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InsideSOCCER May / June 2006 $4.95

Informing and Entertaining the Canadian Soccer Community

Parent’s Guide to Soccer

What’s All That Noise From The Sidelines? OFFSIDE — The Rule Explained World Cup Schedule — A World-Wide Festival Craig Forrest's Amazing Adventure MLS – Primed for a Curtain Call / Charmaine Hooper

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 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Soccer Culture vs Pop Culture

4 Soccer Culture vs Pop Culture

Alfons Rubbens

What will make you a fan?

5 What's All That Noise from the Sidelines?

Dr. Alan Goldberg

8 Injuries in Youth Soccer Nic Pimlott, MD, CCFP Medical Advisor

12

10 Offside Gordon Arrowsmith 12 How to Choose a Summer Soccer Camp

Tony La Ferrara

14 A Better Place To Play

Aurora Youth Soccer Club

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Red Bulls’ hook at the season opener began long before the kickoff. 18-year-old singer Rihanna performed at the Red Bull Energy Station outside the south tower. Then fans watched a motor cross demonstration with two of the sport’s most recognizable names, Tommy “Tomcat” Clowers and “Mad” Mike Jones.

26

A halftime concert featured Shakira and Wyclef Jean, and a pre-game tribute was given to professional soccer in New York, which included former Cosmos teammates Pele, Franz Beckenbauer and Giorgio Chinaglia. That in addition to a BMX demo, a break dancing exhibition and video game stations, while the game ball was delivered via skydivers and an appearance by the bald eagle Challenger, who has performed at many key Yankees games over the years.

16 Committment to Development

Barrie Soccer Club

20 FIFA World Cup Schedule 23 A World Wide Festival

Bob Koep

26 Primed For A Curtain Call

Paul S. Hendren

30 United Soccer League

Ed Swain

32 Juggling Motherhood and a Soccer Carreer Charmaine Hooper 34 Craig’s Amazing Adventure

30

Ron Werda

When I read that New York Red Bulls’ President and GM Alexi Lalas promised his fans this season a completely new way to experience entertaining professional soccer at Giants Stadium, I wondered once again, what does it take to market ‘Soccer’? Is the Red Bulls’ expanded ‘entertainment’ the way to cement soccer in the hearts of thousands of soccer fans?

WOW! and somewhere in the middle of everything, the fans, saw a soccer game! Yes, president Lalas said: “The Red Bulls are committed to entertaining our fans before, during and after our games.” The promise, it seems, has extended to include the entire game day.

34 ‘Informing and Entertaining the Canadian Soccer Community since 1992’ PlaySOCCER Magazine Publisher/Editor: Alfons Rubbens Editorial Address: Box 313, Gormley, Ontario Canada L0H 1G0 Tel. & Fax: (905) 888-9242 Contributors this issue: Gordon Arrowsmith, Tony La Ferrara, Dr. Alan Goldberg, Paul S. Hendren, Charmaine Hooper, Bob Koep, Nic Pimlott, Ed Swain, Ron Werda

32 PlaySOCCER Cover Photograph: Courtesy Nixon Bernardino Photographic Contributors: Shawn Cable, Josh Devins, Marielle Di Turi, Dale MacMillan/CSA, Juan Miranda, Toni Pavia, Pépé, Jaroslaw Popowicz, Nestor Ponce, Power Player Academy, Reuters, Elaine Sun Layout & Design: I . Ball Graphics Printing & Publishing: York Region Printing

My thoughts go out to new MLS Toronto franchise owners Maple Leaf and MLSE. What ‘entertainment’ can we expect to fill the 20,000 seats at a Toronto MLS game? As a purist I cringe at the idea of mixing soccer culture with pop culture. As a realist I appreciate that 90 minutes of soccer action is a hard sell on North American soil. Let us know what you think and we will be happy to publish your comments. Alfons Rubbens Publisher/Editor

 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


“Shoot the ball! Kick it! Come on Billy, for God’s sake shoot it!” The 10-year old who’s related to the voice nervously tries to pass the ball to his nearest teammate, but instead it awkwardly dribbles off the side of his foot out of bounds. The boy’s father is now yelling, “Billy what the heck’s wrong with you, son? Are you that stupid? I said shoot it! Do it like I showed you! Now don’t be lazy! Move your butt and go get that ball back!” That boy looks miserable and quickly glances over to the sidelines at his father before he hangs his head and runs after the ball. A few minutes later an opposing player cleanly tackles Billy and takes the ball away from him. The referee’s whistle is silent. The father explodes at the official, “Are you blind or what? Where’s the foul? How can you not call anything there? That’s a yellow card, ref! How can you not see that?” The referee trots over to the father and tells him to calm down. The father doesn’t back down, “I wouldn’t be complaining if you just did your job!” The referee glares at the man and warns him to keep his mouth shut otherwise he will have him removed from the game. Suddenly it has become very quiet on the field as the game comes to an abrupt halt. Billy and a number of players from both teams stop and watch the altercation. Billy seems to be cringing in embarrassment, looking for a way to disappear. Just another fun day on the soccer field! In theory, soccer is supposed to be an enjoyable “game” organized for and played by kids. Its purpose is to

What’s All That Noise from the Sidelines? By Dr. Alan Goldberg

teach game skills, tactics and a love for physical activity. In addition, and when in the hands of appropriate adults, soccer provides its young participants with a whole host of valuable lifelearning experiences like hard work as a vehicle for success, teamwork, good sportsmanship, healthy competition, mastering adversity in the pursuit of a goal and utilizing failure constructively, all of which are geared toward building self-confidence and leaving the child feeling better about himself. In theory! Unfortunately, as the above scenario all too commonly illustrates, the reality of today’s youth soccer experience is vastly different. Misguided adults, both parents and coaches are inadvertently and selfishly distracting the childathlete from what’s really important and, in the process, killing his/her joy for the sport. Parents like Billy’s, who get too caught up in the game’s outcome, who pressure their kids to perform, who are overly critical and demeaning when they make mistakes, ensure that their child will consistently

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play way below his/her potential, seriously jeopardize the parent-child relationship and increase the likelihood that their child will soon become a sports drop-out statistic. There’s no question that the vast majority of parents mean well and want their children to be happy and successful. Toward this end, they are willing to sacrifice their time, energy and financial resources taxiing their kids to and from practices, getting them additional training, volunteering for the team and club functions, and spending countless hours on the sidelines at tournaments and games. Unfortunately, far too many parents do not know exactly what they should and shouldn’t be doing to be the most helpful. Despite having positive intentions and their child’s best interests at heart, these parents say and do things before, during and after games that distract the child from focusing on the actual game, increase his/her anxiety level and, as a consequence, sabotage his/her overall level of play. So just how important is it for you as a parent that your child has a positive, enriching experience in this sport? Do you really want your son or daughter to perform to his/her potential? Are you truly interested in seeing smiles out there during games instead of tears and unhappiness? If your answer to these questions is a resounding “Yes,” then there are specific things that you do as a parent to make these things happen. Your role in relation to your child’s soccer is absolutely critical in determining the quality of their experience. If you adopt the appropriate behaviors and play the right role, then you will ensure that soccer brings a


smile to your child’s face and joy to his heart. If you play the wrong role and act like Billy’s dad, then you’ll end up making a significant contribution to your child’s unhappiness and heartache. So what’s the right role? First and foremost your main “job” is to be your child’s best fan. You need to be unconditionally supportive. If your child is having a bad game, then she needs your love and support far more than when she’s playing out of her mind. After a tough loss or a poor outing, she needs you to be positive, compassionate and loving. Providing feedback on what she did wrong or expressing your disappointment in her play is not what she needs and will only serve to make a painful situation much worse.

Along these lines, love and support do not mean that you coach from the sidelines. In fact, the very worst thing that you as a parent can do is to “coach” from the sidelines. What’s coaching? Offering “helpful: advice and strategy before and during the game, telling your child what to do and where to go, criticizing their play and getting angry with them when they make mistakes are all examples of off-limit, exceedingly destructive parental behaviors. After-game critiquing is another example of very destructive parental coaching behavior. Understand that you are not helping your child when you coach. You will not get them to play better. You are not motivating them, even if you know the game and that’s your intention! On the contrary! Coaching and critiquing from the sidelines will distract your child from the flow of the game, make him more nervous, kill his enjoyment and, as a consequence, ensure that he will consistently play badly. In addition, keep in mind that your “helpful” sideline comments are most

 - INSIDESOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

often experienced by your child as an embarrassment! Coaching behaviors are only appropriate from the coaches, not the parents. Instead, parents should smile from the sidelines, cheer for good execution regardless of which side it comes from, and encourage fair play and good sportsmanship. This means that you as a parent need to model appropriate, mature behaviors during the game. Yelling at your child, his teammates or the opponents is not mature, appropriate behavior. Loudly critiquing the officiating is not mature or appropriate either. It is not your job to critique the referees. Regardless of how well you may know this game, your calls are not better than


the referees. Excuse me, but you are just a tad bit biased in this situation! Loudly complaining to the ref every time he makes a “bad call” is not only an embarrassment to your child, but it’s quite selfish on your part. It takes the focus of the game off the kids where it belongs and puts it on you. Remember, soccer is about the kids, not the adults. Along these same lines it is not appropriate for you to spend your sideline time grumbling to other parents about your team’s coaches and the playing or tactical decisions that they make. If you have a problem with the coaches, then deal with them at an appropriate time and place, not just before, during or right after a game. Most coaches are volunteers, are grossly under-paid for their time and are doing the best job they know how. What they need from you is your support and help, not your disdain and criticism. Finally, try to act on the sidelines in a way that would make your son or daughter proud to have you as a parent. Remember, your child is not the only one who’s performing during the game. You are also a performer and the quality of their experience is in your hands. Conduct yourself in such a way that you clearly communicate to your child and those around you that this is just a game for children, played by children. That is, you need to keep the proper perspective at all times. If there are other parents around you who are unable to maintain this kind of perspective, notify the team’s coach or league officials. It’s not your job to get in the face of another parent for misbehaving. Let the coach o parent board educate them at the next parents’ meeting. Remember, soccer is a wonderful vehicle to help your children learn valuable life lessons. Do your part to ensure that the lessons that they lear are constructive and positive.

As a parent, the principles in sports psychology and youth sports can help you insure that your children enjoy their competitive sports experience, learn quickly and perform to their potential. In addition, sports psychology can help you avoid the performance-disruptive and self-esteem damaging mistakes made by too many well-meaning parents. If you really want your child to win, then you must learn to play the proper role on the athlete-coachparent team. Dr. Goldberg is a nationally recognized expert, author and clinician in the field of sports psychology and performance psychology with over 20 years of experience working across all sports with athletes at every level. Let Dr. G help you gain the Competitive Advantage.

Bill Hinds, author of Cleats - Who Tracked Soccer Through the House? finds endless humour in soccer’s rowdy but lovable players, coaches, and parents. People of all ages can find humour in this fun collection of soccer tales.

 - INSIDESOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


Injuries in Youth Soccer: A Guide for Coaches and Parents Nick Pimlott MD, CCFP Medical Advisor and Coach, Power Soccer School of Excellence and Power Player Academy

Photos courtesy Power Player Academy

Soccer is a sport that demands the most of an athlete of any age – endurance, speed, power, balance, agility and a delicate touch on the ball. Wayne Rooney of Manchester United is the embodiment of these physical attributes. But soccer also involves frequent collisions with other players, the ball and the ground, resulting in risk of injury. Who Gets Injured? Injury surveillance data shows that most injuries occur in players under age 23 and about half of injuries occur in players under age 15. With the growing popularity of soccer amongst girls the fact that females are twice as likely to be injured as males should be of concern to parents and coaches alike. Adult players are more likely to sustain lower limb injuries, while youth players tend to have more head, face and upper limb injuries. Not surprisingly, goalkeepers are more likely to suffer head, face, neck and arm and shoulder injuries than other players.

Most soccer injuries occur during competitive play rather than in practice and more injuries occur in indoor soccer than in the outdoor game (about 6 times more commonly, in fact). Between one-half and three-quarters of soccer injuries result from physical contact between players. Finally, about 30% of all injuries occur as a result of foul play. How Do We Prevent Injuries? Sports medicine experts believe that 75% of soccer injuries are preventable. Injuries are best prevented by keeping in mind the following: • Soccer players should participate in year-round conditioning programs to improve and maintain strength, flexibility and endurance; • Pre-season training should be progressive in intensity and duration; • Practices should begin with at least 10 minutes of proper warm-up and stretching and end in similar fashion. Warm-ups involving the ball such as dribbling tag for younger players or check-out passing for older players are very effective; • A practice-to-game ratio of at least 3 to 1 can reduce injury risk; • Correct tackling technique should be taught; • Foul play should be discouraged and fair play promoted; • Players should wear appropriate protective equipment, particularly shin guards at both games and practice. Preventing ACL Injuries Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries of the knee are a major concern, especially in female players. Researchers estimate that female players, especially once they reach adolescence, are at 4 to 6 fold greater risk of ACL injury than males. Such injuries have enormous impact, often resulting in players leaving the game, not to mention longer term consequences, such as degenerative arthritis later in life. Although the final verdict is not in, there is evidence that prevention programs such as PEP (www.

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aclprevent.com) and the FIFA-11 (http://www.fifa.com/en/ development/medicalsection/0,1236,4,00.html) may reduce the risk of ACL injuries in soccer players, especially female players. These simple exercises can be incorporated into practices and given as “homework” to players. The Bottom Line Injuries in youth soccer are preventable. It is the responsibility of players, coaches and parents to reduce the risk. Soccer is the beautiful game, and, hopefully, the game for a lifetime for today’s youth players.

5

WEEKS ! 4 LOCATIONS!!

 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


OFFSIDE By Gordon Arrowsmith, former FIFA Referee, Whitby Iroquois SC Head Referee

Remember offside is always “in the opinion of the referee” and no one else Offside Position

There is no other law that causes more confusion than the Offside Law. The Law was introduced to stop players staying upfield, behind the defenders, waiting for a long pass to enable them to go one on one with the opposing goalkeeper. The confusion over offside calls results from parents and players not understanding the difference between being in an offside position and being offside. For players to be offside the following criteria must apply: 1. be in an offside position at the moment the ball is touched forward by a teammate 2. become involved in the play 3. if in the opinion of the referee, there is potential for physical contact, the player in the offside position shall be penalized for interfering with an opponent

If yes to above, then Is the player involved in active play by 4. Interfering with play? 5. Interfering with an opponent? 6. Gaining advantage by being in that position? IF yes to the above, then the player is Offside, otherwise no infraction Determination of Offside

Offside Position It is not an offence in itself to be in an offside position. A player is in an offside position if: • He is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent A player is not in an offside position if: • He is in his own half of the field of play or • He is level with the second last opponent or • He is level with the last two opponents Offence A player in an offside position is only penalized if, at the moment the ball touches or is played by one of his team, he is, in the opinion of the referee, involved in active play by: • Interfering with play or • Interfering with an opponent or • Gaining an advantage by being in that position

Determination of Offside 1. Is the player in the opponents’ half? 2. Is the player nearer the opponents’ goal line than the ball? 3. Is the player nearer the opponents’ goal line than the second last defender?

No Offence There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from: • A goal kick or • A throw-in or • A corner kick

CLEATS

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BY BILL HINDS


Obstructing the Goalkeeper Clear Pass to Teammate

Infringements/Sanctions For any offside offence, the referee awards an indirect free kick to the opposing team to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred. It is also a protective law where a player can be in an offside position over and over, but the referee may not caution him. Only an indirect free kick can be given. To give us a clearer understanding we need to look at the definitions and examples of the three main elements of the offence of Offside.

Rebound from a Goalpost or Crossbar

The definitions of these elements of involvement in active play are as follows: Clear Pass to Teammate 1. Interfering with play means playing or touching the ball passed or touched by a team-mate. Obstructing the Goalkeeper 2. Interfering with an opponent means preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or movements or making a gesture or movement which, in the opinion of the referee, deceives or distracts an opponent.

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Rebound from a Goalpost or Crossbar 3. Gaining an advantage by being in that position means playing a ball that rebounds to him off a post or the crossbar having been in an offside position or playing a ball that rebounds to him off an opponent having been in an offside position. Drawings © 2003 United States Soccer Federation, Inc. InsideSOCCER appreciates the opportunity to reprint these delightful drawings from the ‘Laws Of The Game Made Easy’ booklet published by the United States Soccer Federation, Inc.


How to Choose a Summer Soccer Camp By Tony La Ferrara, Club Head Coach, Pickering SC

Photos Courtesy Pickering SC

The heat of July and August may seem a long ways away in the middle of April, but it’s really not too early to begin planning your child’s summer activities. For many kids, summer means going to camp. With many options to choose from, picking a summer camp can be tough. The tips below will help you narrow your search and determine a camp your kids will rave about until next summer.

The following is a list of questions you should ask:

Start now Camps can fill up fast, so it’s best to begin your search well before the summer is on the horizon.

What is the director's background? How long has the director run this camp?

Determine your child’s needs.

What facilities does the camp have and how convenient are they for campers to get to?

Regardless of the age of your child, it is important that the ultimate selection of a camp accommodate all or some of the needs, interests, goals, and expectations of both parent and child. The parent must make an effort to understand what the child wants and why. A good way to begin is to sit down as a family and respond to the following questions: • Do your kids love sports? • Is this camp activity something they enjoy or something you want them to develop further? • What do you and your child want to gain from the camp experience? Learn new skills; develop more self confidence, improving proficiency in certain areas? • Will the program encourage the child to try new things? • Do your children require any special medical attention (e.g. Asthma – Food allergy) Arrange to speak or meet with the camp director. Don’t feel self conscious about asking a lot of questions. A good camp will have paid a lot of attention to these parental concerns and should be eager to respond to them.

What are the camp's goals and philosophy?

What is the schedule like? Is it a structured program or one that emphasizes a lot of free choice? What is the camper-counselor ratio and what are the characteristics of most of the staff? Inquire about the background of the counselors: their training, experience, age and soccer experience. The majority of counselors should be at least 18-yearsold and have high-level soccer playing experience. What percentage of campers return each year? What is the total cost of the camp? Are there additional charges for some of the activities? Often camp registration costs are not all inclusive. What are you responsible for supplying and what will be supplied by the camp? What is the refund policy? How does the camp insure the safety and security of its campers? Do staff members have First Aid qualifications? What happens when the weather is bad? How does the camp program meet individual needs and differences? Will players be grouped according to skill? If a camp advertises celebrity soccer player, ask whether these people will be at the camp full-time or whether they will merely make occasional appearances.

Have a safe and enjoyable summer! 12 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


Pickering Pickering Soccer Soccer Club Club SUMMER CAMP 2006

Camp Dates Week Week Week Week Week

1 2 3 4 5

July July July July July

3 10 17 24 31

– – – –

July 7 July 14 July 21 July 28 August 4

Time Cost

9:00 am – 3:30 pm $140 / week

$100 for extra session or children $70 half days

After Hours Care There is NO CHARGE if your child requires care before or after the normal camp hours

(9:00am – Noon) – (12:30 – 3:30)

LOCATION Kinsmen Park Pickering Kinsmen Park is located on the East side of Sandy Beach RD north of the Power Plant

LOOKING OUT For #1

GoalKeeper Program

Players who wish to improve their goaltending skills will receive FREE additional training

FOR MORE INFO

WE PROVIDE Camp T-Shirt Group Photo Safe, Fun ,Caring environment World Cup Tournament Evaluations PSC Certificate

(905) 831-9803 CAMP DIRECTOR

Tony La Ferrara (416) 835-0269 E-Mail: headcoach@pickeringsoccer.ca

Website www.pickeringsoccer.ca

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AURORA YOUTH SOCCER CLUB PROFILE offerings and forward thinking approach to grassroots soccer. The AYSC was one of the first Clubs in the region to hire a Technical Director (1996) and to offer online registration (2000). In 2004 the AYSC started a 4-team Summer Women’s Recreational League that has since expanded to a year-round program with 6 outdoor teams.

A BETTER PLACE TO PLAY

In 2005, with direction from the Special Olympics Ontario, the AYSC started its Stinger Stars program for children with physical and intellectual disabilities. The 2005 Summer program had 24 registrants and 6 volunteer instructors.

Since 1964 the Aurora Youth Soccer Club (AYSC) has offered the residence of the Town of Aurora and the surrounding communities the opportunity to participate in organized soccer actives and leagues. What started as a small Saturday practice/league with 40 kids, volunteer coaches from the Men’s Soccer Club and a single field location (Town Park) has blossomed into a thriving volunteer community organization. Today the AYSC is pleased to be able to offer a year-round soccer program to its membership that has climbed to over 4,200.

In 2006 the AYSC will undertake to implement a complete Player, Coach and Referee Development Program aimed at raising the level of our players, coaches and referees throughout the Club. This initiative involves indoor training sessions for our players and coaches under the leadership of the Club’s technical staff, a club focused level one coaching clinic for 100 members, specialized training sessions for all club players, pre-season player, coaching and referee clinics, season long exposure to the Club’s technical staff, a club designed practice manual for all divisions and post season forums.

As a volunteer directed organization the AYSC relies on the expertise, time and dedication of over 600 adult volunteers and a small professional staff. From its Board of Directors to its on-field coaches the volunteers are both seen, heard and appreciated for without them the Club would not be able to run and manage the quality of programs that has made the organization one of the largest in the country (per capita). What really sets the AYSC apart from other recreationally based soccer clubs is not just its size but also its program

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In order to secure the facility space for its programs the Club as had to work closely with the Town of Aurora, both the District and Catholic School Boards as well as private organizations such as Magna and St. Andrew’s College. The AYSC currently programs over 60 outdoor fields and indoor space at 12 different locations. At the end of 2005 construction on an indoor soccer facility got underway. After more than 20 years of persistent struggles and set-backs, Aurora is finally home to a first-class indoor facility. In January 2006 the inaugural AYSC indoor house league season kicked-off with more than 200 players taking to the field. The Club also started its Advanced Player Academy and Men’s over 35 league. In 2004 the AYSC Board of Directors started working on its Strategic Plan that would see the Club through the next 2, 5 and 10 years. With soccer still developing at such a rapid pace throughout the Country the need to plan for the future remains a top priority. Moving forward, facilities and development remain the two primary focuses of the Club. To keep facility development a priority within the Town the AYSC has taken the lead in organizing the town’s first Sport Council. On the development front the OSA will be watching the club’s coaching initiative with an eye on potentially using the model throughout the province. While the 2006 outdoor season has just started the AYSC is already working on its programming and strategic plans for 2007 and beyond.

Photos courtesy Aurora Youth SC

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BARRIE SOCCER CLUB PROFILE

Barrie Soccer Club: Commitment to Development Like the community it serves, the Barrie Soccer Club is going through a period of tremendous growth and development. The city of Barrie is one of the fastest growing areas in Ontario, and the club is keeping pace by offering our members new facilities, programs and opportunities. The Barrie Soccer Club has grown to 4500 members and is the largest youth sports organization in the area. The Club offers a House League program starting with our Micro U4 program right up to Men’s and Women’s Leagues. In addition to our Select and All-Star teams, the club provides a superb rep program with 25 teams for boys and girls beginning at U10.

Head Coach Ray Wright, the club is improving the coaching offered players at the House League and Rep level. Coaches are being instructed through clinics, on-line training and individual sessions. The Club’s program features five current coaches who have attained at minimum their OSA “B” License. We also use Master/Mentor and Player/ Mentor coaches who analyze and improve the training sessions and strategies of our coaches. The Club has significantly changed the structure of our House League to allow young players to improve their skills and appreciation of the game. We started by introducing a Micro Program for ages U4-U6. This program

lets kids learn the game by having fun in small sided games with emphasis on getting lots of opportunity to handle the ball. Starting at U8 we have introduced a program to tier our House League players based on their skill levels. The intent is to allow higher skilled players to compete against each other to continue their development, but also to enhance the enjoyment of the game for all players who will be more comfortable playing at their skill level. The top players and coaches continue their development in the Select program which starts at U9. This program will allow the more skilled players to test their abilities against other clubs in our

The Club under the leadership of President Steve Taylor and Club Manager Rick Morandini have launched a series of programs to enhance the enjoyment of the game for our members. This program incorporates our “Commitment to Development” philosophy and includes a number of initiatives to improve the coaching, facilities and infrastructure of our club. The key to the success of our philosophy is the development of coaches. Under the direction of 16 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

District. Our All-Star program starts at U10 and is designed to provide House League players with the opportunity to further enhance their skills by getting extra coaching and the opportunity to play in tournaments with players of similar ability. The program also provides a feeder system to our Rep Program. The most dramatic program for the Club will come in April when we open the Barrie Soccer Club Development Centre (BSCDC). This exciting new facility came as a result of our partnership with the Barrie Optimist Club. Earlier this year the club took possession of the 7 acres of land owned by the Optimist Club, and are currently


constructing a state of the art training facility for our members. The BSCDC will eventually feature 2 full fields and a third mini-field that will provide additional training opportunities. We will also have our Club Offices and a meeting room for coaches to hold strategy sessions with their teams. Beginning this season we will conduct clinics, training sessions and special events at the BSCDC making this the focal point of our club. What’s next for the Barrie Soccer Club? June will feature the 3rd Annual Spiritfest which is becoming one of the leading Rep Tournaments in the province. We will soon announce a Showcase Tournament for our U16-U17 rep teams to provide them an opportunity to show their skills to University and College coaches. There will be a 3x3 tournament and a Tri-Star Skills Competition for kids of all ages during the Barrie Fair, and much more.

We are very excited about the opportunities we can offer the youth of our community through the Club. Members can keep up to date with all of our programs and initiatives by going to www.barriesoccer.com for information.

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2006 FIFA WORLD CUP GROUP B

GROUP A

PTS

GERMANY COSTA RICA POLAND ECUADOR

ENGLAND PARAGUAY

PTS

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

NETHERLANDS

GERMANY

o COSTA RICA o

ENGLAND

POLAND

o ECUADOR o

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

GERMANY

o POLAND

ENGLAND

o TRINIDAD & TOBAGO o

ECUADOR

o COSTA RICA o

SWEDEN

ECUADOR

o GERMANY o

COSTA RICA

o POLAND

Friday, June 9

o

Wednesday, June 14

o PARAGUAY o

Tuesday, June 20

o

Tuesday, June 20

GROUP D MEXICO IRAN ANGOLA PORTUGAL

PTS

o COTE D’IVOIRE o

MEXICO

o IRAN

o NETHERLANDS o

ANGOLA

o PORTUGAL o

ARGENTINA

o SERBIA & MONTENEGRO o

MEXICO

o ANGOLA

o

o PARAGUAY o

NETHERLANDS

o COTE D’IVOIRE o

PORTUGAL

o IRAN

o

SWEDEN

o ENGLAND

NETHERLANDS

o ARGENTINA o

PORTUGAL

o MEXICO

o

PARAGUAY

o TRINIDAD & TOBAGO o

COTE D’IVOIRE

o SERBIA & MONTENEGRO o

IRAN

o ANGOLA

o

Saturday, June 10

o SWEDEN Saturday, June 10

o

Thursday, June 15

Thursday, June 15

PTS

ARGENTINA COTE D’IVOIRE SERBIA & MONTENEGRO

SWEDEN

Friday, June 9

GROUP C

Thursday, June 15

o

Tuesday, June 20

ARGENTINA

Saturday, June 10

SERBIA & MONTENEGRO

Sunday, June 11 Friday, June 16 Friday, June 16

Wednesday, June 21

Tuesday, June 20

Wednesday, June 21

o

Sunday, June 11 Sunday, June 11 Friday, June 16

Saturday, June 17

Wednesday, June 21 Wednesday, June 21

ROUND GAME #49

o o

Winner Group A 2nd Group B Saturday, June 24

GAME #50 Winner Group C 2nd Group D Saturday, June 24

o o

GAME #51

o o

Winner Group B 2nd Group A Sunday, June 25

GAME #52 Winner Group D 2nd Group C

o o

Sunday, June 25

QUARTER GAME #57 Winner Group #49 Winner Group #50

o o

GAME #58 Winner Group #53 Winner Group #54

Friday, June 30

Friday, June 30 GAME #61 Winner Group #57 Winner Group #58

o o SEMI

o o

Tuesday, July 4 3RD PLACE GAME

o o Loser Semi Finals Game #62 Loser Semi Finals Game #61

Saturday, July 8 20 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


GERMANY 9 JUNE – 9 JULY GROUP F

GROUP E

PTS

ITALY GHANA USA CZECH REPUBLIC

BRAZIL CROATIA AUSTRALIA JAPAN

PTS

o CZECH REP. o

AUSTRALIA

o JAPAN

o

o GHANA

o

BRAZIL

o CROATIA

o

CZECH REP.

o GHANA

o

ITALY

o USA

o

CZECH REP.

o ITALY

o

GHANA

o USA

o

USA

Monday, June 12

ITALY

Monday, June 12

Monday, June 12

Saturday, June 17

o

PTS

SPAIN

o UKRAINE

o

Wednesday, June 14

TUNISIA

o SAUDI ARABIA o

o CROATIA o

FRANCE

o KOREA REP. o

SAUDI ARABIA

o UKRAINE

o

BRAZIL

o AUSTRALIA o

TOGO

o SWITZERLAND o

SPAIN

o TUNISIA

o

JAPAN

o BRAZIL

TOGO

o FRANCE

SAUDI ARABIA

o SPAIN

o

CROATIA

o AUSTRALIA o

UKRAINE

o TUNISIA

o

JAPAN

Sunday, June 18

o

Thursday, June 22

Thursday, June 22

o TOGO Tuesday, June 13

KOREA REP.

SPAIN UKRAINE TUNISIA SAUDI ARABIA

o SWITZERLAND o

Sunday, June 18

Thursday, June 22

PTS

FRANCE SWITZERLAND KOREA REPUBLIC TOGO

GROUP H

FRANCE

Tuesday, June 13

Saturday, June 17

GROUP G

Thursday, June 22

Tuesday, June 13 Sunday, June 18

Monday, June 19

o

Friday, June 23

SWITZERLAND

Wednesday, June 14 Monday, June 19

Monday, June 19 Friday, June 23

o KOREA REP. o

Wednesday, June 21

Wednesday, June 21

OF 16 GAME #53

o o

Winner Group E 2nd Group F Monday, June 26

GAME #54 Winner Group G 2nd Group H Monday, June 26

o o

GAME #55

o o

Winner Group F 2nd Group E Tuesday, June 27

GAME #56 Winner Group H 2nd Group G Tuesday, June 27

FINALS GAME #59 Winner Game #51 Winner Game #52

FINALS

o o

GAME #60 Winner Group #55 Winner Group #56

Saturday, July 1 GAME #62

Winner Group #59 Winner Group #60

Saturday, July 1

o o

Wednesday, July 5

WORLD CUP FINAL

o o Winner Semi Final Game #62 Winner Semi Final Game #61

Sunday, July 9 21 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

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CDS HO ME of

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De ve A N lo p

B N

y em eams d a lT Ac nta B e m

(905) 313-8661

A— MP B — SUMMER CA ing Ad v a n i a nced Tr L ev e l 1 & 2

www.anbsoccer.com 22 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


A World-Wide Festival By Bob Koep

The upcoming soccer World Cup is not only the meeting of the world’s best, but a world-wide festival for (just about) everybody. If it brought together just the top rated countries in the world, FIFA could just take the top 32 teams of its rating list and be done with it. But that wouldn’t be any fun at all. Most of the top rated teams are located in Europe and Latin America with just a few exceptions here and there. But such a system would ignore all the hundreds of other countries around the world. There are 205 member countries in FIFA. Most those countries would then be left to do some sulking, knowing they would never be included in the larger family of soccer. So FIFA invented the world-wide playoff system many years ago and, as a result, everybody gets a kick at the can. And yes, there will be some teams which qualified for the tournament in Germany and have no realistic hope of winning anything. But they are winning a lot of self esteem, the feeling of having been there and the feeling of having been recognized. You ask any fan of say Togo, Angola or Trinidad and Tobago, all first timers, how they feel about going to the World Cup and they will be ecstatic, wave the flag and come out rooting for their colours. Of course they will not win the Cup, but they will have been there and will remember the experience for the rest of their lives.

Moreover, the world-wide qualifying system is a lot of fun, keeps fans under suspense for most of two years (that is how long it takes to shake down the multitudes of contestants) and gives some lucky qualifiers the unique opportunity to rub shoulders with the big boys. This time around there were more than 850 qualifying games, every one of them a challenge to focus on climbing to the next level and for thousands of players an incentive to produce their best stuff. There is rejoicing or despair after each and every game for players and fans alike. And the discussion about the chances of “their team” keeps fans occupied, if it really comes down to it, for much of their lives. If you have ever seen the movie of a game between Montserrat and Bhutan, the two worst teams in the world at that time, you will know what excitement is all about. This game was put on as the losers’ world cup, actually called “The Other Final” back in the World Cup year of 2002. It was just as a gag, really, but it might become a regular feature. If you care, Bhutan won that game, its first international win ever. Now that the dust of seemingly endless playoffs has settled, the lucky survivors can focus on the tournament proper which has 32 teams in eight groups playing an opening round-robin with everybody getting three games before the seed is separated from the chaff. The top two in each group advance to the knock out section with the round of 16, eight 23 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

games head on head with winners going to quarter finals. Those eight survivors will lock horns to decide semi finalists and the two winners of that round go to the grand final on July 9 in Berlin. That means there are 64 games on tap during the 31 day tournament, enough to keep you busy for a whole month. Going back to the rating system, of the 32 top rated teams on the FIFA list, only 21 made it to the finals. All the top 10 got in but already the 11th placed team, Turkey, a World Cup semi finalist four


years ago in Japan, failed to make the grade and so did No 12, Nigeria and No 13, Denmark.

Unfortunately for them, Kuwait didn’t make the grade either as it was eliminated in a final Asian play off round.

On the other hand, such lowly rated sides as Togo, No 59, and Angola, No 60 made it through. Some team qualified with extra ordinary luck, others got eliminated in a heart breaker.

Now when the tournament opens on June 9 everybody starts at zero and has the same chance. There will be upsets and heart breakers. And don’t forget, even the underdogs will have to be beaten before anybody can entertain hopes of claiming the Cup.

Angola and powerhouse Nigeria, for instance, topped their group in Africa with identical records but Angola won the trip based on a better head to head results even though Nigeria had the better goal spread. (Angola had a win and a tie against Nigeria)

1 2

Another African star team, Cameroon, No 16 in the world, got wiped out when it couldn’t convert a penalty in the last minute of the last qualifying game.

3

The most heartbreaking story goes to China which had to bow out after running up a 14-1 goal spread +13 in its group identical with Kuwait which had a 15-2 goal spread. Both countries were tied on points and had exchanged 1-0 home wins in their direct meetings. So with everything even, the nod went to Kuwait on account of having scored one more goal than China. (having allowed one more doesn’t count in the tiebreak rule)

DID YOU KNOW?

4

5

?

6

31 nations, in addition to host Germany, qualified for the 2006 World Cup. Of 194 nations that attempted to qualify, 191 are Member States of the United Nations. 847 games played during qualifying process. 20 qualifying games played by Trinidad & Trinidad, the most needed by any qualifier. 9 qualifying games played by Australia, the least needed by any qualifier. 2,464 goals scored. 2.91 goals per game average. 18 million, approximate number of spectators who attended qualifying games. 22,000, approximate per game attendance average. 7 teams went unbeaten in qualifying campaign and earned a spot in the finals: Croatia, France, Netherlands, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Serbia & Croatia, Spain. 3 teams went unbeaten but didn’t qualify: Cuba, Israel, Morocco. Source: FIFA 24 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

7

8


Biggest Event on the Planet The World Cup of soccer is the biggest event of any size or shape in this world. It will keep the minds of people across the globe occupied for most of a month. A worldwide television hook-up assures a proliferation not seen anywhere else and at times over a billion viewers are expected to watch some of the more prominent games. A total of 1.3 billion watched the 2002 final between Brazil and Germany in Japan, the biggest TV event ever recorded since things began moving on television screens. Chances are this year’s final could top that number as more networks have signed up for broadcast rights in all four corners of the world. FIFA is expecting to collect more than $1.5 billion from television rights alone. Overall, at the last World Cup, some 28.8 billion viewers were recorded in 213 countries, that means, every human being on this earth would have had to watch six games each to come to these numbers.

More realistically, the tournament created such interest that hundreds of millions were glued to the screens on a daily basis. Only in the United States the World Cup wasn’t a big draw with less than half a million viewers per game. Top draw in the U.S. was the Germany vs U.S. quarterfinal with an audience of a measly 3.7 million. You can get twice that audience in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo alone. Of course soccer isn’t a big thing in the U.S. where American football and baseball rule the scene. Americans hail the Superbowl of American football as the biggest show on earth as almost 100 million fans watched this year’s game in the U.S and Canada. Outside of North America, however, the Superbowl is not all that big of a story. But wherever Americans are, including the armed forces, and pockets of fans here and there, such a game will be watched and probably a few hundred millions all told cold tune in world-wide for this single event.

25 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


PRIMED FOR A CURTAIN CALL Photos: Tom Shea / MLSnet.com

Stadium photo: Paul S. Hendren

With Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment looking to expand their growing sports empire Major League Soccer looked north to wed a deep- pocketed partner. Paul S. Hendren explains:

October 3, 1984 was a bittersweet day for big league soccer in Canada’s largest metropolis. Close to 17,000 die hards braved cool autumn winds and jammed into rustic Varsity Stadium to witness the second leg of the 1984 North American Soccer League Final. Despite losing the wildly entertaining two game affair to their American brethren from Chicago, the NASL helped professional soccer find a niche in Toronto’s crowded sports landscape. Even though the Blizzard and the NASL garnished some of the spotlight in the mainstream the 1984 season was a last hurrah for a league that boasted at one time or another the likes of Pele, Franz Beckenbauer and George Best, to name just a few international mega-stars. After 1984 the NASL vanished in a sea of red ink, rocked by over indulgence and poor business practices. The Blizzard, who had averaged over 14,000 per game during the 1984 season, were left without a big time stage to perform and Toronto’s spotlight on professional soccer left town as quickly as it had arrived.

Over the last 16 years the residuals for soccer enthusiasts in Southern Ontario have been a series of good intentioned soccer experiments, all of which have never amassed the same attention the NASL did during its heyday. On November 12, 2005 the Board of Governors of Major League Soccer, America’s eleven-year-old internationally recognized professional soccer league, formally approved Toronto as its newest member to start play during the 2007 season. MLS, with its conglomerate of billionaire investors, had wed Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment after a two-year courtship. Kevan Pipe, Chief Operating Officer for the Canadian Soccer Association, is gushing like an expectant father. Canada has been selected to host the next U20 FIFA World Youth Championships and several of the games are to take place in the spanking new soccer friendly stadium in Toronto. Pipe, however, is most impressed that his brokerage skills have finally

26 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


DID YOU KNOW?

? MLS Cup ratings better than last year MLS Cup 2005 on ABC drew a 1.0 rating from Nielsen Media Research. The 770,000 household viewership of Los Angeles’ 1-0 win over New England represents a 25 percent increase over last year’s 3-2 win by D.C. United over Kansas City.

materialized into something positive for the Canadian game. He was instrumental in marrying MLS with MLSE. “A MLS team in Toronto will change the complexion of the sport in Canada permanently,” boasted Pipe who was awaiting the final rubber stamp for the stadium initiative from all three levels of government. “The scale of MLS is enormous.” He believes a MLS team will bring in significant daily media attention and the league will provide more Canadians with developmental opportunities. Over the past ten years MLS has been able to conjure up a relatively healthy diet of media exposure south of the border. In addition to consistent print coverage MLS has, this season, finally been able to secure a television deal that won’t cost them any money. The deal with ESPN and ABC is a ‘rights fee’ deal that will broadcast over 40 games to American households. Corporate America has also sustained a strong partnership with MLS helping the league develop and overcome an estimated $250 million in losses over its brief existence. Last year international sportswear giant Adidas paid MLS $160 million to outfit all of its teams and invest in league properties. During their inaugural season MLS teams averaged 17,406 but attendance hit a plateau of about 15,000 last year. Three teams have built their own parks with Chicago soon to move into their own soccer friendly facility. Toronto will be in a unique situation, being the first MLS team to have their own stadium before kicking their first ball. The MLS single entity structure and its investors have preached fiscal responsibility, fearing the mistakes of its predecessors. The league office controls all player contracts centrally. During the 2005 season all 331 players in the league earned a cumulative $23.6 million – one-third the Toronto Blue Jays 2006 payroll. Teams are capped at $2 million and the league has imposed maximum salaries of $300,000. Nine marquee players, however, earn much more under a league exception. Landon Donovan, for example, earned $900,000 last season while his Los Angeles Galaxy rookie teammate Herculez Gomez took home a base salary of $16,500. 80 MLS players earn less than $50,000.

Canadian Adrian Serioux playing for Houston Dynamo.

27 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


During the upcoming World Cup in Germany many of the American players have played for, or are presently attached to Major League Soccer teams. Highly successful American head coach Bruce Arena even honed his skills as D.C. United headmaster. FIFA, the soccer world’s governing body, has ranked the Americans fifth (5th) in the world, thanks mainly to the impact Major League Soccer has on the Americans World Cup player pool. Despite being away from professional soccer for more than two decades Randy Ragan still understands the pulse of the Canadian soccer scene. Ragan, who now

works as a non practicing lawyer for the University of Guelph, when not coaching youth soccer, was a veteran of big league soccer when the Blizzard were significant players in

Adrian Serioux

Southern Ontario’s sporting scene. Ragan, who was capped 40 times for Canada, including Canada’s only trip to the World Cup in 1986, believes that Maple Leaf Sports

and Entertainment is the right organization to launch a soccer team given its experience in the business of sports. “It is great and it will invigorate the development of the sport in Toronto/Ontario/ Canada,” Ragan disclosed. He warned, however, that: “For long term health, develop a strong player development program, don’t focus on immediate success at the expense of player development.” He attributed the Blizzard’s success when he was playing to the fact that the management and coaching staff found the right balance between acquiring experienced players and developing youth players. MLS teams have recently committed to a full reserve team system and several MLS clubs have an army of youth teams operating under their banner. Mark Abbott is a MLS pioneer, being the only league executive to have survived the league’s eleven-year journey. Abbott, who was recently promoted to the position of League President, believes Toronto is ripe for MLS. “We see some very important benefits to having MLS in Toronto. It allows us to place a team in a large, ethnically diverse market, with a new, soccer specific stadium that will serve as the team’s home,” he disclosed to Inside Soccer. “It also allows us to bring in a very strong and experienced sports and entertainment company in MLSE as an owner”. The excavation on the grounds where Toronto’s new $62.9 million, 20,000- seat soccer venue will sit has started. Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment has pledged to invest $18 million of their own money for the project, not to mention sinking in $10 million in expansion fees. Everyone associated with the team are holding their collective breaths, anticipating the release of public monies for the stadium project. The North American Soccer League is long gone, buried in the annals of Canadian sports folklore. Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment hope that their union to Major League Soccer will be a curtain call for some more big league soccer memories for decades to come. Feature writer Paul S. Hendren has followed Major League Soccer since the league started play in 1996. His musings about the Columbus Crew and the opening of Crew Stadium were featured at Football Expo in Cannes.

28 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

Houston Calling Since 1996, the year Major League Soccer kicked its first ball; several Canadians have found homes on MLS rosters. The Houston Dynamo, a team that relocated to Texas from Northern California in the off-season, boasts a trio of Canucks; Pat Onstad, MLS Goalkeeper of the Year last season, Dwayne DeRosario, runner up for the 2005 Honda MLS Player of the Year, and newcomer Adrian Serioux, a graduate of the Toronto Lynx. All are integral members of a team widely considered contenders for the 2006 MLS title. “We are delighted to have the three players from our neighbour to the north. It is obvious to us that those three guys are an integral part of our team,” announced Oliver Luck who holds the dual role as Dynamo President and General Manager. “Fairly soon people are going to start talking about Canada as a great exporter of not only hockey players but soccer players as well.” Houston’s debut, on home soil, was an explosive affair as over 25,000 crammed into Robertson Stadium to see their home town heroes run over Colorado 5-2 with Canadian Dwayne DeRosario helping out with four assists.


The Forbes Family Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment Chairman Larry Tanenbaum and his cohorts will be keeping very exclusive company when Toronto joins Major League Soccer in 2007. The list of owners / investors in MLS is a virtual who’s who of billionaire philanthropists who have made it to Forbes list of leading money makers at one time or another.

Pat Onstad

Pat Onstad, 2005 MLS Goalkeeper of the Year

Dwayne DeRosario, (left) runner up for the 2005 Honda MLS Player of the Year.

(1) Philip Anschutz and AEG (Anschutz Entertainment 1 Group), Owners of Los Angeles Galaxy, Chicago Fire, Houston Dynamo and D.C. United. Estimated net worth: $5.8 billion. Anschutz has a long track record as a risk-taker in businesses ranging from railroads, oil and real estate to telecommunications, movie theaters and filmmaking. Whatever the venture, he is known for his vision. AEG was instrumental in helping build two soccer specific stadiums in Los Angeles and Chicago. (2) Lamar Hunt and Hunt Sports Group. Owner of 2 Columbus Crew, Kansas City Wizards and FC Dallas. Hunt, whose family made their mark in the oil and silver industry own the NFL’s Kansas City Chiefs. He purchased the Chiefs in 1960 for $25,000 and the footabll teams present day value is $762 million. Hunt Sports was instrumental in helping build soccer specific stadiums in Columbus and Dallas. (3) Robert Kraft. Owner of the New England Revolution. 3 Estimated net worth: $1.1 billion. Kraft, who also owns the NFL’s New England Patriots and his own privately built stadium, runs one of the largest privately owned paper and packaging enterprises in the United States. (4) Stanley Kroenke. Owner of the Colorado Rapids. 4 Estimated net worth: $1.4 billion. Kroenke’s sports empire includes the Colorado Avelanche of the NHL, and the NBA’s Denver Nuggets. He has built a reputation as one of America’s leading developers of shopping centers and apartment buildings. (5) Jorge Vergara. Owner of Club Deportiva Chivas USA. 5 Estimated net worth: $1.4 billion. Vergara, who owns CD Chivas, one of Mexico’s most fabled soccer clubs, has made his fortune through OmniLife – a leading producer of vitamins in Mexico. (6) Dave Checketts. Owner of Real Salt Lake. Checketts is 6 the former President and CEO of Madison Square Garden in New York and former President of the New York Knicks and Utah Jazz. His company just purchased the NHL’s St. Louis Blues for $150 million and made a $600 million bid for the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team. (7) Dietrich Mateschitz and Red Bull. Owner of New York 7 Red Bulls. Estmitated net worth $2.4 billion. Austrian Mateschitz, who is MLS’s newest investor, turned his energy drink company into a world wide phenomina. Red Bull , along with AEG, have pledged to build a soccer specific stadium in New Jersey 29 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE By Ed Swain

Photos Richard Howes, Marielle Di Turi

to Texas, the USL offers opportunities to play against the very highest level of competition.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the United Soccer Leagues (USL). From its humble start as an indoor soccer league in the Southwest USA, the USL has grown into an association of outdoor soccer leagues spanning the North American continent. From the Pacific Northwest to the Caribbean, from northern Ontario on south

The USL can be viewed as a pyramid of leagues with the youth and amateur leagues forming the base, supporting elite leagues at the very top. On the men’s side, the USL First Division is the top division, with 12 teams, coast to coast. Under the top division, there is a 9 team USL Second Division, concentrated on the east coast of the US. Below that is the Premier Development League (PDL) boasting 10 divisions and almost 60 teams. With a short season, this league is designed to give college level kids in Canada and the USA a chance to play at a high level over the summer and still retain their college eligibility. On the women’s side, the W-League is the top amateur league in North America with 5

divisions and over 30 teams. And the base consists of an ever-growing number of youth teams in the Super-Y League, the grassroots foundation of the USL. Over 80 clubs across the continent offer programs for age groups U13 through U19 (expanded this year to include a U20 division) for both boys and girls teams. In the First Division, the Vancouver Whitecaps have a history of success in the USL and owner Greg Kerfoot has shown great support for the club. With the announcement of development of a new

DID YOU KNOW?

? Romario de Souza Faria (“Romario”) the second leading scorer in world soccer history and 1994 World Cup Champion from Brazil, will be in the Miami FC lineup against the Toronto Lynx at Centennial Stadium on May 26th. Romario became a national hero when he played a key role in helping Brazil win the 1994 World Cup in the United States. He was named the Best Player of that World Cup and received the “Golden Ball” for his efforts. Romario also went on to win the “FIFA Player of the Year Award” that same year. In addition to the World Cup, Romario won the 1989 and 1997 Copas Americas with the Brazilian National Team. During his 21-year career, Romario has played for several of the top clubs in the world including Vasco da Gama, Flamengo, Fluminense, PSV Eindhoven, Barcelona and Valencia. Romario has a total of 959 career goals, and he is rapidly approaching the magical number of 1,000, a feat which only “The King” Pelé has achieved.

30 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


waterfront stadium seating up to 15,000, the club resembles a European club, with reserves and youth teams supporting the professional team and a strong fan base. Where the Whitecaps differ from the European model is the importance placed on the women’s game. The Whitecaps W-League team boasts a large number of women on Canada’s national team and routinely draws large crowds to Swangard Stadium in Burnaby. In the east, the Toronto Lynx have given a number of young players from the Toronto area a start to their professional careers, including Paul Stalteri, now with Tottenham Hotspur. Owners Bruno and Nicole Hartrell are entering their tenth season running the men’s team and have grown a small but dedicated fan base. Last year, the Lady Lynx were formed and enjoyed their inaugural season in the W-League, growing

in reputation to rival Vancouver as the best soccer club in the USL. The Montreal Impact have to be considered the success story of the league. Owned by the Saputo family, the team routinely draws crowds of over 10,000, and are building a new soccer specific stadium to further solidify the game in Montreal.

Thompson-Okanagan and Victoria United representing Canada from B.C., Edmonton Clippers, Calgary Wildfire Juniors, FC Calgary and Lethbridge United from Alberta and Ottawa Fury and the Toronto Lynx Juniors from Ontario. The regular season is capped with an annual championship tournament held in Florida.

In addition to the Whitecaps and Lady Lynx, the W-League boasts the Laval Comets, Ottawa Fury, Sudbury Canadians and London Gryphons as the other Canadian entries.

The USL league is all about building from the grass roots and offering players the chance to compete with the best.

The PDL has the Abbotsford Rangers in the Northwest division, the Thunder Bay Chill in the Heartland division and the Ottawa Fury in the Northeast division. Finally the Super Y-League keeps growing and growing with the Vancouver Whitecaps FC, Abbotsford Fraser Valley,

Toronto Lynx 2005 Home Opener against Montreal Impact

Montreal Impact vs Vancouver Whitecaps.

31 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


CANADIAN WOMEN'S SOCCER

Juggling Motherhood And A Soccer Career By Charmaine Hooper Photos courtesy CSA

Charmaine Hooper with daughter Charlie.

The women’s team has been gearing up for the CONCACAF tournament since early in January ’06. The program has taken a new direction in that the players are training more than in the past and there are more opportunities to play games, especially leading up to the qualifying tournament for World Cup 2007 in November. So far for ’06, Canada has recorded 3 wins and a tie in international friendlies and hope to continue winning. There is a pretty confident feeling surrounding the team this year. After losing 3-1 and 4-3 last fall against world champions Germany, we left with a good feeling. The possibility for Canada to beat Germany is closer than we thought. If we are able to score so many goals, then it is possible to win.

We would have to continue to score and just defend much better. As far as the team is concerned, we still did great even though all our players were not present. Later on in the summer, Canada will be playing Sweden in Minnesota, July 18, USA in Boston, July 30 and then France, Aug. 27 and 30, in France, all part of the preparation leading up to our qualifying tournament. With Canada playing as many exhibition games as possible only allows the team the best possible preparation path. The team is able to work on tactics during the games and also with the hectic schedules of traveling and playing, the team follows during these tune up matches, only helps to toughen the players physically and mentally so that when the big games or big tournaments come around, the players are able to respond, regardless of the schedules, environment or any adversity the team will face. It’s been almost 1 year since my return to the national team and it’s amazing how quickly the year has flown. I have been unbelievably busy just about everyday, taking care of my daughter Charlie, trying to keep up with my training and traveling but I have to say I have enjoyed every minute of it. Having Charlie around the team has been really nice for me, the girls and the coaching staff. She adds a breath of fresh air to our environment every time she is around the team. The great 32 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

“Not only is Charmaine Hooper a wonderful soccer player and outstanding role model as an athlete, she is also the fortunate mother of the cutest little girl, Charlie. For almost a year now, Charmaine has attended our camps – always bringing her daughter – and Charlie has by now become a dear part of our extended family. Charmaine has as always an amazing ability to stay focused on her tasks as a player, still being relaxed in her new role as a mother. It is absolutely a great contribution to the program. She not only proves what you can accomplish as a player when you are driven on your soccer job at 38, but she also shows to the whole world that it is indeed possible to extend that carreer even when you are caring for a little kid." Even Pellerud, Canada's national woman's coach


WWC Schedule June 23-26 Canada vs Italy in Toronto

July 6-19 Camp and game vs Sweden

July 27-31 Camp and game vs USA

August 15-30 Camp and games vs France (Aug. 27 and 30)

Sept. 15-30 Camp in BC

Nov. 18 CONCACAF tournament Canada will be competing in the FIFA U20 Women's World Championship from August 17 to September 3 in Russia. Charmaine Hooper playing against Germany

thing for me is that the girls can help out with watching or taking care of her for small periods of time. My mom, Myrna, is the main care taker and she has been a great help for the past year. One doesn’t realize how demanding a little munchkin can be. My mom helps me to wash the bibs, wash her little

dishes, feed her, bathe her, watches her while I’m at practices or games, changes her pampers, comforts her when I leave for practices, etc. It is a never ending list of duties so I try to help out as much as possible and of course by the end of the camps, I am exhausted from Charlie duties and team duties. I would not

change anything about it. Charlie is actually like our team mascot and right now, I don't think that she is aware that her mommy plays soccer for Canada but sooner or later she will understand everything. By this summer, she should be shagging balls for us at camps. I know she will love that.

Sinclair to England Two-time Hermann Trophy winner Christine Sinclair, who led Portland to the NCAA Division I title and set a single-season scoring record with 39 goals, has signed to play for Chelsea Ladies FC. Sinclair, who has 53 goals in 71 outings for Canada will also play for the Vancouver Whitecaps of the W-League starting in May. 33 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


Craig’s Amazing Adventure By Ron Werda

Photos Shawn Cable

“The splendid work done by SOS Children’s Villages is charity where deeds speak louder than words” www.soschildrensvillages.ca

Craig Forrest

,

Rogers Sportsnet Pro Soccer analyst and former captain of the Canadian Men’s Soccer Team, and his intrepid team of goodwill emissaries visited five SOS Children’s Villages in South Africa and once again demonstrated that Soccer is the tie that binds.

cooked meals provided by the SOS Mothers (appointed caregivers) and visits to communal gardens (where program beneficiaries grow nutritious food for their families) and to a heart-rendering community daycare centre. They made many friends everywhere they went. Craig and "his team" were greeted gleefully by a marching group of drummers and majorettes parading up the road to one community SOS Social Centre, and was treated to traditional and gospel song and dance performances in

The many SOS and community children readily took heartily to Craig, as he spent hours playing soccer at the different SOS villages. During one soccer freefor-all, the SOS and community children were very intent on refereeing their game themselves, invoking a full set of rules including ‘out of bounds’‚ and penalty kicks. Soccer is the tie that binds, and the children soon warmly clung to and crawled all over their special visitors, relaxing just long enough for all to enjoy the tasty, home34 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


traditional attire at another. While boys and girls dance groups performed traditional Swazi dances, as part of one dance, the girls narrated a serious message about preventing HIV/AIDS. The poignancy of such a sincere performance from innocents really drove home the tragedy of their situation so starkly as the sight of broken-down shacks harbouring HIV/ AIDS victims amidst a tourist area with five-star hotels.

Everything that Craig Forrest and his team saw along the way deeply affected them. Craig can attest: “I’m extremely excited to have [had] this opportunity to... [see] firsthand the important work of SOS Children’s Villages. I’m really looking forward to... help raise awareness for the subSahara’s vulnerable children. I know this will be an incredible learning experience for me and I hope that I can share what I learn with sports audiences across Canada.” One child, a resident and beneficiary of one of the SOS Children’s Villages visited, said it best when repeatedly saying: “I’m so happy you came to visit me!”

Canadian soccer helps children around the world! The Canadian Soccer Association (CSA) has teamed up with SOS Children’s Villages Canada to support the Official Charity campaign of the 2006 FIFA World Cup. The campaign aims to raise sufficient funds for 6 new SOS Children’s Villages for orphaned and abandoned children by the time the whistle blows at the final of the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany. The Villages will be built in Mexico, Brazil, Nigeria, Vietnam, the Ukraine, and South Africa. As part of this campaign SOS and the CSA named Canadian soccer celebrity, Craig Forrest, as the ‘FIFA for SOS Children Ambassador’ for Canada. In this role Craig joins over 50 leading football stars around the world. 35 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


36 - INSIDESOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


KINGS CROSS PHYSIOTHERAPY & SPORTS INJURY CLINIC

SPEED FOR SOCCER SUMMER CAMPS • FOR THE FIRST TIME KINGS CROSS PHYSIOTHERAPY IS PROVIDING THEIR UNIQUE BLEND OF SOCCER SPECIFIC SPEED TRAINING & TECHNICAL INSTRUCTION IN A 3 DAY CAMP FORMAT. THESE CAMPS ARE IDEAL FOR BOTH INDIVIDUAL PLAYERS & TEAMS. • SPEED, AGILITY & COORDINATION TRAINING ARE ASPECTS OF THE ATHLETE’S PROFILE THAT ARE DIFFICULT TO INCORPORATE INTO PRACTICES. OUR CAMP FORMAT WILL HELP PLAYERS IMPROVE THESE IMPORTANT SKILLS. • PRE & POST PROGRAM TESTING WILL BE CONDUCTED & A GRADUATING REPORT PRESENTED AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE CAMP • DATES :

JULY 18, 19 & 20 AUGUST 1, 2 & 3

JULY 25, 26 & 27 AUGUST 8, 9 & 10

• TIME :

START 9:30AM & FINISH AT 3:30PM WITH A 1 HOUR BREAK AT LUNCHTIME.

• LOCATION : CALEDON EAST SOCCER COMPLEX, OLD CHURCH ROAD (JUST EAST OF AIRPORT ROAD) CALEDON • BUS TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED TO & FROM A MISSISSAUGA & BRAMPTON LOCATION. • COST : $200 PER PLAYER. PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION FORM THAT IS ABAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE. •

CONTACT : JASON BENT SOCCER PROGRAMS COORDINATOR JBENT@KCPHYSIO.COM 905 796 2000

Jason Bent Photo: Nestor Ponce

INFO : WWW.KINGSCROSSPHYSIO.COM

Test your Soccer R E C C ame O S e d Knowledge and i s n I f the G

! Z I U Q

Laws o

1 2 3 4

Win 1 4

BOOK PRIZES!

Answer the following questions: Is it permissible for a goalkeeper to take a throw-in, corner-kick, penalty kick, ect.? Yes No May players wear a one-piece playing suit in place of shirts and shorts? Yes No Are players allowed to use tape to cover jewellery that is considered to be dangerous? Yes No A player accidentally loses his/her footwear and immediately scores a goal. Is this permitted? Yes No

of

10 BOOK PRIZES TO BE WON

5 Can a captain send off one of his/her

team-mates for serious misconduct? Yes No 6 Does a team captain have the right to question a decision of the referee? Yes No 7 May a goalkeeper join other players at a dropped ball situation? Yes No 8 If a goalkeeper is bouncing the ball, may an opponent play the ball as it touches the ground? Yes No

To enter: Mail your answers with your name, address, and telephone number or e-mail address no later than July 31st to:

InsideSOCCER Magazine, Name:_ ___________________________________________________ Box 313, Gormley, ON L0H 1G0 Address:_ _________________________________________________ Or enter on-line at: www.bcsoccerweb.com www.ontariosoccerweb.com www.soccer.loop48.com

Tel/e-mail:_ _______________________________________________ 37 - INSIDESOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


38 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer


T h e P e rf e c t

Getaway

Just jump on the train and go! Ontario and Québec are alive with fun! City explorations, sports, shopping, theatre, wining and dining... all that’s missing is you! And when you take the train, getting there is half the fun‑!

L’ é va s i o n

IDéALE

Prenez le train et allez-y‑! Balades, sports, magasinage, théâtre, bonne table, divertissement… L'Ontario et le Québec sont animées et emballantes‑! Il ne manque que vous‑! Et s’y rendre en train est un vrai plaisir.

Book online, contact your travel agent or call VIA Rail Canada at 1 888 VIA-RAIL (1 888 842-7245) TTY 1 800 268-9503 (hearing impaired).

Réservez en ligne, communiquez avec votre agent de voyages ou appelez VIA Rail Canada au 1 888 ‑VIA-RAIL (1 888 842-7245) ATS 1 800 268-9503 (malentendants).

39 - InsideSOCCER, 2006 Parent’s Guide to Soccer

www.viarail.ca


Inside Soccer Parent's Guide 2006  

Inside Soccer Magazine informing and entertaining the Canadian soccer community.

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