Page 1

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service Remember! Celebrate! Act! one love - one dream Make it a day on, not a day off January 14th, 2011 10:00am—noon Governor’s Office Building 200 Madison Street Room 450 Jefferson City, MO.


2


TABLE OF CONTENTS Letter from Governor Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon .................................................................................................... page 2 Letter from Roxana “Roxy” Flores, JC Regional MLK Committee President .................................................. page 3 Program........................................................................................................................................................................ page 4 Lift Every Voice and Sing ......................................................................................................................................... page 5 Biography of Director Bill Miller, Guest Speaker .................................................................................................. page 6 Jefferson City Regional MLK Committee ............................................................................................................... page 7 Biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ..........................................................................................................pages 8-9 Advertisements ................................................................................................................................................. pages 10-11 From the Speech: “March on Washington” ...................................................................................................... pages 12 2010 - 2011 MLK Journalism and Poster Contest

Adrienne Luther

Ruby Fleener

Victoria Green

Ashley Dawson

3

Patrick Mahoney


4


A Day of Service… A Day to Remember! January 14, 2011 Dear Friends, It is an honor to welcome you to the 2011 celebration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.! During his lifetime, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. worked tirelessly toward a dream of equality. He believed in a nation of freedom and justice for all, and encouraged all citizens to live up to the purpose and potential of America by applying the principles of nonviolence to make this country a better place to live. A Day of Service is a way to transform Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life and teachings into community service that helps solve social problems. That service may meet a tangible need, such as fixing up a school or senior center, or it may meet a need of the spirit, such as building a sense of community or mutual responsibility. On this day, Americans of every age and background celebrate Dr. King through service projects that: Empower Individuals Dr. King believed each individual possessed the power to lift himself or herself up no matter what his or her circumstances – rich or poor, black or white, man or woman. Whether teaching literacy skills, helping older adults learn how to surf the web, or helping an individual build the skills they need to acquire a job, acts of service can help others improve their own lives while doing so much for those who serve, as well. Bridge Barriers In his fight for civil rights, Dr. King inspired Americans to think beyond themselves, look past differences, and work toward equality. Serving side by side, community service bridges barriers between people and teaches us that in the end, we are more alike than we are different. Strengthen Communities Dr. King recognized the power of service to strengthen communities and achieve common goals. Through his words and example, Dr. King challenged individuals to take action and lift up their neighbors and communities through service. These ideas of unity, purpose, and the great things that can happen when we work together toward a common goal – are just some of the many reasons we honor Dr. King through service on this special holiday. Sincerely,

Roxana “Roxy” Flores Jefferson City Regional MLK Committee President

5


PROGRAM Posting of Colors............................................................................................ Department of Corrections Color Guard Pledge of Allegiance .............................................................................................................................................. Audience Master of Ceremonies ............................................................................................................................... Ms. Lori Simms Deputy Director, Division of Tourism

Invocation ........................................................................................................................................... Rabi Joseph Benson Black National Anthem ........................................................................................................................................ Audience Welcome ............................................................................................................................................... Mr. Walter Pearson Assistant Deputy Commissioner of the Office of Administration

Dance Performance ................................................................................................... Lincoln University Dance Troupe Music Selection .......................................................................................................................... South School Elementary Introduction of Guest Speaker ......................................................................................................... Ms. Michele Radney Personnel Analyst, Department of Natural Resources

Guest Speaker ................................................................................................................................................ Mr. Bill Miller Director of the Division of Personnel, Office of Administration

Dance Performance ................................................................................................... Lincoln University Dance Troupe Introduction of First Lady ............................................................................................Commissioner Kelvin Simmons Commissioner of the Office of Administration

Remarks by First Lady ........................................................................................ First Lady Georganne Wheeler Nixon Presentation of Awards ...................................................................................... First Lady Georganne Wheeler Nixon Poster and Essay Contest: Attending Lori Simms and Forrest Neal Community Service: Attending Linda Thompson and Judy Healy - Mendez Remarks from Local NAACP ............................................................................................................ Mr. Rod Chapel Jr. President of the JC Chapter of the NAACP

Closing Remarks ..................................................................................................................... Ms. Roxana “Roxy� Flores President of the JC Regional MLK Committee

Benediction ............................................................................................................................................ Rev. David Phelps Retiring of the Colors .................................................................................... Department of Corrections Color Guard

Refreshments will be served immediately following the end of the reception 6


Lift Every Voice and Sing The Negro National Anthem Lift every voice and sing, 'Til earth and heaven ring, Ring with the harmonies of Liberty; Let our rejoicing rise High as the listening skies, Let it resound loud as the rolling sea. Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us, Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us; Facing the rising sun of our new day begun, Let us march on 'til victory is won. God of our weary years, God of our silent tears, Thou who has brought us thus far on the way; Thou who has by Thy might Led us into the light, Keep us forever in the path, we pray. Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee, Lest, our hearts drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee; Shadowed beneath Thy hand, May we forever stand, True to our God, True to our native land.

7


Director Bill Miller Office of Administration, Division of Personnel

Bill started his public service career as one of the youngest city councilman elected in the City of Berkeley, MO. Bill’s experience is very diverse; he explains “this is just where life took him”. He was the first African American elected as a councilman and then Mayor of the City of Berkeley; he was one of two appointed as Commissioner to the St. Louis County Board of Elections and one of only a few invited to a joint session of Congress, where Nelson Mandela was honored. Bill worked in the corporate arena for over 25 years and was recently appointed by Governor Jay Nixon as Director of Personnel for the State of Missouri. He has worked in the private sector in Engineering, Human Resources Management, and Hospital Administration and before coming to the state, operated his own company; which he labels as a multi-directional company doing business in Human Resource Consulting, Government Relations and Talent Management. Bill is a motivational speaker, with his signature, “You are what you are Cause that’s what you Wanna be”. As a commercial actor, he has also appeared in numerous commercials, produced videos and is a voice over artist. Bill says contrary to typical thinking, he is not a “Jack of all Trades and a Master of None”. He has just led a very diverse life and is proud of it. He has a Bachelor’s in Aeronautics, a Masters in Business Administration and has an instructor certification in Quality/Performance Improvement. He is a Vietnam era veteran and is a native of Mississippi and has many stories of his growing up at a very oppressive time but a time when he learned that life only leads you where you want to go. He believes his faith, family and friends are his most important assets.

“A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus.” -Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

8


Jefferson City Regional MLK Committee The Jefferson City Regional MLK Committee is a non-profit organization, whose purpose is to strengthen communities, empower individuals, and bridge barriers through the provision of community programs, scholarship, and service. Every year this organization works to promote the principles of freedom and unity, and the celebration of diversity, that highlighted the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Board of Directors Roxana “Roxy” Flores—President Nimrod Chapel Jr.— Vice-President Walter Johannpeter—Treasurer Michele Radney—Secretary Nimrod Chapel Sr. — Assistant Secretary

2011 Committee Members Alan Green Forrest Neal Kelly Levy Linda Thompson Lori Simms Walter Pearson

2011 MLK Celebration Sponsors Missouri Community Service Commission WillCo Technologies

Special Recognition Hon. Nimrod and Denise Chapel, Jr. Hon. Sreenu Dandamudi Jefferson City NAACP Lincoln University Marie Peoples Nimrod and Dr. Cynthia Chapel Office of Administration - Division of Personnel Office of Administration - Facilities Management Design and Construction Office of Administration - Office of Equal Opportunity Richard AuBuchon

9


Biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a vital figure of the modern era. His lectures and dialogues stirred the concern and sparked the conscience of a generation. The movements and marches he led brought significant changes in the fabric of American life through his courage and selfless devotion. This devotion gave direction to thirteen years of civil rights activities. His charismatic leadership inspired men and women, young and old, in this nation and around the world. Dr. King’s concept of “somebodiness,” which symbolized the celebration of human worth and the conquest of subjugation, gave black and poor people hope and a sense of dignity. His philosophy of nonviolent direct action, and his strategies for rational and non-destructive social change, galvanized the conscience of this nation and reordered its priorities. His wisdom, his words, his actions, his commitment, and his dream for a new way of life are intertwined with the American experience. At the age of five, Martin Luther King, Jr. began school, before reaching the legal age of six, at the Yonge Street Elementary School in Atlanta. When his age was discovered, he was not permitted to continue in school and did not resume his education until he was six. Following Yonge School, he was enrolled in David T. Howard Elementary School. He also attended the Atlanta University Laboratory School and Booker T. Washington High School. Because of his high scores on the college entrance examinations in his junior year of high school, he advanced to Morehouse College without formal graduation from Booker T. Washington. Having skipped both the ninth and twelfth grades, Dr. King entered Morehouse at the age of fifteen. In 1948, he graduated from Morehouse College with a B.A. degree in Sociology. That fall he enrolled in Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. While attending Crozer, he also studied at the University of Pennsylvania. He was elected President of the Senior Class and delivered the valedictory address. He won the Peral Plafkner Award as the most outstanding student, and he received the J. Lewis Crozer Fellowship for graduate study at a university of his choice. He was awarded a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Crozer in 1951. In September of 1951, Martin Luther King, Jr. began doctoral studies in Systematic Theology at Boston University. He also studied at Harvard University. His dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman,” was completed in 1955, and the Ph.D. degree was awarded on June 5, 1955.

10


11


CONTACT INFORMATION Jefferson City Regional MLK Committee JeffersonCityMLK@gmail.com Or Follow us on: facebook.com/jcmlk www.twitter.com/jcmlk

12


13


From the Speech: “March on Washington” “I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed; ‘We hold these truths to be selfevident, that all men are created equal.’ I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave-owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day, even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.” “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. I have a dream that one day down in Alabama with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today.” “This hope is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the south with. And with this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.” “...And so let freedom ring, from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania. Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado. Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California. But not only that. Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia. Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee. Let freedom ring from every hill and mole hill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring And when we allow freedom to ring – when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: Free at last, free at last. Thank God almighty, we are free at last.”

14


15


PROUDLY SUPPORTS THE 2011 JEFFERSON CITY REGIONAL MARTIN LUTHER KING COMMITTEE Sponsored by: Office of Equal Opportunity Truman Building 301 West High Street, Room 630 Jefferson City, MO. 65101 573-751-8130 http://oa.mo.gov/oeo/

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

Program Designed By Kelly Levy, Division of Personnel 16

-Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King Program 2011  

Martin Luther King Program

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you