you have to talk in every session, but it does mean that you should show that you are actively engaged in some way (making eye contact with whomever is speaking, nodding your head to show you understand a point that was made, etc.). Please understand that your active participation in this process is vital, as you and the trainer are partners in this venture. The learning outcomes expressed on page 4 will not happen if you expect them to happen to you. You must make them happen. Attendance at sessions is not enough to make the desired outcomes become a reality – you must actively engage with the materials and with your teammates. You must be willing to think critically and creatively about the contents and how you can apply them, you must be willing to believe that a solid understanding in such materials will help you become an even better LEGACY team member than you already are, and you must actively work outside of sessions to apply the contents explored in each session.

Admit that you have a lot to learn. We all do. Learning should be a cycle that never ends. Each session, a different topic will be introduced in this training, and while you might be familiar with some topics more than others, no one person is an expert in all of them. The facilitator and your LEGACY teammates each come to the table with a great deal of experience that can shed new light on an old topic, so if you are paying attention, there will always be something new to learn or a new way to look at something you already know.

Assist your teammates. While this curriculum aims to help each of you as individuals, it also aims to help build the LEGACY team. Sharing this experience together can be very powerful if you strive to work together to support each other, challenge each other, and generally help each other in understanding and application of this material. And, you might make a few new friends while you’re at it!

Apply yourself and the material. You will only take away from this learning experience how much you are willing to give to it. So please – strive to apply yourself and make the most of the material and the overall experience. And, of course, as had been already mentioned, work to implement tangible actions based on what you learn in the sessions. If you apply yourself to the material and apply the material in your facility, you will be well on your way to creating a values-driven culture in your facility and on your team!

Please take a moment to seriously consider what it will mean for you to be able to meet your own expectations and those of your teammates, as well as the 5 As. Think it

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

WELCOME to LEGACY Supervisory / Team Lead Training!

You are about to embark on Part 3 (Personal Skills) of an exciting journey that will help you to explore your role as a LEGACY Team Lead in relation to: • • • •

LEGACY The folks with whom you work Your own personal leadership development Scenarios you may encounter in your environment

Through the exploration of the Team Lead role, you will learn a great deal about yourselves, your teammates/associates, and LEGACY as a company. Moreover, you will learn valuable practical philosophies and skills that you can apply after each session. These philosophies and skills will make you an even greater asset to your facility and to the LEGACY team than you already are. __________________________________________ WHAT YOU WILL NEED TO GET STARTED:  Printed copy of this manual  Pen or pencil  Extra paper (if you like to take a lot of notes!)

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS At LEGACY, LEADERSHIP is defined as the active, team-oriented process of thinking critically about (THINK it), believing in (MEAN it), and living (SHOW it) our LEGACY values, day-in and day-out, in a meaningful way that drives the creation of extraordinary, sustainable relationships and results. Leadership is about being an active part of establishing LEGACY’s Performance-Based Culture. This training program, while it is not specifically focused on the LEGACY Values, is being presented to you because it builds upon the foundation of the LEGACY Values and will assist you in creating a PerformanceBased Culture in your facility/office and on your team. The LEGACY Training motto “THINK it. MEAN it. SHOW it.” which is a reflection of the fact that our aim with this training is to help us develop our overall leadership philosophies and skills through our exploration of contents related to LEGACY’s Core Values. Each session in each of the training modules we will encounter throughout the duration of this training program will connect back to the theme of “THINK it. MEAN it. SHOW it.” by asking and exploring the answers to three key questions: 1 – WHAT? This section includes the content, the topic; will mainly consist of exploring pertinent information about the topic at hand. By asking and answering “WHAT?” about the topic, we will explore the “THINK it” component of our leadership development model. 2 – SO WHAT? This section will challenge the group to make sense together of what the content really means for the company, for our office, and for ourselves as individuals. By asking and answering “SO WHAT?” about the topic, we will explore the “MEAN it” component of the leadership development model. 3 – NOW WHAT? This will be a brief but important section, where we will be challenged as a team to create an initiative (it can be big or small, team-based or individual-based, etc.) to apply the contents and demonstrate our understanding of them. By asking and answering “NOW WHAT?” about the topic, we will examine the “SHOW it” component of our leadership development model. Considering any of these three questions in isolation of the others, while important, does not give a comprehensive view of the topic at hand. However, when we put all three of the components together – regardless of the topic – it presents the most holistic view of the topic and helps those studying the topic to exert their leadership potential in very positive and effective ways. Visually, this holistic approach looks like the diagram at the top of the next page:

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IMPACTING LIVES â—? DEVELOPING LEADERS

Lesson Five: Personal Skill Development

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS Session 21: Delegation and Follow Up

SESSION 21 OBJECTIVES: • The group will explore the basics of delegation through a few basic activities • Each Team Lead will have a solid understanding (THINK it) of what delegation is really all about • Each Team Lead will begin to explore the importance of effective delegation and begin to think about their own personal delegation skills (MEAN it) • Each Team Lead will practice/apply session learning on the floor , and complete the Homework Challenge before next session (SHOW it) _________________________________________________________________ What’s the Big Idea?

Delegation can make or break a leader

WHAT is DELEGATION? Delegation is one of the most important skills you can develop not only as a LEGACY team member, but as a leader and a person in general. Good delegation saves you time, develops people, grooms successors, and motivates others. Poor delegation causes confusion and frustration (for you and others) and serves only to de-motivate; not to mention - poor delegation usually leads to the task at hand being performed incorrectly, which can lead to more conflict, tension, and frustration in addition to the need for more time and energy to re-do the work, re-delegate the task, etc. Delegating SMARTER! A simple delegation tool is the SMARTER acronym - a quick checklist for proper delegation:

• • • • • • •

Specific Measurable Agreed Realistic Time-bound Ethical Recorded

Steps to Effective Delegation 1 - Define the task Confirm in your own mind that the task is suitable to be delegated. Does it meet the criteria for delegating? 2 - Select the individual or team What are your reasons for delegating to this person or team? What are they going to get out of it? What are you going to get out of it?

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IMPACTING LIVES � DEVELOPING LEADERS 3 - Assess ability and training needs Is the other person or team of people capable of doing the task? Do they understand what needs to be done. If not, you can't delegate. 4 - Explain the reasons You must explain why the job or responsibility is being delegated. And why to that person or people? What is its importance and relevance? Where does it fit in the overall scheme of things? 5 - State required results What must be achieved? Clarify understanding by getting feedback from the other person. How will the task be measured? Make sure they know how you intend to decide that the job is being successfully done. 6 - Consider resources required Discuss and agree what is required to get the job done. Consider people, location, premises, equipment, money, materials, other related activities and services. 7 – Agree to deadlines When must the job be finished? Or if an ongoing duty, when are the review dates? When are the reports due? And if the task is complex and has parts or stages, what are the priorities? At this point you may need to confirm understanding with the other person of the previous points, getting ideas and interpretation. As well as showing you that the job can be done, this helps to reinforce commitment. Methods of checking and controlling must be agreed with the other person. Failing to agree this in advance will cause this monitoring to seem like interference or lack of trust. 8 - Support and communicate Think about who else needs to know what's going on, and inform them. Involve the other person in considering this so they can see beyond the issue at hand. Do not leave the person to inform your own peers of their new responsibility. Warn the person about any awkward matters of politics or protocol. Inform your own boss if the task is important, and of sufficient profile.

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IMPACTING LIVES � DEVELOPING LEADERS 9 – Provide feedback on results It is essential to let the person know how they are doing, and whether they have achieved their aims. If not, you must review with them why things did not go to plan, and deal with the problems. You must absorb the consequences of failure, and pass on the credit for success. Levels of Delegation: 1 "Wait to be told." or "Do exactly what I say." or "Follow these instructions precisely." This is instruction. There is no delegated freedom at all. 2 "Look into this and tell me the situation. I'll decide." This is asking for investigation and analysis but no recommendation. The person delegating retains responsibility for assessing options prior to making the decision. 3 "Look into this and tell me the situation. We'll decide together." This is has a subtle important difference to the above. This level of delegation encourages and enables the analysis and decision to be a shared process, which can be very helpful in coaching and development. 4 "Tell me the situation and what help you need from me in assessing and handling it. Then we'll decide." This is opens the possibility of greater freedom for analysis and decision-making, subject to both people agreeing this is appropriate. Again, this level is helpful in growing and defining coaching and development relationships. 5 "Give me your analysis of the situation (reasons, options, pros and cons) and recommendation. I'll let you know whether you can go ahead." Asks for analysis and recommendation, but you will check the thinking before deciding. 6 "Decide and let me know your decision, and wait for my go-ahead before proceeding." The other person is trusted to assess the situation and options and is probably competent enough to decide and implement too, but for reasons of task importance, or competence, or perhaps externally changing factors, the boss prefers to keep control of timing. This level of delegation can be frustrating for people if used too often or for too long, and in any event the reason for keeping people waiting, after they've inevitably invested time and effort, needs to be explained.

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IMPACTING LIVES â—? DEVELOPING LEADERS 7 "Decide and let me know your decision, then go ahead unless I say not to." Now the other person begins to control the action. The subtle increase in responsibility saves time. The default is now positive rather than negative. This is a very liberating change in delegated freedom, and incidentally one that can also be used very effectively when seeking responsibility from above or elsewhere in an organization, especially one which is strangled by indecision and bureaucracy. E.G, "Here is my analysis and recommendation; I will proceed unless you tell me otherwise by (date)." 8 "Decide and take action - let me know what you did (and what happened)." This delegation level, as with each increase up the scale, saves even more time. This level of delegation also enables a degree of follow-up by the manager as to the effectiveness of the delegated responsibility, which is necessary when people are being managed from a greater distance, or more 'hands-off'. The level also allows and invites positive feedback by the manager, which is helpful in coaching and development of course. 9 "Decide and take action. You need not check back with me." The most freedom that you can give to another person when you still need to retain responsibility for the activity. A high level of confidence is necessary, and you would normally assess the quality of the activity after the event according to overall results, potentially weeks or months later. Feedback and review remain helpful and important, although the relationship is more likely one of mentoring, rather than coaching per se. 10 "Decide where action needs to be taken and manage the situation accordingly. It's your area of responsibility now." The most freedom that you can give to the other person, and not generally used without formal change of a person's job role. It's the delegation of a strategic responsibility. This gives the other person responsibility for defining what changes projects, tasks, analysis and decisions are necessary for the management of a particular area of responsibility, as well as the task or project or change itself, and how the initiative or change is to be implemented and measured, etc. This amounts to delegating part of your job - not just a task or project. You'd use this utmost level of delegation (for example) when developing a successor, or as part of an intentional and agreed plan to devolve some of your job accountability in a formal sense. Source: http://www.businessballs.com/delegation.htm SO WHAT? NOW WHAT?

Delegation can make or break a leader Think it

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

Session 22: It’s About That Time!

SESSION 22 OBJECTIVES: • Each Team Lead will have a solid understanding (THINK it!) of time management skills • Each Team Lead will begin to explore the importance of having effective time management skills and how their management of time adds up to have impact to the business (MEAN it) • Each Team Lead will practice/apply session learning on the floor (SHOW it) __________________________________________________________________ What’s the Big Idea?

We don’t manage time – we manage ourselves

WHAT? Understanding TIME MANAGEMENT Time management is commonly defined as the management of time in order to make the most out of it.  TIME MANAGEMENT IS A MYTH!  No matter how organized we are, there are always only 24 hours in a day. Time doesn't change, so we can’t manage it. All we can actually manage is ourselves and what we do with the time that we have!! “You can't manage time, it just is. So ‘time management’ is a mislabeled problem, which has little chance of being an effective approach. What you really manage is your activity during time, and defining outcomes and physical actions required is the core process required to manage what you do.” – David Allen Plan Your Day

• • • • • • • Think it

Visualize your long term picture of success and put it in writing. Review your goal frequently. Your goal should be specific, measurable, achievable and compatible with where you are now. There should be an end date as well. Steven Covey calls this "Begin with the end in mind." Try to do your planning at the same time every day. Use this time to review past accomplishments as well as future things to do. Use only one planner to keep track of your appointments. Keeping a separate business and personal planner creates confusion. Write out a To Do list every day. Include items that can be completed, such as "Prepare exhibits for monthly report", rather than just "Work on report." Separate your To Do list into A, B and C priorities. "A" items are important to your long term success, "B" may be urgent but not as important and "C" are those that would be nice to do if you get the time. Start with the A items. Don't work on a C just because it's easy to do. Also, break your A items into small manageable chunks, so they're easy to accomplish. Check off items as you complete them to give yourself a sense of accomplishment. Block off time in your planner for major activities. This might include a block of

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS time for working alone on major tasks. If someone wants to meet you during that time, say "I'm sorry, I already have an appointment." • Don't jam your day full of activities. Leave time for emergencies, special opportunities and thinking time. • Be your own manager. Ask yourself if you have met your goals, and what changes you plan to make to achieve them. • Do it now. People will often say "Call me next week, and we'll book an appointment then." Respond by saying, "Let's save ourselves a call and do it now." • Always plan time for balance; include family, fitness, recreation, social and spiritual activities. • Conduct a time study to see how you're doing and where the opportunities for improvement lie. Many people are only able to spend one quarter of their time on top priority activities. Moving this up to one third of the week means almost 4 more hours per week on key activities. Personality Type Typically seen… The Fireman - For you, every event is a Running to a car crisis. You're so busy putting out fires that you have no time to deal with anything else - especially the boring, mundane things such as time management. Tasks pile up around you while you rush from fire to fire all day.

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The Over-Committer - Your problem is you can't say 'No'. All anyone has to do is ask, and you'll chair another committee, take on another project, or organize yet another community event. You're so busy you don't even have time to write down all the things you do!

Hiding in the rest room

The Aquarian - There is such as thing as being too "laid-back" - especially when it starts interfering with your ability to finish tasks or bother to return phone calls. Getting to things when you get to them isn't time management; it's simple task avoidance. The Chatty Kathy - Born to socialize, you have astounding oral communication skills and can't resist exercising them at every opportunity. Every interaction becomes a long drawn out conversation - especially if there's an unpleasant task dawning that you'd like to put off.

Hanging out with feet up on desk

The Perfectionist - You have a compulsion to cross all the "t's" and dot all the "i's", preferably with elaborate whorls and curlicues. Exactitude is your

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS watchword, and you feel that no rushed job can be a good job. Finishing tasks to your satisfaction is such a problem you need more time zones, not just more time. Source: http://sbinfocanada.about.com/cs/timemanagement/a/timetypes.htm

I M P O R T A N T

U N I M P O R T A N T

URGENT Activities: • Crises • Pressing problems • Deadline-driven projects

NOT URGENT Activities: • Prevention • Relationship-building • Recognizing new opportunities • Planning

Results: • • • •

Results: • Vision, perspective • Balance • Discipline • Control • Few Crises Activities: • Trivia, busy work • Some mail • Some phone calls • Time wasters

Stress Burnout Crisis Management Always putting out fires

Activities: • interruptions, some calls • Some mail, some reports • Some meetings • Pressing matters Results: • Short-term focus • Crisis management • See goals and plans as worthless • Feel victimized, out of control • Shallow/broken relationships

Results: • Total irresponsibility • Termination • Dependent on others for basics

Stop Procrastinating • Harold Taylor defines procrastination as the intentional and habitual postponement of an important task that should be done now. • Understand the cause for procrastination, then develop strategies to fix it. • Recognize that procrastination stems from habit. New habits will be needed, and these take time and commitment to develop. • Recognize the difference between an appropriate decision to delay, and an irrational postponement without justification. • Fix procrastination by working on a) tasks and b) your environment: HTTP://WWW.GETMOREDONE.COM/TIPS.HTML

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

W e don’t manage time – we manage ourselves

SO WHAT? NOW WHAT?

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS Session 24: Setting Goals and Objectives

SESSION 24 OBJECTIVES: • Team Leads will learn effective guidelines for setting goals and objectives (THINK it) • Team Leads will begin to explore the importance of their goal setting to the overall team/business (MEAN it) • Team Leads will have clear action steps to implement (SHOW it) the information learned in today’s session __________________________________________________________________ What’s the Big Idea?

SMART goals or “no goals”

WHAT? Understanding GOALS and OBJECTIVES Creating SMART Goals Adapted from Paul J. Meyer's "Attitude Is Everything."

Specific A specific goal has a much greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal. To set a specific goal you must answer the six "W" questions: *Who: Who is involved? *What: What do I want to accomplish? *Where: Identify a location. *When: Establish a time frame. *Which: Identify requirements and constraints. *Why: Specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal. Measurable Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of each goal you set. When you measure your progress, you stay on track, reach your target dates, and experience the exhilaration of achievement that spurs you on to continued effort required to reach your goal. To determine if your goal is measurable, ask questions such as......How much? How many? How will I know when it is accomplished? Attainable When you identify goals that are most important to you, you begin to figure out ways you can make them come true. You develop the attitudes, abilities, skills, and financial capacity to reach them. You begin seeing previously overlooked opportunities to bring yourself closer to the achievement of your goals. You can attain most any goal you set when you plan your steps wisely and establish a time frame that allows you to carry out those steps. Goals that may have seemed far away and out of reach eventually move closer and become attainable, not because your goals shrink, but because you grow and expand to match them. When you list your goals you build your self-image. You see yourself as worthy of these goals, and develop the traits and personality that allow you to possess them. Realistic To be realistic, a goal must represent an objective toward which you are both willing and able to work. A goal can be both high and realistic; you are the only one who can decide just how high your goal should be. But be sure that every goal represents substantial progress. A high goal is frequently easier to reach than a low one because a low goal exerts low motivational force. Some of the hardest jobs you ever

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS accomplished actually seem easy simply because they were a labor of love. Your goal is probably realistic if you truly believe that it can be accomplished. Additional ways to know if your goal is realistic is to determine if you have accomplished anything similar in the past or ask yourself what conditions would have to exist to accomplish this goal. Timely A goal should be timely in 2 senses – 1.) it should have a timeline set to it with deadlines and such, and 2.) it should have components that will be completed within the next 6 months. By focusing on setting deadlines and by concentrating on the near future, your SMART goal is more likely to be completed! Setting Action Steps Action steps are the stepping stones along the journey to reaching your goals! Action steps should be: Specific: Similar to SMART goals, Action Steps need to be specific. Indicate when you will complete a task. What resources you will need to complete a task? Set deadlines and timelines. Task-based: Actions steps are essentially tasks or a “to do” list to reach your goals. Tasks should be easily accomplished and assist you in staying on track with manageable work. Energizing: Successfully completing an Action Step should be celebrated! This is an indication that you are staying focused and on track with your larger goals and vision. Performance-driven: Action Steps are all about outcomes and accomplishments. Implement tasks and projects to reach your goals, and reach your goals to work toward your Vision. OK, so what the heck is the difference between a Vision, Goals, and Action Steps?!?!? Fair question! Let’s imagine that this whole process is a ladder, with your VISION sitting at the top. Your Vision is the BIG thing you want to accomplish. It is ultimately what you strive for – it’s the big change you wish to create. The steps of the ladder represent your GOALS. Your Goals, which are dictated by your Vision, should be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely. Achieving your Goals will bring you one step closer to achieving your Vision. Imagine that your Goals are steps that you must take to reach your Vision, just like you must take steps up a ladder to reach the top. Of course, you must act to be able to reach your Goals – this is where ACTION STEPS come in. Action Steps are the Specific, Task-based, Energizing, Performance-driven measures you must take in order to

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS achieve each of your Goals. If Goals are steps toward reaching your Vision, then Action Steps are baby-steps toward reaching your Goals. SO WHAT?

NOW WHAT?

SMART goals or “no goals”

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS Session 25: Public Speaking and Presentation Skills

SESSION 25 OBJECTIVES: • Team Leads will explore (THINK it) the “WHAT”s behind: o common “trips ups” when it comes to public speaking o the connection between charisma and public speaking o the “Four Ps of Inferiority” that sometimes keep us from wanting to speak in public • Team Leads will be challenged to redefine “charisma” and identify tools to boost their individual ChariZma (MEAN it) • Each Team Lead will use the session’s learning in their future Pubic Speaking opportunities (SHOW it) ________________________________________________________________ What’s the Big Idea?

You can’t go wrong speaking from your heart

Just for fun, a few famous words about Public Speaking: “The human brain is a wonderful thing. It starts working the moment you’re born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public.” -- Unknown “According to most studies, people's number one fear is public speaking. Number two is death. Death is number two. Does that sound right? This means to the average person, if you go to a funeral, you're better off in the casket than doing the eulogy.” -- Jerry Seinfeld __________________________________________________________________ GROUP EXERCISE: Introductions! Please introduce yourself to the rest of the group, using: • Your Name • Your Position • Your Hometown • Your Favorite color -

How do you think you did? Would you want to listen to the rest of what you have to say after your introduction? If “yes,” why? If “no,” why not? __________________________________________________________________ WHAT is PUBLIC SPEAKING? 1 - ALL speaking is PUBLIC SPEAKING! If you can start to see this, your skills will begin to improve dramatically. Specifically, though, when we say “Public Speaking,” we are typically referring to those opportunities where one must speak to a group of people in a relatively public setting (a setting more public than just a one-on-one conversation or where one person is speaking to a few people in a small, informal setting). One of the best ways to improve one’s public speaking skills is to learn what factors are typically keeping us from wanting to speak in public or from believing we are effective public speakers. We will refer to such factors from here on out as “Competing Forces.”

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS What are the COMPETING FORCES for YOU as a public speaker? Some common Competing Forces are: - Fear of messing up - Fear of freezing up - Fear of stumbling over words - Fear of people looking at me - Fear of not being taken seriously

- Uncomfortable standing up in the open - General discomfort - General nervousness - General Anxiety - Don’t want to sound fake

The best ways to beat ANY Competing Force are to: 1. PAUSE, breathe, refocus 2. Boost our ability to override these forces consistently, or our CHARIZMA. Now, let’s talk about WHAT makes Public Speeches EFFECTIVE or INEFFECTIVE? Team A, please brainstorm answers to the following questions:  What are some characteristics that make speeches or speakers INEFFECTIVE? Team B, please brainstorm answers to the following questions:  What are some characteristics that make speeches or speakers EFFECTIVE? Please share your ideas with the rest of the group, and allow them to share any ideas they might add to your lists. Take notes here: INEFFECTIVE

EFFECTIVE

The ultimate goal here, of course is to avoid the INEFFECTIVE characteristics as

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS speakers within our speeches, and aim for employing as many EFFECTIVE characteristics as possible. Of course, a speech is only as good as its speaker! The WHATs behind creating and delivering an outstanding speech: 1 - Building an Outline - The Baseball Diamond (Appendix 11) 2 - Choosing Your Words / Practicing Your Content * Once you’ve built an outline, write down key words you want to remember to use in your presentation * Record bullet points onto 3 X 5 notecards; better yet – onto large newsprint so your main points are out there for everyone to see * Practice, practice, Practice! 3 - Using Your Voice * Tone and how to change it * Volume 4 - Watching Your Body Language * Stance * Eyes * Facial Expressions

* Not swallowing you words * Annunciation

* Body Movements * Hand gestures

SO WHAT?

Think it

Why is it important for you to develop effective public speaking skills in your role?

What difference will improving your public speaking skills make in how you are viewed by your teammates? By the Associates? By others in your life?

Which of the competing forces or ineffective characteristics “get you” the most frequently?

What do you think your facility’s culture would look and feel like if the entire Leadership Team used EFFECTIVE strategies all the time when Public

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS Speaking? In what ways would it benefit you? Your teammates? The Associates? Your customers?

NOW WHAT? RE-INTRODUCTIONS! Please re-introduce yourself to your teammates (Name, Position, Hometown, Favorite Color) – use what we learned today to do so! Homework Challenge: If you do not normally run stand-up meetings, ask your supervisor to let you speak for at least 3 minutes in one next week. Use the strategies outlined in today’s session. Ask your Supervisor to use the Public Speaking Evaluation below to evaluate your speaking. PUBLIC SPEAKING EVALUATION (adapted from Nancy Hunter Denney’s “How to Zing! Your Life and Leadership”) Place a check mark next to each trait (in the “Frequency of Use” column) whenever it is used by the speaker you are observing.

Trait

Frequency

Complimented/expressed appreciation to audience Smiled/appeared to be having fun Let silence happen instead of using space filler Used a personal story/example to make a point Used appropriate humor Identified 5 or less major points Used a medium other than voice to make or support a point If he/she strayed from outline, got back on track Faced left, right, and center audience equally Handled difficult questions appropriately Admitted to not knowing an answer Clarified a question if no one responds Repeated questions asked so that everyone is clear Made inappropriate remarks, uses inappropriate humor Became defensive if challenged by audience member Read directly from notes Made a self-serving comment (speaks out of ego) Apologized for being “bad” or not knowing something Looked away from audience Spoke “small” and softly Pointed out when they have lost their place Spoke quickly and ran words together Used distracting body movements Used space-fillers (“ummmm,” “like,” “right,” etc.) Used humor inappropriately • • • • • •

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On a scale of 1 (awful) to 10 (exceptional), how did this speech rate in your eyes? Why? On a scale of 1 (insignificant) to 10 (worthy), how did this speaker make you feel? Why? How would you describe this speaker’s perceptiveness to the audience? What methods did the speaker use to engage their audience? How did the speaker respond if the audience appeared not to respond? What various methods were used to make points?

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS • • • •

Think it

What five or less points were made? How effectively was the speaker’s content presented? How did the speaker handle questions? What did the speaker do to persuade the audience to listen to their points? What did the speaker do to demonstrate their confidence?

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

APPENDICES

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS Appendix 1

HOW TO PREVENT INTERRUPTIONS • Prevent interruptions from walk-in visitors by isolating yourself. Close your door. Put up a sign. Work in a conference room. If you work in an office, take a day to work on important projects at home if necessary. • Don't feel obliged to have "an open door policy." This allows people to manage your time on their terms, not on yours. "Open door" means you're generally available for honest communication from any level. It doesn't mean "always" available. • If you have an assistant, establish clear guidelines as to what kinds of interruptions are appropriate, so they can screen visitors. The assistant should have the authority to schedule a subsequent meeting, or divert the inquiry to someone else. • Block off your time for priorities. Handle larger, important projects early in the morning, before you read your email and before interruptions are likely to occur. Schedule a quiet hour to create essential private time. • Inform co-workers or subordinates that you generally like to come in at perhaps 8:00 am, and work on your own until 9:30 am. Only then do you accept meetings. • Change the layout of your desk so that you're not facing traffic. Otherwise, you encourage interruptions. • If you're storing materials or files that people have to access frequently, move them to another area. WHEN THEY WALK IN… • When someone asks for a few minutes of your time, respond with "Sure, how about if I come by your office at 2 o'clock this afternoon?" This gives you more control. • If they insist that it's urgent, ask them how many minutes they need, then agree to that time (or tell them how much time you can give them). • Stop people from telling stories. Interrupt them and say, "Can you summarize how I can help you in one sentence?" If they ramble on, say "OK, so how can you sum up what you need from me?" • If they're asking for help, ask them what solution they propose? • Agree to help them with their request, but schedule a specific time to do it. PREVENT THEM FROM STAYING… • When someone walks into your office or cubicle, immediately stand up. That way, your visitor is less likely to sit down and get comfortable. • If you must, place a binder or a briefcase on visitors' chairs, to discourage people from sitting down if they happen to drop in. (Or remove chairs altogether.) • Invent a meeting that you have to go to. Confess that you promised to call someone back about a confidential matter at exactly this time. Go make some photocopies. This will bring a meandering discussion to an end. • Set a time limit. Then check the time in an obvious way, and make sure to announce the end of the allotted time when it occurs. • Ask subordinates to "save up" items of importance and deal with them in a bunch at an appointed time. • Be careful that your tactics aren't counter productive to the organization. What may benefit you as an individual may be detrimental to the team. Isolating yourself might frustrate others, or cause them to waste their own time because you weren't available for help.

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS HOW TO DEVELOP TASK STRATEGIES Unpleasant tasks • Unpleasant tasks rarely turn out to be as bad as you think. • Complete these tasks first. Schedule them for early in the day. Give yourself a reward for doing them. Complex Projects • Something looms ahead of you: starting a small business, getting a job, preparing the annual budget. The job is too big or will take too long to do now, so you put it off. • Break large jobs into smaller, more manageable tasks. Plan and complete a start-up task, no matter how small. Indecision • People delay because they can't make up their minds. • Determine a time for making a decision and the criteria for making it. Share your deadline with someone else. Fear of failure (lack of self confidence) • People don't want to face the consequences of failure, so they delay. (Some people suffer from fear of success too!) • Develop a clear mental picture of the completed task and how you will feel at that time. Maintain a focus on the end result, not just the process. Remind yourself how good you'll feel when you're finished. Lack of interest • You are tired or lazy. You're just not very interested in the task. • Reward yourself for accomplishments. Go out for special lunches when major projects are completed. If you don't earn the reward, don't take it. • Schedule the task for when you will be at your peak. Perfectionism • People delay because they want to get the project perfect. • Set deadlines for yourself. Tell other people your deadlines and encourage them to check up on you. • Maintain your high standards, but recognize that sometimes 80% for you may well be 100% for someone else. Don't spend hours conducting a detailed cost breakdown when a rough estimate would suffice. Hostility towards a boss • People delay because they don't like the person who assigned the task. • Review with your boss what exactly is needed. Clarify the expectations. • Make a game out of unpleasant tasks. Give yourself points, or do a running commentary on yourself as you do the task. Distraction, lack of focus • Sometimes losing concentration causes delays. • Create a to-do list with priorities. • Block your time for projects. • As you get distracted from a work project, make a rule that you are not allowed to move out of your chair, make a call, surf the net, pick up a book etc. until you return to your task. • Complete something. Make a very small task for yourself and finish it. Very small. Then, make another one.

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS HOW TO SAY NO

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

We say "yes" to others because we want to please them. But when eventually we can't continue, we let them down and we feel guilty. Both parties suffer. Recognize that a desire to please often prevents us from saying no. Stick to your plan. If you have a written set of goals and strategies, this gives you a reason to stick to your course. ("Thanks, but I already have an investment plan, so you don't need to send me a newsletter about stocks.") When someone persists, repeat your position, perhaps in a slightly different way. ("As I already said, our policy is to donate to charities that help children only.") Make sure you understand exactly what is being asked of you before you respond. Perhaps the task is more time consuming than you thought. On the other hand, it may not take much effort at all. Excel at just a few things, rather than being just average at many. Don't try to do everything. You have a right to say no. Remember that others may take you for granted and even lose respect for you if you don't. Be polite, but firm in saying no. You only build false hopes with wishy-washy responses. For instance, the phrase "I'll try to be there" in response to a party invitation is giving yourself an excuse to avoid a commitment. It doesn't do anyone any favors. When a superior asks you to do a new urgent task; Remind her that you are working on other projects that she has already identified as top priorities Ask for help in deciding where the new task should fall on the list of priorities Point out that you might be able to do everything, but not to the usual high standards that are expected. Some experts recommend keeping your answer short. This way, you can say no without feeling the need for a lengthy justification. ("I'm sorry, I'm not available that night.") On the other hand, others say that giving a longer answer with reasons reinforces your credibility. Let the situation decide. Provide suggestions or alternatives to the person who is asking. ("I can't do that task today, but how about next week," or "How about asking John instead?") When in doubt, it's easier to say no now, then change your mind to a yes later, rather than the other way around.

When You Have to Say Yes • Sometimes, saying no is simply unavoidable. Here are some techniques to use: • Tell the person you can agree to their request this time, but ask how the two of you might plan better for the next time. • Tell them yes, but remind them they owe you one. For example, they might cover you for a shift next time you need time off. • Tell them yes, but take control by saying you'll come back to them with a timetable. For instance, say, "I expect I'll be able to do that for you by the end of the week." • Put a tough condition on your agreement. "If it would only take an hour, I'd be able to help, but I can't give you more than that."

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IMPACTING LIVES ● DEVELOPING LEADERS

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Team Lead Training 103 Revised Aug 2012  
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