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Health & Safety • Introduction Risk Assessment • Generic risk assessments • Guidance on using generic risk assessments Supporting Information • Health hazards terminlogy explained • Harzardous plant information • Safeguarding children • Group safety at water margins

a joint project


Introduction This section is designed to equip you with much of the information needed to conduct outdoor lessons, from simple science studies to gardening and pond dipping, safely and enjoyably. It consists of two main sections. The first part contains generic risk assessments, and guidance on using generic risk assessments, for common activities in outdoor education. These have been developed in line with the guidance issued by CEA@Islington in the Risk Assessment Toolkit recently distributed to schools. Schools must conduct and approve their own risk assessments following this guidance however the generics included here will give the risk assessment team at your school a basic overview of typical risks and hazards associated with activities they may not be fully familiar with. For further information on risk assessment and risk assessment training contact the CEA@Islington Health and Safety Team on 020 7527 5971 or 5795. If you are considering conducting any activities off site you should discuss these with the CEA@Islington Off Site Visits Officer and follow the guidance in the CEA@Islington publication Health & Safety for Off Site Activities. Your school should have a copy or you can download one from www.islingtonschools.net/DownloadableDocuments/Services/offsiteactivities.pdf The second section contains additional information on the types of thing you need to be aware of e.g. hazardous plant information, health hazards, group safety and guidance for non-teaching staff on working with vulnerable groups. This is included not to put you off getting involved in an activity but to help you make informed choices for your pupils, school grounds to help you conduct your activities. It is assumed throughout that schools take full responsibility for the safety and welfare of the children in their care and ensure all relevant procedures are followed regarding the completion of appropriate checks for qualifications and CRB for all staff or volunteers working with children.

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RISK ASSESSMENT

Location (tick)

teachers contractors

playground (specify)

premises manager parents

classroom (specify)

Environmental Art School pupils volunteers

no

other (specify)

Ref No

hall (specify)

support staff

GRAEA

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)

TA’s others (specify) Assessor/s

Who could be at risk (tick) Date of assessment

yes

In Place

Signature of assessor/s

Recommended Control Measures

• Trees will not be climbed during this activity. • Ladders will be used to hang any dressing in trees and will only be used by trained adults. • Supervisory ratios for children must follow guidelines set by school. See also Generic Risk Assessments Tower Scaffolds and Ladders and Stepladders and Work at height in Risk Assessment Toolkit. • Hazardous plants will be identified beforehand, and no contact will be allowed with them. • Following any handling of natural material hands must be washed before eating, drinking or smoking and at end of activity. • Collection of natural materials must be approved by the relevant authority and not cause environmental damage.

Risk Level

Review date

Hazards what can go wrong

Date and method relevant staff and others informed No

Task or Issue

Tree dressing

Falls from heights – tree dressing

Contact with Contact with natural materials hazardous plants and natural materials.

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 1 of 2


Hazards – what can go wrong

Inhalation of fumes from paints, glue and sprays.

Contact with cutting tools

Task or Issue

Use of paints and glues

Use of tools

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 2 of 2

No

See also Generic Risk Assessment Equipment – Non Electrical in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Knifes or other cutting tools must be used on a stable surface and guards replaced when tool is not in use.

• Children must not work un-supervised with any cutting tools, glues or paints.

• Tools not in use must be stored safely out of reach.

• The number of tools in the work area must be kept to the minimum.

• Children instructed in correct use of tools and equipment.

• Glues must be solvent free.

• Sprays must be CFC free.

• Paint must be lead free and water based.

• Prolonged use of sprays, glues and paints must be subject to a detailed COSHH assessment.

• Containers must be kept closed when not in use.

• Use of glues, sprays or paints must be in a well ventilated area.

• Ensure adequate supervision.

Recommended Control Measures

Environmental Art

RISK ASSESSMENT

yes

no

In Place

Risk Level

GRAEA

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)


RISK ASSESSMENT

Location (tick)

teachers contractors

playground (specify)

premises manager parents

classroom (specify)

Environmental Education School pupils volunteers

other (specify)

Ref No

hall (specify)

support staff

GRAEE

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)

TA’s others (specify) Assessor/s

Who could be at risk (tick) Date of assessment

Signature of assessor/s

no

In Place yes

Risk Level

Review date

• High factor sun block or clothing (inc. hats) must be worn by all children (and workers to set example).

Recommended Control Measures

Heat or cold related illness

• Sleeves must be kept rolled down when working in vegetation.

• Hazardous plants must be identified in advance, and children prevented from working with them.

• Collection of natural materials must be approved by the relevant authorities.

• Children must be frequently reminded of the terrain.

• Activities must be stopped if children’s clothing becomes unsuitable for conditions.

Blisters and rashes

Phytophotodermatitis

Slips, trips and falls

Weather effects

Hazards – what can go wrong

Date and method relevant staff and others informed No

Task or Issue

General

Contact with hazardous plants and natural materials.

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 1 of 2


Hazards – what can go wrong

Using tools and equipment • Site must be kept tidy, tools and equipment out kept to a minimum with frequent reminders to children about nature of the terrain.

Cuts and bruises

See also Generic Risk Assessment Equipment - Non Electrical in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Tools and equipment should be well maintained and in good working order.

• Tool and equipment used by children must be sufficiently supervised.

• All cuts must be washed and treated immediately.

• Children instructed in correct use of tools and equipment.

See also Generic Risk Assessment Litter Picking in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Food consumption must be prevented during collection of natural materials and minibeasts.

• In damp or wet areas, all workers, especially children, must cover cuts and keep hands away from face. • Wash hands before eating, drinking (or smoking) and on completion of activity using antibacterial soap and clean water.

Recommended Control Measures

Minor bruises and sprains

Contact with Weil’s disease micro-organisms Toxocariasis

Task or Issue

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 2 of 2

No yes

no

In Place

Risk Level

Environmental Education

RISK ASSESSMENT

GRAEE

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)


classroom (specify)

GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT Location (tick)

Gardening School Who could be at risk (tick)

teachers contractors

playground (specify)

premises manager parents

no

other (specify)

Ref No

hall (specify)

support staff

GRAGa

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)

TA’s others (specify) Assessor/s

pupils volunteers

Date of assessment

yes

In Place

Signature of assessor/s

Recommended Control Measures

• High factor sun block or clothing (inc. hats) must be worn by all children (and workers to set example). • Activities must be stopped if children’s clothing becomes unsuitable for conditions. • Keep work areas clear and tidy, removing clippings frequently. • Regularly remind children of terrain. • Everyone must wash hands before eating, drinking or smoking and on completion of activity. • Advise all involved in gardening activities to ensure tetanus vaccination is kept up to date.

Risk Level

Review date

Weather effects

Hazards – what can go wrong

Date and method relevant staff and others informed No

Task or Issue

General

Slips trips and falls

Tetanus

Contact with Contact with • Gloves must be worn when handling soil. hazardous plants micro-organisms . • Wash hands before eating, drinking (or smoking) and natural and on completion of activity using antibacterial materials. soap and clean water. • Food consumption must be prevented during gardening activities. Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 1 of 2


Hazards – what can go wrong

Puncture wounds Strained back

Use of hand tools Cuts and sprains

Handling rubbish and waste material

Phytophotodermatitis

Contact with Thorny material hazardous plants

Task or Issue

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 2 of 2

No

• Tools and equipment used by children must sufficiently supervised. • Keep tools and equipment out to a minimum. • All tools and equipment to be well maintained and in good working order. • Check and clear ground before kneeling for work, consider the use of kneeling mats. • Alternate digging and other work to avoid strains. See also Generic Risk Assessment Equipment – Non Electrical in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Bags of rubbish must not be held close to body. • Use handling aids or carry between two people. • Everyone must wash hands before eating, drinking or smoking. • Use small bags to prevent carrying too much waste. See also Generic Risk Assessment Litter Picking in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Shrubs must be thinned from the outside to the centre. • Thorny plants must be identified and all advised on careful working. • Protective goggles must be worn when working in close proximity to thorny plants. • Suitable gloves must be worn when working with thorny plants. • All irritant plants on site must be identified to all workers before work starts. • Gloves must be worn and sleeves rolled down when handling any irritant plants.

Recommended Control Measures

Gardening

GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT

yes

no

In Place

Risk Level

GRAGa

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)


GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT

Location (tick)

teachers contractors

playground (specify)

premises manager parents

classroom (specify)

Pond dipping School pupils volunteers

other (specify)

Ref No

hall (specify)

support staff

GRAPD

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)

TA’s others (specify) Assessor/s

Who could be at risk (tick) Date of assessment

Signature of assessor/s

no

In Place yes

Risk Level

Review date

• High factor sun block or clothing (inc. hats) must be worn by all children (and workers to set example).

Recommended Control Measures

Heat or cold related illness

Hazards – what can go wrong

Date and method relevant staff and others informed No

Task or Issue

General

• Activities must be stopped if children’s clothing becomes unsuitable for conditions.

See also Generic Risk Assessment Ponds in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Wash hands after any activities and particularly before eating, drinking or smoking.

• Store all equipment away from banks leaving access routes clear.

• Regularly remind children of terrain.

• Keep work areas clear and tidy.

Weather effects Slips, trips and falls

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 1 of 2


Death by drowning

Hazards – what can go wrong

Contact with bio-hazards

Contact with dead animals or water polluted by them

Ill health

Hepatitis

Tetanus Contact with micro organisms Leptospirosis

Deep or fast flowing water

Task or Issue

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 2 of 2

No

• Store all equipment away from banks leaving access routes clear. • Limit number of children at bank side to prevent overcrowding. • Ensure adequate supervision. • Provide lines or ropes to prevent children from falling into water. • Work will only take place where easy access and exit from water exists. • Areas showing significant hazards on banks (e.g. water flowing, overhanging trees, unstable banks) will be avoided. • Dipping activities will not take place in water over 1 metre deep. • If children are to stand in water they must be able to do so easily. • Children to remain behind barriers where present. • Provide lifebuoy or throwing line for emergency use. • Advise all involved in activity to ensure tetanus vaccination is kept up to date. • Wash hands before eating, drinking (or smoking) and on completion of activity using antibacterial soap and clean water. • Children and leaders must not handle debris or material from the water with bare hands use nets or other collection equipment. • All cuts to be thoroughly cleaned and covered immediately. • Work will not take place in water where sewage is known to be present.

Recommended Control Measures

Pond dipping

GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT

yes

no

In Place

Risk Level

GRAPD

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)


GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT

Location (tick)

teachers contractors

playground (specify)

premises manager parents

classroom (specify)

Small carpentry work School pupils volunteers

no

other (specify)

Ref No

hall (specify)

support staff

GRASC

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)

TA’s others (specify) Assessor/s

Who could be at risk (tick) Date of assessment

yes

In Place

Signature of assessor/s

Recommended Control Measures

• Safe working distances must be observed. • Supervision in place must be adequate taking into account groups, ages, abilities, experience and tool use. • Walkways must be kept clear of waste, tools or equipment. • Children instructed in correct use of tools and equipment • Tool use must be adequately supervised. • All tools must be well maintained • Use tools as per manufacturer’s instructions. • Carry regular recorded checks and inspections of tools and equipment. • Damaged or worn tools must not be used, take out of service for maintenance. See also Generic Risk Assessment Equipment - Non Electrical in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

Risk Level

Review date

Overcrowding of work space

Hazards – what can go wrong

Date and method relevant staff and others informed No

Task or Issue

General Slips, trips and falls Use of hand tools Cuts and bruises

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 1 of 2


Ill health

Electric shock

Dust inhalation, asthma and ill health

Electricity

Sanding

Hazards – what can go wrong

Working with treated timber

Task or Issue

Generic Risk Assessment Form - page 2 of 2

No

• Sanding must only be done in adequately ventilated work areas. • Dust masks must be worn when sanding operations take place. • Use Local Exhaust Ventilation where ventilation inadequate.

• Ensure adequate supervision. • Children instructed in correct use of tools and equipment. • Carry out visual checks before tool use. • Carry regular recorded checks and inspections of tools and equipment. • Electrical equipment to be maintained as per school procedures. • Electrical tools not to be used in damp conditions. • Electrical tools to be either 110v or battery for outside use. See also Generic Risk Assessment Equipment – Non Electrical in Risk Assessment Toolkit.

• Use untreated timber where possible, all timber treatments to be subject to a COSHH assessment. • Treated timber must be dry before work starts on it. • Wash hands before eating, drinking (or smoking) and on completion of activity using antibacterial soap and clean water. • Waste treated timber must be disposed of via waste facility.

Recommended Control Measures yes

no

In Place

Small carpentry work

GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT

Risk Level

GRASC

Additional Control Measures Needed (Transfer to Action Plan)


Guidance on using GENERIC RISK ASSESSMENT FORMS Generic risk assessments are model assessments which can be adapted to fit particular circumstances. They can be very useful, however, schools must demonstrate that they are specific to their school. e.g. a risk assessment for slip and trip hazards on floors will need to be adapted for areas where liquid might be spilt. Generic assessments for activities will need to be adapted if they take place at different times of the day or in different surroundings.

SCOPE OF ASSESSMENTS The assessments in this section, and the Risk Assessment Toolkit recently issued by CEA@Islington, do not cover all the activities or areas that may need assessing. Areas, activities or equipment for which there is no generic assessment should be risk assessed in the manner recommended in the general guidance using Form RA4 Risk Assessment - General Form. Risk assessments for science and technology activities are provided by the CLEAPSS service. Generic risk assessments for off-site activities can be found in the CEA@Islington manual Health and Safety for Off-Site Activities.

RISK ASSESSMENT TEAM The forms need to be filled in by “competent” persons. Teams are recommended. (See general guidance for recommendations on the composition of the assessment team.)

USING THE ASSESSMENTS The generic risk assessments should be used as model assessments. Copy them before filling them in. You may need to use separate copies for different situations, places, rooms or people. First fill in the top section of the form. It is best to be as specific as a possible. Then proceed through the form filling in all the relevant sections. Tasks and Issues – this is a list of issues to consider and also (if relevant) a breakdown of the task being risk assessed. Extra tasks or issues which you identify should be added at the bottom of the form. Hazards - what could go wrong - contains some of the hazards associated with the activity. Recommended control measures - this is a list of control measures which, if implemented, can help avoid or reduce the risk of harm. They are recommendations based on legal requirements and best practice guidance. In place - tick the appropriate column to indicate whether the recommended control measures are already in place or not. Risk level - Fill in the risk level for each task or issue. See Risk Ranking section in general guidance for how to assess the risk level. Additional control measures needed - if “no” is marked against any recommended control measure, its implementation should be considered. It is not necessary to implement all the measures, but, if an accident occurs, justification for any decisions may be required. The aim of this process is to bring the risk down to a minimum or “low”. Where control measures identified as necessary cannot be put in place immediately, short term measures should be implemented, with a view to introducing the additional control measures as soon as possible.


Action Plan For ease of management, it is suggested that actions to be taken are transferred to Form RA6 Risk Assessment Action Plan

PLEASE NOTE • The generic risk assessments are for guidance only. • The generic risk assessment may not cover all the issues and control measures you should consider. • The absence of a generic risk assessment for any topic, task or issue does not mean that a risk assessment for this item is not necessary.


Supporting information The following pages give some brief information on potential health hazards to be aware of when working out of doors. If you require more information on any aspect of health and safety, or if you are concerned, you should contact the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Infoline - 0845 345 0055 or visit www.hse.gov.uk The information on plant hazards was kindly supplied by the Royal Horticultural Society. Please note that the RHS Botany Advisory Service update this document periodically. You should ensure you keep yours up to date by sending an A4 S.A.E. to The Botany Advisory Service, RHS Gardens Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB. When you are planning an activity outside always look at potential hazards and how you can remove or control them.

Health hazards Tetanus Tetanus is a medical term indicating a prolonged contraction of striated muscle (the muscle normally under voluntary control), caused by bites or cuts which become infected. This shouldn’t be a problem as long as the individual’s tetanus immunity is up to date. A GP can advise on this and children are usually covered under the childhood immunisation programme. Check that anyone getting even a small cut on site has an up to date immunisation and if not, suggest they obtain immunisation straight away.

Bites and stings Bees, wasps and other insects can give nasty bites/stings. While these rarely present major hazards it is important to be aware of the risk of anaphylactic shock. This is a major allergic reaction of the whole body and can be recognised by widespread red blotchy skin, swelling of the face and neck, impaired breathing and a rapid pulse. It is caused by rapid dilation of the body’s blood vessels and constriction of airways, and is potentially fatal. If such symptoms occur, get medical attention immediately.

Heat exhaustion Includes sunstroke, but it doesn’t need to be sunny for someone to suffer from heat exhaustion. Brought on by physical exertion or in the very young/old during prolonged heat waves. Symptoms include feeling weak, faint or dizzy with accompanying headache or nausea, thirst and profuse sweating. Sufferers should be moved to the shade, and made to sip water. To guard against sunstroke avoid working during the hottest part of the day, wear a hat and take frequent rest and water breaks..

Sunburn This is an increasingly serious health hazard in the UK. It often occurs unknowingly to those with skin exposed on dull days that are cool or feel so due to the wind. Avoid it by being sensible. Wear a hat, long-sleeved clothing, and apply sunblock/suntan lotion. If sunburn does occur, cool the area with water. Don’t burst blisters, as the skin underneath is sterile. Blisters should be allowed to burst or subside of their own account.


Toxocara canis This is a micro-organism found in dog faeces which can cause blindness in children. The risk to adults is not considered to be great provided normal standards of hygiene are maintained. Before conducting outdoor education activities in public places it is always a good idea to check the area children are going to be working in and remove any dog faeces found. Wash skin with soap and water immediately after contact with dog faeces.

Sharps Although not a common occurrence it is sensible to be aware of the possibility of used needles and syringes being discarded in shrubs beds and public places. Before taking children into an area it is prudent to conduct a ‘needle sweep’ (they often have orange tips which are fairly visible). Do not touch any you find but instead postpone the activity and call Contact Islington on 020 7527 2000. or your local council They will arrange for them to be removed.

Blue green algae Algae can, in certain conditions, produce a ‘bloom’ in hot weather which may be toxic. Avoid working in the vicinity of this scum on the water’s edge and wash it off immediately if it comes into contact with skin.

Leptospirosis Weil’s disease is one of two forms of Leptospirosis to affect humans - a bacterial infection carried in rats’ urine which can contaminate water and wet river and canal banks. The other form, Hardjo, is transmitted by exposure to the urine or foetal fluids of cattle. The bacteria do not survive for long in dry conditions. Infection occurs through cuts, abrasions and the lining of the eyes and mouth. Symptoms start with a flulike illness and persistent severe headaches leading to meningitis, jaundice and sometimes death. Sensible precautions include: washing thoroughly after contact with water and before eating, drinking (or smoking), covering cuts with waterproof plasters and avoiding further contact with water.

Lyme disease This can be transmitted to humans when bitten by ticks that usually live on deer and sheep. Ticks need moist and relatively warm conditions to survive between blood feeds and tall vegetation to climb up to find a host, bracken is ideal for this. Unlikely to be an issue in Islington, however if children do go on a field trip they should keep skin covered and avoid brushing against vegetation. If a rash develops around a tick bite, seek medical help immediately.

Hepatitis Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver and has a number of causes but usually it is the result of a viral infection. There are many types of virus which can cause hepatitis. Faecally-contaminated water is a common source.


The Royal Horticultural Society Botany Advisory Services January 2006

Take Care, Be Aware!

Some advice on plant hazards in the garden Serious poisoning by plants is very uncommon in the UK. Some garden plants contain poisonous substances and thus present a hazard but, for several reasons, risk of harm is mostly low. Some plants are well-known to be poisonous; others have a foul taste which reduces the likelihood of a dangerous quantity being eaten; still others just don’t look edible. Small children may be vulnerable until they can be taught not to eat any part of a growing plant, or fallen fruits or seeds.

Where’s the harm? Some plants are safe and good to eat – these are food-plants. Most others – weeds and ornamental plants – are not dangerous. Some may cause a digestive upset or discomfort if eaten; a very few common garden plants are more toxic and could cause severe poisoning. Nibbling plant parts is mainly a hazard of childhood. Adults, however, are more at risk from contact with plants and their sap, for example when weeding or pruning. There are three main types of contact hazard: • Irritant sap may cause a burning sensation and sometimes blistering of the skin; anyone can be affected if the exposure is sufficient; • Some plants contain chemicals called allergens. These do not affect everyone, but some individuals may acquire a sensitivity to them, resulting in an allergic reaction; • A very small number of plants have sap which renders the skin excessively sensitive to strong sunlight. Contact with the plant followed by exposure to sunlight results in very severe, localised sunburn with blistering and a long-lasting skin discoloration.

If it isn’t food, don’t eat it Ornamental plants are just that; they are not to be eaten or played with. Make sure your children know this too. When pruning or weeding, wear gloves and keep your skin covered; wash carefully when the job is finished.

Animals Never leave hedge clippings or uprooted plants in reach of farm animals or pets. Seek veterinary advice if you think an animal has eaten a poisonous plant. Take along samples of the plant concerned.

Look for the label The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) has drawn up a Code of Practice which helps its members to label clearly at point of sale those plants which are known to pose a risk of injury, either through eating or from contact. The list overleaf mirrors the HTA guidelines and includes garden plants and houseplants, some very common, which have been known to cause injury, either by contact or after being eaten. All these plants are safe to grow provided they are treated with respect. Remember, they are ornamental plants, often very beautiful – they are not meant to be eaten.

WHAT TO DO If you think a child or adult has eaten part of a doubtful plant, seek medical advice at once from a hospital Accident & Emergency department. Try to take a sample of the plant along. DO NOT PANIC and DO NOT try to make the person sick. PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

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Name

Effect

Common name if different from botanical name

Acalypha

skin & eye irritant; poisonous skin & eye irritant; poisonous poisonous

chenille plant, copperleaf

monkshood

Actaea section Actaea Aesculus

poisonous; irritant to and via the skin poisonous; skin irritant somewhat poisonous

Aglaonema Agrostemma githago

poisonous; skin & eye irritant somewhat poisonous

Chinese evergreen corncockle

alder buckthorn Allamanda Alocasia Aloe Alstroemeria amaryllis Amaryllis belladona angel’s trumpet angel’s wings Anthurium Apocynum Arisaema arrowhead vine Arum Asparagus

See Rhamnus poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous skin irritant See Hippeastrum poisonous See Brugmansia See Caladium poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Syngonium poisonous; skin & eye irritant may cause skin allergy; fruits poisonous See Asparagus poisonous; skin irritant See Colchicum See Actaea section Actaea See Amaryllis belladonna See Hyacinthoides See Lagenaria poisonous poisonous See Rhamnus See Opuntia microdasys See Dictamnus

Acokanthera Aconitum

asparagus fern Atropa autumn crocus baneberry belladonna lily bluebell bottle gourd Brugmansia Brunfelsia buckthorn bunny ears cactus burning bush

bushman’s poison

baneberry horse chestnut

taro Peruvian lily belladonna lily

flamingo flower dogbane cobra-lily cuckoo-pint, lords-and-ladies asparagus fern

deadly nightshade

angel’s trumpet yesterday, today and tomorrow

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

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Name

Effect

bushman’s poison Caladium calico bush calla lily Calla palustris Capsicum annum (ornamental cultivars) castor oil plant celandine, greater

See Acokanthera poisonous See Kalmia See Zantedeschia poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous; skin & eye irritant

chalice vine chaste tree Chelidonium majus chenille plant cherry laurel chincherinchee

See Solandra See Vitex skin irritant See Acalypha See Prunus laurocerasus See Ornithogalum

Chinese evergreen Christmas cherry Chrysanthemum cobra-lily Colchicum Colocasia esculenta comfrey, Russian comfrey Convallaria majalis copperleaf Coriaria corncockle crepe jasmine cuckoo-pint ¥Cupressocyparis leylandii daffodil Daphne dasheen deadly nightshade Delphinium (including Consolida) Dendranthema: see Chrysanthemum devil’s ivy Dictamnus Dieffenbachia

See Aglaonema See Solanum pseudocapsicum skin irritant See Arisaema poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Symphytum poisonous See Acalypha poisonous See Agrostemma githago See Tabernaemontana See Arum skin irritant See Narcissus poisonous; skin irritant See Colocasia esculenta poisonous; skin irritant See Atropa poisonous

Common name if different from botanical name angel’s wings

water arum ornamental pepper

See Ricinus communis See Chelidonium majus

See Epipremnum skin irritant poisonous; skin & eye irritant

greater celandine

autumn crocus dasheen, eddo, taro lily-of-the-valley

mezereon, spurge laurel thornapple larkspur

burning bush dumb cane, leopard lily

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

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Name

Effect

Common name if different from botanical name

Digitalis

poisonous

foxglove

dogbane Dracunculus dragon arum dumb cane Echium eddo elder Epipremnum Euonymus Euphorbia

See Apocynum poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Dracunculus See Dieffenbachia skin irritant See Colocasia esculenta See Sambucus poisonous; skin & eye irritant somewhat poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant NB: poinsettia, E. pulcherrima, is not harmful See Veratrum See Gelsemium may cause skin allergy

false hellebore false jasmine Ficus benjamina Ficus carica fig flamingo flower four o’clock plant foxglove Frangula: see Rhamnus Fremontodendron Gaultheria section Pernettya Gelsemium German primula Gloriosa superba glory lily goosefoot vine Hedera hellebore, false Helleborus hemlock water-dropwort henbane Heracleum mantegazzianum Hippeastrum hogweed, giant Homeria Dieffenbachia

skin & eye irritant See Ficus See Anthurium See Mirabilis See Digitalis skin & eye irritant somewhat poisonous poisonous See Primula obconica poisonous glory lily See Syngonium somewhat poisonous; skin irritant See Veratrum somewhat poisonous; skin irritant See Oenanthe See Hyoscyamus severe skin irritant in bright sunlight poisonous See Heracleum mantegazzianum poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant

dragon arum

devil’s ivy spindle tree spurge, poinsettia

weeping fig fig

false jasmine glory lily

ivy Christmas rose, Lenten rose

giant hogweed amaryllis

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

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Name

Effect

Common name if different from botanical name

horse chestnut

See Aesculus

Hyacinthoides hyacinth Hyacinthus Hyoscyamus Hypericum perforatum Ipomoea Iris ivy Japanese lacquer tree jasmine, false Kalmia +Laburnocytisus ‘Adamii’ Laburnum

poisonous See Hyacinthus skin irritant poisonous poisonous poisonous somewhat poisonous; skin irritant See Hedera See Rhus See Gelsemium somewhat poisonous poisonous poisonous

bluebell

Lagenaria Lantana larkspur laurel Lenten rose leopard lily Leyland cypress Ligustrum lily-of-the-valley Lobelia (except bedding lobelia, L. erinus) locust tree lords-and-ladies lupin Lupinus Lysichiton Mandragora mandrake marvel of Peru may apple mezereon Mirabilis Monstera deliciosa morning glory

poisonous poisonous; skin irritant See Delphinium See Prunus laurocerasus See Helleborus See Dieffenbachia See Cupressocyparis leylandii somewhat poisonous See Convallaria majalis somewhat poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Robinia pseudoacacia See Arum See Lupinus somewhat poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous See Mandragora See Mirabilis See Podophyllum See Daphne poisonous; skin irritant poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Ipomoea

bottle gourd

henbane perforate St John’s wort morning glory

calico bush

privet

lupin skunk cabbage mandrake

marvel of Peru, four o’clock plant Swiss cheese plant

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

23 right


Name

Effect

Common name if different from botanical name

Narcissus

somewhat poisonous; skin irritant

daffodil

Nerium oleander Nicotiana Oenanthe crocata, O. aquatica, O. phellandrium oleander oleander, yellow opium poppy Opuntia microdasys

poisonous poisonous poisonous

oleander tobacco hemlock water-dropwort, water-dropwort

Ornithogalum pagoda tree Papaver somniferum Passiflora caerulea passion flower peace lily

somewhat poisonous; skin irritant See Sophora poisonous somewhat poisonous See Passiflora caerulea See Spathiphyllum

Pedilanthus pepper, ornamental Pernettya: Peruvian lily Philodendron Phytolacca Podophyllum poinsettia poison ivy pokeweed Polygonatum Polyscias Portugal laurel Primula obconica privet Prunus laurocerasus Prunus lusitanica Rhamnus (including Frangula) Rhaphidophora Rhus verniciflua,

skin & eye irritant; poisonous See Capsicum annum See Gaultheria See Alstroemeria poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous; skin irritant poisonous See Euphorbia See Rhus See Phytolaccavvvv somewhat poisonous poisonous; skin irritant See Prunus lusitanica skin irritant See Ligustrum poisonous seed kernels are poisonous poisonous; skin irritant poisonous; skin & eye irritant poisonous; severe skin irritant

R. radicans, R. succedanea, R. diversiloba, R. rydbergii,

See Nerium oleander See Thevetia See Papaver somniferum skin irritant

bunny ears cactus chincherinchee, star-of-Bethlehem opium poppy passion flower (hardy)

pokeweed may apple

Solomon’s seal

German primula cherry laurel, laurel Portugal laurel alder buckthorn, buckthorn Japanese lacquer tree, poison ivy, sumach

R. striata, R. toxicarium, R. vernix

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

24 right


Name

Effect

Common name if different from botanical name

Ricinus communis

poisonous

castor oil plant

Robinia pseudoacacia Ruta

locust tree rue

St John’s wort Sambucus (except S. nigra) Schefflera Scilla Scopolia skunk cabbage snowberry Solandra Solanum Solanum pseudocapsicum Solomon’s seal

poisonous severe skin irritant in bright sunlight See Hypericum perforatum poisonous skin irritant somewhat poisonous poisonous See Lysichiton See Symphoricarpos poisonous poisonous poisonous See Polygonatum

Sophora Spanish broom Spartium junceum Spathiphyllum spindle tree spurge spurge laurel star-of-Bethlehem sumach Swiss cheese plant Symphoricarpos Symphytum Syngonium tobacco Tabernaemontana taro Taxus Thevetia thornapple tulip Tulipa

poisonous See Spartium junceum poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Euonymus See Euphorbia See Daphne See Ornithogalum See Rhus See Monstera deliciosa poisonous poisonous poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Nicotiana poisonous See Alocasia, Colocasia poisonous poisonous; skin irritant See Datura See Tulipa somewhat poisonous; skin irritant

pagoda tree

umbrella tree Veratrum

See Schefflera poisonous

elder umbrella tree

chalice vine Christmas cherry, winter cherry

Spanish broom peace lily

snowberry comfrey, Russian comfrey arrowhead vine, goosefoot vine crepe jasmine yew yellow oleander

tulip false hellebore

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

25 right


Name

Effect

Common name if different from botanical name

Vitex

skin irritant

chaste tree

water arum water-dropwort winter cherry Wisteria woody nightshade Xanthosoma yesterday, today and tomorrow

See Calla palustris See Oenanthe See Solanum pseudocapsicum somewhat poisonous See Solanum poisonous; skin & eye irritant See Brunfelsia

yew Zantedeschia

See Taxus poisonous; skin & eye irritant

calla lily

Compiled by the Staff of the Royal Horticultural Society Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey GU23 6QB Email: advisory@rhs.org.uk Website: www.rhs.org.uk

PLEASE NOTE: This document is regularly updated. To request the most recent copy please send an A4 SAE to: Botany Advisory Services, TCBA, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey, GU23 6QB

26 right


Safeguarding children on practical environmental activities Policies and procedures Schools have a legal responsibility for the welfare of the children in their care and should have strict procedures regarding the employment (paid or otherwise) of adults directly supervising children during and out of school hours which must be followed at all times. Generally the law requires that in situations out of normal classroom activities, where you are directly supervising children under 16, they will need to have a signed and dated parental consent form detailing • their presence with you • what they will be doing • parent or guardian contact details in case of an emergency • permission to provide emergency medical treatment Schools should organise this before any clubs start up or trips are undertaken. However this also means it is not possible to allow any children to ‘drop in’ to your session if you have a space for them without a completed consent form. Staff and volunteers working with potentially vulnerable people e.g. children and those with special needs are under a legal duty of care. This can be interpreted as a duty to act as a careful parent would.

Adequate supervision When setting up any activity you must plan it to ensure you can maintain a good standard of discipline, behaviour, safety and welfare throughout. During practical outdoor activities this means ensuring you have enough suitably qualified and experienced adults supervising children. This not only ensures the activity goes ahead safely but also enjoyably. If at anytime you become concerned about the safety or supervision of an activity simply stop as quickly and safely as possible until you are confident decent levels have been restored. Often safety issues can be resolved by limiting the types and numbers of tools available for use or changing the activity. It is always good to have a plan B, C and D just in case and a supply of materials or environmental games to keep children engaged and occupied until the session finishes or practical work can be resumed. Teachers are used to looking after large groups of children, however when factors such as using tools, knowledge of the task being undertaken, or the ages and abilities of those involved are introduced into the equation, this may mean introducing supervision ratios of 3:1 or even lower during specialised tasks or where skilled tool use is required.


Ultimately you must be confident that there are enough adults present to ensure a good standard of discipline, welfare and health and safety. If you are new to running a club or activity start off with a 3:1 ratio until you get to know the group and what you can cope with. More children can join at a later stage (or adults take time off) but it is better to start off small than to be forced to reduce numbers of children who have signed up to an activity. Ideally a minimum of 2 non-teaching staff will be required to run a club. Volunteers who have little experience of working with children can often have a lot to offer with regards to practical knowledge. Increasing the number of adults involved increases the skill base in the group and the delivery capacity.

Minimising opportunities for abuse Another important benefit of increased numbers of adults supervising is that it minimises opportunities for abuse. Schools will have their own policies and procedures on reporting and dealing with instances of suspected abuse and you should seek guidance on this from the school you will be working with. As a general rule however, adults should always work with children in a group, never 1:1 except in an absolute emergency. This not only reduces opportunities for abuse to take place, but also allegations of abuse to be made. Abuse comes in different forms: • emotional – being criticised, blamed, sworn and shouted at, and rejected by those they look to for affection • physical – hitting, kicking, beating with objects, throwing and shaking • sexual – being forced or persuaded into sexual acts or situations by others • neglect – not being given food, warmth, shelter, care and protection. It is the duty of all people working with children or vulnerable people to ensure that abuse in any form does not take place either intentionally or otherwise and to take appropriate action where abuse is suspected in accordance with school policies and procedures.

Further training Safeguarding the welfare of children is a huge topic. Many organizations run excellent training courses including the NSPCC for child protection generally and BTCV, ETN and the RHS for working with children on environmental and gardening projects specifically (see Useful contacts – Training providers for details).


Group Group Safety Safety at at Water Water Margins Margins

Who is this leaflet for? Teachers, lecturers, youth workers, voluntary leaders and anyone else who might organise and lead the type of educational visit described below.

What does it cover?

I am grateful to the Central Council of Physical Recreation for taking the lead in producing Group Safety at Water Margins. They have worked with partners from all sectors to produce a good practice guide which enjoys widespread support. This new guidance complements my Department's own Handbook for Group Leaders and will help the training of educational visits co-ordinators. Safety during educational visits is paramount and I will watch

the impact of Group Safety at Water Margins with particular interest.

Ivan Lewis

Learning activities that might take place near or in water – such as a walk along a river bank or seashore, collecting samples from ponds and streams, or paddling or walking in gentle, shallow water.

What doesn’t it cover? Swimming and other activities that require water safety or rescue qualifications and equipment, or water-going craft.

How will it help me? Hazards are always present. This leaflet lists a number of things to take into account which will help you to plan and lead a safe and enjoyable visit. Read note1 to find further guidance!

Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Young People and Adult Skills

1 Things to think about before you go Why are we going? There are many reasons for leading a visit near water. Off-site visits can bring the curriculum to life. They can also develop team-working skills and improve self-esteem, which can help to raise achievement. Perhaps more importantly these experiences can help young people begin to learn how to look after themselves in an unfamiliar environment. They can also be fun!

Top Tip

Whatever your reason for going, having a clear purpose and plan will help your group to get the most from the day – and will help to maintain safety.

How well do I know my group? What is the age range of your group? Is the group used to an outdoor environment? Can the group members’ behaviour be trusted? How physically able is the group? Do any group members

1

Further information is available in the DfES publication Health and Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits: A Good Practice Guide (HASPEV) and its supplements, which include A Handbook for Group Leaders. See Section 5 for contact details.

have special educational or medical needs? Will group members have warm, waterproof clothing and suitable footwear? Each of these factors may impact on your choice of venue and activity.


1 Things to think about before you go (cont)

2 Getting ready to go If you do lead the visit yourself you should take a number of steps to identify the foreseeable hazards, and to

Who will be in charge?

minimize the risks these present to your group. This is

You need to assess accurately your own competence to lead the proposed visit. If you are a school teacher you

commonly known as risk assessment. Some of the things you will need to consider are listed below.

should refer your plans to your head teacher and educational visits co-ordinator or outdoor education adviser. If you work in a local authority or are a voluntary leader, find out who is responsible for advising on visits within your own organisation, and ask their advice. If the proposed activity is beyond your level of competence or resource, then you should make different plans which are within your capacity. Alternatively you could approach an external organisation to lead those aspects of the visit that are beyond your capacity (see note2 for ideas).

Top Tip

Whatever you choose to do, be sure that all those present know

Who will help me? You will need enough competent helpers on the day. Consider what ratio of leaders to group members is appropriate to your group, activity and venue. The person responsible for advising on visits in your organisation can assist with this. Ask the same questions about your helpers as you would about the group. You should also brief them fully on the purpose and plan for the visit, and ensure that they understand their responsibilities throughout.

How can I prepare the group? Telling group members in advance about the purpose of your visit, the environment you are visiting and any hazards it presents will help them to prepare and to

who is responsible for

participate appropriately on the day. If appropriate,

what should be

obtain informed consent from group members’ parents.

happening at every point during the visit.

How well do I know the place? You should always check out a venue before you go there with a group. A competent person accompanying you on any exploratory visit can help you to identify hazards, and assist you if you get into difficulty. If in the last resort, a pre-visit is not possible then the group leader should obtain information in other ways in order to prepare adequately for the visit.

Top Tip

Here are some of the things you should think about on Check out what lies downstream, or around the corner from your work area – is there a fallen

an exploratory visit:

Look for the hazards If you will be working near water, how likely is it that someone will fall in?

tree, a fence, a weir,

If they do, could you get them out by reaching with a

a waterfall – or any

towel, a stick, a piece of clothing, or any public safety

other hazard? If you

equipment that is available? Could you wade in to get

are not happy with

them without putting yourself in danger? If not then you

your choice of

should move to Plan B. Remember that sudden and

location, look for

unexpected immersion in cold water has a rapid and

another, safer one.

dramatic effect on the body’s systems and will impair people’s ability to reach safety.

2

This might include an LEA approved outdoor education centre, a centre in membership of the British Activity Holiday Association or the Institute for Outdoor Learning, or a centre holding the relevant licence from the Adventure Activities Licensing Authority. See Section 5 for contact details.


Do you intend your group to get into the water?

Tidal conditions

First consider whether entering the water is appropriate

If you are working near the sea or an estuary, check tidal

to the purpose of the visit, and what you expect your

conditions with the coastguard, so you know when high

group to be doing in the water.

tide is, how high it will reach, and whether there are any

If you do plan to enter the water, your group must be able to get in and out easily. Find some gradually sloping land and check that the bank is not slippery, and that there is no deep mud or vegetation. You also need to be sure there are no underwater hazards (such as rocks or roots which can trap feet, rusty

strong local currents. Could your work area be cut-off or submerged by a sudden wave or quick rise in the tide level? The tide may advance more quickly than your group can retreat. Also beware steeply shelving shingle beaches, where one step could take someone out of their depth. Again you may need to move to Plan B.

cans or wire which can cut, or strong currents). The best way to check for hazards is to wade in using a strong stick for support and ensuring you have a colleague to

Top Tip

Ask somebody with good local knowledge (perhaps the land or water owner) if there have been any

assist you.

changes to the area, or whether the local environment alters regularly.

Top Tip

Remember that fast moving water above knee height is likely to knock people off their feet. Consider

Think about what to wear

whether this is likely at your venue.

In damp, cold weather wearing a few layers of clothing

You may need to move to Plan B.

with waterproof trousers and jacket will help to keep your group warm and dry. Wellingtons or other waterproof

Think about what could change Your surroundings Are there cliffs above you (could someone knock loose stones down) or below you (how close to the edge are you)? Is there livestock nearby (could it enter your work area)? The weather

boots may be a good idea – however remember that wellingtons can fill with water and make it difficult to reach safety. You should also take some spare clothing and towels with you. In warm weather sunscreen, baseball caps and long sleeves will protect your group from burning. Your group should keep footwear on at all times during the visit.

Get a weather forecast before you go and ensure you understand how it might affect your location and

What’s Plan B?

planned activity. Heavy or persistent rainfall can alter

Plan B is an alternative – not an emergency procedure. You

situations vastly – even when falling elsewhere. River

may need to change your plan for any number of reasons.

banks will become slippery, and streams and rivers can

Plan B might mean doing the same activity at a different

rise quickly and flow faster. You may need to move to

location, or a different activity altogether. Be prepared to

Plan B (see opposite column).

move to Plan B before or even during the activity. You also need to pre-check your Plan B. If you visit a place regularly you might be able to identify cut-off criteria. These are signs that circumstances have changed such that you need to move to Plan B. Examples might include the river or tide having risen above a certain point. However, remember that visiting one venue once a year for ten years is ten days’ experience – not ten years’.


3 Things to think about on the day Tell people where you are Make sure that somebody at your usual base knows where you are going, what you will be doing and when you expect to return. Also leave details of any alternative plans.

Brief the group

Group control Behaviour Agree the safety rules

Although you have prepared your group and helpers in

before the visit and stick to

advance of the visit, you should also brief them on the

them. If you decided on your

day. Make sure that the group and the helpers know

pre-visit that it was unsafe to enter

what they will be doing, and what is expected of them.

the water, then have confidence in your

Also let them know about any foreseeable hazards that

decision and do not be pressured into changing it.

you identified on the pre-visit. This will help you achieve your objectives and lessen the chance of something unexpected occurring.

If you do enter water, keeping the group on task will help to ensure safety, as incidents are more likely to occur during unstructured activity. The group need to be aware that pushing, dragging or ducking others into

Top Tip

Always get a local weather

water are unsafe and unacceptable practices.

forecast on the day of your visit – and know how this will impact on your plans and location.

Top Tip

Set physical boundaries beyond which the group should not venture. You might use fixed landscape features such

Review the situation

as a wall, or place your own markers.

On arrival at your venue reconsider the key issues that were raised in your pre-visit. Has anything changed that means you should now switch to Plan B? You should review the situation continuously, as conditions may change at any point, meaning you have to change plans or cut short your visit.

If you need to change plans Your group may well be disappointed if they cannot complete the activity that was originally planned, particularly if they or another group have enjoyed it before. A well-briefed group and a good Plan B can help

Supervision Having small groups, each with its own leader, is often better than one large group with several leaders. Ideally there would be enough leaders so that the overall leader does not have their own group. Each group should appoint a head counter to check regularly that all members are present. If you are walking along a canal towpath, or any other narrow track near water, make sure that everyone present is aware of the dangers of such a restricted environment.

to overcome this disappointment. If you move to Plan B be sure to notify your base of this.

Top Tip

Top Tip

The prudent leader will often choose to get between the group and a potential hazard.

Just because you did it last year – does not mean that you have to

Changing

do it this year!

If your group need to change their clothing, normal

Just because it was safe last year

sensitivity should ensure that neither you nor they are

– does not mean it is safe this year!

put in a vulnerable position. This issue should be covered in your child protection procedures.

Continued overleaf...


3 Things to think about on the day (cont)

4 In the long term The more often you visit a venue, the more confident you will become

Health and hygiene Water quality is important and can be affected by a number of factors such as rainfall or hot weather. Bacteria may derive from chemicals, sewage, dead animals or other causes. Have a look round for any obvious signs such as cloudiness in the water, or froth on the surface.

– but beware complacency! It is still important to check the venue before each visit, as things could have changed since your last visit. You could also do a number of things to develop your own skills and those of others:

Plans C, D and E Visit more venues so that you have a range of alternative plans.

Make sure your group wash their hands

This will also help you

before eating, and if appropriate shower

to develop your

upon return. If any members of your group

understanding of the

fall ill following the visit advise them to tell

outdoor environment

their GP where they’ve been and what you

and the weather.

were doing. Ensure that the group have sufficient food

Plan for succession

and drink for the visit. In hot weather it is

You could maintain and develop

particularly important to drink water to

your own skills by asking for training,

avoid dehydration.

and assisting on visits led by more experienced people. You could also

First aid and incidents

help others to develop by asking them to assist on your visits.

The group leader should have a good working knowledge of first aid and ensure that an adequate first aid box is taken. Any

5 Further information

wounds should be cleaned and covered quickly.

Purpose and content of visit

Emergency procedures are an essential part

There are a number of individuals and organisations that can provide

of planning a visit. Ensure that you know

resources to help you plan a productive visit. LEA Outdoor Education

where the nearest hospital is and that you

Advisers and Educational Visit Co-ordinators have already been

can gain assistance if needed. Remember

mentioned. Other helpful contacts include:

that mobile telephones may not work in remote areas. If you have been trained, and are currently practised in the use of throwlines, you may wish to take one with you. However, remember that taking a throwline is not a reason to take a risk. Using Plan B is preferable to using a throwline.

Top Tip

Record any incident which may have given you cause for concern. This will help you to understand how and why it happened and how to avoid it in the future.

Association of Heads of Outdoor Education Centres C/o NAHT, 1 Heath Square, Boltro Road, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH16 1BL. 01444 472476

Institute for Outdoor Learning Plumpton Old Hall, Plumpton, Penrith, Cumbria CA11 9NP. 01768 885800 www.outdoor-learning.org

British Activity Holiday Association Orchard Cottage, 22 Green Lane, Hersham, Walton on Thames KY12 5HD. 01932 252994 www.baha.org.uk

National Association of Field Studies Officers Stibbington Centre, Stibbington, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire PE8 6LP. 01780 782386 www.nafso.org.uk

Field Studies Council Montford Bridge, Preston Montford, Shrewsbury, Shropshire SY4 1HW. 01743 852100 www.field-studies-council.org


Acknowledgements This document was developed by a working group comprising the

Relevant qualifications

following organisations:

If you enjoy leading outdoor visits then you should consider further training or gaining a relevant qualification. The organisations below all provide qualifications which will help you develop your skills in this area. British Canoe Union Adbolton Lane, West Bridgford, Nottingham NG2 5AS 0115 982 1100 www.bcu.org.uk

Lifesavers The Royal Life Saving Society UK River House, High Street, Broom, Warwickshire B50 4HN. 01789 773994 www.lifesavers.org.uk

British Sports Trust Clyde House, 10 Milburn Avenue, Oldbrook, Milton Keynes MK6 2WA. 01908 689180 www.bst.org.uk

OCR Examinations Board Progress House, Westwood Way, Coventry CV4 8HS. 02476 470033 www.ocr.org.uk (OCR provide a Level 3 Certificate in Off-Site Safety Management)

Mountain Leader Training UK Siabod Cottage, Capel Curig LL24 0ET. 01690 720272 www.ukmtb.org

Royal Yachting Association RYA House, Ensign Way, Hamble, Southampton SO31 4YA. 0845 345 04000 www.rya.org.uk

Safety information The DfES good practice guide Health and Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits (and its three part supplement) is a key reference point for information on organising and leading visits safely and can be downloaded at www.teachernet.gov.uk/visits Further safety information is also available from the following sources: Adventure Activities Licensing Authority 17 Lambourne Crescent, Cardiff Business Park, Llanishen, Cardiff CF14 5GF. 029 2075 5715 www.aala.org.uk British Association of Advisers and Lecturers in Physical Education Sports Development Centre, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leics LE11 3TU. 01509 228378 baalpe@lboro.ac.uk The Environment Agency Rio House, Waterside Drive, Aztec West, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4UD. 01454 624400 www.environment-agency.gov.uk Health and Safety Executive Information Services Caerphilly Business Park, Caerphilly CF83 3GG. 08701 545500 www.hse.gov.uk (the HSE provides a free document entitled 5 steps to risk assessment)

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency Spring Place, 105 Commercial Road, Southampton SO15 1EG. 02380 329100 or 0870 600 6505 (24hr information line) www.mcga.gov.uk Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 83 Piccadilly, London W1J 8QA. 020 7509 5555 www.nc.uk.net/safeswimming/ The Royal National Lifeboat Institution West Quay Road, Poole, Dorset BH15 1HZ. 0800 328 0600 www.lifeboats.org.uk The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents Edgbaston Park, 353 Bristol Road, Birmingham B5 7ST. 0121 248 2000 www.rospa.com

CCPR and DfES are also grateful to the following organisations for providing feedback to the working group: Adventure Activities Industry Advisory Committee, British Activity Holiday Association, British Canoe Union, British Waterways, Health and Safety Executive, National Union of Teachers, Outdoor Education Advisers’ Panel, Professional Association of Teachers, Royal Yachting Association, Secondary Heads Association, Scout Association, Youth Hostels Association.

Designed and Produced by Coachwise Solutions 020178

5 Further information (cont)



Health & Safety