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Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project


Contents

Executive Summary

3

Introduction

4

Background

4

Purpose

6

Objectives

6

Methodology

6

Report Definitions

6

Stakeholder Engagement

7

Part 1 – Context Victorian ADF Transitions

8

Veteran and Family Sentiment

9

Broader Charity Environment

9

Veteran Communications

9

Part 2 – Victorian ESOs The Victorian ESO Sector

10 10

ESO Sector Self-Regulation

12

ESO Survey Results

13

Service Delivery

14

Service Delivery Duplication

14

Service Delivery Gaps

18

Brand Awareness

21

Part 3 – Client Need

22

Veterans and Veterans’ Family Locations

22

Client Segments

28

Perception of ESOs

30

Further Client Segmentation

31

Part 4 – Conclusion

32

Annex A – Victorian ESO Survey Report

33

Annex B – Perception of ESOs

33

Annex C – Young Veterans Project Survey Report

33

References

34

Disclaimer: The Commonwealth has not participated in the research, production or exercised editorial control over the activity or its contents. The views expressed and conclusions reached herein do not necessarily represent those of the Commonwealth, which expressly disclaims any responsibility for the content or accuracy of the activity.

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8


Executive Summary The Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Report seeks to build on the work completed as part of both the Aspen Foundation Report and the Victorian Veterans’ Sector Study. The ESO environment has become more crowded since the last of these reports was completed because of the steadily increasing number of organisations that serve veterans and their families. Over the past 18 months alone, approximately 1,800 new veterans’ charities have emerged1.

In a significantly less crowded sector in years gone by, the support model for the pre-1991 veterans has been very effective. However, for post-1991 veterans and their families, there is anecdotal evidence of more friction in transition from service life, and a diminished understanding of who and what is out there to support them. Around 5,200 Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel transition per year, and this number could be set to increase, given the data featured in the 2017 ADF Families Survey that indicates 20 per cent of personnel intend to transition. Many more service personnel have expressed discontent and their intention to leave the Australian Defence Force in the coming three years. The Aspen Foundation Report posited that there was a propensity for transitioning personnel to settle in remote mining towns and in areas close to Australian Defence Force bases. While it is true in some cases, there is a large percentage of personnel who do not choose to settle in those locations. In Victoria, the largest veteran concentration ‘nodes’ are the Greater Melbourne region, the SheppartonSeymour area, and the AlburyWodonga area. The net interstate migration to Victoria is 18,000 per year. It is possible that more Australian Defence Force personnel will choose to settle in Victoria due to the favourable economic and employment options.

This Report details five key recommendations: »» First, further analysis should be undertaken on the Victorian Client Nodes (the geographic locations with over 50 resident veterans) to learn more about client-directed needs. We have only just started to understand the client and their needs. »» Second, a detailed client journey map should be developed to identify areas of friction and to support the Victorian Minister for Veterans input into the next Veterans’ Ministers’ Roundtable in 2018. »» Third, the Victorian ESO Community, through its state and federal ministers, should make a strong commitment to self-regulation initiatives and agree to an additional layer of regulation under the Veteran Support Services Accreditation Association. »» Fourth, a communication and engagement strategy should be developed, supported by the Victorian Minister for Veterans, to ensure key communications messages are clear both to the public and the veterans’ community. Increasing veterans’ awareness of ESO service offerings using multiple channels, including social media, is critical. »» The Victorian ESO community should agree to implement these recommendations so that a sectorwide symposium can be conducted in 2021, to inform key stakeholders about the key insights from the 2020 Census in relation to veterans, and the major actions for ESOs that result from those insights.

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Introduction

Background Over recent years, it has become evident that the typical profile of Ex-Services Organisation (ESO) sector clients has been changing. It is clear that ESOs need to adapt their services and support to enable needs-based, client-centric and meaningful provision of services to the current and future generations of veterans. The change in profile of ESO clients is due to the simultaneous decline in the size of the Second World War veteran segment, and the increasing proportion of younger veterans transitioning from the Australian Defence Force (ADF)2. Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA) statistics for the positive and negative growth of their treatment populations are illustrated in Figure 1.

A key challenge for ESOs will be the transition to client-directed services

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The segments within the younger veteran client population are no longer neatly defined, unlike the historical status quo within the sector. The historical veteran was typically a male, the family was typically a female spouse and children, and client needs were typically focussed on health or social services3. The younger veteran demographic still has clients with these support requirements, but most of their needs relate to post-ADF employment and their families4. ESOs must adapt. A key challenge for ESOs will be to become clientdirected organisations to provide the most effective experience for all clients before, during, and after they need support from an ESO within the sector. The requirement for the ESO sector to adapt is being enabled by the Commonwealth Government’s Supporting Younger Veterans (SYV) Grants Program. This program provides funding to ESOs to encourage partnerships that will deliver innovative and sustainable services for younger veterans, and build community capacity to meet the needs of this group5. The grants will also help raise awareness of the issues faced by younger veterans. The SYV Grants Program generously funded Melbourne Legacy to conduct this Victorian ESO Mapping Project.


% Change in DVA Treatment Population by Conflict – June 2017 13.86%

15 10

7.62%

7.11%

5.66%

% Change

5 0.20%

0 -5

-3.47% -8.20%

-10 -13.25%

-15

British Commonwealth & Allied

No Operational Service

Peacekeeping & Other Operations

East Timor, Afghanistan & Iraq

Gulf War

Vietnam

Korea, Malaya & FESR

Second World War

-20

First World War

-16.16%

Figure 1: Growth and decline of DVA’s different conflict treatment populations6

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Purpose

Methodology

Report Definitions

The purpose of this Project is to enable a more coordinated, collaborative and targeted provision of services from Victorian ESOs, so that they may meet the current and future demand from younger veterans and their families (ESO clients). Formalised collaboration within the Victorian ESO sector will enable more efficient and effective provision of required services to younger veterans and their families, and more efficient and effective use of both internal and external funding streams.

This Project focused its research on two different stakeholder groups to inform the objectives: the ESO sector, and younger veterans. The definitions used for both groups are listed below. Research into these two groups was conducted primarily by gathering data through a survey for each group. Detailed reports of each survey are in this Report’s Annexes, and relevant aspects of these surveys are discussed in Parts 2 and 3 of this Report.

A younger veteran is:

Objectives The objectives of this Project were to: »» Map the Victorian ESOs working with younger veterans and their families to identify any duplication or gaps in the provision of services. »» Host and facilitate a Victorian ESO Service Mapping Conference concurrently with the November sitting of the Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC)-led ESO Round Table, during the conduct of the Project. »» Deliver the Project Report on 1 December 2017 based on clientdriven needs.

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The surveys of both groups aimed to measure the loyalty of the client base. To achieve this, the Net Promoter System (NPS)7 was used. »» The NPS is an index ranging from100 (indicating all respondents are ‘detractors’ and gave a score of between 1 & 7/10) to 100 (all respondents are ‘promoters’ and gave a score of 9 or 10/10). A positive score is determined to be ‘good’, above 50 is ‘excellent’ and negative scores identify that there are more ‘detractors’ than ‘promoters’.

»» Anyone who has served in the ADF since 1991, and their families. These younger veterans and their families will be referred to in this Report as ‘clients’. This Project notes there are various definitions of ‘veteran’, ranging from the Oxford dictionary (“an ex-member of the armed forces”) through to the Veterans Entitlement Act 1986 (“persons who have taken to have rendered eligible war service”), to various definitions included in the Constitutions of the many organisations operating in the ESO sector. The definition of a ‘veteran’ is generally accepted to be that provided by DVA. It is noteworthy for the context of this report that the Joint Communique from the Veterans’ Ministers’ Meeting of 8 November 2017 establishes the definition of a veteran as “a person who is serving, or has served in the ADF”. The Victorian Minister for Veterans has agreed that the definition should not be limited by definitions contained in existing legislation.


Ex-Service Organisation (ESO): »» Includes member-based organisations (ESO), non-member based organisations Veteran Service Organisation (VSO), Trusts, and Unit and Ship Associations. The term ‘ESO’ in this Report will refer to this entire group. »» For continuity from the Aspen Foundation ESO Mapping Project (ESOMP)8, this Report has maintained the above definition for organisations operating within the ESO sector under the umbrella term of ‘ESO’. Stakeholder Engagement During the course of this Project, a number of activities were conducted to engage with the 397 registered organisations in Victoria who list veterans as beneficiaries of their work. This Project identified the eight organisations that actively serve the needs of veterans and their families in Victoria. These eight organisations represent 354 of the 397 actively registered entities in Victoria.Those organisations are: »» The Victorian State Branch of the RSL »» Legacy »» Carry On »» Partners of Veterans’ Association »» Vasey RSL Care »» Defence Force Welfare Association »» Bravery Trust »» War Widows Guild – Victoria.

The Project Officer, supported by Melbourne Legacy, developed an internet presence and a social media footprint to encourage participation, and provide updates and progress reports on the Project. The social media presence was successful at gaining relevant and insightful content, but its value was diminished by the generally poor use of social media amongst ESOs and the limited use of ‘tagging’ and promoting within the ESO community. While the eight organisations were all involved in focus groups and were engaged via email and in person, this did not translate into support across multiple other communication channels. The Project Officer also conducted office calls and briefings to solicit support and collaboration amongst ESOs. Specifically, the Victorian Veterans Council and Veterans Branch allowed an ESO Roundtable event to be used for the purpose of gaining input and insight from the sector and seeking their support to advertise and gain participation in the activity.

There are 397 registered organisations in Victoria who list veterans as beneficiaries

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Part 1 Context Victorian ADF Transitions DVA Transition data indicates that approximately 5,200 people transition from the ADF nationally per year9. As of September 2017, the post-1991 veteran cohort in Victoria is comprised of approximately 27,760 people, out of a total cohort nationally of approximately 72,000 post-1991 veterans who have discharged10. According to the 2016 Census, 18,000 people migrated to Victoria in 201611. Reflecting a national trend, Victoria has experienced a relocation of people to be closer to the city and its employment opportunities, and away from regional communities12. A full list of the locations in the Greater Melbourne area that currently comprise more than 50 veteran residents (‘nodes’) can be found in Table 3 of this Report. In Victoria, various entitlements and/ or policies exist that could benefit veterans, such as: »» Youth Policy: Building Stronger Youth Engagement in Victoria »» Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2015–2019 »» The Age-Friendly Victoria Initiative »» State Disability Plan 2017–2020 »» Department of Health and Human Services Strategic Plan 2016

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The Victorian ESO community may be unaware of many of the entitlements and/or policies that exist under statebased legislation. Therefore, veteran clients may not be informed about the support that they could potentially benefit from. At the same time, one in five Australians receives some form of welfare payment and the Federal Government spends approximately $300,000 per minute on social security and welfare payments13. It is possible that there is both misinformation about, and an inequity in, the apportionment of welfare and/or social security payments to veterans. Further, there are more than 31,000 social service providers operating in Victoria14. Over the past 18 months alone, approximately 1,800 new veterans’ charities have emerged15. Any veteran could conceivably access support through a number of these organisations in their local geographical area. However, the number of providers also increases the likelihood of veterans being overwhelmed with well-meaning support organisations of differing levels of quality, and their needs may not be met despite the large number of entities that exist to potentially serve them. This is in contrast to veterans’ experiences in uniform, where many of their social service, welfare and health needs and outcomes are tightly controlled by the Department through a well-defined (and deliberately limited) service provider network.


5,200

people transition from the ADF nationally per year9

Veteran and Family Sentiment The Department of Defence surveys a random sample of current serving ADF members regularly as part of the YourSay survey. In figures from February 2017, as quoted in the Defence Community Organisation’s ADF Families Survey, 20 per cent of respondents expressed an intention to leave the ADF16. In the most recent ADF Families Survey, 24 per cent of partners who responded wanted their serving ADF partners to transition within the next three years. A further 25 per cent of respondents were undecided as to whether they wanted their partner to stay in uniform or return to civilian life. Between 19 per cent to 24 per cent of dual ADF couples and single-parent ADF personnel who responded to the survey expressed the intention to transition from the ADF within three years17. The findings of the Young Veterans Project (YVP) Survey attached to this Project indicate that prior to transition, during transition and after transition, veterans have either a neutral or dissatisfied attitude with Service life. The survey findings point to further dissatisfaction or a trend towards dissatisfaction, as a result of the transition process and unmet or underserviced needs. It is at this point where DVA and the ESO typically become involved in the case management of a veteran and their family. Conclusive data about veteran suicide rates, drug and alcohol abuse, homelessness and other social issues is not currently available. Veterans’ welfare continues to be an area that frustrates policy makers and elected officials. Attending ministers at the Veterans’ Ministers’ meeting of 8 November 2017 agreed to include

questions specific to veterans in the next Australian Census in 2020. This will assist in gaining insight and muchneeded data into veterans’ welfare and support needs. However, there is a wealth of data currently available to Veterans’ Ministers and the ESO sector which is under-utilised. For instance, the DVA’s publicly-available internet site includes a substantial database of current statistics (updated by quarter) which could be better harnessed by ESOs. The DVA website also includes projections based on the age, gender, and geographic locations of veterans and their dependants, which could provide useful planning data for ESOs. Leading up to the 2020 Census, all organisations that support veterans should work together to utilise existing data to meet veterans’ needs better and to plan for the future. The 2020 Census findings in respect of veterans will provide a comprehensive baseline of data upon which to build relevant interventions, be it in relation to government policy or ESO services. The Census findings will deliver a critical moment for the ESO community and state government to focus efforts to achieve improved veterans’ support outcomes.

Moreover, charities in Australia20: »» Utilised the services of 2.88 million unpaid volunteers in 2016. »» Reported total revenue of almost $143 billion in 2016, with veterans’ charities reporting combined total revenue of $19.4 billion in 2015. Veteran Communications Traditionally, communication with veterans and their families has occurred via email, telephone and through ‘passive’, one-way information displayed on websites. Social media has either not been employed, or has been significantly under-utilised by ESOs. As a two-way communication mechanism, social media is an exceptionally valuable tool for ESOs to exploit. The 2017 Sensis Social Media Report, Australians and Social Media, suggests that social media use by people aged 18–29 is almost universal, at 99 per cent21. Amongst the 30–39 year-old age group, social media use is 96 per cent, and usage among 40–49 year-olds is 86 per cent22. ESOs simply cannot afford to ignore or underutilise social media channels if they wish to remain relevant and build connections with younger veterans.

Broader Charity Environment More than 50,000 charities are currently registered in Australia with the Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission (ACNC), of which there are more than 5,000 purporting to support veterans and veterans’ families18. To put this into context, 10 new charities are created every day across Australia, and over the past 18 months, three of those 10 new charities were established to support veterans and their families19. This indicates a perception – if not a reality – of there being unmet or under-serviced needs in relation to veteran clients. Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

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Part 2 Victorian ESOs The Victorian ESO Sector The Victorian ESO sector is made up of 695 organisations, and represents 25 per cent of the ESOs in Australia23. There are 397 registered organisations in Victoria who list veterans as beneficiaries24. However, it is unclear how active these organisations currently are and how many clients they serve.

NT 1%

2,780 ESO locations across Australia

QLD 21% WA 10%

SA 10% NSW 28% ACT 1%

VIC 25%

Figure 2 National Distribution of ESOs

25

10

TAS 4%


Typical client needs of Traditional ESOs

Typical client needs of Emerging ESOs

Housing

Generally are more settled in their housing or are looking to aged care housing assistance

Housing for young families and learning to navigate the private sector of housing market is a key need

Employment

Having been in the workforce some time their needs for employment assistance are lower

This is a key area of need for younger veterans who are often looking for their first post service job.

Health

Needs are more reflective of an ageing cohort. Clients are accessing DVA and other health care programs

Mental health needs are more prevalent than physical needs. The organisiations use active programs (adventure, cycling events etc.) to build clients’ self-esteem

Social

Commemorative events and social events are very important with their established peers and networks

Looking to establish post-service networks. Social events are more physical, active and aimed at younger and family lifestyles

Communication

Often communicate to clients through regular meetings and newsletters

Often communicate to clients though social media pages, campaigns and the organisiations’ websites

Figure 3 High-level summary of key differences between Traditional ESOs and Emerging ESOs 28

The national ESO sector has seen the emergence of new ESOs due to the unmet needs of young veterans and their families26,27. The 2015 Veterans’ Sector Study Report highlighted the high-level client needs of traditional ESOs in comparison to new ESOs, shown in Figure 3 (above).

The growth of the post-1991 client segment and the decline of the Second World War client segment serviced by DVA, as illustrated in Figure 1, will continue to drive the ESO sector’s need to adapt29. A declining membership base, decreasing funding base, and diminishing volunteer base have all been identified as being interlinked and exacerbating factors

as to why the capacity of traditional ESOs has declined30. The Veterans’ Sector Study Report identified that some ESOs have responded to this predicament by offering different types of membership, including memberships for current serving ADF members and their families, and that this may help to slow the declining member base31.

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ESO Sector Self-Regulation The Aspen Foundation ESOMP identified opportunities for the development of quality assurance models for ESO service delivery35, namely:

Declining membership

»» Monitoring As funding is primarily generated by membership fees, funding declines as membership numbers decline

Declining funding

As the veteran population ages and decreases, there are likely to be less volunteers available to run ESOs and deliver services

Lack of resource sustainability to secure ESOs future

Declining volunteers

Compounding factors: The proliferation of niche ESOs which spreads existing funding and volunteer effort too thinly

Volunteers are not equipped to deal with the ‘red tape’ administrative burden which all ESOs must comply with, including adherence to corporate governance, work health and safety and other regulatory requirements

Figure 4: Causes of decline of the capacity of traditional ESOs32 Currently there are low barriers to entry for an organisation to service the perceived or real needs of younger veterans and their families. Those new ESOs that are comparatively sophisticated in their operations and marketing, and hold events that are high-profile or gain media exposure (for instance, those that feature a celebrity supporter), are likely to be more effective in reaching veterans and will therefore experience considerable growth in comparison with traditional ESOs. The rapid growth of market share (client base), relative fundraising success and positive brand recognition by new ESOs, such as Soldier On, is a recent demonstration of this33. The positive brand recognition for new ESOs is likely to see them being the first point of contact for veterans and their families, which can represent a large number of future clients annually.

12

However, there is a stark comparison to be made in relation to the general public’s level of awareness of traditional ESOs and new ESOs. Research conducted on behalf of Melbourne Legacy indicates there is a low level of brand awareness of newer ESOs among the general public, whereas traditional ESOs enjoy higher brand recognition, both prompted and unprompted34. This is a positive sign for traditional ESO fundraising efforts, but does not address the risk of declining brand recognition and service offering awareness among the ESO target client base. The ESO sector has already experienced a level of disruption by newer ESOs such as Soldier On. Improving awareness among current serving ADF personnel and their families will assist in overcoming the negative perception of traditional ESOs by closing the information gap concerning the services and benefits that traditional ESOs can provide.

»» Evaluation »» Accreditation »» Service Charter ›› ›› ›› ›› ››

codes of conduct minimum levels of service delivery response times referrals handover protocols

»» ESO sector self-regulation Furthermore, a 2015 report by the Australasian Services Care Network (ASCN) contended that there is an apparent lack of evaluation of effectiveness of many programs on offer by ESOs, and that amongst ESOs there is a lack of agreed standards of service, codes of practice/service charters, formal communications/referral structure, and no single system point of contact at a time of crisis36. Implementing a sector-wide measure such as the Net Promoter Score would enable various aspects of a quality assurance model, and importantly, would support increased self-regulation of the sector. In December 2012, the Australian Government established a national NFP regulator, the ACNC. The purpose of the ACNC is to determine the status of charitable, public benevolent institutions and not-for-profit organisations, whilst also providing education and support to the sector, and a public information portal37. A 2010 report from Melbourne Law School identified relevant conclusions about the regulation of NFP sectors. Their analysis suggests that a national regulator (in this case, the ACNC) should focus on two aspects of regulation38: 1. Ensuring loyalty to the purposes

of the NFP, and effectiveness in achieving their purpose. 2. Streamlining regulation to minimise

the compliance burden and prevent duplication.


The Aspen Foundation’s ESOMP Report identified opportunities for the ESO sector to develop organisational and service delivery models, namely a quality assurance regime, to enable more transparent, effective, and efficient use of ESO sector resources39. Given that the Aspen report identified that charities listing veterans and/or their families as beneficiaries had a combined total income of $19.4 billion40, any form of regulation or organisational and service delivery models, and the transparency they provide, will result in more efficient and effective allocation of funds provided by the public (via federal and state governments) and individual, foundation, or corporate donors41. This transparency will enable greater discretionary allocation of funding to individual ESOs, which will see those ESOs who participate in sector-wide self-regulation, and demonstrate efficient and effective use of funds, receive a greater allocation of funds compared to other ESOs. Collaboration and self-regulation within the ESO sector will deliver both financial and non-financial benefits to organisations operating within the sector, and may reduce the risk of further disruptors entering the ector by increasing the barriers to entry.

ESO Survey Results Survey Audience and Segments Out of the 695 organisations in the Victorian ESO sector, only the ESOs who are providers of services were surveyed to identify where service provision overlaps and gaps exist. The following ESOs assisted this Project by either responding to the ESO survey or meeting with Project staff: 1. Legacy 2. RSL Victoria 3. Carry On 4. Partners of Veterans Association 5. Vasey RSL Care

Whilst the ESO Survey had a low response rate from sub-branches – five per cent for RSL and 30 per cent for Legacy – this was not an issue for the veracity of the data used to develop this Report, as the services provided by sub-branches are typically standardised across each ESO. A detailed report can be found in Annex A, including a link to an interactive version of the report (this link will remain active until September 2018). This report includes segmentation for respondents who identified as being state headquarters of an ESO, a branch or sub-component of an ESO, or a state-level component of a national ESO.

6. Defence Force Welfare Association

Sector Self-Perception

7. Bravery Trust

Within the ESO Survey, respondents were asked to rate themselves using the NPSiii format42 on how they feel the following four segments perceive them, with results shown in Figure 4:

8. Totally and Permanently Incapacitated

Federation – Victoriai The following ESOsii did not assist this Project by either responding to the ESO survey or meeting with Project staff: »» Soldier On »» Australian Peacekeeper and Peacemaker Veterans’ Association – Victoria

Segment

»» Current serving ADF members. »» Families of current serving ADF members. »» Ex-serving ADF members. »» Families of ex-serving ADF members.

Score

Promoters

Passives Detractors

Current Serving ADF

-78.9

1

2

16

Families of Current Serving ADF

-78.9

1

2

16

Ex-Serving ADF

-63.1

1

5

13

Families of Ex-Serving ADF

-52.6

1

7

11

Table 1: ESO sector self-rating of their perception by different client segments

i)  Due to TPI Federation’s limited client pool within the younger veterans’ segment, it was agreed that their response would not value add to the data set. ii)  Organisations who meet the Aspen Foundation ESOMP definition of an ESO, but who aren’t a service provider, were not included in the scope of this project. iii) Whilst this NPS was only measured once, it still provides a good insight into how the ESO sector thinks their client segments perceive them. For the NPS to be accurate and usable to drive change or growth, it needs to be regularly and consistently measured.

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

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While the sample size of these responses was small [18], it is important to note the majority of ESO respondents for all four questions believed that their clients were detractors or passives, and only one respondent per question believed that their clients were promoters. This will be contrasted in part three of this report with the perception of ESOs from the YVP Survey. One contributing factor to this negative perception and client journey is the presence of well-intentioned volunteers throughout the sector who are not qualified or trained to deal with the different needs of younger veterans and their families. The large scale of the sector and client base means that these volunteers are frequently the sole interface with the client, and a mutual

Service Delivery

lack of understanding between the ESO representative (of client needs) and the client (of ESO services) results in the negative perceptions that were evidenced in both surveys for this Project, as seen in Annexes A (ESO sector self-perception) and B (client segment perceptions). The ageing demographic profile of many volunteers also means that they are likely to not be as active in the coming decade43, and they will need to be replaced by a cohort of younger volunteers. For this new cohort of volunteers to be effective at assisting clients, and helping to enable a satisfying client journey, they will need to be effectively trained and mentored44 by professional qualified staff and social workers who have the necessary skills to serve younger client needs.

The services offered by Victorian ESOs are summarised in Table 2 below. Within this table, ESOs were kept as single state-wide entities, instead of depicting the services offered by sub-branches. The data below does not demonstrate how these services are broken up geographically. Service Delivery Duplication Table 2 demonstrates that there are multiple ESOs that are enabling or providing the same services. In areas such as education (primary, secondary and tertiary), significant support is offered by various ESOs.

Services provided by Victorian ESOs through Referrals, Coordination, Funding, or Provision Victorian ESO

Temporary Accom. services

Emergency Emergency Emergency Mental Health Food Financial services support Assistance

Physical rehab or treatment

Mental rehab or treatment

Families couples counseling

Permanent Accom.

DVA Advocacy

-

RSL

-

Legacy

-

Carry On

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Partners of Veterans

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vasey RSL Care

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

DFWA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Job search

Job application

Job interview

Physical fitness: individuals

Physical fitness: groups

Dietitian

-

-

-

-

-

-

Bravery Trust

-

*

-

*only for aged care residents

Victorian ESO

Family Support

RSL

Secondary Education

Tertiary Education

-

-

Legacy Carry On Partners of Veterans

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vasey RSL: Care

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

DFWA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Bravery Trust

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 2: The services provided by Victorian ESOs. This encompasses referrals, coordination, funding, or provision. Survey results can be found in Annex A.

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Maintenance and Monitoring of Contact Mediums The ESO Survey identified duplication across the offered contact media, the days of the week they are monitored, and the times of the day they are monitored, as illustrated in Figures 5, 6 and 7.

80

60

40

Contact Media

Other

Mail (Australia Post or courier)

Fax

Telephone

Email

Website contact form

0

Instagram

20

In person at one of your permanent locations

As it is inconclusive whether there is a duplication of services relating to temporary accommodation, emergency food and financial assistance, and psychology/mental health support services, more research is required. If further review highlights a duplication of services, there will be an opportunity for discussion between the ESOs providing the service to identify which entity could potentially remove their offering in that geographic location. In doing so, administrative or financial burdens can potentially be reduced, or other resources redirected to cover any gaps (geographical or service) that may be identified.

100

Facebook

Whilst RSL, Legacy, Soldier On and Bravery Trust offer various elements of temporary accommodation, emergency food support, financial assistance and mental health-related service offerings, due to geographic distribution factors it is not conclusive whether this constitutes a duplication of offerings. The dispersion of younger veterans and their families around Victoria, and the apprehension that current and ex-serving members may feel about accessing mental health support through the ADF, DVA, and the Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS) means that having these services offered by three organisations with various geographic footprints is likely to enable reasonable access for those clients who need it.

How can currently or ex-serving veterans and/or their families contact your ESO?

Percent %

Temporary Accommodation, Emergency Food Support, Financial Assistance, and Psychology and Mental Health Support

Percent

Responses

Facebook

54.2%

13

Instagram

4.2%

1

Website contact form

45.8%

11

Email

95.8%

23

Telephone

95.8%

23

Fax

50.0%

12

Mail (Australia Post or courier)

79.2%

19

In person at one of your permanent locations

75.0%

18

Other

12.5%

3

Figure 5: ESO contact media

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

15


of ESO contact monitoring occurs on weekdays

Which days of the week are these methods of contact actively monitored by someone in your ESO? 100

80

Percent %

95.8%

60

40

20

0 Monday to Friday

Saturday

Value

Sunday

All of the above

Percent

Responses

Monday to Friday

95.8%

23

Saturday

66.7%

16

Sunday

62.5%

15

All of the above

62.5%

15

Figure 6: ESO weekday contact monitoring Having the same contact media offered and monitored in a large proportion of all ESOs is an inefficient use of resources, due to the duplication of employees and of any physical, hardware, or software solutions required to first establish and then maintain these contact media. This level of duplication is also a potential source of friction with clients, particularly if the media are not actively or effectively monitored.

16


During which of the following time windows are these methods of contact actively monitored by someone in your ESO? 80 70 60

Percent %

50 40 30 20

Value

Other – please describe

Night 8pm–6am

Evening 6pm–8pm

Late afternoon 4:30pm–6pm

Afternoon 12pm–4:30pm

0

Morning 8:30am–12pm

10

Early morning 6am–8:30am

The Veterans’ Sector Study Report identified that communicating with veterans without a linkage to an ESO is essential to ensure they receive the information and support they need, and that doing this via multiple channels can ensure that higher numbers of veteran community members are reached45. It also noted that younger veterans are a cohort that ESOs have difficulty engaging with, and that the generational, demographic, and geographic diversity of the veteran community requires an equally diverse approach to engagement through mixed communication media to reach the widest audience46. Further, the Report found conclusions from a largescale study of American veterans that the provision of information regarding veterans’ services and benefits through the internet is vital47. In light of this data, it is clear that a cohesive communications strategy covering multiple media, including the internet, is vital. The Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet’s Veterans Branch currently has an ongoing project to understand the needs of current and future veterans better, which will provide more information about the optimal methods to engage with younger veterans and their families.

Percent

Responses

Early morning 6am–8:30am

12.5%

3

Morning 8:30am–12pm

75.0%

18

Afternoon 12pm–4:30pm

70.8%

17

Late afternoon 4:30pm–6pm

37.5%

9

Evening 6pm–8pm

33.3%

8

Night 8pm–6am

16.7%

4

Other – please describe

20.8%

5

Figure 7: ESO daily contact monitoring

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

17


Service Delivery Gaps

Job Search, Application, Interview, and Transition Assistance Whilst there is a reported provision of job search, application, and interview assistance services from three ESOs as per Figure 10, 50 per cent of YVP Survey respondents did not know about the services offered by ESOs (see Figure 11).

0 -1 -2

% Change

More than half of the workforce within ESOs that provide clients with pensionrelated support (i.e. ‘advocates’) is aged 67 years of age or older48. Over the coming decade this portion of the workforce will potentially decrease their working hours, if not cease working altogether. Concurrently, DVA is experiencing a decrease in the number of Gold Card holders (–7.47 per cent or –2,191 card holders), and an increase in the number of White Card holders (1.98 per cent or 180 card holders), as shown below in Figures 8 and 9. As the commencement of support for a veteran is an administratively burdensome component of the process for both the veteran and the advocate, the net increase in White Card holders, the DVA treatment population growth shown in Figure 1, and the potentially decreasing workforce of qualified advocates, will result in excess demand for advocacy services. Unmet demand is likely to increase the negative perceptions of both ESOs and DVA, due to the additional stress this will place on the veteran and their family.

% Change of Gold Card Holders

-3 -3.43%

-4

-4.38%

-5 -6 -7

-5.83% -6.33% -6.92%

-7.24%

-7.47%

-8 NSW

VIC

QLD

SA

WA

TAS

TOTAL

Figure 8: Percentage change in Gold Card holders by state for DVA49

% Change of White Card Holders 5.90%

6 5

4.28% 4

% Change

DVA Advocacy

3

3.77%

3.70%

TAS

TOTAL

3.04%

1.98%

2 1

0.13% 0 NSW

VIC

QLD

SA

WA

Figure 9: Percentage change in White Card holders by state for DVA50

18


0

None of the above

Emergency financial support (payment of rent, bills, or debts)

Emergency food support

Emergency accommodation or housing support

Spiritual or religious

Dietitian or nutrition

Physical fitness: individuals Physical fitness: groups

Job interview

Job application

Job search

Other – please describe

Spiritual or religious

Dietitian or nutrition

Physical fitness: groups

Physical fitness: individuals

Job interview

Job application

Job search

Family or couples counseling

Mental rehabilitation or treatment

Physical rehabilitation or treatment

0

Physical rehabilitation or treatment Mental rehabilitation or treatment Family or couples counseling

Percent %

Percent % Which of the following offering categories do you provide or facilitate services or support for? 80

60

40

20

Figure 10: ESO reported service offerings

Please help us understand what you currently know about the services and support available to you through Victorian ESOs.

50 per cent of YVP Survey respondents did not know about the services offered by ESOs

50

25

Figure 11: YVP Survey respondent knowledge of ESO services

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

19


“ Job skills resume/interview… Transition becomes challenging when all this stops in the transition stages.”

“ Better employment services, particularly for those veterans with disabilities and those who completed service without qualifications recognised in the civilian world.”

20

“ Assisting with translation of skills into civilian skills for resumes. Assisting with skills match for civilian employment.”

“ More focus on job placement and the culture shock associated with leaving the ADF and becoming a civilian again…I was basically shown the gate and that was it. The ADF spends a lot of time turning us into soldiers and getting us to think and react in a specific way and yet turns us loose with no thought to how we will reintegrate into civilian life. Suddenly our mates, our identity, and our purpose is stripped from us. It’s no wonder so many take their lives after leaving. I came bloody close myself.”


Despite the low level of knowledge of ESO offerings in these service areas, it is clear there is considerable client need. Excerpts of quotes from the YVP Survey in relation to younger veterans’ needs for job searching, applications, interviewing, and transitions are noted here. Further comments can be found in Annex C1.

partners of ex-serving members, particularly if the veteran and their partner have remained in the service location after transition, as opposed to moving to an area with improved employment prospects. The provision of employment support services to partners is likely to be an area where more services can be delivered.

This unmet need has led to the establishment of start-up companies like WithYouWithMe51 – a company that works to identify skills shortages in the Australian labour market and develops training programs to fill the gap with transitioned veterans – and the New South Wales52 Government Veteran Employment Program and Victorian Government Veteran Employment Strategy53.

Brand Awareness

However, the problem is not confined to veterans themselves. The 2017 ADF Families Survey identified that ADF partners experience high levels of unemployment (20 per cent of respondents*)54, under-employment (12 per cent of respondents) 55, and career or employment sacrifices (81 per cent of respondents)56. Victorian locations with the highest partner unemployment rates were Sale (39 per cent), Albury/Wodonga (36 per cent), and Seymour/ Puckapunyal (25 per cent)57. The unemployment, under-employment, and career or employment sacrifice rates may also be similar for the

A consistent theme between the Aspen Foundation Report, the Victorian Veterans Council Sector Study, and the YVP Survey is that veterans and their families have a poor understanding of the many organisations and services available in the sector. Further, the general public, whilst having an initial emotional connection to charities in the sector, has relatively low brand awareness of ESOs. For example, Pro Bono Australia releases annually a widely-respected list of the top 40 ‘Most Respected’ charities in the country. For the past five years, no ESO has featured in this list. A recent Melbourne Legacy market research activity in the greater Melbourne region demonstrates that ESOs are in decline in terms of public awareness58.

* This Survey identified that their result is over-representative of unemployed partners, and that the 2015 Defence Census data indicates that approximately 14 per cent of the partners of Permanent ADF members are unemployed.

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

21


Part 3 Client Need Veterans and Veterans’ Family Locations The Department of Veterans’ Affairs has compiled accurate data of veterans by conflict, and by postcode in the Greater Melbourne region. Of the 29,000 veterans residing in Victoria, at least 14,000 are located in the Greater Melbourne region59.

22

Postcode Suburb

No. of Resident Veterans (2016)

3015

Newport

55

3016

Williamstown

61

3018

Altona

59

3020

Sunshine

57

Approximately 8,400 of these veterans served in the Second World War, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and the Malayan Emergency. The remainder comprises the post-1991 cohort. The two other significant locational clusters of post-1991 veterans are Seymour/ Shepparton and Albury/Wodonga60.

3023

Burnside

84

3024

Mount Cottrell

92

3028

Laverton

102

3029

Hoppers Crossing

282

3030

Werribee

373

3032

Maribyrnong

50

Table 3 contains a list of the Greater Melbourne region suburbs that comprise clusters of 50 or more resident veterans with a DVA-issued health treatment card (‘Client Nodes’).

3040

Essendon

57

3043

Tullamarine

55

3044

Pascoe Vale

67

3046

Glenroy

74

3064

Craigieburn

77

3073

Reservoir

115

3076

Epping

54

3081

Heidelberg West

53

3082

Mill Park

63

3083

Bundoora

86

3084

Heidelberg

94

3085

Macleod

115

3087

Watsonia

64

3088

Greensborough

191

3094

Montmorency

50

3095

Eltham

3101

Kew

68

3103

Balwyn

56

103

3104

Balwyn North

67

3108

Doncaster

74

3109

Doncaster East

67

3124

Camberwell

89

3125

Burwood

52


Of the 29,000 veterans residing in Victoria, at least 14,000 are located in the Greater Melbourne region Postcode Suburb

No. of Resident Veterans (2016)

Postcode Suburb

No. of Resident Veterans (2016)

3130

Blackburn

119

3197

Patterson Lakes

3131

Nunawading

89

3198

Postcode Suburb

55

3941

Rye

Seaford

122

3977

Cranbourne

366

3132

Mitcham

52

3199

Frankston

3133

Vermont

86

3201

Carrum Downs

81

3134

Ringwood

118

3204

Bentleigh

80

3135

Ringwood East

60

3212

Avalon

100

3136

Croydon

186

3214

Corio

104

3137

Kilsyth

63

3215

Geelong North

111

3138

Mooroolbark

81

3216

Belmont

315

3140

Lilydale

71

3218

Geelong West

52

3145

Caulfield East

59

3219

Geelong East

104

3146

Glen Iris

53

3220

Geelong South

3147

Ashburton

54

3224

Leopold

100

3149

Mount Waverley

102

3337

Melton

121

3150

Glen Waverley

196

3338

Eynesbury

84

3152

Wantirna

151

3429

Sunbury

3153

Bayswater

60

3752

South Morang

50

3155

Boronia

70

3754

Doreen

101

Ferntree Gully

130

3756

Wallan

Glen Huntly

58

3805

Narre Warren

116

3165

Bentleigh East

86

3806

Berwick

155

3172

Springvale South

53

3810

Pakenham

178

3174

Noble Park

74

3910

Langwarrin

125

3175

Dandenong

93

3912

Somerville

111

3178

Rowville

88

3915

Hastings

3186

Brighton

91

3918

Bittern

54

3187

Brighton East

90

3919

Crib Point

51

3191

Sandringham

67

3930

Mount Eliza

96

3192

Cheltenham

133

3931

Mornington

217

3193

Beaumaris

105

3934

Mount Martha

101

3194

Mentone

65

3936

Dromana

84 127

Mordialloc

112

3939

Rosebud

Chelsea

102

3940

Capel Sound

229

Table 3: The Greater Melbourne region suburbs that comprise clusters of 50 or more resident veterans with a DVA-issued health treatment card (Client Nodes)

136

3156

3196

76

78

3163

3195

No. of Resident Veterans (2016)

61

108

77

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

23


Gender and Service of ADF Transitions to Victoria 2012–2016 2000 1621 1500

Transitions

The Victorian Centre for Data Insights, within the Department of Premier and Cabinet, recently conducted an analysis of the data from the transition of 2,643 ADF personnel to Victoria during the period 2012 to 201661. Figures 12 through 16 illustrate how these personnel are segmented according to gender and service, rank, tenure bands, transition year and employment categories. Figure 17 depicts how these personnel are geographically distributed across Victoria according to rank and gender.

1000

500

391

305 174

93

59

Female Navy

Female RAAF

0 Male Army

Male Navy

Male RAAF

Female Army

Rank of ADF Transitions to Victoria 2012–2016 2000 1696

Transitions

1500

1000

500 263

254

208

190 32

0 Other Ranks

Senior NCO

NCO

Junior Officer

Officer

Senior Officer

Figures 12 and 13: Service and Gender, and Rank of ADF Transitions to Victoria62

24


Tenure Bands of ADF Transitions to Victoria 2012–2016 768

800

775

700

Transitions

600 500 380

400 300 200

179

159

152

122

100 0

83 21

4 <1

1–5

6–10

11–15

16–20 21–25 26–30

31–35

36–40 41–45

Years of tenure

Year of ADF Transitions to Victoria 2012–2016 600

565

561 524

513 480

Transitions

500 400 300 200 100 0 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Figure 14 and 15: Tenure Bands and Year of ADF Transitions to Victoria63

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

25


Employment Category of ADF Transitions to Victoria 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2016 Infantry

397

Ordnance

285 185

Transport

179

Engineering Warfare

169

Signals

164

Electrical & Mechanical Engineer

152 134

Engineer

134

Armoured Logistics & Admin

109

Artillery

109

Air Technical

78

Support Operations

53

Medical

46

Force Protection & Discipline

45

Air & Operations

45

Aviations

44

Logistics

43 36

Military Police

28

Catering Health Services

27

Health

24

Intelligence & Information Systems

21

Intelligence

20

Ground Technical

19

Band

14

Nursing

13

Infrastructure Technical

11

Finance

9

Psychology

8

Education

8

Chaplain

7

Medical Administration

5

Executive

5

Dental

5

No Broad Category Grouping

3

Legal

2

Doctor

2

Senior Officer 1 Radiography 1 Public Relations 1 Pharmaceutical 1 Environmental 1 0

50

100

150

200

250

300

Figure 16: Employment Categorisation of Transitions to Victoria64

26

350

400


Male

Female

Figure 17: Geographical distribution, filtered by gender [2317 males, 326 females] and rank65

Victoria Rank Banding:

As an effort to increase understanding within the sector, a geographical service delivery map could be constructed. This can either be self-initiated by individual ESOs within the sector, or included as part of future sectorwide collaboration projects.

Junior Officer

NCO Officer

Other Raniks

Senior NCO

Senior Officer

Victorian Ex-Service Organisationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mapping Project

27


55.8%

of respondents identified as a ‘veteran’

Client Segments As discussed earlier in this Report, the ESO sector needs to focus on futureproofing itself to enable meaningful provision of support to younger veterans and their families. The future clients of the sector – those members yet to transition from the ADF – have demographic and need similarities to younger clients already being serviced by the ESO sector.

through RSL, Soldier On, Legacy, the Defence Force Welfare Association, or Bravery Trust. Not only are their needs diverse, there is also a distinct lack of awareness or knowledge of ESO service offerings, with 50 per cent of respondents to the YVP Survey having no knowledge of the services offered by ESOs, as seen in Figure 11. This lack of knowledge and understanding is likely to contribute to client or potential client confusion.

The historically neatly-defined boundaries between client segments, and thus between ESOs, are no longer relevant to the newer generation of veterans and their families. Clients in this segment can now have quite diverse demographic features that cause them to fit into numerous distinct ESO client segments. These individuals potentially qualify for assistance

One key impediment that the YVP Survey highlighted is that only 55.8 per cent of respondents identified as a ‘veteran’, as seen in Figure 18 with no segmentation of responses. Figure 19 further segments respondents by Service, with Navy respondents at 70 per cent, Army respondents at 51.7 per cent, and Air Force respondents at 61.5 per cent.

How would you best describe yourself? 60 50

Percent%

40 30 20 10 0 A currently The partner An ex-serving The partner serving member or family of a member of or family of an of the ADF currently serving the ADF ex-serving member member of of the ADF the ADF

Figure 18: Client description of self – no segments

28

A veteran


The numerous segments, and different ways that a single client can qualify with multiple ESOs, will potentially increase confusion and decrease the quality and cohesiveness of the client journey. The Victorian ESO sector needs to develop a cohesive and seamless client journey map. This journey should encompass the Aspen Foundation ESOMP life-cycle of a veteran, including: in-service, transition, and ex-service69. Whilst it is difficult for ESOs to be actively involved with current serving members, passive education at regular intervals will enable the increased awareness of ESO sector services. Once the transition has commenced, active engagement by ESOs and other organisations can then be enabled or enacted. Development and implementation of a client journey map will enable the ESO sector and other peripheral organisations to transition to being client-directed organisations. An additional benefit of having a cohesive client journey map is that it will enable earlier intervention across all customer segments.

How would you best describe yourself? 100

80

Percent %

The Veterans Sector Study Report of 201566 identified four key steps that influence the ability of a veteran to access support services, as seen in Figure 20. The first of these is ‘identifying self as veteran’. The Report further identified that issues arising with any of these steps is likely to result in delays for the veteran in accessing support, which would potentially lead to an increased cost and effort in treatment in the future67.

60

40

20

0 A currently A partner An ex-serving The partner A veteran serving member of family of a member of of family of an of the ADF currently serving the ADF ex-serving member member of of the ADF the ADF A veteran

Navy

Army

Air Force

Figure 19: Client description of self across segments of Navy, Army, and Air Force

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Identify self as veteran

Become aware of services and benefits available to veterans

Become aware of how access those services and benefits

Have the ability to access and engage with services

ACCESS REQUIRED SERVICES Figure 20: Steps to influence veteran access to support services68 Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

29


Perception of ESOs and DVA During the YVP Survey, respondentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perceptions of both DVA and ESOs were gathered using the NPS to measure client loyalty. As outlined earlier in this Report, this measure is an isolated score and cannot be used as a basis for decision. However, it still provides insight into how clients perceive DVA and ESOs, and hence their loyalty can be inferred. The results from the YVP Survey, including all relevant client segmentations regarding perception, are summarised in Figures 21 (DVA) and 22 (ESOs) below, and are contained in detail in Annex B. Segment

Current Serving ADF Partner of Current Serving ADF Ex-Serving ADF Families of Ex-Serving ADF

Score

Promoters

-35.7

10

Passives Detractors

7

25

Total Responses

42

-40

2

2

6

10

-43.5

10

6

30

46

-20

2

0

3

5

A veteran

-53.4

11

6

43

60

Navy

-33.3

6

2

13

21

Army

-41.5

17

14

51

82

-20

3

2

5

10

Defence Civilian

-100

0

0

3

3

Voluntary Discharge

-55.3

8

5

34

47

0

10

4

10

24

Score

Promoters

Passives

Detractors

-30

9

10

21

40

Air Force

Medical Discharge

Figure 21: Client perception of DVA Segment

Current Serving ADF Partner of Current Serving ADF

-50

1

3

6

10

Ex-Serving ADF

-36.2

11

8

28

47

Families of Ex-Serving ADF

-20

2

0

3

5

A veteran

-31

12

16

30

58

Navy

-36.3

4

6

12

22

Army

-24.7

21

19

41

81

Air Force Defence Civilian Voluntary Discharge Medical Discharge

9.1

5

2

4

11

0

0

3

0

3

-45.8

8

10

30

48

13

11

4

8

23

Figure 22: Client perception of ESOs

30

Total Responses


Whilst the client perception of DVA and ESOs for most segments is still negative (10/11 and 9/11 respectively), there is one key conclusion that both sets of perceptions demonstrate regarding the transition pathway. Personnel who voluntarily discharged from the ADF had negative perceptions of DVA (-55.3) and ESOs (-45.8), whereas personnel who were medically discharged had positive perceptions of DVA (0) and ESOs (13). For the medical discharge pathway, there were sample sizes of 24 for DVA and 23 for ESOs. This change in score implies that something about the medical discharge process altered clients’ perceptions of DVA and ESOs. The gathering and validation of knowledge regarding the roles, service offerings, and quality of DVA and ESOs is the key difference between someone who has voluntarily transitioned and potentially never accessed the services of DVA or an ESO; and someone who has transitioned medically, as they would have interacted with DVA and potentially an ESO throughout their transition.

Further Client Segmentation This Project identified broad insights about young veterans and their families, and identified the following natural client segments due to the responses on the YVP Survey. Respondents identified as belonging to the following segments: »» A veteran

More detailed client segments would need to be identified by further research to identify their relevance and their needs. These other segments could include: »» Current serving Regular personnel by Service »» Current serving Reserve personnel by Service »» Ex-serving Regular personnel by Service

»» Navy »» Army

»» Ex-serving Reserve personnel by Service

»» Air Force »» Current serving ADF »» Ex-serving ADF

»» Partners or spouses of current serving personnel

»» Partner or family of current serving ADF

»» Partners or spouses of ex-serving personnel

»» Partner or family of ex-serving ADF

»» Children of current serving personnel

»» Personnel who voluntarily transitioned

»» Children of ex-serving personnel

»» Personnel who medically transitioned

»» Transitioned personnel with mental health needs

The respondents to the YVP Survey ranged in age from 25 to 62, encompassing four generations70:

»» Transitioned personnel with physical health needs

»» Baby Boomers, born between 946 and 1966. »» Generation X and Y (encompassing ‘Millennials’), born between 1966 and 1986.

»» Transitioned personnel with transition or employment needs »» Transitioned personnel with intrinsic, extrinsic, or social needs

»» iGeneration (or Generation Z), born between 1986 and 2006. A report on generations from the 2006 Census briefly describes the social and economic history, and characteristics for each generation71. An important point to note when looking at broad generational characteristics is that people within these cohorts share certain characteristics, but also have a great deal of variance. Due to this, it is worthwhile segmenting generations into more detailed groups based on identifiable diverse characteristics72.

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

31


Part 4 Conclusion As a result of the analysis undertaken during this Report, it is recommended that: 1. Further analysis is undertaken of the Victorian Client Nodes (i.e. geographic

locations of clusters of more than 50 veterans) to learn more about clientdirected needs. The Client Node analysis contained in this Report is only based on DVA statistics, the Aspen Foundation Report, the Victorian Veterans’ Sector Study and the Victorian Centre for Data Insights. While this is a more comprehensive analysis than previously conducted, further insights can be gleaned from this data that will help veterans. Further, the work being undertaken to make ADF transitions smoother will add substantially to the Victorian ESO community’s understanding of veteran locations and needs. Engagement of a professional demographer will provide a comparatively superior analysis and insight to what has been possible in the three months of this Project.  2. A detailed client journey map should be developed to identify areas of friction

and to support the Victorian Minister for Veterans input into the next Veterans’ Ministers’ Roundtable in 2018, which will occur in conjunction with the Transition Symposium and the Invictus Games in Sydney. Similarly, the Victorian Government will potentially continue to lead in its commitment to informationsharing across agencies to assist in improving transition across all jurisdictions. The client journey map should clearly identify touch-points and areas of risk in the journey from stable, secure support, employment and welfare as an employee of the Department of Defence, to at least the same level of support after transition to life within the Victorian community. 3. The Victorian ESO Community, through its state and federal ministers, should

make a strong commitment to self-regulation initiatives and agree to an additional layer of regulation under the Veteran Support Services Accreditation Association. This additional layer of self-regulation will not replace the oversight provided by the ACNC. Rather, it will further enhance public confidence and trust in ESOs and lead to better outcomes for veterans. This self-regulation should also ensure that each ESO has a clear value proposition which demonstrably meets a veteran’s needs in a hierarchical way i.e. using a model similar to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to meet the short, medium or long term needs of veterans and their families. 4. Develop a communication and engagement strategy, supported by the Victorian

Minister for Veterans, to ensure key communications messages are clear both to the public and the veteran community. Increasing veterans’ awareness of ESO service offerings using multiple channels, including social media, is critical. Further, while there have been some admirable efforts to increase ESO collaboration, and a collegiate approach to problem solving, there is still much to do and this work must continue. 5. The Victorian ESO community should agree to implement these

recommendations so that a sector-wide symposium can be conducted in 2021, to inform key stakeholders about the key insights from the 2020 Census in relation to veterans, and the major actions for ESOs going forward. An accelerated solution design forum should be a part of this symposium to realise tangible outcomes across the ESO sector in order to achieve improved veterans’ support. 32


Annex A – Victorian ESO Survey Report A password-protected interactive version of this Report can be accessed at the following link until September 2018. Please request access through the Community Services Manager at Melbourne Legacy. https://data.surveygizmo.com/r/581431_5a16f9c4d14590.49494739 Annex B – Perception of ESOs A password-protected interactive version of this Report can be accessed at the following link until September 2018. Please request access through the Community Services Manager at Melbourne Legacy. https://data.surveygizmo.com/r/581431_5a1bf836efa981.47334302 Annex C – YVP Survey Report C1 – YVP Survey Report – Veteran, Current Serving, and Ex-Serving Segments A password-protected interactive version of this report can be accessed at the following link until September 2018. Please request access through the Community Services Manager at Melbourne Legacy. https://data.surveygizmo.com/r/581431_5a1aaf4c769185.37778680

Victorian Ex-Service Organisations’ Mapping Project

33


References Australian Charities and Not-forProfits Commission statistics accessed 30th November 2017.

15. Australian Charities and Not-for-

Veterans’ Sector Study Report, https://www.dpc.vic.gov.au/ images/Veterans_Affairs/ Veterans_Sector_Study_Report_-_ December_2015.pdf, p.12

16. ADF Families Survey 2017,

3.

Veterans Sector Study Report, p.12

17. Ibid, p. 38

4.

Ibid, p.12

18. Ungar,Y. (2017). Australian Charities

5.

Department of Veterans’ Affairs, https://www.dva.gov.au/ consultation-and-grants/grants/ grant-and-bursary-programs/ supporting-younger-veteransgrants-program [accessed: 04 Sep 2017]

1.

2.

6.

7.

Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Treatment Population statistics, https://www.dva.gov.au/about-dva/ statistics-about-veteran-populationtreatmentpop [accessed: 27 Oct 2017] http://www.netpromotersystem. com/index.aspx [accessed: 05 Nov 2017]

8. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

https://www.aspenfoundation. org.au/sites/default/files/ Final%20Report%20%28Main%20 Doc%29%201.6b.pdf, p.23 9.

Department of Veterans’ Affairs, https://www.dva.gov.au/aboutDVA/statistics-about-veteranpopulation [accessed: 30 Nov 2017]

10. Ibid 11. Australian Bureau of Statistics,

https://www.abs.gov.au/census [accessed: 30 Nov 2017] 12. Ibid 13. Australian Parliamentary Library,

https://www.aph.gov.au/ about_parliament/parliamentary_ departments/parliamentary_library/ pubs/BriefingBook45p/WelfareCost [accessed: 30 Nov 17] 14. Department of Human

Services Directory, https:// humanservicesdirectory.vic.gov.au/ home.aspx [accessed 30 Nov 17]

34

Profits Commission statistics accessed 30th November 2017. http://www.defence.gov.au/ DCO/_Master/documents/FamilySurvey/2017-Survey.pdf p. 37 [accessed: 30 Nov 17]

Report 2016 Key Findings. Warlows Legal Insights. https:// www.warlows.com.au/australiancharities-report-2016-key-findings/ [accessed: 30 Nov 17] 19. Ibid 20. Ibid 21. Sensis Social Media Report,

https://www.sensis.com.au/asset/ PDFdirectory/Sensis-Social-MediaReport-2017.pdf [accessed: 30 Nov 17] 22. Ibid 23. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.24-26 24. ACNC, https://www.acnc.

gov.au/ACNC/FindCharity/ Advanced_register_search/ACNC/ OnlineProcessors/Online_register/ Search_Advanced.aspx [accessed: 27 Oct 17] 25. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.24 26. Ibid, p.43 27. Veterans Sector Study Report, p.81 28. Ibid, p.81–82 29. Ibid, p.13 30. Ibid, p.83 31. Ibid, p.86 32. Ibid, p.83 33. Ibid, p.81 34. Berowne, J. 2017, Legacy Brand

Audit Survey Research Report dated 4th December 2017 35. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.44

36. Australasian Services Care

Network, Veterans Health Report, http://www.ascn.org.au/ veteranshealthreport/ [accessed: 27 Oct 17] 37. Chia, J., Harding, M., O’Connell, A.,

and Stewart, M. (2011), Regulating the Not-for-Profit Sector, Melbourne Law School, p.1 38. Ibid, p.5 39. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.46 40. Ibid, p.27 41. Chia et al (2011), p.9 42. http://www.netpromotersystem.

com/index.aspx [accessed: 05 Nov 17] 43. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.44 44. Ibid 45. Veterans Sector Study Report, p.34 46. Ibid 47. Ibid, p.38 48. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.44 49. DVA Treatment Population statistics,

https://www.dva.gov.au/about-dva/ statistics-about-veteran-populationtreatmentpop [accessed: 27 Oct 17] 50. Ibid 51. https://www.withyouwithme.com.

au/about-us/ [accessed: 14 Nov 17] 52. https://www.vep.veterans.nsw.gov.

au [accessed: 14 Nov 17] 53. https://www.dpc.vic.gov.au/

index.php/veterans/public-sectorveterans-employment-strategy [accessed: 14 Nov 17] 54. ADF Families Survey 2017, p.18 55. Ibid, p.19 56. Ibid, p.13 57. Ibid, p.18 58. Berowne, J. 2017, Legacy Brand

Audit Survey Research Report dated 4th December 2017


59. Department of Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Affairs,

https://www.dva.gov.au/aboutDVA/statistics-about-veteranpopulation [accessed: 30 Nov 2017] 60. Ibid 61. Victoria Centre for Data Insights,

Analysis of Department of Defence Transition data 2012-2016, accessed from Veterans Branch, Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet 62. Ibid 63. Ibid 64. Ibid 65. Ibid. 66. Veterans Sector Study Report, p.27 67. Ibid 68. Ibid 69. Aspen Foundation ESOMP Report,

p.10 70. Australian Bureau of Statistics

(2006), From Generation to Generation, http:// www.ausstats.abs.gov.au/ Ausstats/subscriber.nsf/0/ CB1A3CF0893DAE4CA25754C00 13D844/%24File/20700_ generation.pdf [accessed: 30 Nov 2017] 71. Ibid 72. Ibid

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