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fotografie

PHOTOGRAPHY YOU CAN LIVE WITH

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VOLUME 1

ISSUE 4


Beauty, Mystery, And The Art Of Fine Photography. Many grand landscape photographs are images that

are full of drama and what you might call “big light.” But Paul Adams’ grand landscapes are much more intimate and calming. There is a feeling of softness and a sense of mystery about when, how and where his images were made. Paul’s images feel almost impressionistic and they invariably leave you longing to see more. This issue of Le Fotografie Magazine will help satisfy that craving. Our main mission at Le Fotografie is to celebrate the art of photography. We want to help everyone appreciate the magic of this extraordinary artistic medium. In the pages that follow we hope to not just show fine photographs, but to help you understand what makes them special. For most people, photographs are viewed in books, magazines or on the internet. But if you’ve never held a beautifully-crafted, original print in your hands you’ve missed something special. At our Le Fotografie on-line gallery we’re making original prints as affordable as we can so than anyone can afford to experience the depth and beauty of an original, fine art photograph. With this issue of Le Fotografie Magazine we feature the work of photographer Paul Adams. We invite you to enjoy learning more about Paul’s ethereal landscapes.

Visit Our Website To View Our Curated Collection Of Affordable Fine Art Photographs. www.lefotografie.com Content ©2011 Le Fotografie Images © Paul Adams


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Paul Adams has been photographing for over 25 years. Paul was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest and grew up backpacking and exploring the nearby coastal ranges as well as running rivers above the Arctic Circle in Alaska. Paul was awarded a Masters of Photography in 1996 and has taught photography at Utah State University, the Florida Keys, and Brigham Young University. He lived in Europe as a Fulbright Scholar and taught photography in Northern England. Paul has had his work displayed both nationally and internationally. His photographs are included in several permanent collections including the Chattahoochee Valley Art Museum, Nora Eccles Museum of Fine Art, Chicago Institute of Art, the Tenba Corporation, and Brigham Young University Art Museum. Paul has been a professor of photography at BYU since 2002. On A Personal Note: Paul came to Jackson Hole back in the early 1990’s to serve as a photography intern at my advertising agency. He came highly recommended by John Telford, a friend and fellow photographer, who was teaching the program. John said, “Every once in awhile a student comes along who really has passion and talent. Paul is one of those. You can’t go wrong with this guy.” John was right. When he wasn’t working for us, Paul spent every minute he was with us making pictures and printing. I remember he did a beautiful portfolio of images that he made by transferring the dye from early dye sublimation prints onto beautiful rag paper. The images were painterly and quite original. I especially remember that because I was quite jealous of some of them. Some things never change. Edward Riddell

Curator, Le Fotografie


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Black Rod And Salt, Great Salt Lake Š2007 Paul Adams

Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Sweet Pit Apricots Š2008 Paul Adams

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The Mysterious and Magical Images Of Paul Adams. In today’s world it can be difficult to make original photographs. There of hundreds of millions of cameras in the hands of millions of serious photographers. So when you run across photographs that make you stop and say, “Whoa,” then you know it’s either something you’ve never seen before or something that’s been done before, but this time better. Paul Adams’ images of the area around the Great Salt Lake are both. There’s been plenty of images of the lake and the salt flats that lie to the west. But Paul’s images stop you in your tracks. Everything about them is different. The quality of light. The subjects he picks. The often symmetrical compositions. Or in many cases, all of the above. It’s not unusual for photographers to do their best work of subjects that are close to home, maybe even right in their backyard. Paul lives in Provo, Utah and it’s a short trip to the shores of the Great Salt Lake. He’s clearly spent some time working here. He understands the light and atmosphere. He’s perfected a sense of style and composition working in this vast, seemingly empty landscape. The result is a body of work that’s beautifully ethereal, almost surreal. We are drawn into the images in a way that few photographs accomplish. In the following pages we’ll explore a few of the techniques Paul Adams uses to make these masterful images.


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Salt Flat Puddle

Š2005 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Spiral Jetty

Š2008 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


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Never Bull’s-Eye Your Subject. Well, Almost Never. It’s the first thing we teach beginning photographers. Don’t bull’s-eye your subject in the center of the frame. It’s the single most common rooky mistake. But with the right subject and in the hands of a skilled photographer, symmetrical compositions can be extremely powerful. Rule number 2 is not to split your image in half with the horizon. Well, so much for rules. In Mile Marker 2 Paul Adams gives us a perfect example of how and when to break all the rules. Not only did he bull’s-eye his subject, he used a square format to perfectly echo the size and shape of the green and black mileage marker which is the central object in the frame. He also split the frame with the horizon. He’s aligned the horizon to go squarely through the middle of that square mileage marker, and squarely through the middle of the frame. Everything, absolutely everything masterfully pulls our eye straight to the middle of the frame where it’s rewarded with that bizarre green and black marker. Finally, there’s the quality of light. Imagine if this photograph had been taken in bright sunlight. It would have been a totally different picture and almost certainly not as beautiful. The soft and low contrast light that pervades the scene serves as the perfect foil for the vivid color and contrast of the mileage marker. This is an image made with great intent. And its intent is totally obvious. Yet, it’s a powerful and mysterious image you can keep looking at over and over again.

Mile Marker 2

©2006 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Salt Lake Arch

Š2005 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


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To Infinity And Beyond.

One of the hardest things to do in a still photograph is to convey a sense of depth and space. A photograph after all is two dimensional. So it’s always beautiful to see an image that you can look into and just keeping looking, back further and further into the image until you lose yourself in the distance. Paul Adams has accomplished this beautifully in Conduit, Great Salt Lake. Not only has Paul rendered the conduit and its reflection as a virtual infinity symbol, he’s also managed to seemingly capture the concept. The haze blurs the horizon just enough that it disappears so it’s hard to tell where the picture ends. And the perfectly calm water renders an almost perfect reflection which is emphasized by the mostly symmetrical composition of the image. People always stop and look at this picture. First and foremost, they are stopped by trying to figure just what is going on in the picture. Is it some sort of environmental sculpture or is it a found object? Is the object floating in space? Where is its base? As in many of Paul’s images these questions can be answered but only by looking closely. And when you figure it all out, it’s not as though you’re finished looking. It’s then that you enjoy the moment and revel in Paul’s visual trickery.


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Conduit, Great Salt lake

Š2009 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Key West Pier

Š2007 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


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Give Us Words In A Photograph, And We’ll Read Them. It’s amazing. Sometimes there’s absolutely nothing we can do to get people to read. But if you take a picture with a sign or other words in it, you can almost count on people reading those words. So they’d better count. In Rooms For Rent, Greece, Paul Adams has given us very few words. But the words definitely count. Where are these rooms for rent? Do you see any rooms? So, once again, Adams has created mystery in one of his images, this time with a touch of humor. Look as far as you can see and you won’t see any rooms. Paul has also ultilized another photographic axiom. If you contrast warm and cool colors as in the blues and yellows in this image, both colors seem more intense. So the light yellow stucco which might have been lost becomes an important element when constrasted with the predominantly blue tones in the rest of the image. And the soft yellows are particularly beautiful because of the soft enveloping light which feels like dawn.


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Rooms For Rent, Greece

Š2007 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Speed Limit 55

Š2007 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


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Windmills, Holland Š2005 Paul Adams

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Flat Iron Building

Š2010 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Windstorm, Rupert, Idaho Š2008 Paul Adams

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BB Gun Arcade

Š2006 Paul Adams Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Visit Our Website To View Our Curated Collection Of Affordable Fine Art Photographs. CLICK HERE www.lefotografie.com


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fotografie

A CURATED COLLECTION OF

AFFORDABLE FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHS


Le Fotografie - Paul Adams