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LE CREUSET

LIVING Spring/Summer 2016

B a Vi d

£2.00

l i z a r


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FULL OF LATIN

FLAVOUR Welcome to Le Creuset Living the new six-monthly lifestyle magazine that promises to bring you the latest interior trends and Le Creuset products, tasty recipes, interviews with chefs and producers, and ideas on what to do with your leisure time. In this launch issue we have been inspired by Brazil, its carnival culture, delicious food and its creative ambition.   Despite Brazil’s rapidly growing economy and ever-increasing presence on the world stage, we continue to discover new things about this colourful and vibrant nation. The dramatic landscape and cultural kaleidoscope entice adventure seekers to explore this breath-taking country. But it is the people, with their natural effervescence fuelled by sunshine and samba, that has visitors coming back for more. So it is exciting to see that Brazilian cuisine is coming out of the shadows, wowing the world with its big flavours and generous sharing meals. The chilli-fired stews and churrasco misto (mixed grill) are reaching British street food markets and inspiring restaurant menus nationwide.   Brazil has much to celebrate, and this year more than ever, as the world’s fifth largest country prepares to host the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro in 2016. Following Carnival season in February, the Games will come hot on its heels in August. We can expect a party like we have never seen before executed with passion and hospitality on a mammoth scale.   To get the festivities started, Le Creuset launches its Vida Brazil collection inspired by Brazil’s exuberant colours and bold cuisine. The range, including new grills, casseroles and serving dishes, reflects the vibrant and varied scenery of Brazil and is guaranteed to add a burst of happiness to your home. It’s all about sharing that Latin zest for life with people you love.   To help you to explore this bold and beautiful world, in this first issue of Le Creuset Living we have worked with innovative chef Andy Bates to create a series of simple, mouth-watering recipes that combine Brazilian and British flair, page 6. Andy has spent a lot of time travelling around Brazil filming for TV food channels, learning about their classic dishes and meeting the people behind them – you can read about his love of food and travel, page 16. We also explore how South America has influenced British food both in street food markets and restaurant cuisine, page 14, and why the British barbecue is about to enjoy a Brazilian makeover, page 24. Simply invite your friends over and serve. It’s guaranteed to be hot!

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COLOUR ME HAPPY

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SUMMERTIME … AND THE GRILLING IS EASY

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FOOD FOR THE SOUL

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COFFEE WITH A KICK

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WIN AN EXCLUSIVE BRAZILIAN COOKERY COURSE

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THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR THE JOB

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KEEP IT COOL WITH A CAIPIRINHA

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STREET FOOD TO DESIRE

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SECRET BRAZIL

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ANDY BATES — GET IT WHILE IT’S HOT

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FIND THE PERFECT GIFT

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A GOOD GRILLING

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WHAT’S HOT IN 2016

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AT ONE WITH NATURE 3


COLOUR ME HAPPY The Brazilian Rainforest is ablaze with colour inspiration creating a rich landscape and striking palette. Brazilians have used colour in their everyday lives from interior design, architecture, street art, ceramics and market displays. It is a true expression of their passion and individuality. In Britain colour is an integral part of our lives and homes as an expression of our taste and a statement of style.   As pioneers of the kitchen kaleidoscope, Le Creuset now offers an extensive number of shades to complement every home. The new Vida Brazil collection for Spring/Summer 2016 brings together the warm tones of Cerise and Soleil and the cooler shades of Marseille and new Cool Mint. Together they create a vibrant statement but look just as good on their own.   Marseille is a vivid blue reflecting the warm sea and clear skies. Cool Mint, an aqua green, is found in the flora and fauna of the Amazon jungle; Cerise, an exotic red, is seen in dragon fruit and fiery chillies and Soleil is a sun-filled yellow from citrus fruits and papaya.   Brazilians are relaxed about how they use colour and so are we at Le Creuset. Be inspired by your surroundings and feel empowered to use colour to reflect your style. Celebrate your individuality and uniqueness.

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Clockwise from left: Stoneware Small Platter in Marseille; Cast Iron 24cm Signature Round Casserole in Soleil; Stoneware Stackable Ramekin in Soleil and Classic Salt and Pepper Mills in Cool Mint; Cast Iron 24cm Signature Round Casserole in Cerise

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FOOD FOR THE SOUL A casserole is comfort food at its best­— a simple, hearty dish that delivers a warm hug. In Brazil, one-pot heroes are a national staple — the perfect sharing meal for parties large or small. When cooking with a Le Creuset casserole it can be left to work its magic, freeing up your time to do something else. Once ready, lift the lid to enjoy wonderful aromas. Whether you are preparing an informal dinner party or supper for the family it is guaranteed to be a success! CALDO VERDE – SHREDDED KALE & SMOKED SAUSAGE STEW Originally from Portugal, Caldo Verde, is a quick, no-fuss dish that has long been a family favourite because of its simple ingredients and delicious flavours. It is a cross between a soup and a stew as it includes large chunks of sausage and vegetables. Preparation time: 15-20 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Serves: 4 Le Creuset 3-ply Stainless Steel 26cm Shallow Casserole INGREDIENTS 2 tablespoons mild olive oil 600g smoked sausages, cut into large pieces 2 banana shallots, finely chopped 4 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 800g waxy potatoes (Charlotte or Anya) cut into quarters, lengthways 500-600ml good chicken stock 200g kale, washed, tough stems removed and cut into 1cm shreds Salt and pepper to taste METHOD 1. Heat the oil in the casserole on a medium heat setting, add the sausages, seal and cook for 3-4 minutes until caramelised. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 2. Add the shallots and garlic to the remaining oil in the casserole and fry gently for 5 minutes. Add the white wine vinegar and cook for a further minute. 3. Add the potatoes and cook for 5 minutes. 4. Return the sausages to the casserole, along with any resting juices and the chicken stock. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes until the potatoes are cooked. Stir the potatoes to break up a little in the stew. 5. Finally add the kale and cook for 5 minutes and season with salt and pepper to taste. COOK’S NOTES • • • •

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If preferred, use good quality pork sausages as an alternative to smoked. If made one or two days in advance the flavours will intensify. Keep chilled until needed. To keep the leaves a vibrant green, do not cook the kale for more than 5 minutes. For a vegetarian alternative, replace the sausages with a 400g can of white beans, such as cannellini, and use vegetable stock.


From left: 3-ply Stainless Steel 26cm Shallow Casserole; Stoneware Stackable Ramekin in Soleil; Classic Pepper Mill in Cool Mint

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Clockwise from top left: Classic Salt and Pepper Mills in Cerise; Stoneware Salad Bowl in Marseille; Tumblers Set of Four; Stoneware Stackable Ramekin in Cool Mint; Cast Iron 24cm Signature Round Casserole in Marseille

MOQUECA FISH STEW Originating from the eastern state of Bahia, this fragrant fish stew enriched with coconut oil, has become a cornerstone of Brazilian cuisine. Preparation time: 20-30 minutes Cooking time: 70 minutes (including 20 minutes marinating) Serves 4 Le Creuset Cast Iron 24cm Signature Round Casserole INGREDIENTS 1kg mixed firm white fish such as bass, cod or snapper; skin removed, filleted and cut into 2-3cm chunks 8 large prawns, peeled (tails intact) and deveined Juice of 3 limes Zest of 1 lime Coarse sea salt to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 red onion, finely sliced 1 large red chilli, halved and finely sliced 1 red pepper, deseeded and finely sliced 1 yellow pepper, deseeded and finely sliced 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons tomato purée

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1 tablespoon virgin coconut oil 1 teaspoon shrimp paste 1 bay leaf 500ml light chicken stock 400ml tin coconut milk METHOD 1. Put the fish, prawns, lime juice, lime zest and a pinch of salt into a bowl. Mix well, cover and chill for 20 minutes to marinate. 2. Heat the olive oil in the casserole on a low to medium heat setting and gently fry the onion for 5 minutes until softened but not browned. 3. Add the chilli, peppers and garlic and cook for another 8-10 minutes. Add the tomato purée, coconut oil, shrimp paste and bay leaf and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. 4. Pour in the stock and coconut milk, bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes. 5. Add the fish and prawns, put on the lid, turn off heat and leave for 5 minutes. COOK’S NOTES • • •

Do not cook on too high a heat, or overcook, as the fish will become dry and the sauce may start to split. Half a jar of potted shrimp, a fish stock cube or 1 tablespoon of miso paste can be used instead of shrimp paste, if preferred. Serve with rice garnished with lime wedges, chopped spring onions and chopped coriander.


BANANA & PINEAPPLE MERINGUE PIE Discovered in Rio de Janeiro, this is the perfect dessert for a large gathering. Containing tropical fruit and with a super-sweet taste, it captures the lively flavours of Brazil perfectly. Preparation time: 50-60 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Serves 4-6 Le Creuset Stoneware Medium Heritage Dish, Le Creuset 3-ply Stainless Steel 24cm Shallow Casserole and 14cm non-stick Milk Pan INGREDIENTS FOR THE FRUIT AND SAUCE 250g caster sugar 4 tablespoons cold water 120ml double cream 50g butter 1 teaspoon sea salt 2 ripe bananas cut into 2cm slices 1/2 a ripe pineapple cut into 2cm cubes FOR THE CUSTARD 2 egg yolks 1 teaspoon vanilla paste or 1 fresh vanilla pod 15g cornflour 250ml whole milk 200g tin sweet condensed milk FOR THE MERINGUE 4 egg whites 200g golden caster sugar 1 teaspoon cornflour 50g desiccated coconut

METHOD FOR THE FRUIT AND SAUCE 1. Pour the sugar into the casserole, add the water and stir. Heat gently on a low to medium heat until the sugar has dissolved. 2. Turn up the heat slightly and allow to bubble for 5 minutes until the mixture turns to caramel. Do not take off the heat or stir during this process. 3. Stir in the cream, butter and salt. 4. Place the fruit into the stoneware dish and pour the caramel over. FOR THE CUSTARD 1. Whisk the egg yolks, vanilla and cornflour together in the milk pan. Gradually whisk in the milk and condensed milk and bring to the boil, stirring constantly. 2. When the custard starts to thicken and boil, take off the heat and pour over the caramel. Leave to cool a little. FOR THE MERINGUE 1. In a scrupulously clean and dry bowl whisk the egg whites until they double in size and stand in stiff peaks. 2. Mix the sugar and cornflour together and fold into the egg whites, a third at a time, until shiny and holding the stiff peaks, then fold in the coconut. 3. Spoon the meringue mix on top of the custard making peaks with each spoonful. 4. Put the dish in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes or until crisp and golden on top. Turn off the oven and leave for 10 minutes. Serve warm.

COOK’S NOTES •

As an alternative to making caramel, buy a jar of dulce de leche (boiled condensed milk) available from major supermarkets. Pour it into a bowl, loosen with two tablespoons of double cream and pour over the fruit.

Left to right: Stainless Steel Spoon; Stoneware Medium Heritage Rectangular Dish in Cool Mint

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BRAZILIAN BREAKFAST CAKE Breakfast Brazilian-style involves fruit, cheese breads, tapioca, crêpes and lots of cake. Whereas we might enjoy a slice of sponge cake with an afternoon cup of tea, in Brazil they kick-start their day with sugary treats and a sweet, strong coffee. Preparation time: 5 minutes Cooking time: 50-55 minutes Serves 8-12 Le Creuset 3-ply Stainless Steel 24cm Shallow Casserole INGREDIENTS 250ml whole milk 397g tin sweetened condensed milk 30g unsalted butter, softened 3 eggs 150g caster sugar 250g plain flour 3 teaspoons baking powder Pinch of salt 2 tablespoons desiccated coconut (optional) 50g grated Parmesan cheese (optional) Icing sugar for decoration

METHOD 1. Pre-heat oven to 180ºC/ 160°C Fan / Gas Mark 4. 2. In a food processor or blender mix all the wet ingredients together (milk, condensed milk, butter and eggs). 3. Then add all the dry ingredients (sugar, flour, baking powder, salt, coconut and cheese) and blend for 30 seconds. 4. Transfer to a greased shallow casserole, or a baking dish, and bake for 50 to 55 minutes. 5. Allow the cake to cool, carefully remove from the casserole or baking dish, then decorate it with sieved icing sugar.

COOK’S NOTES •

Do not open the oven when cooking as the mixture is like a batter and needs constant heat.

Do not worry if the cake cracks a little towards the end of baking.

Serve for breakfast alongside a bitter coffee, it really does work!

The coconut and Parmesan cheese are optional but add a little South American sweet and savoury seasoning to the dish.

From Left: 3-ply Stainless Steel 24cm Shallow Casserole; Stoneware Set of Six Mixed Rainbow Tea Plates; Stoneware Cafetiere in Soleil; Olive Wood Bread Knife;

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COFFEE WITH A KICK

In a world of skinny lattes and flat whites, coffee culture has had a makeover in Britain. The choices are seemingly endless as we tailor our drinks to our individual tastes. In the world’s largest coffeeproducing country there is really only one choice – the cafezinho. Brazilian Portuguese for ‘little coffee’, the cafezinho is a small, strong and very sweet shot of black coffee. Brazilians drink it like the British drink tea. It’s the cultural rocket fuel that keeps everyone alert and animated.   Traditionally brewed using a cloth coffee filter known as a ‘coffee sock’, the cafezinho is made by boiling the water and sugar together before adding the ground coffee when the temperature dips to 90ºC. An easy way to recreate this at home is to brew and filter it in a Le Creuset cafetiere and serve in espresso mugs. Once tasted your daily latte could be a thing of the past.

From left: Stoneware Espresso Mugs in Marseille and Cerise; Stoneware Cafetiere in Marseille; Stoneware Stackable Ramekin in Soleil; Stoneware Medium Storage Jar in Cerise

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THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR THE JOB

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It is Le Creuset’s mission to ensure our cookware combines good looks with good cooking. Whether you are a consummate entertainer or an enthusiastic beginner, we will ensure you get the most out of your pots, pans, casseroles and serveware.

Clockwise from top left: 3-ply Stainless Steel 26cm and 24cm Shallow Casseroles; Stoneware Stackable Ramekins in Marseille, Cool Mint and Soleil; Stoneware Utensil Jar in Marseille; Silicone Spoon Spatula in Cerise; Stainless Steel Flat Whisk; Silicone Basting Brush; Stoneware Petite Casserole in Marseille; Cast Iron 20cm Signature Round Casserole in Cool Mint; Cast Iron 24cm Signature Round Casserole in Marseille; Stoneware Grand Mug in Soleil; Stoneware Grand Teapot in Soleil; Stoneware Mug in Cerise; Classic Salt Mill in Cerise; Classic Pepper Mill in Cool Mint; Toughened Non-Stick 28cm Deep Casserole; Stoneware Medium Heritage Dish in Cerise; Stoneware Small Heritage Dish in Marseille and Cool Mint; Stoneware Jug in Soleil; Stoneware Large Storage Jar in Marseille; Stoneware Small Storage Jars in Cerise and Marseille

UNMATCHED VERSATILITY AND DURABILITY Cast Iron A Cast Iron casserole is, without doubt, an essential piece of equipment that offers great value as it can be used for a huge variety of tasks and recipes. Often only the one pot is needed, it will go from hob (including induction) to oven or grill, then to the table, keeping your food warmer for longer. It can be used for marinating too as the easy clean enamelled surface is impervious and resists staining. A Cast Iron casserole is unsurpassed in its ability to cook anything from rice in 30 minutes to a fragrant onepot meal, succulent oven roast or freshly baked bread. Whatever you cook, Le Creuset Cast Iron will produce superb results because it distributes and retains heat exceptionally evenly. And best of all it comes in a choice of colours to suit all interior styles and a lifetime guarantee for peace of mind.

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STYLISH DESIGN, SUPERB COOKING RESULTS 3-ply Stainless Steel Beautiful, stylish and ideal for everyday cooking, the 3-ply Stainless Steel collection features the latest 3-layer technology of an aluminium core between two layers of premium quality stainless steel. This special layering system spreads heat perfectly, so food cooks gently and evenly. Cooking with 3-ply Stainless Steel is a joy, it heats up quickly and the interior surface, which comes in uncoated or non-stick finish, releases food easily and won’t stain. Helpful touches like laseretched capacity marks, the non-drip pouring rim and large helper handles all add to an unrivalled cooking experience. Perfect for sautéing, casseroles, steaming and roasting there is a pan for every occasion. Suitable for use on all hobs, including induction, the range is also covered by a lifetime guarantee.


TOUGH, SLEEK AND VERSATILE

STYLISH, COLOURFUL, DURABLE

Toughened Non-Stick

Stoneware

A kitchen must-have, Toughened Non-Stick is durable and withstands the rigours of even the most demanding kitchen. Its special hardened body retains its shape perfectly and won’t distort – even when the heat is on! And the strong, reinforced non-stick coating, on the inside and outside, is a dream to clean. The special base design makes the pans perfect for use on all heat sources, including induction hobs, and the professional-style, stainless steel handles are attached with rivets for a secure, permanent fixing. Light enough for everyday use and available in a wide choice of shapes and sizes, Toughened Non-Stick is sure to become your new favourite pan for its outstanding performance and no-compromise lifetime guarantee.

Discover the wide range of Stoneware products including cookware, breakfast and storage pieces in a variety of colours. Perfect for mixing or matching with Cast Iron and ideal for everyday use, the range includes baking dishes, versatile ramekins, petite casseroles, storage jars and breakfast serveware. All Stoneware is suitable to prepare, cook and serve a wide choice of recipes and can go in the oven, under the grill, in the microwave, freezer and dishwasher. Made from specialist clays and fired at the highest temperatures, Stoneware is strong and hardwearing and is covered by a five-year guarantee. Unique enamelling expertise also makes sure that the products are easy to clean and scratch resistant.

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STREET FOOD TO DESIRE

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uge queues snake down the street as fragrant aromas waft through the air. This is Whitecross Street Market, near London’s Old Street, where some 20 stalls serve cuisine from around the world to workers, locals and tourists. At Brazil Flavour, the brainchild of Socrates Guimãraes, the queue is particularly long. For the past eight years it has been serving up the likes of espetinho , little skewers of chicken or beef, and the winter warmer, feijoada , a bean, beef and pork stew. “More people know about Brazil and its food through the World Cup (which Brazil hosted in 2014), and many people do business there now,” explains Socrates.   There are an estimated 200,000 Brazilians in the UK and while the popularity of street food continues across the country, the rise of Brazilian food has been largely confined to restaurants. This comes as something of a surprise to fans including Richard Johnson, founder of the British Street Food Awards. Richard, who is also a journalist, broadcaster and author of Street Food Revolution, sees the UK’s love of Brazilian culture and the fact that its food is so suited to handheld eating as the perfect ingredients for a flourishing of Brazilian street food in the UK.   “It is a culture that does small eats “on the go” well and it is a cuisine that is largely undiscovered,” he says. “Given how popular Brazilians are the world over it would seem like a natural thing to do. We know enough about Brazil and have enough reference points to make that leap. If I was a street food operator I would be looking to learn more.”

‘Brazil is all about fun, samba and party. Give it another 10 years and Brazilian food could be as popular as Indian food is in the UK now’

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o much of Brazil’s traditional food is already based in street food culture. Michelin-starred Brazilian-born, Marcello Tully, is head chef at Kinloch Lodge on Skye, in Scotland. He is from northeast Brazil and creates exquisite dishes incorporating his Brazilian heritage and his love of the country’s street food. “I try and do Brazilian street food and put it in a fine dining arena and change the recipe slightly,” says Marcello.   Twice a week he serves a version of pão de queijo (cheese bread) as a canapé, he also serves coxinha (deep-fried shredded chicken in breadcrumbs shaped like a chicken thigh) replacing the traditional chicken with blue cheese.   When he arrived in the UK aged six, some 40 years ago, there was one Brazilian restaurant in London. “Now there are so many,” he says. “Brazil is such a vast country and it has a huge and diverse culinary presence.” Marcello is encouraged by the increase in Brazilian cuisine in the UK including rodizios , which are similar to US-style barbecue restaurants.   Leandra Garcia has seen the UK’s love of Brazilian meats and grilling grow. She works in Adega Brasil, a Brazilian deli in Willesden, northwest London (an area with a large population of Brazilians). “Our customers are now 35 to 40 per cent Europeans and they really like our tender meats and sausages for their barbecues,” she says.   Brazil hosting the 2016 Olympics will be a further boost, says Sarah Edwards, director of trends at The Food People, which provides food and drink trend reports to the industry. “There have also been some influential chefs on the global scene such as Alex Atala of D.O.M in São Paulo, who has been the ambassador for Brazilian cuisine, and Helena Rizzo and Daniel Redondo of Mani restaurant in São Paulo,” says Sarah. “Both D.O.M and Mani are in the World’s 50 best Restaurants.”   Marcello is convinced that Brazilian food will one day dominate British culinary habits.“Brazil is all about fun, samba and party,” he says. “Give it another five or 10 years and I don’t see why Brazilian food couldn’t be as popular as Indian food is in the UK now.”

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ANDY BATES GET IT WHILE IT’S HOT

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treet food pioneer and TV chef Andy Bates is on a global food journey with a mission to bring more colour to your cooking. Inspired by food and travel, Le Creuset and Andy share a passion for Brazil’s wonderful culinary culture resulting in a series of classic Brazilian recipes with a modern twist.   When we meet, Andy is busy preparing the Brazilian feast from the collection of recipes he created for Le Creuset. As he works, he talks excitedly about his travels and food adventures. His background, however, is far a cry from the glitz and glamour of Rio de Janeiro – it all started with a classic British pie.   Andy trained as a chef in France, then returned to the UK and spent the next eight years working behind-thescenes in television. He reignited his love of food when he started his Eat My Pies stall in 2008. “Street food markets were full of paella, and Asian and Indian food, but there was nothing British. So I set up my own stall selling pies on London’s Brick Lane.”   Now a rising star of the food scene, Andy’s downto-earth and engaging personality has seen him forge a career as a TV chef with three series for the Food Network and regular appearances on the BBC’s Food & Drink show. He is also a leading expert on street food and makes regular appearances at food festivals all over the world.

‘Brazil has totally changed the way I cook. It is quick - with colour, vibrancy and freshness’   Get him talking about his culinary experiences and his eyes light up, he becomes animated and fizzes with ideas as he shares tips, recipes and comes up with lists of everything from his best-ever meals to potential last suppers. “I love cooking and travelling so to have a career doing both is the dream.”   Last year he filmed Andy Bates Brazilian Street Feasts, which saw him travel to São Paulo, Bahia and Rio de Janeiro, as well as in the Amazon rainforest. Inspired by his time there, Andy has created a series of classic Brazilian recipes with a contemporary twist for the Le Creuset Vida Brazil collection.   “Travelling around Brazil has totally changed the way I cook. It’s about quick cooking with lots of colour, vibrancy and freshness. It has also really influenced the way I use ingredients – marrying flavours together and cooking with produce I’ve never used before.   “There are a lot of Portuguese influences in Brazil — you can find some wonderful one-pot dishes and a liberal use of chilli and coriander. I then love putting my own little twist on things. A lot of stews can be turned into pies. Reduce down my Chicken Xim Xim recipe and it works brilliantly in a pasty. Every country I have visited

has its own version of a pasty. And South American dishes are just so fresh and vibrant.” It doesn’t get much fresher or more vibrant than the meal Andy had while shooting in Praia do Forte. It turned out to be on his ‘best-ever’ list – and for good reason. “We filmed a local fisherman who served the most amazing lobster on the beach. This guy goes out on his boat, brings in his lobsters and grills them fresh on the beach. He then makes tables out of the surfboards lying around and serves up his lobster with a cold beer from a bucket. I remember thinking: Life’s all right. Simple but totally memorable.”

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arbecuing is a matter of national pride for Brazilians. The average UK offering of sausages and burgers cannot quite compete with the gargantuan cuts found on a churrasco misto (mixed grill). Best appreciated at a leisurely pace, to do the meat justice, each cut is prepared to maximise the flavours when grilled to pink perfection. “Brazilians spend a lot of time marinating their meat,” says Andy, “and it makes such a difference. It needs a bit of planning, but it’s well worth the effort. Then set a table outside and enjoy the sunshine.”   “We could learn a lot from the Brazilians when it comes to barbecuing. It does require a bit of forethought, but marinating is the key to great grilling. You don’t have to cook on a barbecue; you can use your oven, but always try and eat outside. Our unpredictable weather doesn’t always allow it, but eating outside makes you smile.”   Although he spends a lot of his time travelling to exotic locations, Andy is just as inspired by Britain and is proud of our culinary curiosity that has seen a boom in niche food producers setting up stalls at food markets all over the country.   “We have four seasons providing a variety of quality produce. In fact, the UK grows some of the best root vegetables I’ve ever tasted. As a nation, we are also really good at trying new food. We are very open to new ideas. It’s our curiosity that makes us great.”

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A GOOD GRILLING You don’t need sunshine to bring summer to your plate. The churrasco misto is one of Brazil’s great passions. Get inspiration from our new range of grills and turn up the heat.

Clockwise from top right: Tumblers Set of Four; Toughened NonStick 35cm Ribbed Rectangular Grill; Silicone Round Cool Tool in Marseille; Olive Wood Carving Knife; Cast Iron 26cm Signature Square Grillit® in Cerise

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Clockwise from top left: White Wine Glasses Set of Four; Toughened Non-stick 35cm Ribbed Rectangular Grill; Silicone Round Cool Tool in Marseille; Stoneware Stackable Ramekin in Soleil; Cast Iron 20cm Signature Round Casserole in Cool Mint

GRILLED BUTTERFLIED CHICKEN & CORIANDER RICE A delicious alternative to classic roast chicken served with a simple and authentic Brazilian rice. The juices from the chicken soak into the rice giving it extra flavour. For an extra-succulent result, try brining the chicken before grilling (optional). Le Creuset Toughened Non-Stick 35cm Ribbed Rectangular Grill, Le Creuset Cast Iron 20cm Signature Round Casserole Preparation time: 25 minutes or 20 hours including brining Cooking time: 75 minutes Serves 4 INGREDIENTS 1-1.2kg whole chicken, butterflied FOR THE BRINE 100g brown sugar 100g coarse sea salt 1 litre hot water 1 small onion, chopped 2 teaspoons chilli flakes 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 teaspoon dried oregano 150ml Cachaça Juice and zest of 1 lime 1 teaspoon black peppercorns FOR THE RICE 12 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 cup jasmine white rice 2 cups boiling water 1 teaspoon salt Handful of fresh coriander, roughly chopped

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METHOD TO BUTTERFLY THE CHICKEN 1. Remove the backbone by placing the chicken breast-side down on a board and, using a very sharp knife, cut along the backbone, as close to the bone as possible. 2. Turn the chicken over. Use a chopping board to press down to flatten breastbone. TO BRINE THE CHICKEN (OPTIONAL) 1. Submerge the chicken in a large bowl, mix the salt and sugar with the hot water, then mix in all the remaining ingredients. Cover and chill for at least 4 hours or overnight. TO COOK THE CHICKEN AND RICE Pre-heat oven to 180°/160°C Fan/Gas Mark 4 1. Remove the chicken from the brine, pat dry and rub all over with olive oil. 2. Heat the grill on a medium heat. Test the temperature of the pan (see Cook’s Notes, right) when hot enough place the chicken skin-side down pressing firmly to maximise contact with the grill. Cook for 12-15 minutes then carefully turn over, using tongs. Place it skin-side up and cook for a further 12-15 minutes. 3. Place the grill into the oven and cook for 15 minutes more. Remove and allow the chicken to rest on the grill for 20-30 minutes. 4. Heat the oil in the casserole on a medium heat and fry the onion for 5 minutes. Add the garlic powder and rice and cook for a further 2-3 minutes, stirring regularly to ensure the rice is coated in oil and doesn’t stick to the bottom. . 5. Add the water and salt and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, put on the lid and simmer for 15-20 minutes until rice is cooked. Remove from the heat and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Stir through the coriander and serve.

COOK’S NOTES •

To flatten the chicken, weigh it down by placing a heavy pan wrapped in foil on it during cooking.

Rest the chicken for as long as possible to relax and tenderise the meat.

Garnish the chicken with lime wedges and serve with a pot of hot pepper sauce.


BEEF FLANK WITH BRAZIL NUTS & SPINACH PESTO The Brazilians’ secret to a delicious grilled steak is marinating. The seasoned oil penetrates the flesh giving more flavour and helping to tenderise the meat. A great alternative to a barbecue, this recipe brings the taste of the outdoors in and can be made with any cut of steak. Here we use beef flank which is tasty and economical.

Preparation time: 24 hours (for marinating) Cooking time: 25 minutes (including resting) Serves 4 Le Creuset Cast Iron 26cm Signature Square Grillit® and 26cm Frying Pan INGREDIENTS 1kg-1.2kg beef flank FOR THE MARINADE 1 teaspoon ground cumin 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 teaspoon chilli flakes Juice and zest of 1 lime 150ml olive oil FOR THE PESTO I tablespoon olive oil 1 banana shallot, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed 200g baby spinach 150g feta cheese 1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped 125ml evaporated milk 50g toasted Brazil nuts Salt and pepper

METHOD TO MARINATE 1. Mix all the ingredients together and pour over the steak in a zip-top freezer bag. Seal and place in the fridge overnight. FOR THE PESTO 1. Add the oil to the frying pan and warm on a low to medium heat. Gently fry the shallot and garlic for 5 minutes. Allow to cool. 2. Add all the pesto ingredients to a food processor including the fried shallot and garlic and blend to an even consistency. Season with salt and pepper, set aside. TO COOK THE STEAK 1. Remove the meat from the fridge an hour before cooking. Take out of the bag and dry on kitchen paper to remove any excess marinade. 2. Pre-heat the Grillit® on a medium heat setting. Test the temperature of the pan before adding steak (see Cook’s Notes below). When hot enough add steak and cook for 3-4 minutes each side (for medium rare — depending on thickness of steaks). Don’t be tempted to move the steak before this time; allow the surface to seal on the ribs of the pan. When it is cooked it will release easily. 3. Remove the steak from the pan, put onto a warm plate or dish, cover loosely and rest for 10 minutes. This will make sure that the meat is tender and juicy as it will retain more moisture when carved. 4. To serve, slice the steak across the grain and serve the pesto alongside. COOK’S NOTES • To check the Grillit® is hot enough add a few drops of cold water to the surface. If it sizzles and the water evaporates almost immediately, it’s ready to use. If the water steams and has no sizzle, heat the pan a little longer and repeat the test again.

Clockwise from top left: Red Wine Glasses Set of Four; Silicone Round Cool Tool in Marseille; Cast Iron 26cm Signature Square Grillit® in Cerise ; Olive Wood Carving Knife

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Stoneware Small Serving Platter in Marseille

GRILLED PRAWNS & CRUSHED AVOCADO ON TOAST A delicious starter for a dinner party or a show-stopping snack which shows the tropical flavours and vibrant colours of Brazil. Nearly all the preparation can be done a day in advance. Preparation time: 50 minutes Cooking time: 10-12 minutes Serves 2 Le Creuset Toughened Non-Stick 28cm Ribbed Square Grill, Le Creuset Cast Iron 20cm Signature Round Casserole INGREDIENTS 6 large tiger prawns, shells and heads on 3 cloves of garlic, crushed 1 red chilli, halved lengthways, deseeded and thinly sliced Olive oil Salt and black pepper FOR THE STOCK 1 tablespoon olive oil Prawn shells 1 small onion, chopped Thumb-size piece fresh ginger, sliced 200ml coconut milk Light soy sauce Fish sauce FOR THE SALSA & AVOCADO Half a ripe mango, cut into ½cm dice Half a red onion, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped 1 red chilli, finely chopped Juice and zest of half a lime 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 ripe avocado 1 tablespoon soured cream 1 tablespoon fresh coriander, chopped Juice and zest of half a lime 2 slices of sourdough bread cut from a small oval loaf

METHOD TO PREPARE THE PRAWNS AND MAKE THE STOCK 1.

Remove the shells and devein the prawns, keeping the heads on. Keep the shells to use in the stock.

2.

Put the prawns, garlic, chilli and olive oil into a bowl, cover and marinate in the refrigerator until needed.

3.

Heat the olive oil in the casserole on a low to medium heat, add the prawn shells, onion and ginger then fry gently for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

4.

Add the coconut milk, bring to the boil and reduce by a third, season with half a teaspoon of soy sauce, half a teaspoon of fish sauce and salt and black pepper.

5.

Strain the stock into a container and discard the shells and vegetables. Allow to chill and refrigerate until needed.

TO MAKE THE SALSA AND CRUSHED AVOCADO 1.

In a bowl mix the mango, red onion, basil, chilli, lime juice and zest, the olive oil and season with salt and black pepper. Cover and refrigerate until needed.

2.

Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone. Remove and roughly chop the flesh, put in a bowl with the soured cream, coriander and juice and zest of half a lime. Season with salt and pepper.

3.

Place a layer of cling-film directly onto the avocado mixture to prevent it from turning brown. Refrigerate until needed.

TO COOK AND ASSEMBLE 1.

Remove all items from the fridge, gently heat the stock in a small saucepan.

2.

Heat the grill on a medium heat setting; meanwhile brush the sourdough slices with a little olive oil. When the grill is hot enough add the bread and toast on both sides. Remove and spread one side of each slice with crushed avocado. Set aside until needed.

3.

Bring the grill back up to temperature, add the prawns and cook for 3 minutes on each side. For the final 30 seconds, lower the heat and pour in the remaining marinade.

4.

Remove the pan from the heat. Place three prawns on top of each slice of avocado toast and spoon over the pan juices.

5.

Spoon the mango salsa around the toast, then drizzle with stock. Serve with a hot water and lemon finger bowl.

COOK’S NOTES •

You can peel the prawns and make the stock and salsa the day before and refrigerate until needed.

Take care not to burn the garlic when cooking or it will taste bitter.

Any leftover stock can be frozen for up to two months.

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AT ONE WITH NATURE

Create leisurely meals to celebrate the longer days. Le Creuset has everything you’ll need from glasses to vibrant cookware and grills that bring sizzle to your summer table.

1. Tumblers Set of Four, £45; 2. Stoneware Salad Bowl in Marseille, £25; 3. Waiter’s Corkscrew in Yellow £20; 4. Silicone Basting Brush in Cerise, £11.50; 5. Olive Wood Carving Knife, £125; 6. Cooler Sleeve in Cerise, £18; 7. Toughened Non-Stick Rectangular Grill, £115, 8. Stoneware Small Serving Platter in Marseille, £25; 9. Cast Iron 26cm Signature Square Grillit® in Cool Mint, £99; 10. Salt Mill in Soleil, £25; 11. Glass Wine Carafe, £50; 12. 3-ply Stainless Steel 30cm Non-Stick Frying Pan, £130;

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SUMMERTIME...

AND THE GRILLING IS EASY

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ith British summertime comes the sizzling sound of the barbecue and smoky aromas that builds our anticipation for a fair weather feast. It is casual dining at its best. The perfect opportunity for a relaxed gathering, soaking up the sunshine, eating and drinking through sun-baked afternoons and balmy evenings.   Sausages, burgers and kebabs are a staple of the Great British barbecue scene but there is much to learn from other grilling champions around the world. The Brazilians are devoted to the churrasco that can see up to 20 high quality meats and special cuts on offer with the picanha – a melt-in-your-mouth juicy prime sirloin – the grilling highlight. The Argentines have asado, firekissed beef, kidneys, liver and sausages served with chimichurri sauce. Italians grill chicken marinated in olive oil and garlic, lemon and rosemary, adding pork and beef to their meal before settling in the shade with jugs of local wine. The one thing we all have in common is the relaxed atmosphere, the leisurely pace and a

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passion for that chargrilled flavour. Barbecues can be a challenging in the UK – our unpredictable weather lets us down, the battle between raw and burnt food as we try to gauge the optimum temperature to cook over charcoal or running out of gas halfway through a social gathering. It can be fraught, but it doesn’t need to be. Grilling can be easier – and enjoyed all year round – if you have a Le Creuset grill in your kitchen. They can be used to enjoy quick and easy meals with all the delicious flavour of an outdoor barbecue but with all the convenience of indoor cooking.   Le Creuset grills provide a healthier way to cook needing little or no added fat or oil. They have a specially designed ribbed interior that produces distinctive char-lines and flavour making your meat, fish or vegetables look attractive and taste delicious.   Available in Cast Iron and Toughened Non-Stick, they can be used on the hob, including induction, in the oven, under the grill and you can even use the Cast Iron grills on the barbecue for maximum versatility.


SECRET WEAPON

COOKING TIPS

The Cast Iron grill is a cook’s secret weapon to produce the most succulent seared food. Used by professional chefs in restaurants worldwide, the Cast Iron grill has the exceptional property to achieve a high cooking surface heat on a low to medium setting and once hot it will stay hot. The outside of your food will seal very quickly as you add it to the pan locking in the maximum amount of moisture, nutrients and flavour for the tastiest meat you have ever had. All the Cast Iron grills are coated with Le Creuset’s specialist satin black enamel finish specially designed for high surface heat use. Very tough and durable, it will not wear off at searing temperatures and promotes the caramelization of food. It is also hygienic and easy to clean (no seasoning is required). Available in a wide range of shapes, sizes and colours to suit your cooking styles and serving requirements, Cast Iron grills also come with a lifetime guarantee.

Always pre-heat the grill with no oil and no food for 2-3 minutes on a low to medium setting. It is important that the cooking surface is sufficiently hot before you start grilling and searing. When using a grill pan, far less oil is required than for frying for example. Once the pan is hot enough, simply apply oil lightly with a brush, pad of kitchen towel, oil spray or apply directly to the surface of the food. The best oils to use on the grill surface are vegetable, sunflower, rapeseed, groundnut (peanut) or corn oils as they have a higher smoking point.

GRILLING GREATS Take inspiration from South America, put in a little preparation time and elevate your grilled feast from good to great. Marinade: a heavily seasoned oil that you soak meat in for at least four hours before cooking. It does as much good for the texture of the meat as it does the flavour. Most marinades are made up of an acid (vinegar and/or lemon juice) and oil. The acid breaks down the fibres to tenderise the meat and the oil infuses the meat with the powerful seasoning.

STYLE AND SUBSTANCE Perfect for creating healthy, tasty meals at any time, the grills in our Toughened Non-Stick range have been thoughtfully designed to be easy to use and handle. Made from cast aluminium, they have a special base making them suitable for use on all hobs, including induction, and they come with stylish yet practical cast stainless steel handles. They have an extremely effective non-stick coating that ensures that more delicate food such as fish, seafood, fruit and cheese can be grilled to perfection without sticking. The non-stick coating is durable yet releases food effortlessly. Available in two shapes and sizes, 28cm Square and 35cm Rectangular, these ribbed grills are the perfect addition to any food-lover’s collection and are covered by a no compromise 10-year guarantee.

Dry rub: sprinkled or patted onto barbecue food, creating a crust that helps hold in moisture. They can contain a variety of herbs and spices and usually include some salt and sugar. To make your own spice rub to create a dish with a Latin kick, mix together 60g brown sugar and 60g paprika; 1 tablespoon each of ground black pepper, salt, chilli powder, garlic powder and onion powder; and 1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper for something with a little Latin kick. Play with your store cupboard spices to create a blend tailormade to your taste. You can also buy ready-made rubs from all major supermarkets. Glaze: a thinned-out sauce brushed onto your barbecue food to enhance flavour. The sauce will usually contain some sugar and the aim is to caramelise the coating so it is thick and sticky – not burnt and bitter. For a quick and easy barbecue glaze mix together 170g of tomato ketchup; 3 tablespoons cider vinegar; 2 tablespoons each of brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce, 1 teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper. Then repeatedly brush the glaze onto your choice of meat or fish during the grilling process. There are no rules, you can add maple syrup, honey, whisky, spices and chillies, for example. Whatever tempts your tastebuds and fuels your culinary imagination.

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WIN AN EXCLUSIVE LE CREUSET COOKERY COURSE If you are feeling fired up and want to learn how to bring a bit of Brazilian flair to your cooking, then here is your chance. Le Creuset is teaming up with Season Cookery School (part of the Exclusive Hotels Group) to offer a series of one-day courses during 2016.   Situated in the stunning grounds of Lainston House, Winchester, the bespoke Le Creuset and Season cookery courses will ignite your passion for food and cooking in a fun yet professional environment. Using only Le Creuset cookware collections throughout the day, your Exclusive Hotel Group chef will explain how to get the best out of the products and teach you how to make mouth-watering dishes. The first course will run on May 31, 2016, with other courses running to December 31, 2016. See www.lecreuset.co.uk for full details.   We are offering 12 lucky readers the opportunity to win a place on the first Le Creuset Vida Brazil cookery course on May 31, 2016, at the Season Cookery School in Winchester, Hampshire.   To enter, simply visit www.lecreuset.co.uk/vidabrazilcompetition, enter your details and answer the following question: What is the name of the Brazilian national drink?   The 12 winners for the May 31 course will be notified by April 30 2016. The exclusive Le Creuset Brazilian Cookery courses will include one night accommodation for the winners at Lainston House and standard rail travel to Winchester.   For more information, full terms and conditions and recipes from Le Creuset Vida Brazil, go to: www.lecreuset.co.uk/vidabrazil

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KEEP COOL WITH A

CAIPIRINHA Caipirinha is the national cocktail of Brazil – a refreshing and potent mix, perfect for a summer gathering. Originally drunk by slaves in the sugar cane fields, it first came to global attention in 1922 when Brazilian modernists chose Caipirinha as the official drink of Brazil for an international event called Modern Art Week. The recipe was taken to Paris by French modernists to be served to the fashionable and fabulous. From there it took on the world.   To mix your own: cut 5 limes into wedges, squeeze the juice into the jug and add the wedges. Add 12 tablespoons of sugar and smash the sugar and limes well with a muddler. Fill half of the jug with ice and have another bash. Finally pour over 700ml of Cachaça, stir well and top up with ice. Best served in Le Creuset tumblers. Saudé, tim tim!

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SECRET BRAZIL 3

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razil occupies a great swathe of South America, stretching from the Amazon Basin to the southernmost point of Rio Grande de Sul with 7,500km of sun-baked beaches in between. There is plenty to explore. The obvious mustsees are: the Christ the Redeemer statue, perched atop the Corcovado Mountain overlooking Rio, The Amazon National Park, and São Paulo’s cultural scene. The only downside is that they are so popular you have to join a scrum of sightseers and their selfie sticks, but with a little insider knowledge you can plan a unique holiday.

1. Ipanema and Copacabana are a highlight for beachlovers, but venture a little further afield to Jericoacoara for a truly spectacular stretch of coast. Jeri, as it‘s known locally, is famous for its undulating dunes and crystal-clear ocean. 2. Pantanal is arguably better for seeing wildlife than the Amazon National Park. Home to the biggest jaguar population on the planet, this national park also has caiman, aardvarks, giant river otters and many other exotic species. 3. Brazil’s capital city Brasilia is not exactly hidden, but it is often overlooked in favour of Rio and São Paulo because it is quieter. But this majestic city designed by urban planner Lúcio Costa and architect Oscar Niemeyer is a defining example of modernism that looks as impressive today as it did when it was built in 1956.

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4. A trip to the newly pacified favelas in Rio reveals a wealth of gastro-talent. Try the pasteis tropeiros (black bean, spinach and chorizo pasties) at Bar do David in the Capéu Manguira favela or the hand rolls at Sushi Yaki in Rocinha. Good, simple local food found off the beaten track. 5. The colonial city of Olinda on the northeast coast has beautiful 18th century baroque architecture. Originally a centre for the sugar cane industry, it is an artists’ colony full of galleries, and studios. It also has a lively restaurant scene that showcases the international influence on regional dishes, such as the pumpkin-shrimp curry at Oficina do Sabor. 6. Sugar Loaf Mountain is probably on your itinerary for its breathtaking city views. To avoid crowds, climb Pedra da Gávea taking in coffee plantations and waterfalls en route. 7. Very much in the shadow of its Chilean and Argentinian neighbours, Brazilian wine is gaining popularity. Head to the picturesque wine-growing region of Bento Gonçalvez in Vale dos Vinhedos to sample some great wines by micro- producers that never reach the supermarkets. 8. If you are making the trip to the majestic Iguazo Falls, take the time to visit Curitiba — one of the greenest cities in the world. Sophisticated and sustainable, Curitiba’s development in the 1960s incorporated eco housing, large green spaces and a quality of life unseen in any other Brazilian city. Don’t miss the Botanical Garden for its treasure trove of native plants and the impressive greenhouse inspired by London’s Crystal Palace.

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Cast Iron Rectangular Grill, £99 Excellent for lower fat cooking, it will withstand higher surface cooking temperatures whilst recreating the delicious flavour of seared dishes at home.

3-ply Stainless Steel 24cm Deep Casserole, £140

Stoneware Heritage Rectangular Dishes, from £26 to £46

Beautifully made and stunning to look at, the Deep Casserole offers efficient one-pot cooking, perfect for taking from kitchen to table.

A kitchen essential, these dishes come in 3 sizes – small, medium and large – and 10 colours to suit all cooking tasks and decors.

FIND THE PERFECT GIFT

Stoneware Cafetiere, £50 Enjoy coffee (or even loose tea) in colour. Available in 12 colours, the enamelled easyto-clean surface resists, staining, chipping and cracking.

Shopping for wedding, birthday or indulgence? Whether you choose a kitchen accessory or a cookware investment piece – a little Le Creuset luxury goes a long way

Stoneware Grand Mug, £15 With its sleek design and 12 colour options, this 400ml capacity handcrafted mug is perfect for serving hot drinks or soup.

Cast Iron Signature Shallow Casserole, from £160

Toughened Non-Stick 30cm Shallow Casserole, £152

Stoneware Storage Jar, from £16 to £28

Available in 2 sizes and 12 colours. It is exceptionally versatile and can be used as a casserole, roasting dish, stir-fry pan, baking and serving dish.

Perfect for everyday cooking, this hard-working pan can tackle a variety of tasks, can be used on all heat sources and it’s easy to clean.

Available in 4 sizes and 7 colours, the stackable storage jars with tight fitting beech lid, are the ideal way to keep ingredients fresh.

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W H AT ’ S H OT I N 2 0 1 6 February 5-9 Carnival Rio de Janeiro The Rio carnival is one of the wildest extravaganzas on the planet. Beginning on the Saturday and ending on Ash Wednesday, it includes processions, music shows and carnival balls. February 5-9 Carnival São Paulo While not as famous as Rio’s celebration, São Paulo’s carnival is a riot of samba school rehearsals, street parades and blocos (neighbourhood street parties). March 20-27 Semana Santa Starting on Good Friday, Rio marks Semana Santa, or Easter week with religious festivals and ceremonies across the city. April 24-29 São Paulo Fashion Week The success of supermodels such as Giselle Bündchen, has made São Paulo Fashion Week the fifth most important fashion week after New York, Paris, Milan and London. May São Paulo Virada Cultural This is a 24-hour, non-stop celebration of city culture that showcases everything from dance and film to art and theatre. Mid-May São Vito Festival For almost two months a year São Paulo’s Italian community holds the festival of São Vito with street parties and processions. June 29-July 3 FLIP: Paraty International Literary Festival Leading Brazilian authors are joined by international writers such as Ian McEwan and Carol Ann Duffy for a lively mix of readings, debate, music and food. August 5-21 Rio 2016 Olympic Games Over 200 nations are set to compete in the world’s biggest sporting event, and 35 venues around the city will host all the various sporting events.

CREDITS

September Rio International Film Festival The Festival do Rio is a major event on the international film circuit. It showcases more than 500 feature films, documentaries and short films.

LE CREUSET LIVING

September 7-18 Rio 2016 Paralympics Following the huge success of the London 2012 Paralympics, this will be the first time the multi-sport event has been hosted by a South American nation.

EDITORIAL

September 10-December 12 São Paulo Art Biennial The São Paulo Biennial has been running since 1951, and is the world’s second oldest art biennal after Venice. The event allows Brazilian and international artists to exhibit in the worldrenowned Ciccillo Matarazzo Pavilion, designed by Oscar Niemeyer. September 26-October 10 Brazil Restaurant Week This food festival takes place in Rio, São Paulo and 12 other cities across Brazil. Hundreds of restaurants take part, and passionate Latin foodies pay a fixed price for three-courses at selected restaurants. October 11 Rio de Janeiro Pride The Rio de Janeiro Pride is one of the biggest gay pride parades in the world. More than two million people take part in parties on the beaches and across the city. November Fashion Rio Fashion Rio, a twice-yearly event, features major designers and emerging talent. November 11 Brazilian F1 Grand Prix The Formula 1 circus arrives in São Paulo at the Interlagos racetrack, a course renowned as one of the most difficult on the F1 circuit.

Created by Talk Content www.talkcontent.com

■ Editor Rachel Jane ■ Design Talk Content ■ Writers Rachel Jane Jane Clinton ■ Photography David Cleveland ■ Stylist Kasha Harmer ■ Home Economist Beatrice Ferrante ■ Stock photography iStock www.istockphoto.com Getty Images www.gettyimages.co.uk Shutterstock www.shutterstock.com STOCKISTS Available at www.lecreuset. co.uk, Le Creuset Retail Stores and authorised Le Creuset stockists. For more information go to www.lecreuset.co.uk/stores

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Cel e b r ate C o lour Car nival!

Lifestyle Magazine Vida Brazil Spring/Summer '16  

Welcome to Le Creuset Living the new six-monthly lifestyle magazine that promises to bring you the latest interior trends and Le Creuset pro...

Lifestyle Magazine Vida Brazil Spring/Summer '16  

Welcome to Le Creuset Living the new six-monthly lifestyle magazine that promises to bring you the latest interior trends and Le Creuset pro...

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