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D A V I D

le

fotografie

PHOTOGRAPHY YOU CAN LIVE WITH

FULLAGAR

VOLUME 1

ISSUE 6


Photograhers Make Images So The Rest Of Us Can See The World Differently. When you view David Fullagar’s photographs you’ll be struck by the simplicity of his compositions. There is nothing fancy, no gimmicks, just beautifully seen and elegantly composed images. Simple looking, yes. Simple to create? No.

Most good photographs have this trait. There’s nothing extra in the images. Everything included in the frame is essential to the final effect. There’s nothing to add and nothing to take away. But photographers can’t simply choose to leave things out. They must do that through careful cropping and camera position. Like any art form it takes skill and discipline. Today, most people view photographs in magazines, books, or on the internet. But if you’ve never held a beautifully-crafted, original print in your hands you’ve missed something special. At our Le Fotografie on-line gallery we’re making original prints as affordable as we can so that anyone can afford to experience the depth and beauty of an original, fine art photograph. With this issue of Le Fotografie Magazine we feature the work of photographer David Fullagar. We hope his images help you see your world through new eyes. Visit Our Website To View Our Curated Collection Of Photography You Can Live With. www.lefotografie.com Content ©2011 Le Fotografie Images © David Fullagar


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David’s interest in photography began at age 10 when he spent summers with an uncle who was an avid landscape photographer. They would get up at dawn to row around the lakes and rivers surrounding his home in the UK looking for photographs. David’s uncle used a big mahogany Thornton Pickard Ruby Relex camera that took half-plate (3¼” x4¼”) glass negatives. Eventually David acquired his own camera, a folding Zeiss Nettar, and he’s been photographing ever since. All David’s early work was in black and white using medium format equipment. Having recently switched to digital, he still prefers black and white because, for David, it allows more freedom of expression. His favorite subjects include historic buildings and intimate landscapes, often including figures to add human interest and scale. David’s other passion, sailing, also influences his photography in that he is drawn to marine subject matter. On A Personal Note: I first met David when I was teaching a photography workshop in Tuscany. David was fairly quiet, but confident. Unlike many students, he was there to learn and take photographs. He didn’t feel the need to prove to anyone that he could make fine pictures. David went about his work methodically and with great precision. When I saw some of the pictures I was very impressed. So I asked to see more. When I saw the full scope of David’s work I asked if he’d like to show and sell his work through Le Fotografie. I’m extremely pleased he said, “Yes.” -Ed Riddell Curator, Le Fotografie


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Duomo, Orvieto, Italy ©2009 David Fullagar

Following Spread (pages 6-7)

Misty Isles, British Columbia ©2007 David Fullagar


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Photographing Strangers. Ever since artists have been able to capture a human likeness there have been portraits. The history of art is full of very famous examples, such as Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa or Van Gogh’s Self Portrait. Wealthy and famous people often commissioned portraits of themselves as a way to preserve their image and legacy. Then along came photography and it became an affordable way for everyone to preserve the family legacy. Just think of family photo albums and school portraits. But all of these images involve someone asking a painter or photographer to make a portrait of themselves. What about the photographer who wants to take a portrait of a stranger who may not even speak your language? Not a candid snapshot, but a portrait where the photographer asks permission and engages his subject directly over a period of time. The photographer chooses his subject, chooses a location and sometimes directs his subject in subtle and sometimes more direct ways. It is often intimidating for both the photographer and the subject. After all the photographer is asking a total stranger for his trust and time. So when do such portrait sessions result in powerful images? Obviously, the setting, the light, the relationship that developed between the photographer and his subject all count for a lot, but in the end there is one single element that matters most. It’s the eyes. More often than not great photographic portraits have direct eye contact. The subject is looking directly into the lens, not at the photographer or something else but directly into the “eye” of the camera. Such direct eye contact creates a kind of bond between the subject and image. It’s as though the subject is looking directly back at the viewer while we are looking at him. Sometimes it’s even disconcerting. And because of the two-dimensional quality of the photographic image it also results in a portrait where the subject’s eyes seem to follow the viewer as the viewer changes his viewing position. Try it, with the portrait of the novice monk. Slide your head left to right in front of your computer monitor. The young monk’s eyes will follow you.


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Novice Monk, Myanmar Š2010 David Fullagar

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Mohammed The Taureg Š2008 David Fullagar

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Inle Lake, Myanmar

Š2010 David Fullagar Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


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Light And Pattern. We all know that light is the essence of a photograph. Indeed, a photograph is a kind of light recording. But there is something about the human eye that is attracted to patterns of light, and in particular, repeating patterns of light. Photographers often seek out repeating patterns, objects and shapes to create interesting photographs. The key is to find patterns that are organized in such a fashion as to create an interesting composition. In man’s built landscapes, architects and city planners have long known that humans find comfort in repeating shapes and patterns. They have used that in their building designs and city layouts, so the built environment is always a good place to find interesting patterns. But nature, too, has repeating patterns everywhere, whether it’s mud cracks in the desert, ripples of waves on the surface of a lake, or the patterns on windblown sand dunes. So we know pleasing light and interesting patterns make good photographs, but best of all is when the two come together. David Fullagar has done this masterfully with Tile Patterns and Sand Dunes. Here the subject itself has beautiful patterns but then Fullagar’s use of light and shadow adds another layer of repeating patterns and shapes. It’s the combination of light and pattern that makes these two images particularly compelling. Chances are you haven’t thought about these photographic elements consciously before, but my bet is that you’ll find them in pictures that you like. And now that you’re thinking about them you’ll begin to see them in the world around you.


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Tile Patterns, San Quirico d’Orcia, Italy ©2009 David Fullagar

Following Spread (pages 16-17)

Sand Dunes, Death Valley ©2006 David Fullagar


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Hubbell Trading Post Š2008 David Fullagar

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Chapter House Steps, Wells Cathedral Š2008 David Fullagar

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Wells Cathedral, United Kingdom Š2008 David Fullagar

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Pecos Kiva, New Mexico Š2008 David Fullagar

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“Painterly Light” In Photographs. I used to bristle when people referred to photographs as looking “painterly.” It seemed to be that photographs should not attempt to imitate paintings, certainly not intentionally anyway. Yet I came to accept that from most people it was meant as a compliment. And I must admit certain photographs do seem to look painterly. So I’ve tried to wrap my mind around the qualities that give a photograph a painterly feeling. First, I think photographs with a softer look and more diffused light tend to look more painterly. Also, photographs with large out-of-focus areas tend to have a kind of painted look. My resistance to the concept first came because of my stubborn insistence that photography should be its own medium and not mimic painting as it did in its early history. Yet, photography has certainly validated many techniques adopted by painters. For example, painters know that to convey a sense of distance and space in a landscape painting, they need to make distant objects less sharp and lighter, with less saturated colors. That’s exactly what happens in a photograph. And when it’s particularly evident in a photograph, it tends to take on a painterly feel. In fact a photograph that has a painterly quality can be beautiful to behold, especially when we realize that it is rendering a scene that really had that beautiful quality of light. Photographers can’t create that light, we work with what we find, so it means the photographer has really managed to capture a magic moment of light.


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Sunset, Zion National Park Š2007 David Fullagar

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Landscape Patterns, Val d’Orcia, Italy ©2009 David Fullagar

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Vertical Rainbow, Canyon De Chelley Š2008 David Fullagar

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Visit Our Website To View Our Curated Collection Of Photography You Can Live With. CLICK HERE www.lefotografie.com


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fotografie

A CURATED COLLECTION OF

AFFORDABLE FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHS


Le Fotografie - David Fullagar