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fotografie

PHOTOGRAPHY YOU CAN LIVE WITH

VICTORIA

BLUMBERG

VOLUME 1

ISSUE 7


Making Photographs Of Things We Can’t Really See. One of the traits of photography that we don’t think

about much is the ability of a photograph to record things that we can’t really see. Things like fleeting and instantaneous moments of action, weather and facial expressions. Sure we can “see” those things but they sometimes happen so fast that we certainly can’t recall them in our vision, at least not accurately. Photography can do that. It’s like a time machine in that way. It allows us to go back and see a moment in time over and over again. It’s an “instant replay” of one short moment in time. Victoria Blumberg’s close-ups of flowers are another example of this. First, our eyes can’t focus that close without mechanical assistance, and while our eye allows us to focus on one plane of a subject, as soon as we look at the other plane our eye focuses there. So we don’t perceive a difference in focus between foreground and background. But a photograph does and it allows us to view a different version of a scene than we usually “see.” Le Fotografie has been around for almost a year now. We’ve enjoyed every minute of the experience. It’s been our great joy to bring beautiful photographs to the attention of our subscribers and viewers, and to allow you to afford to own beautiful prints of those images so you can enjoy them on the walls of your home every single day. Visit Our Website To View Our Curated Collection Of Photography You Can Live With. www.lefotografie.com Content ©2011 Le Fotografie Images © Victoria Blumberg


VICTORIA

BLUMBERG


BLUMBERG

Victoria Blumberg enjoys creating beauty through color and light. A photographer and stained glass artist, flowers have always been one of Victoria’s favorite subjects. Observing the mystery and wonder within each flower and discovering its beauty is like entering another world. Victoria delights in the infinite small details each flower reveals .... water droplets like stained glass, the visiting butterflies and bees, the occasional passing lady bug and the myriad array of colorful hues, and the shifting light of day as it highlights each flower portrait. In her short-lived garden in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Victoria finds pleasure and peace in the warmth of the sunshine, calming sounds of the creek and the friendship of flowers. On A Personal Note: I first saw Victoria’s flower pictures in an exhibit at a local coffee shop here in Jackson, Wyoming. I’ve seen a lot of flower pictures in my life, probably too many, but Victoria’s were something else entirely. The selective focus, the intense colors and the dramatic cropping were quite wonderful. Equally as important is the fact that the pictures had a totally charming feminine quality with their intimacy and delicacy. The images are such a wonderful contrast to some of the men’s work on Le Fotografie that it was impossible to resist the charm of Victoria’s beautiful images. -Ed Riddell Curator, Le Fotografie


BLUMBERG

Osteospermum

Š2007 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Margerite Daisy

Š2006 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


BLUMBERG

Juxtaposing Warm and Cool Colors.

For most photographers color theory is something that never enters their mind. They make color images that please them and they never really think much about why certain color images “work” better than others. But somewhere along the line in my photography career my wife took up painting. And let me tell you that painters do think about color theory. Alot. Color theory is a huge topic. There are many thick books written on the subject. But one part of color theory is something most painters learn early on and that’s the part about using contrasting colors to make certain colors stand out more in their paintings. In particular, painters know that contrasting warm and cool colors make those colors “pop,” to use a popular photography term. Warm and cool colors probably got referred to as that partly because of the emotions they convey. Warm colors are warm like the flames of a fire: yellows, oranges, reds. Cool colors are best represented by blues, like the ocean, the sky or like Antarctic icebergs. Photographs that juxtapose warm and cool colors really make both appear more vibrant. You can easily prove this to yourself. Block out all the warm or cool colors from an image by covering either the warms or cools with your hand. You’ll immediately notice that the color that is still visible immediately looks less vibrant. This concept extends to any colors that are approximately opposite each other on the color wheel. There we go with color theory again.


BLUMBERG

Pansy #1

Š2006 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Flower #10

Š2006 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Amethyst Brachycome

Š2009 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


BLUMBERG

Selective Focus Controls How We Look At A Photograph. As we mentioned in the introduction of this issue of Le Fotografie Magazine, the human eye really doesn’t have selective focus, unless you really work at it and train your eye. If you hold your finger out in front of your face at the closest distance at which you can clearly focus your eyes on your finger, you’ll see that everything out beyond your finger appears out of focus. But the minute you try to look at the things beyond your finger, boom, your eyes refocus on the background. It happens instantaneously so you hardly notice. Hence, the human eye tends to see everything as being in focus since everything we try to look at appears in focus. However, a photograph records the focus the instant the image is captured and records what the lens sees at that moment (i.e. whatever the lens is focused on). Have you ever noticed that in most paintings everything seems sharp? That’s because that is how we see. But it’s not how the camera sees. Hence a photograph can record as sharp whatever the lens is focused on at the moment. The objects beyond appear out of focus because at that moment they are. When viewing photographs our eye is drawn first and foremost to the areas that appear in sharp focus. So a photographer can effectively control where the viewer looks in a photograph by selectively focusing on one precise spot and throwing the rest of the image out of focus. And voila, that’s where we’ll look first. Victoria Blumberg’s choice of where to focus controls how we view her images. And she uses that control to her distinct advantage.


BLUMBERG

Shasta Daisy

Š2009 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Zinnia

Š2007 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Starburst Ice Plant

Š2009 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


BLUMBERG

The Inevitable Comparisons With O’Keeffe.

Georgia O’Keeffe is certainly universally recognized as one of America’s foremost painters. And her flower paintings are some of her best-known works. By the end of her ninety-eight year life she had produced more than 200 paintings of flowers. So when any female artist makes art involving flowers, comparisons can and probably should be made.

One of Georgia O’Keeffe’s more abstract flower paintings: Light Iris, 1930, 40” x 30”

A second classic O’Keeffe flower painting: Narcissa’s Last Orchid, 1941, 21 1/2” x 27 1/4”

First, let’s be clear. Being compared with O’Keeffe to begin with is an honor, not a slam. Second, any art builds on art that’s gone before it. That’s a good thing too. O’Keeffe’s most famous flower paintings often showed flowers in extreme close-up and in minute detail. Another comparison with Blumberg. O’Keeffe’s flowers are often about color, pure color, sometimes even extreme color. Another similarity. But while Blumberg’s flower photographs may evoke memories of O’Keeffe’s paintings, they certainly aren’t trying to be imitative. The major difference (and it’s a difference I really like) goes back to the selective focus. There is a softness to Blumberg’s flowers that is extremely appealing. And while O’Keeffe’s paintings often draw our eye to the center of the flower, that’s often not the case with Blumberg’s photographs. I love the way that Victoria draws our eye to the spots she’s chosen with selective focus and I love the beautiful and soft transitions of the various colors. There are few hard edges, just gorgeous transitions from one area of color to another. O’Keeffe once said: “When you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it’s your world for the moment. I want to give that world to someone else.” I suspect Victoria Blumberg would wholeheartedly agree.


BLUMBERG

Morning Glory

Š2009 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Flower And Water Drop Š2009 Victoria Blumberg

Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Lupine

Š2009 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Pansy #2

Š2006 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


BLUMBERG

Osteospermum #2

Š2007 Victoria Blumberg Click The Image To View Purchase Details At Le Fotografie.


Visit Our Website To View Our Curated Collection Of Photography You Can Live With. CLICK HERE www.lefotografie.com


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fotografie PHOTOGRAPHY

YOU CAN LIVE WITH

Le Fotografie - Victoria Blumberg  

Volume 1, Issue 7 Featuring the photography of Victoria Blumberg. Infomation about Victoria Blumberg, comments about her work and techniques...

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