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Dr.  Lee  Allen  Aggison,  Jr.


DR. LEE ALLEN AGGISON, JR.

7142 Wayne Road Romulus, Michigan 48174 Cellular: 860.992.8777 laggison@aggisongroup.com


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

December 28, 2017 Jan Greenwood and Marion Frenche Greenwood/Asher & Associates, Inc. 42 Business Center Drive, Suite 206 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Stillman College Board of Trustees Presidential Search Committee 3601 Stillman Boulevard Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 Dear Presidential Search Committee, I am both elated and humbled to write to you. I am an alumnus of Stillman College and convinced that I am able to lead this venerable institution and assist it in realizing the laudable goals it has set for itself. Following this letter, you will find my Curriculum Vitae and a list of references as requested. I have experience in many areas of academia including: administration, team building and leadership in higher education, accreditation application/compliance, business practice analysis, budget management/development, policy development, academic assessment, instruction, molecular and cellular research, committee service, diversity and inclusion, staff and faculty evaluation, and staff management. Since my time as an undergraduate student at Stillman, I have had continuous involvement in diversity and inclusion programs that serve underrepresented populations in sciences and health professions. As the Vice President for Academic Affairs at Wiley College (Marshall, Texas), I established the first HBCU chapter of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science. For four years, I served first as the Associate Dean of the Graduate School and then as the Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Connecticut (Storrs, Connecticut). A critical part of my duties at the University included the recruitment and retention of underrepresented graduate students and increasing the diversity of the graduate school. As a direct result of my activities, the University of Connecticut experienced an unprecedented number of graduate school applications from minority students as well as a subsequent increase in the number of underrepresented students matriculating. Another most significant result of my activities is that faculty, staff and students committed themselves to supporting efforts that promote diversity and came to understand the necessity of it within an institution of higher learning. This is partially evidenced in the increase in the number of requests I received for involvement in the diversity activities that I created at the University and from the number of faculty, staff and administrators that sought my consultation on a wide range of diversity issues. I have a deep and abiding love for liberal arts institutions. The majority of my career has been spent serving these institutions because I believe in their missions. The Stillman College family left an indelible impression upon me and has been responsible for the person that I am today. I have many seminal memories of Stillman College, here are but a few‌


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

I.

The first time that I drove onto the campus – I entered on the Brown Memorial side. It was Thursday morning and I was greeted with the vision of all the male students in slacks, starched white shirts, and neckties. I immediately called my mother and informed her that, “this school is way too conservative for me” and that there was no way I could make it here. The next night I attend a Hay College Center party. I called my mother the next morning and told her that everything would “be okay”.

II.

My first day of class – I was busy talking with my newfound friend, class began and I continued to talk. Dr. Clarence Thomas informed me that summer vacation was over, registration had concluded, the weekend ended more than eight hours prior and that time for chitchat had run its course. It was now time for class to begin. All of this in full view of my classmates. I have never, ever repeated this mistake.

III.

During my first semester, Dr. Cordell Wynn paid a visit to my General Biology class – he spoke about his life, about his hopes for our future, about his favorite breakfast foods as a child. Initially, it was all very disconcerting to me: to have the President of the College to visit our class and have a discussion with us about grits and fried fish. The memory stuck with me, more than any other day in that class. It was a year later that I realized the impact of that moment – Dr. Wynn deeply and truly cared about the student body. A year or two after that I realized that it went even deeper than that – Dr. Wynn cared about me. And it was many more years later that I realized another truth – Dr. Wynn cared about all humanity. The way that you treat people within your sphere of influence (in particular, people that you supervise or are dependent upon you) is a reflection of your attitude toward all humanity.

IV.

The day that I finally learned the Central Dogma of Biology – for three years at Stillman, I memorized the words, committed the diagrams to memory, and could state the definitions on command. It was not until Dr. Diana Dorai-Raj’s Biochemistry class, during one of her late evening study sessions that the truth came crashing down onto me. I turned to Dr. DoraiRaj and said, “you mean to tell me that this is going on in every cell, thousands of times per second, all the time, in every living thing”? Her reply was, “YES! Absolutely!” Tears filled my eyes: to catch a glimpse of the handiwork of the Almighty filled me with awe, all of biology and chemistry now made sense. I had been a fool all of these years memorizing things instead of learning them. I had a monumental task ahead of me – the reexamination of everything I had memorized in biology and chemistry.

V.

The day that the true value of Stillman College was revealed to me – Dr. Clarence Thomas and I had some of the most stimulating and challenging debates I have ever had; from religion to science, his knowledge on such a wide range of topics was awe-inspiring. During one of our many philosophical debates, Dr. Thomas stated, “Mr. Aggison, you are the most selfish man I have ever met. You believe that your education is for yourself, to serve your needs and wants. We are educating you to serve the world, your education is for your community, to be of service to all mankind.” I was devastated and it took me many weeks to understand exactly how Dr. Thomas arrived at this assessment of my character. I had never expressed to him my desire for material wealth or fame. I surmised that his extensive experience both in the pulpit and as a faculty member allowed him to easily detect this flaw in my character. He and I had several subsequent discussions about that day and I came away from the experience a better person. I vowed that I would live up to the highest ideals of humanity and dedicated myself to serving all of mankind. Nearly 15 years later, after Dr. Thomas had retired and while I was a faculty member at Stillman, Dr. Thomas paid me a


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

visit. We discussed the good ole days, had some lemonade and lots of laughs. At the end of our visit together, Dr. Thomas turned to me and said that he was, “well pleased...but do not forget what I have told you, you have a responsibility to serve all of humanity”. This would be a heavy burden for any person, the weight of which might be overwhelming. I have taken this charge seriously and strive each day to serve the people within my sphere of influence. VI.

The day that I got up the nerve to talk to the prettiest girl I had ever seen – it occurred right there on that campus in the Hay College Center Dining Hall. She shot me down cold. Eventually, Ruth Washington took pity on me and allowed me to buy dinner for her. We were married a couple of years later by Dr. Thomas in the Myrtle Williamson Memorial Prayer Chapel.

These and many other moments at Stillman College have assisted and guided me throughout my life. It is possible that I could have gone to some other institution, had life altering moments, and experienced some level of success. However, this is not the case. My life altering moments occurred at Stillman College. My successes emanate from Stillman College. The life I have chosen to live is a result of my experiences with Stillman College. This institution means the world to me and I want to see it succeed and flourish. I understand, honor, and appreciate Stillman’s rich history – what it means to Tuscaloosa, the nation, and the world. I want to see Stillman reach its highest heights, while simultaneously remaining true to its special mission. For these and many other reasons, I would like to bring my more than 23 years of education, experience and knowledge to work for Stillman College. I believe that I have the leadership skills necessary to steward Stillman College. I offer significant abilities in the areas of administration and management, assessment and accreditation review, development of academic programs, program development and review, curriculum reform, course development and academic advisement. I have directed teams, projects, and departments and have performed a wide variety of activities, including development and infusion of technology into the classroom. I am familiar with supervision and managerial functions, including mentoring, recruiting, hiring, training, scheduling and budgeting. I am an effective organizer, team member, planner and leader. My outgoing and friendly nature, combined with my effective leadership skills, allow me to interact well with the various members of an institution. I can provide a list of references upon request and I have requested these colleagues to be prepared to submit letters on my behalf. Undoubtedly, my references will give you an idea of my potential for making a worthwhile contribution to Stillman College. I believe it may be mutually beneficial for us to meet formally. You may contact me by phone, email or through U.S. Postal Service to inquire about the possibility of a meeting. Thank you for your time and consideration. “Hail O Hail Stillman!” Best regards,

Lee Allen Aggison, Jr., Ph.D. Stillman College Class of 1990


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

CURRICULUM VITAE EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE September 2015 – Present AGGISON GROUP, INCORPORATED President AGGISON GROUP, INCORPORATED is a private, for-profit corporation, fully authorized by the laws of the State of Michigan and qualifies within the terms and provisions of the laws of the State of Michigan and of the United States of America as a private, stock offering, for-profit corporation under applicable revenue laws, rulings and regulations thereof. The corporation is primarily rooted in the real estate business: buying, selling, trading, renting, and leasing residential, vacant, industrial, and commercial properties. The corporation also provides consultancy services to individuals and institutions in the following areas: Project Management, Quality Management, Quality Client Services, Executive and Leadership Development, Administrative Management Workshop Development, Effectiveness and Efficiency Analysis, and Board Effectiveness. July 2014 – July 2015 Division of Academic Affairs Wiley College Vice President for Academic Affairs Professor of Biology Supervisor: Dr. Haywood L. Strickland Duties: Supported the mission of the College. Served as a member of the President’s Cabinet. Developed and implemented educational activities both strategic and operational including metrics to track and evaluate progress. Assessed quality of program operations. Provided leadership to ensure campuses maintain satisfactory academic progress in the areas of attendance, grades, matriculation, and graduation. Assisted in developing and managing the educational budget. Established and maintained compliance with academic policy and procedure. Significant Accomplishments: Establishment of a Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS): SACNAS is an inclusive organization dedicated to fostering the success of Chicano/Hispanic and Native American scientists, from college students to professionals, in attaining advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in STEM. The establishment of a chapter at Wiley College represents the first chapter established at an HBCU. Revised the Academic Program Review Process: The process that was in place upon my assuming the Vice President for Academic Affairs position was inefficient, seen by the faculty as a perfunctory task, and was the cause of much consternation. I proposed a new process that had some general guidelines but also allowed for departments to implement department-specific guidelines as the faculty saw fit. Most importantly, the new program review cycle is seven years as opposed to four years. This longer cycle-time allows for a better, more accurate evaluation of a program’s action plan and quality improvements. The new process went into effect Fall 2015.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

Reorganization of the Office of Academic Affairs: Wiley College is a small institution with an average enrollment of 1,300 students. However, just ten years ago, the average enrollment was 400 students. The Office of Academic Affairs had not changed significantly in that time and was operating as though it was serving 400 students with a small faculty. I appointed and lead an ad hoc committee to look at the reorganization of the Office. The primary issue being that the Officewith a Vice President, administrative assistant, and a database administrator were responsible for far too much of the operation and administration of Academic Affairs. The proposed new organization distributes the operation and administration of Academic Affairs among the Deans and the Faculty. This model allowed the Deans and the Faculty to directly participate in the governance of the College. August 2012 – June 2014 Office of the President Executive Assistant to the President Director of Administrative Management Programs Wiley College Supervisor: Dr. Haywood L. Strickland Duties: Supporedt the mission of the College. Assisted the President where needed and requested, to achieve the goals of the College. Served as a member of the President’s Cabinet and on the Wiley College Board of Trustees Governance Committee. Significant Accomplishments: Re-designed Wiley College Website: Upon arriving on the Wiley College campus, I discovered that the College website was dated, confusing, contained conflicting information, and was not pleasing aesthetically. I further discovered that the process for updating the website was not effective or efficient, there was a lack of website architecture, and direct management of the website was performed remotely. Since a website is a vital asset to all institutions of higher education, I advocated for a re-design. I created a project plan for redesigning the website along with new website management protocols. The College hired a web administrator and I managed the project through its successful completion. Wiley College now has an effective, efficient, responsive, and aesthetically pleasing website. Scholars of the Culture: The Wiley College Conference on the Hip-Hop Experience: Faculty from the English and Mass Communication departments approached me about hip-hop pedagogy and the possibility of creating an academic conference on hip-hop culture. I agreed to lead the effort to establish the “Scholars of the Culture: The Wiley College Conference on the Hip-Hop Experience” conference at Wiley College (the first of its kind at a Historically Black College). I created a project plan for the conference and involved Wiley College faculty, staff and students as planners and participants. The conference hosted scholars from across the country for two-days and gained national attention. Emergency Management Plan: Upon arriving at Wiley College, I discovered that the emergency management plan for the College was inadequate. The plan included a response plan but lacked a prevention, preparedness, and recovery plan. Students, staff, and faculty were underprepared to handle emergencies, which placed the College at significant risk. I was appointed chair of an emergency management committee to ensure that the College’s emergency management plan was comprehensive and effective. I completed the plan and once fully implemented will significantly reduce the risks to the College.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

September 2011 – July 2012 Office of the Provost Special Assistant to the Provost University of Connecticut Supervisor: Dr. Peter Nicholls Duties: Implemented a new department within University Information Technology Services (UITS): Information Technology Quality Management (ITQM). Supervised the management of 15 employees and consultants. Ensured that all new policies and procedures that are created within this new department were in line with University policies and the UCONN Academic Plan. Within this new Department resided six new offices: Service Management, Information Technology Governance, Information Technology Project Management, Communications, Quality Management, and Engagement Management. These new offices were transforming UITS into a Service-Oriented Organization. The Information Technology Quality Management Department ensured excellence and continual improvement in all IT processes, services and internal communications through employee involvement, engagement management, project management, service management and governance. Service Management redefined the services offered by UITS, established a service strategy, creating a service design, redefined Service Level Agreements, rewrote the Service Catalog, ensured smooth service transitions, tracked the effectiveness of service performance, and continually improved service delivery. Information Technology Governance is established a set of processes that ensured the effective and efficient use of information technology resources enabling the University of Connecticut to achieve its goals. IT Governance created policies and the organizational structure for ensuring selection of those initiatives that best support UCONN’s vision. The Information Technology Project Management Office (ITPMO) afforded UITS the ability to efficiently execute projects: completing projects on time, within scope, and within budget. The ITPMO accomplished this by standardizing processes, improving performance management, proactive reporting on the progress of projects, and the establishment of a university-wide information technology project management methodology. The Engagement Management office identified available UITS and third-party solutions that was applied to the University’s business needs. The Engagement Management office promoted the combination of business management excellence with IT best practices across the University. March 2010 – August 2011 Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Dean of the Graduate School University of Connecticut Interim Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Dean of the Graduate School Supervisor: Dr. Peter Nicholls Duties: Supported the University’s teaching, research and public service mission. Supervised the day-to-day operation of the Graduate School including, but not limited to: management of $26 million budget, developing and implementing University policies, staff supervision, personnel decision-making, scheduling, evaluation, long-range planning and academic strategies to create a culturally diverse environment. Managed, developed, implemented and administered minority outreach services, recruitment programs and activities aimed to increase graduate enrollment and retention of a diverse, multicultural student population that is characterized by academic excellence. Prepared and validated academic memoranda of understanding in collaboration with the International Affairs Office and the departments, schools, and colleges. Served as Chair of the Graduate Faculty Council and its Executive


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

Committee. Represented the University of Connecticut Graduate enterprise at the Council of Graduate Schools and other venues as required. Served as the Principal Investigator for UCONN’s Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate grant. Served as Institutional Coordinator of the NRC Assessment of Doctoral Programs. Developed, implemented and promoted a university-wide plan for the inclusion of Responsible Conduct of Research training for faculty, staff, administrators, graduate and undergraduate students. Oversaw the annual Outstanding Scholarship Program and Multicultural Scholarship Program competitions. Served as co-PI for the Professional Science Master’s programs (Microbial Systems Analysis, Applied Genomics and Applied Financial Mathematics) on campus and promoted/regulated the development of additional programs. Advised faculty and administration on graduate education policy and the proper ways to handle issues. Administered the Graduate Faculty appointment process. Served as point of contact for several external organizations: ETS/GRE, the Compact for Faculty Diversity, Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, Department of Higher Education, etc. Significant Accomplishments: Separation of the Office of the Vice President for Research from the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education: In the Spring semester of 2009, a committee of UCONN faculty, administrators, and graduate students was commissioned by the Provost. The charge to this committee was to determine if the university should maintain a centralized graduate school or move to a de-centralized model. In Fall semester of 2009, the committee recommended to maintain a centralized model and to separate the unit: Office of the Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Education to the Office of the Vice President for Research and the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education. In the Spring semester of 2010, the separation occurred. I was instrumental in assisting UCONN’s Senior Leadership team with the planning and facilitation of this separation and the successful creation of the new offices. Re-structuring and Re-organizing the Graduate School: The President and Provost relied upon me to establish the new organizational structure of the newly independent Graduate School. I proposed the new structure and completed the staffing plan. The initial staff level was 9 professional staff and on average 10 student laborers. The staff consisted of 15 professional staff and 10 student laborers. Established a New Admissions Process: In comparison to peer and aspirant institutions, the graduate admissions process was antiquated and did not meet the needs of the Graduate School or graduate programs. For the 2011-2012 admission cycle, there was a new application process for the Graduate School. During the summer of 2011, the new application process was implemented. The new process allowed the Graduate School to: improve customer relations management, integrate application efforts with recruitment efforts, increase yield of completed applications, integrate application with the current Student Administration system seamlessly, increase the selfservice aspects of the application process, give graduate admissions committees greater control and access to their applicants, increase security within the graduate school, streamline the application process, utilize a paperless system, gather data on applicants in real-time, communicate effectively with all prospects, offer customized applications to the more than 90 programs, track and subsequently retain more students. Developed a New Course in the Institute for African American Studies: In 2010, I developed a course titled, “The Wu-Tang Clan’s Impact: Social, Cultural, and Political”. This course was taught within the Institute for African American Studies. On the surface, the goals of the course


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

were to learn about the history and cultural elements that make up Hip-Hop in general and the WuTang Clan specifically. At a deeper level, the goals of the course also included: the development of critical thinking skills, the fostering of intercultural dialogue/communication, and the promotion of cultural sensitivity. The course was wildly popular among students. The use of this subject matter has proved to be profoundly impactful on the education of students. Established a Practice of “Shared Governance� with the Graduate Faculty Council: Upon assuming the position of Vice Provost and Dean, I implemented the practice of shared governance with the Graduate Faculty Council. The new model was received well by the Graduate Faculty Council and reinvigorated the faculty's passions for graduate education. Assessment of the Graduate School: In the Fall semester of 2010, I organized a group of UCONN graduate students and charged them with the task of conducting an independent assessment of the Graduate School. The assessment entailed the use of interviews, surveys and focus groups. In the Spring semester of 2011, the group of students received IRB approval to conduct their study. Creation of an Online Graduate Catalog: In 2011, for the first time, the Graduate School made available an online catalog. Chaired the Complete Re-write of all Graduate School Policies and Procedures: Upon assuming the position of Vice Provost and Dean, I discovered that there were several inconsistencies and outdated policies governing the Graduate School. I subsequently discovered that the policies governing the Graduate School were put into place in a piecemeal fashion and that there had never been a comprehensive review of all of these policies. I formed and chaired a committee that was originally tasked to review and update the policies. Subsequent to our first series of meetings, we all came to the consensus that the committee should eliminate all of the old policies and procedures and start with a clean slate. Re-established the Standing Committees of the Graduate Faculty Council: In analyzing the structure and organization of the Graduate School, I discovered that there were eight Standing Committees within the Graduate School established in the late 1970s. These committees however had not met in more than thirty years. I re-established these committees and requested the Graduate Faculty Council update the charge for these committees to be in line with the current vision of graduate education at UCONN. Established Policies and Practices for Post-Doctoral Fellows: The Graduate School was responsible for administering the affairs of Post-Doctoral Fellows but had never done so effectively. In the Fall semester of 2010, I began the process of organizing our Post-Doctoral Fellows and began to craft policies and practices for guidance and administration of this group. Implemented an Electronic Submission Process for Theses and Dissertations: Since the Fall semester of 2010, all Masters students were able to submit their thesis electronically through a twostep process. Subsequently, the electronic submission process was extended to all doctoral students. This eased environmental pressure as well as allowed the students and Graduate School staff to become more efficient. Creation of a Business Practice Manual for the Graduate School: The creation of a Business Practice Manual allows for more efficiency, cross training and serves as an emergency back up when necessary. There was no such manual within the Graduate School.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

Creation of a PeopleSoft Manual for the Graduate School: The creation of a PeopleSoft Manual allowed for more efficiency, cross training and served as an emergency back up when necessary. PeopleSoft is UCONN’s human resource management, customer relations, financial and student administration system. There was no such manual within the Graduate School. Implemented Workshop Series: I created a series of workshops to benefit faculty, administrative assistants, and most importantly graduate students. These workshops addressed a range of issues for the UCONN community: professional/personal development for graduate students, understanding the policies and practices of the Graduate School, degree completion requirements, funding opportunities, etc. There was no such services provided by the Graduate School. Conducted an Efficiency Analysis of the Graduate School (Six Sigma): I undertook the efficiency analysis of all of the business practices of the Graduate School utilizing the Six Sigma process. This ensured that the staff was being as effective as possible as well as minimized confusion about processes from the populations that were serviced. Chaired the Re-write of the Graduate School By-Laws: As a result of the separation of the Office of the Vice President for Research from the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education, the by-laws were no longer relevant. A re-write of the by-laws was necessary for optimize operations. April 2008 – March 2010 Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Education University of Connecticut Associate Dean of the Graduate School Supervisor: Dr. Suman Singha Duties: Supported the University’s teaching, research and public service mission. Supervised the day-to-day operation of the Graduate School including, but not limited to: staff supervision, personnel decision-making, scheduling, evaluation, long-range planning and academic strategies to create a culturally diverse environment. Managed, developed, implemented and administered minority outreach services, recruitment programs and activities aimed to increase graduate enrollment and retention of a diverse, multicultural student population that is characterized by academic excellence. Adjudicated academic misconduct issues regarding graduate students, conducted investigations of those issues and chaired formal hearings with students that had grievances with their departments or major advisors and mediated the resolution of those grievances. Served as vice-chair of the Graduate Faculty Council and its Executive Committee. Prepared and shepherded new academic programs through the approval process. Represented the University of Connecticut Graduate enterprise at the Department of Higher Education and other venues as required. Served as the Principal Investigator for UCONN’s Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate grant. Served as Institutional Coordinator of the NRC Assessment of Doctoral Programs. Developed, implemented and promoted a university-wide plan for the inclusion of Responsible Conduct of Research training for faculty, staff, administrators, graduate and undergraduate students. Oversaw the annual Outstanding Scholarship Program and Multicultural Scholarship Program competitions. Served as co-PI for the Professional Science Master’s programs (Microbial Systems Analysis, Applied Genomics and Applied Financial Mathematics) on campus and promoted/regulated the development of additional programs. Advised faculty and administration on graduate


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

education policy and the proper ways to handle issues. Administered the Graduate Faculty appointment process. Served as point of contact for several external organizations: ETS/GRE, the Compact for Faculty Diversity, Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, Department of Higher Education, etc. June 2006 – July 2012 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology University of Connecticut Associate Professor-In-Residence Supervisor: Dr. David Benson Duties: Instruction of Microbiology Courses; Served as Mentor and Coordinator of PSM program in Microbial Systems Analysis; Founder and Director of the University of Connecticut Summer Research Program for Minority Undergraduates; Served as Mentor for Graduate Students of Color Association, National Society of Black Engineers, Northeast Alliance Graduate for Education and the Professoriate; Assisted with the diversity efforts of the University of Connecticut Graduate School; Admissions Committee; Diversity Committee; Board of Directors Member African American Cultural Center. October 2005 – May 2006 Department of Biology Wiley College Associate Professor of Biology Supervisor: Dr. Kifu Berhane Duties: Instruction of Biology courses; Academic Advisement; Served as Mentor for various student organizations. August 2004 – August 2005 Department of Natural Sciences Texas College Chair of Natural Sciences and Associate Professor of Biology Supervisor: Dr. M.S.T. Namboodiri Duties: Reformed Biology curriculum; Development of New Courses; Instruction of Biology courses; Academic Advisement; Committee Service. August 2004 –August 2005 PROJECT EXPORT (National Institutes of Health) Texas College-University of Texas Health Center Tyler Director of Mentor Program Supervisor: Dr. Chiagozi Nwasaruba Duties: Developed and Implemented Undergraduate Research Program; Developed and Implemented Undergraduate Research Seminar; and Assessed Undergraduate Research Program’s Effectiveness; Developed and Implemented Faculty Research Program.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

August 2000 – July 2004 Department of Natural Sciences Stillman College Assistant Professor of Biology Supervisor: Dr. Charlotte Carter Duties: Instruction of Biology courses, Served as Research Mentor; Academic Advisement, Development of New Courses; Committee Service; and Served as Mentor for Various Student Organizations. May 2001 – July 2004 Tuscaloosa Science Institute Co-founder and Director Duties: Development and Implementation of Science Education Programs for K-12 students; and Served as Research Mentor. May 2003 – July 2003 Stillman College Instructor and Mentor, Upward Bound Biotechnology Program Supervisor: Mr. Vernon Freeman Duties: Instruction of Biology; Developed and Implemented Middle School Research Program; and Serve as Research Mentor August 2000 – July 2002 Stillman College Director, Harte Honors College Supervisor: Dr. James B. Mackin Duties: Developed and implemented Harte Honors College Program; Academic Advisement; Instruction of Harte Honors College courses; and Assess Harte Honors College Program August 2000 – July 2001 Stillman College Editor, Undergraduate Scholar Journal Supervisor: Dr. James B. Mackin Duties: Editor of Undergraduate Scholar Journal May 2002 – August 2002 Department of Biology Lawson State Community College Adjunct Professor of Biology Supervisor: Dr. Bruce Crawford Duties: Instruction of Microbiology


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

EDUCATION AVETA Business Institute, Boardman, Ohio Six Sigma Black Belt Certification, December 2012 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, March 1998 - July 2000 Department of Human Genetics/Cardiovascular Research Center Post-Doctoral Advisor: Dr. Kotoku Kurachi Research: Cellular Trafficking of Human Factor IX Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan Doctor of Philosophy, August 1991 - May 1998 Thesis: “Regulation of Escherichia coli Ribonuclease III by the Bacteriophage T7 Protein Kinase.� Major: Biological Sciences Minor: Biochemistry Stillman College, Tuscaloosa, Alabama Bachelor of Science, August 1986 - May 1990 Majors: Biology and Chemistry Minor: Computer Science


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

GRADUATE and UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE May 1991 – February 1998 Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University Graduate Research Assistant Dr. Allen W. Nicholson May 1996 – August 1996 Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University Graduate Teaching Assistant Biology 778 Genetic Engineering Lab May 1995 – August 1995 Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University Graduate Teaching Assistant Biology 778 Genetic Engineering Lab January 1994 – May 1994 Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University Graduate Teaching Assistant Biology 612 Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab January 1987 – May 1990 Minority Biomedical Research Support Program, Stillman College Research Intern Dr. Jarnail Singh Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Senior Thesis Advisees (Stillman College) Chanelle Adams LaRhonda Bester Catameron Bobino Skyler Carlisle Tamika Collins Candyce Curry

Trazana Dodd Diondra Harris Taesha Hollins Marvin Jackson Siobon Johnson Edwin Kamara

Sherita McGee MaryRuth Steele Roderick Stephens Craig Williams


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

AWARDS, HONORS and OUTREACH ACTIVITIES 2013-2015 2013 2009 2009 2008-2009 2006-2009 2006-2009 2006-2009 2004 2002-2003 2002-2004 2002 2001-2004 2002 2002 2002 2001-2002 2002-2003 2001 1998-2000 1998-2000 1995 - 1998 1992 - 1996 1990 - 1995 1993 - 1994 1990 1987 - 1990 1990

Board of Trustee Member, Boys and Girls Club of The Big Pines Established Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Chapter at Wiley College Established Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Chapter at UCONN Creator and Administrator of Visiting Professor Weekend Co-Director of Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Program Advisor to: Graduate Students of Color Association, National Society of Black Engineers, and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Director, Northeast Alliance Summer Research Program for Underrepresented Undergraduates Creator and Administrator of Spring Recruitment Weekend Chair of Alabama Academy of Science (Science Education) Awarded Students At-Risk Grant from the Tuscaloosa City School System Howard Hughes Undergraduate Research Program Faculty Mentor Exemplary Service Award District of Alabama, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Vice-Chair of Alabama Academy of Science (Science Education) Travel Award, Institutionalizing Research, Council on Undergraduate Research Travel Award, Ninth National Council on Undergraduate Research Conference Travel Award, American Physiological Society Conference Faculty of the Year, Student Choice Award, Stillman College Brother of the Year, DFL Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. National Institutes of Health - Biotechnology 2001Fellow National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Research Supplement for Underrepresented Minority Individuals in Postdoctoral Training Fellowship Cardiovascular Research Center Fellow -University of Michigan Minority Biomedical Research Support Fellow, Wayne State University Martin Luther King-Caesar Chavez-Rosa Parks Fellow, Wayne State University Skillman Fellow, Wayne State University National Institute of Health Graduate Research Fellow, Wayne State University Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow, Wayne State University Minority Biomedical Research Support Fellow, Stillman College Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Achievement Award, Stillman College


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

PUBLICATIONS/ABSTRACTS/PRESENTATIONS “Utilizing the Wu-Tang Clan as a Vehicle to Develop Critical Thinking Skills, Foster Intercultural Dialogue/Communication, and Promote Cultural Sensitivity.” Lee Allen Aggison, Jr. The Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association 2013 National Conference, Washington, DC. 2013 Guest Speaker and Session Chair. “The Art of Graduate Education.” Lee Allen Aggison, Jr. Institute for Teaching and Learning and Faculty Diversity, St. Petersburg, FL. 2012 Guest Speaker. “The Art of Graduate Education.” Lee Allen Aggison, Jr. Institute for Teaching and Learning and Faculty Diversity, Washington, DC. 2011 Guest Speaker. “A Celebration of Graduate Education: The Good, The Bad and the Ugly.” Lee Allen Aggison, Jr. AGEP, Mississippi State University. 2008 Guest Speaker. “Bringing Science Back to the Classroom.” Lee Allen Aggison, Jr. Alabama Academy of Science. 2002 Guest Speaker. “Salt, Slavery and Hypertension.” Lee Allen Aggison, Jr. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Alabama. 2001 Guest Speaker. “Intracellular Trafficking of Human Factor IX." Lee Allen Aggison, Jr., Sumiko Kurachi and Kotoku Kurachi Poster Exhibit Spring 1998, Sponsored by Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Michigan. “The Regulation of Escherichia Coli Ribonuclease III by the T7 Bacteriophage Protein Kinase.” Lee Aggison, Jr. and Allen Nicholson, Poster Exhibit Spring 1997, Sponsored by Wayne State University and Parke-Davis Pharmaceuticals Research. “Phosphorylation of Elongation Factor G and Ribosomal Protein S6 in Bacteriophage T7-Infected Escherichia Coli.” Erle Robertson, Lee Aggison, Jr., and Allen Nicholson, Molecular Microbiology, Vol 11, January 1994, p. 1045-1057. “Teratogenicity and Developmental Toxicity of Carbon Monoxide in Protein-Deficient Mice.” Jarnail Singh, Lee Aggison, Jr., and Linda Moore-Cheatum, Teratology, Vol 48, March 1993, p. 149-159. “In utero Ethanol Exposure Reduces Fetal Brain Protein in Mice.” Lee Aggison, Jr., Easter Brock, Linda Moore-Cheatum, and Jarnail Singh, 1990 NIGMS Minority Programs Symposium Proceedings, October 11-13, 1990, p. 10. “Effects of Carbon Monoxide Exposure on the Maternal and Placental Blood Cell Counts.” Lee Aggison, Jr., Linda Moore-Cheatum, and Jarnail Singh, Seventeenth NIH-MBRS Symposium Proceedings, October 5-7, 1989, p. 85.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

ADMINISTRATIVE PHILOSOPHY Know Your Team The leadership team of the college must think institutionally and act strategically. They must always keep at the forefront of their minds the short, mid, and long-range health of the institution (the hallmark of good stewardship). Concerning themselves with only short-range goals places the University in peril. Setting leadership team goals and objectives which are in line with the mission of the college and meet the expectations of the Board of Trustees is a given. Leadership is getting the leadership team to achieve these goals and objectives effectively and efficiently. I refer to leadership as an art because there is much more to it than simply developing a comprehensive project management plan, following a Gantt chart, calculating risks, making assessments, placing check marks next to performance indicators, and filing end-of-year reports. Many leadership teams are adept at the mechanics of administration and management. The greatest leadership teams have something more. That something more allows the leadership team to go beyond simply achieving goals and objectives. That something more allows the organization to develop novel ideas and innovations through the freedom of expression, solid teamwork, mission clarity, and organizational support. That something more is the emotional intelligence quotient of the leader: emotional intelligence, understanding personality and behavioral styles, awareness of prevention-focused motivation vs. promotion-focused motivation members, etc. My emotional intelligence allows me to inspire and drive leadership teams toward creativity. I utilize a combination of both “hard skill” and “soft skill” methods and concepts to manage leadership teams to get the very best performance from people: • Standards within the Project Management Body of Knowledge • Six Sigma Standards and Tools • Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Instruments • Patrick Lencioni’s Concepts on Leading Executive Teams o “The Four Obsessions of an Extraordinary Executive” o “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team” The concepts are simple, adaptable to almost any organization, and when employed properly, have the ability to filter throughout the organization. Trust The foundation of a healthy, cohesive leadership team is TRUST between its members. This trust begins with the executive leader. To achieve this trust takes time and significant effort. As a leader, I have found the following practices effective in facilitating trust: remove fear of conflict, address difficult situations head-on, facilitate difficult conversations, mediate interpersonal conflicts, minimize political motivations and activity within the leadership team, and become open to the harshest criticisms from team members. These practices are difficult to master and even more difficult to maintain within a team once established. However, once established, I have found that the teams I have led became very efficient, focused, and inspired.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

Flexible and Agile To obtain victory for Stillman College, the administration, faculty, and staff must be flexible and agile. Proper planning and management are required, but the ability to respond to changes in the educational environment without becoming overly reactionary (resulting in mission drift) is necessary as well. To be sure, the future of liberal arts education in the United States is not crystal clear to most, including those that are firmly immersed in the academy. Some of the issues facing higher education include: Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), for-profit online education, the coming U.S. Department of Education rating system performance standards, the sky-rocketing cost of education, and the “amenities race�. All of these are pressures that institutions of higher education must contend with. These pressures will tend to be more significant for small private liberal arts institutions. While the pressures will become substantial, if the leadership of WCC prepares for them in light of the mission and vision of the institution, and maintains the forward momentum achieved by the previous administration, the College is sure to continue to flourish. Initiative and Action I am a firm believer in careful, methodical planning for short, mid, and long-range activities. This careful planning however cannot hinder an institution from taking brave and bold actions when it is required. Whether it is making the necessary adjustments in the operations of the institution or seizing upon an opportunity that presents itself. Brave and bold actions must of course be based upon data/facts and walk the fine line between responding and reacting. While responding, the institution cannot lose sight of its mission, organizational clarity, and operational unity.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

DIVERSITY PHILOSOPHY “Believe those who are seeking the truth. Doubt those who find it.” -Andre Gide I discourage my students from entering quotes from others in their personal statements. However, I have decided to break my own directive in this instance. Primarily because my diversity philosophy is somewhat nebulous and while I do have a core belief (bringing together people from diverse backgrounds to learn from each other and thereby improve the human condition), the specific diversity policy and its practical implementation are undoubtedly different for each institution. From a Utilitarianism point of view, the idea of promoting diversity is unquestionable. This idea is the foundation of the country and what has led to the United States’ greatness among nations. Very few people within the United States in fact do not disagree with the Utilitarianism view of diversity. The social justice, benefits and richness of diverse environments are seen as worthy attributes. The problem comes when decisions have to be made about how to ensure that an institution is indeed diverse. To create a diversity policy and passively wait for the diverse environment to occur, as far as I am aware, has never happened. Like any other policy, there are three major elements that must be overseen: 1) Creation of the Policy, 2) Implementation of the Policy, and 3) Assessment/Evaluation of the Policy. 1) Creation of the Policy: Diversity in academia has many viewpoints, competing theories/philosophies and moral and ethical arguments that each institution must contend with. Additionally, circumstances are ever changing and what may seem to be a correct approach for an institution at the time may not be appropriate at some point in the future. Thus, flexibility must be expected from everyone when dealing with a changing policy. It should also be expected that the various constituencies of an institution will be consulted when crafting a diversity policy and are continuously informed about the subsequent implementation of that policy. Beyond the constituencies of the institution, entities outside of the institution must be taken into consideration. These include but are not limited to: the local community, state and federal agencies, accrediting agencies, ranking bodies, auditors, the national/international academy, etc. 2) Implementation of the Policy: In order to ensure a successful implementation of a diversity policy the following elements are needed: clear directives and support from the institution’s leadership; commitment from change agents within the institution; buy-in from the various constituencies; involvement of the constituencies in the implementation of the policy; and an effective leader of the implementation process. This leader must be able to interact effectively with all constituencies, instill in the constituencies the sense of ownership of the policy, serve as a resource for guidance both inside and outside of the institution, have the ability to create and evaluate programs that promote the diversity policy and advocate for change in the policy when necessary. 3) Assessment of the Policy: A mistake that I have often witnessed is the lack of attention to assessment. It is often an afterthought, when considerations for assessment should be done simultaneously during the planning phase. Efforts spent at the beginning can keep everyone focused on the goals and objectives and significantly reduce confusion during assessment. Assessment should also be a continuous task and should not be left to “the end”. Continuous assessment will alert the leader of the necessity for changes and modifications to the policy.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY My time as an assistant professor at Stillman College caused me to focus keenly on my objectives with regards to my time in the classroom. I began my career believing that college professors were only required to transfer information to the student. Within my first few weeks of employment I realized that far more was involved in the instruction process. Besides the transfer of information, I believe that it is the responsibility of the professor to: foster critical thinking; instruct students in acquiring effective learning skills; prepare students to function in an information/technological laden field; ensure that students develop problem-solving skills; and stimulate students to develop ethically sound opinions. As with many educators, my teaching philosophy developed as a result of the fusion of several teaching styles and methods. From my experiences as a student, I have gleaned what I believe were the best attributes from my former professors. I utilize a combination of lecture method, the Socratic method, and hands-on activities. While most subjects require the lecture method, I believe that the Socratic method and hands-on activities must be inserted into the classroom as often as possible. Whenever possible, I stimulate and encourage debates as they relate to the material being taught. Through these discussions students realize that their active participation in the learning-teaching process is integral and essential to the education process. They also realize that of all people in society, they most of all, should have an opinion that they are able to effectively articulate. Through article reviews, utilization of the Internet, oral presentations, and discussions I have sought to thoroughly involve students in the learning process. It is also imperative to extend the learning experience outside of the classroom. Students that are actively engaged in the learningteaching process develop their inquisitive nature, which leads to a greater understanding and a deeper appreciation of the subject matter. The global market has become divided into the technologically knowledgeable elite and the disadvantaged majority. I believe that it is necessary that institutions of higher learning provide diverse opportunities for students to study their subjects as practiced by practitioners as early in their academic careers as possible. My academic and research background qualify me to instruct general biology, cell biology, microbiology, environmental science, molecular biology, gene structure and function, protein structure and function, virology, enzymology, and several popular culture subjects.


Dr. Lee Allen Aggison, Jr.

REFERENCES

Dr. Sandra Petersen Professor of Molecular Neuroendocrinology of Reproduction Director, STEM Diversity Institute Director, Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 spetersen@vasci.umass.edu Office: 413.545.1808 Cellular: 413.687.9564 Dr. Ernest Plata Vice President for Academic Affairs (Wiley College, retired) P.O. Box 886 Jefferson, TX 75757-0886 eplata@att.net 903.235.7585. Dennis Steverson, JD Attorney at Law 1923 7th Street Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 Dstever58@aol.com Office: 205.345.1300 Cellular: 205.792.9075



AGGISON CV