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O C M L E E W

8 LEBANON MISsOURI ouR toWn, youR toWn

2017-2018 GUIDE TO LEBANON-LACLEDE COUNTY


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Lebanon Parks Page 22

Wagons for Warriors Page 52

NFL star gives back Page 59

Nice place to visit...great place to live Tourism Director Nicole McGinnis talks about what makes Lebanon special. ........................................PAGE 4

Lebanon-Laclede County Library There are about 100,000 reasons to visit the local library. ......................................... Page 18

Lebanon's Wild Side

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Bennett Spring State Park is just a few miles west of Lebanon. ......................................... Page 44

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The town shuts down for the annual parade to kick off the holiday season. ......................................... Page 80

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Nice place to visit ...

... Great place to live! Lebanon and Laclede County offer a little something for everyone Shopping, antiquing, fishing, tubing, camping, hiking, swimming, golfing, dining, sightseeing, fueling your need for speed or how about floating your cares away? Whether you’re here for business or pleasure; we have something for everyone in and around Lebanon, Missouri! Home to more than 14,000 residents and several native pioneers of industry, Lebanon is conveniently located directly on Interstate 44 positioned perfectly in the scenic Ozarks of south-central Missouri. The Lebanon and Laclede County Area offers a wide variety of indoor and outdoor amenities to fit just about any event need. The City of Lebanon alone is home to 8 parks encompassing over 100 acres. Located within these parks are disc golf, baseball/ softball fields, basketball courts, paved walking trails, several playgrounds, 11 shelters, Boswell Aquatic Center, Nelson Pond and a skate park! The Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center is the areas crown jewel in indoor facilities; this multi-purpose facility will accommodate conventions, trade shows, and expositions, sporting PAGE 4

events, theatrical productions and business meetings. Come enjoy a demolition derby, bull riding, country music concert, county fair, gun show or even a community garage sale in our Cowan Civic Center. The YMCA is housed in the Cowan Civic Center as well, and is one of the largest not-for-profit community service organizations in the Ozarks. It is equipped with a gymnasium and a large multi-purTourism Director pose sports facilNicole McGinnis ity, which includes an amazing NCAA approved lap pool and a tennis court. Lebanon is a great place to visit; our historic downtown features many unique shops and is growing and renewing daily! Lebanon also has many outlet stores, like The Mall, or Shepherd Hills Factory Outlet, the world’s largest

dealer of top-selling Case Knives. The huge store offers Ozark Walnut bowls and a vast selection of home décor items. The Heartland Antique Mall is the largest between Joplin and St. Louis, with more than 250 dealers and a Russell Stover’s candy outlet. The area also has numerous other family owned antique stores which are sure to have the perfect vintage treasure for your collection. Lebanon was an important stop along Historic Route 66 and Boswell Park located on the historic route is themed to recognize that. The park is home to 3 larger than life murals featuring historic images of the route and host an annual Route 66 Festival each June which features a parade, live entertainment, family games, vendors and more! Historic Route 66, often romanticized Mother Road, inspires in many of us something buried deep within us. Some may see Route 66 as a link to our parents and grandparents, others perhaps feel the sense of freedom that the road provided to those early travelers. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


Most of the original auto courts and cafes are long gone, but a few sites still exist such as the Munger Moss Motel and the newly revitalized Wrinks Market can be visited along the historic highway in Laclede County. Along with driving the mother road you can learn more about the historic route in Lebanon’s world renowned Route 66 Museum and Research Center. Every weekend from April through September, you can feed your need for speed at I-44 Speedway, part of the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series and Midway Speedway with its fast and wild

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

dirt-track racing, two popular courses. Lebanon is also conveniently located near Bennett Spring State Park. The pristine beauty of the park is a natural attraction. Besides fishing, this popular and scenic park offers 12 miles of hiking trails, Niangua River float trips, interpretive

center, a rustic dining lodge, hatchery tours, cabins & condos, or you can just pitch up a tent, whichever your preference you’ll find dozens of campgrounds and RV parks throughout the area. No matter when you visit, we’ll welcome you with open arms. Lebanon, we live and you will love it! Come see us! For more information contact the Tourism Office for the City of Lebanon at toll free 866-LEBANON, or visit our website at www.lebanonmo.org. -Lebanon Tourism Director Nicole McGinnis

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We're here to serve! Our purpose is to serve our community-and do it well! If you are new to or just visiting, we think you are going to really like it here. The list of things that make us so unique and welcoming is Chamber Director endless. From Darrell Pollock Bennett Spring State Park to Route 66, there isn’t enough room to write all the great things that represent our region. Excellent healthcare, entertainment and recreation, churches, city parks, shopping and one of a kind eating experiences all add to the charm and uniqueness we enjoy. The city is also experiencing steady growth in jobs, construction and new businesses. As you

visit our community, feel free to browse and be sure to visit with our friendly locals. You will be hard pressed to find a more hospitable and genuinely friendly people. It’s exciting times here in Lebanon and Laclede County.

We welcome you to come and be a part! Remember to drop by or give us a call here at the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce. We’re here to serve! -Darrell Pollock Executive Director of Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce

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REDI for business

Lebanon REDI focuses on growing business

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public-private partnership formed to help Lebanon and Laclede County move forward economically, Lebanon Regional Economic Development, Inc. (Lebanon-REDI) continues to serve as a key partner in the economic development process. Formerly known as America’s Heartland Economic Partnership, the entity was formed in 2004 and became Lebanon-REDI in 2010. The organization has a mission “to strengthen the

Laclede County economic base and increase the standard of living of all residents through retention, expansion, attraction and development of primary jobs and capital investments.”

According to Lebanon-REDI President/Chief Executive Officer Brian Thompson accomplishing this mission requires “all hands on deck.” “More than ever before, the economic development process requires everyone playing their important role,” said Thompson. “Companies looking to bring jobs to a community or even existing businesses with expansion plans want to know that a location is willing to plan and develop its future.”

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Lebanon REDI CEO Brian Thompson speaks during a Lebanon City Council meeting. Thompson said that recent success stories indicate that Lebanon and Laclede County are on the right track when it comes to working together to make progress. “We continue to see a combination of business expansions and new developments,” he said. “We have seen this positive trend now for the last couple of years. These are all positive indicators for our economy today and beyond.” Laclede County has especially seen a turnaround in employment factors. The county’s unemployment rate has reached 17-year lows recently from a percentage standpoint and its labor force is its largest since 2008-09 levels. Thompson praised efforts of local

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educators from secondary and post-secondary school districts throughout the county for working hard to help students be college and career ready. “Our schools are working hard to find ways to better educate our youth and to inform them of the various options they have locally,” said Thompson. Annually, Lebanon-REDI partners with Lebanon Technology and Career Center (LTCC) by providing partial funds to help LTCC remain a testing site for the National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) examination. LTCC tests 17 and 18-year-old students each year, giving them an extra advantage especially for those who will move directly into the local labor pool upon high school graduation.

The NCRC measures a test taker’s ability in areas of applied mathematics, reading for information and locating information. REDI is also partnering with the school district and the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce on the development of a local affiliate of the Greater Ozarks Center for Advanced Professional Studies (GOCAPS) program, which provides students with real life opportunities and the chance to see actual careers in action. Lebanon-REDI also has a strong working relationship with the three higher education institutions that have a presence in Lebanon and Laclede County – Ozarks Technical Community College (OTC), Missouri State University and Drury University. “We are beyond fortunate for a community of our size to have three higher educational entities with a presence here,” he said. Thompson said that partners throughout the community, county, region and state are critical to keep Lebanon and Laclede County moving in the right direction. “We could really go on and on about how many entities and organizations are involved in the economic development process from our city and county governmental agencies to local nonprofits and charitable organizations to the faith based community, it truly is everyone,” he said. “And Lebanon and Laclede County are certainly blessed to have a strong base to support our growth efforts.” One of Lebanon-REDI’s primary functions is to assist companies with expansion or growth opportunities. This is accomplished through a number of means, according to Thompson. “We do our best to help out in whatever manner is needed,” he said. “It could be as minimal as a letter of support to a company that is applying for a grant or certificate of need to a state governing body, or as detailed as physically helping an industry official fill out paperwork for state or federal incentives. Our main goal is to help the company remove barriers that stand in their way of being successful. Each case is unique and we are glad to help as best we can in whatever way that ends up taking shape.” For more information on LebanonREDI, contact Thompson by phone at (417) 533-5627, by e-mail at brian@ lebanonredi.com, in person at 200 East Commercial (Allen Building) in Lebanon, or visit www.LebanonREDI.com. ■ OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


Area students can get a four year degree right here at home Although Lebanon is a relatively small town, students with big city university ambitions can fulfill their dreams without ever leaving their community. T hanks to a par tnership between Ozarks Technical Community College and Missouri State University, Lebanon students can receive a four-year degree in many fields, including elementary education, criminal justice, communications and general studies. MSU, which used to be locally housed at the Nelson Education Center, moved into the OTC Lebanon Center’s Reuben and Mary Lou Casey Hall, which is named after its 2010 donors, in the summer of 2013 and opened up for classes the following fall. OTC, which offered a two-year associate’s degree, will now be able to give its students an option to continue into a specific degree program. “Basically what it is going to do is allow the students to have easier access, where they can interact between both schools and end up not only graduating with an associate's degree but also at least a bachelor’s degree,” said Gib Adkins, outreach coordinator for MSU’s Lebanon operations. While MSU students could achieve a bachelor’s degree from MSU at the Nelson Education Center, they couldn’t do it with the ease that they will be able to at OTC, Adkins added. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

“ This is going to give a seamless transition from your freshman year on forward with our close partner, Missouri

State University,” OTC Chancellor Dr. Hal Higdon said when the partnership was announced.

The area that MSU moved into was a previously unfinished area of the campus. An open warehouse space was converted into six additional classrooms, restrooms and an office area. MSU offers classes in the form of traditional classes and iTV (interactive TV) classes. The iTV classes allow students to interact in real time with a professor in Springfield or 1 of 14 other locations in 4 states who is teaching through a video that is streamed to Lebanon. “They can interact in real time with the instructor, share papers — everything they could do in a real class,” Adkins said. There also will be classes that blend live and iTV classes.

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OTC LEBANON Dusty Childress

MSU LEBANON Gib Adkins

This isn’t the first time that MSU and OTC shared the same building. Both were at one time housed at the Nelson Education Center adjacent to Nelson Park. OTC moved out of the building after the Caseys donated two industrial buildings on Route MM in late 2009. In 2013, the Caseys, who are from California, donated the 50 acres of land surrounding the buildings, bringing up the total value of the family’s gift to OTC to $3.1 million, the biggest gift in the college’s history. The campus opened up in fall 2011 with 13 classrooms, computer labs, a student lounge and student services department at Casey Hall. A second building includes workforce development and technical education classes. The finishing of Casey Hall, which allowed MSU to move into the Lebanon Center, was paid for with a $500,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Economic Development loan and $100,000 of OTC’s own funds.

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Adding MSU to the mix may only be just the beginning of OTC’s expansion in Lebanon. The college has announced a master plan that would utilize the extra land donated by the Caseys. The plan includes extra buildings for general education classes, OTC’s Allied Health program, agricultural services building, administrative offices and an arboretum. The plans also call for a fountain and several other water features. MSU had been offering college courses in Lebanon for 15 years. It started offering classes at the Lebanon Technology and Career Center. ■

OTC LEBANON CENTER 22360 Route MM Lebanon MO 65536 Phone: (417) 447-8932 (417) 532-5044 Email: lebanon@otc.edu Website: lebanon.otc.edu Office Hours Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. MSU LEBANON Phone: (417) 532-0518 (417) 532-5044 Email: GibAdkins@MissouriState.edu

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

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New courses at new location Drury University began classes, including law enforcement courses, in Lebanon in June 2017 in new quarters at 128 E. Commercial St., just across from Drury’s Lebanon oďŹƒce. Lebanon site coordinator Millie Gann said the new home is something Drury has been working on a long time. “Drury in Lebanon has waited a long time to nd a home,â€? Gann said. “We have this beautiful landscaped courtyard to look at every day and we have four classrooms we worked very hard to provide our students.â€? Drury President Dr. Tim Cloyd said students taking classes in the new facility will have the advantage of a personal connection with instructors. “We give our students individualized and customized experiences. We are like a boutique rather than a mass online program. We have connections with human beings and that’s what’s critical,â€? Cloyd said.

Drury University officials cut the ribbon at the college's new Lebanon location on Commercial Street in June 2017. Cloyd said the Drury College of Continuing Professional Studies, which oers evening and online courses, has been around since the late 1940s. He said Drury’s alumni base includes 15,000 living alumns who are graduates of the CCPS.

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“Drury was founded in 1873 and it has been serving Missouri and the country for almost 150 years,â€? Cloyd said. “So Drury is not a y by night organization, Drury is a place that cares and a place that’s a part of Missouri.â€? The classroom location at 128 E. Commercial St. is a new permanent home for Drury classes in the region and allows Drury to oer summer classes in Lebanon for the ďŹ rst time in several years. The space houses a new computer lab and student lounge. It is home to the Drury Law Enforcement Academy’s second location, starting in June. This was the ďŹ rst time law enforcement courses will be offered by Drury in the Lebanon area. Drury University began in Lebanon in 1986 by oering two courses at the Lebanon Junior High School. At the Lebanon location students may receive associate’s degrees and take courses toward bachelor’s degrees.

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Museum of the 'Mother Road' Local area celebrates its Route 66 heritage with a facility inside the library

M

ost people know enough to visualize neon and chrome at the mention of Route 66, but if you really want the lowdown on the Mother Road, then Lebanon’s Route 66 Museum is a must-see. Located in the Lebanon-Lacede County Library, 915 S. Jefferson Ave., the museum is one of only two museums in Missouri that are dedicated entirely to Route 66. The other one is in Times Beach. “You won’t find just a ton of these out there,” museum curator Mark Spangler said of the museum. “Some communities celebrate their Route 66 connection, and others do not. Some are catching on and actively developing that; we started that process s dozen years ago when we had the idea to do the museum, so we’re kind of ahead of the curve.” Although Route 66 probably wasn’t much different from other interstate highways in its day, a series of circumstances caused it be one of the most well-known roads from an era when the United States’ infrastructure was just beginning to take shape. “Route 66 wasn’t the only highway, it wasn’t the longest, it wasn’t the first, it just became perhaps the most famous, perhaps because of some quirky little things that happened,” Spangler explained.

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To begin with, promotors were exceptionally active in trying to draw attention to the road for economic purposes. A more specific event that helped launch Route 66 to its current fame was the publication of John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath.” The novel follows the members

of the fictitious Joad family as they head toward California in an attempt to flee the Dust Bowl via — you guessed it — Route 66. Besides nudging the highway into the limelight, the book also coined the term “The Mother Road” in reference to Route 66.

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


Another popular culture reference to the highway came in the 1960s in the form of a television show simply titled “Route 66.” “It was just a couple of guys in a convertible just out goofing around on Route 66, which kind of hearkens into the whole ‘Get your kicks on 66’ the whole song that kind of made it famous as far as a sound to go along with it. “ Spangler said of the show. “But that’s part of the problem. So many people think that’s it — ‘Get Your Kicks on 66’ — and there’s so much more to it. You can slice it and dice it in so many ways besides just a place to have a good time.” Lebanon’s Route 66 museum originated in 2004 when the library moved from a smaller building into its current location,

which was once a K-Mart building. The move allowed the library to have much more space than it had had before; in fact, it had a little space to spare. Route 66 Society member Bill Wheeler had some ideas about what the facility could do with that space. “I would say this was his idea. If you could credit any one individual, Bill was the one that approached the library about doing this,” Spangler stated. The library board approved of Wheeler’s idea, and the Route 66 Museum was born. Today, visitors to the museum can see a variety of displays, including three vignettes: one of a gas station, one of a diner and one of a tourist cabin. The museum also boasts a diorama of the intersection of Route 66 and

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Highway 5 as it looked in the 1940s. Spangler stated, “Now there’s nothing that remains of (the buildings shown in the diorama), but because the family was careful about documenting their businesses, we have just a fabulous set of photographs of what was one of the jewels in our community of the Route, the Nelson Hotel and Dream Village. And we’ve got just a fabulous set of photographs — you seldom see a place documented that well with photographs.” The museum also has a variety of artifacts, including a switchboard from the office of the Munger Moss Motel and a piece of sign post from one of the “Our Town, Your Town” signs that used to mark the edge of the city.

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“We had two of these signs at the entrances to Lebanon over Route 66,” Spangler explained. “They were beside Route 66 trying to beckon folks into town. ... And unfortunately we lost those signs. When the route changed directions they were dismantled and scrapped and are now gone. When we redid Elm Street, they came across one of the supports, the one up on the east side of town, so that’s as close as we can come to having a piece of the original sign.” The museum features two glassed-in displays, one describing different types of pavement that road builders considered using, and another one explaining the Good Roads Movement, which was the immediate precursor to Route 66. Although the museum continues to be a work in progress, it receives a large number of visitors. According to Spangler, the Route 66 Museum draws people from around the world. “You would be gratified to see the amount of people that come to the museum with no more advertising than we are able to do. We have a worldwide audience for that and it seems like it is growing every year. It’s very gratifying to see people interested in the things that you spend so much time on,” Spangler said. A good museum always has a good gift shop, and Spangler said that he believes the new gift shop is a wonderful contribution for the tourism aspect of the museum. “I’m going to say that you are not going to see a nicer gift shop than ours. You just will not. We have all been working very hard on it, and it seems to have paid off. We set out to make this special and we’ve done everything we can to do that,” Spangler said. The gift shop features a wide variety of items, both functional and artistic. There are

Mark Spangler, Route 66 Museum curator, shows off a model of Route 66 landmark John's Modern Cabins that is featured in a display at the museum. candles, books, tableware, jewelry, paintings, prints and everything related to Route 66. “If you truly want a unique gift that you will not find anywhere else, we have something for you,” Spangler said. Besides the traditional Route 66-themed items, the gift shop is actively trying to have American-made traditional arts and crafts. Spangler hoped to add wallets, purses and journals, all handmade. “The next time you need to buy a wallet for someone, remember the gift shop. You can buy a wallet that is made right down the road

in Marshfield,” Spangler said. Preserving Lebanon’s history is very important to Spangler, he said. Although his work isn’t done, he hopes what is already accomplished is something the community can take pride in. “Every area has its own history that is interesting and relevant. However, not every area choses to focus on that … I would hope that our heritage and things around us are not only things that we care about, but also something that we care to present to people that come to visit us,” Spangler said. ■

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


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100,000 reasons to visit Whether it’s leisure reading, family research or a look back in time, visitors can find it all and then some at the Lebanon-Laclede County Library. The library is home to over 100,000 items, according to director Kathy Dame. There is wireless Internet service, books on tape, large print books, DVDs, videos, a children’s room and many research resources, like those found in the Missouri Room, the hot spot for genealogists and history buffs.

The Missouri Room houses obituary books published by the Laclede County Historical Society. These include obituaries for Laclede County residents, but are invaluable resources for anyone seeking clues about their ancestors. Marriage records and cemetery record books compliment that research, as do copies

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of published family histories. There are two volumes of the Laclede County History and the 1888 Goodspeed history of the county that includes a number of biographies of prominent residents and original settlers.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


The library subscribes to Heritage Quest, an online genealogical database that carries all U.S. censuses, as well as lists of books and articles about family history and images of Revolutionary War pension records. Library cardholders have free access. The Missouri Room microflm collection, available free, contains all Missouri census records and many rolls of microfilmed local newspapers, including the Laclede County Republican, the Lebanon Rustic-Republican and all editions of The Daily Record. There are also old editions of the Lebanon High School Magnet yearbook and Polk City Directories for many years. Besides genealogical materials, the room is full of books and magazines containing Missouri and Ozark history. There are Missouri Blue Books, official manuals, dating from 1889 to the present. There is also a four-volume “Ozark Folksongs, a collection by Vance Randolph that was published in the 1940s. Best selling books by authors with an Ozark connection are also located in the room. There is “Shepherd of the Hills,” written by Harold Bell Wright while he lived in Lebanon and the “Little House” series written by Laura Ingalls Wilder, who lived at nearby Mansfield in Wright County.

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

The room is ideal for researching Missouri, with information on caves, the capital, flowers, archeology, geology and other subjects. The library is also a place for fun educational programs for all ages. Every year, the library sponsors a themed summer reading program for children, from the first of June to the end of July. The library alsoworks closely with the Laclede Literacy Council, which offers tutoring from kindergarten through adult. Free classes offered by the council include English as a Second Language, basic literacy,

jail and probation tutoring, citizenship and GED. For highway and map enthusiasts, there is a complete library of road maps, dating from the 1900s to present. A relatively new attraction at the library is the addition of the Kinderhook Treasure gift shop, which is filled with numerous unique items. The building is handicapped accessible. More information about the library is available by calling (417) 532-2148 or visiting the website at www.lebanon-laclede.lib. mo.us. ■

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Starvy Creek Festival

Thousands of avid bluegrass fans brazenly ignore the midsummer heat every year, flocking to Conway, Mo., to attend a series of outdoor concerts known as the Starvy Creek

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The 32nd annual Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival took place over three days at the end of June at Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park at 2229 Bluegrass Road near Conway, about 22 miles southwest of Lebanon. In 2016, the event included performances by Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver, Dailey and Vincent, the Spinney Brothers, the Bluegrass Martins and the Lonesome Road Band as well as seven other bands. Starvy Creek was never intended to become the massive event it is today. On the contrary, it started out in 1985 as music party on the farm of Don and Bobby Day. Don Day explained, “I was just going to invite a few friends in, then one of them suggested, ‘Why don’t you just have a little festival?’ So we did that, and it just kept going. But I didn’t really plan what it has turned out to be.” So instead of having a private party for just family and friends, the Days invited the public. That first year, the festival had about eight campers. Then year after year, it gradually got bigger, until the Days' farm became the Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park. Don Day can’t recall any monumental changes in the running of the festival. “We started out doing a bluegrass show, an basically we’ve just stayed with that,” he said. However, if there weren’t any noticeable changes, there must have been some incremental ones. The festival that started out as a music party with

eight campers now draws about 2,000 to 2,500 people each day the festival runs. There is now a festival in September as well as the one to kick off July. Some things really haven’t changed: Don and Bobbie Day still organize the details of the festival themselves, although they have help from their sons and daughter. As big as the festival has grown though, planning for it is an allyear effort. Day said he thought the festival was good for the local economy. “There’ll be people here probably from 20 different states, and they come in and just spend several days here in Missouri, and they spend money,

and there’s a lot of business done here through them, and sales tax revenue, and all that.” However, the real purpose of the festival is to provide entertainment. “I’d just encourage people, if they like bluegrass music, to come. That’s basically the reason to come,” Day stated. The Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park is located at 2229 Bluegrass Road, Conway, Mo., about 22 miles southwest of Lebanon. The Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival does not allow alcohol, electric instruments or chairs with backs taller than 38 inches. Pets are allowed on leashes, but not in the concert area. For more information, go to www. starvycreek.com. ■

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Lebanon Parks offer something for everyone

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Gasconade Park Located at 4th Street and Harrison, Gasconade Park was Lebanon’s first. One shelter was built years ago, and the Lions Club soon added playground equipment. The park currently houses the Hughes Senior Center, for which the city donated land. The park has a quarter-mile walking track, dedicated to Emma LaBlank, who has a long history of serving food to senior citizens in the area. A second shelter house was built on the foundation of the original bathhouse of the old pool. The park has a play area with equipment and a ball field. Gasconade Park provides green space for neighborhood children and areas for picnicking. T he L ebanon Park s Depar tment turned its attention to upgrades at Gasconade in 2016, sending out a survey to area residents to find out what they'd like to see there. A dog park and a walking trail were some of the favored ideas for the space.

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Spiller Park A small neighborhood park on Spiller Street near the water tower. It is a small, quiet green space with playground equipment and picnicking areas.

Boswell Park Originally known as Maplecrest Park, this area now bears the name of its largest benefactor. It is located on Historic Route 66 and in 2016 was being transformed for a Route 66 theme. After a donation from the Boswell family the park changed names. The family donated $100,000 in the late 1970s to provide matching funds to build the outdoor pool. It was then named after James E. Boswell, Jr. (1937-1955). The park includes three shelters for picnicking, a baseball field with spectator seating, concession stand, batting cages and restrooms. It also has a well-utilized one-mile walking trail. It also includes two lighted tennis courts, an outdoor basketball court and a disc golf course. The crown jewel of the park is the Boswell Aquatic Center. The pool complex, located inside the park, is complete with two 26-foot water slides, a kiddie pool, a main pool, shade structures and a recently renovated bathhouse. Since the aquatic center opened in May 2008, thousands of pool-goers have lined up to splash around in the cool water. The original pool was built in the 1970s and had undergone little in the way of improvements in 30 years of public use. The $1.1-million pool project included the renovation of the earlier facilities and the addition of several new pool features. The renovation was funded by the Capital Improvement Tax that was approved by Lebanon voters in February 2007.

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Wallace Park Lebanon’s second newest park was the result of a gift from St. John’s/Breech Medical Center after a new hospital replaced Wallace Hospital on Harwood Avenue. The land from the old hospital was given to the city, and most of the building was demolished. Wallace Park also has beautiful new playground equipment and a small gazebo for picknicking. The Lebanon Community Band and Choir perform at the park.

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Originally the Route 66 theme project was intended as a small "pocket park" inside Boswell Park, but in the summer of 2015 the Lebanon Park Board decided to expand the project to make the rest of Boswell Park Route 66-themed as well. Part of the funding of the funding for the project is coming from the city’s sale of the Nelson Education Center to Tracker Marine. The center was on land that the Nelson family originally donated to the city, and Nelson family descendent Bruce Owen has said that he would like for at least part of the funds from the sale to go toward preserving the history of Route 66. The refurbished park will also include three 10-by-20 foot Route 66-themed murals. The murals, which will cost $75,000, are expected to be paid for through fundraising conducted by the local Route 66 Society. The rest of the improvements include renovations to the ballfields and restrooms as well as a new playground.

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Nelson Park Bordered by Maple Lane, Bland Road, and Kent Drive. Nelson Park offers four softball and baseball fields, a concession stand, restrooms, a skate park and a small fishing pond for senior citizens or kids under 16 years of age. There is also a multi-purpose field (for Mighty Mite football), bathroom facilities for that area and a concession stand. There is spectator seating, plenty of parking, lots of green space and two shelter houses connected by a fenced play area for child safety. Nelson Park plays host every year to the city's Kids Fishing event sponsored by the city Parks Department and the Missouri Department of Conservation. According to Lebanon Assistant Parks Director Elliot Wilburn, kids ages 15 and younger are welcome to fish in Nelson Pond on a catch-andrelease basis for one Saturday morning in June. Prior to the event, organizers stock the pond with hundreds of catfish and bluegill. Although the young fishermen can't keep their catches, the Conservation department offers prizes for the biggest fish in different age ranges on that day. Kids who have their own fishing poles and bait are encouraged to bring them, but the Missouri Department of Conservation has some poles on hand for those who don't own one. In addition to fishing, the event

regularly features hot dogs, beverages and a bounce house. Wilburn said that Kids Fishing Day usually draws between 200 and 250 children. "I think it's a great way to spend some time with the family, get out

and enjoy the parks," Wilburn said in anticipation of the event in 2016. "We've had a lot of updates to Nelson Park over the last few years, so they can come out and see what we've done to the park and have a good morning with their family."

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and more people were asking for it,” Shelton said. Shelton added that the inspiration of Helen Cowan was one of the main driving points behind the park. “Mrs. Cowan enjoyed walking her dog in Atchley Park. I mean, she was out there all the time walking her puppies regardless of the weather. Rain, snow, cold and everything else, she was religiously out there,” Shelton said. "It’s really a great area. There is lots of shade, which is very important when deciding on an area for a dog park. You don’t want the dogs out in the exposed sun in the summertime without a shaded area. ... I really think it’s going to be a great fit for a park and a perfect contribution to the parks of Lebanon,” Shelton said. Lebanon's canine population seems to agree.

Palmer Park Atchley Park Located on North Missouri 5. The park has four ball fields, restrooms, three park shelters, a fenced playground area and a disc golf course. A lighted walking trail surrounds the park. There are entrances at the back and front of the park. Ample parking is provided. Several weddings are scheduled each year at the gazebo. With the recent relocation of the playground at Atchley Park, the Lebanon Park Board was tasked with finding a practical solution for the empty space. After much consideration, the board agreed for the old playground space to be renovated into a dog park.

“We’ve been thinking about a dog park for a number of years. It was just always a matter of where to put it. We had discussed doing something at Gasconade (Park) a long time ago. Between finding the right location, fencing, water, restrooms and other hindrances, we never knew where to put it,” said Parks Director John Shelton. According to Shelton, the public has been wanting a dog park in Lebanon for some time. “We’ve had a lot of people asking about it and calling. It really seemed like more and more interest was being expressed over the last couple of years. Then as we became more dog-friendly in the parks with stations and other added things, it just seemed like more

A green space located on the southern side of the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center property. The area contains a gazebo that is a popular picnic spot, and it is a good relaxation place after a walk on the trail surrounding the civic center.

Harke Park Named in honor of the generosity of Walter and Rene Harke, Harke Park is located on National Avenue just off Fremont Road. It includes a half-mile paved walking track. The park also has a beautiful gazebo, play areas with state-of-the-art playground equipment, a disc golf course, restrooms (heated in winter) and picnic areas. ■

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Local Schools

■ Lebanon R-3 Central Office 1310 E. Route 66 Superintendent Dr. David Schmitz Phone: 417-657-6001 www.lebanon.k12.mo.us Office hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Joe D. Esther Elementary School 1200 Clark Avenue Pre-K-1st grade Principal Shalyn Howe Phone: 417-657-6002 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Maplecrest Elementary School 901 Maple Lane 2nd and 3rd grades Principal Bryan Campbell Phone: 417-657-6003 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-

day through Friday ■ Boswell Elementary School 695 Millcreek Road Fourth and fifth grades Principal Rachelle Jennings Phone: 417-657-6004 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Lebanon Middle School 2700 Buzz Pride Dr. Sixth through eighth grades Principal Tom Merriott Phone: 417-657-6005 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ■ Lebanon High School 777 Brice St. Grades nine through 12 Principal Kevin Lowery Phone: 417-657-6006

Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Lebanon Technology and Career Center 757 Brice St. Grades nine through 12 Director Keith Davis Phone: 417-657-6007 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Hillcrest Education Center 301 Hoover St. Grades nine through 12 Coordinator Scott Williamson Phone: 417-657-6008 Office hours: 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday Other schools in the county ■ Joel E. Barber C-5 School District 16050 Route KK Grades pre-K to eighth Superintendent Tina Nolan Phone: 417-532-4837 ■ Gasconade C-4 School District 32959 Route 32 in Falcon Grades pre-K through eighth Superintendent Jim Bogle Phone: 417-532-4821 ■ Laclede County R-1 District 726 W. Jefferson Ave. Superintendent Mark Hedger Phone: 417-589-2951

PAGE 28

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With a mix of tight, tree-lined fairways and some that are more forgiving, the course definitely presents a variety of play. The clubhouse features a bar, the 19th Hole, and gives golfers an opportunity to relax, and the grounds also feature a swimming pool and tennis courts.

The state-of-the-art fitness center is open 24/7 to all members and includes cardio, free weights and circuit training. There are certified instructors that provide a variety of fitness classes, including spinning and zumba, and a certified massage therapist is available by appointment.

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Membership at GreatLife includes access to all other GreatLife facilities, including locations in Springfield, Kansas City, Topeka, Kan. and elsewhere. More information is available at www. lebanonmissourigolf.com, or by calling the club at 532-2901. ■

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Swiss Inn has served burgers for 50 years In many ways, Lebanon's Swiss Inn is exactly like it was ďŹ ve decades ago, but the restaurant's philosophy of good food, good service and reasonable prices continues to serve the children and grand-

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children of its original customers. "I just try to keep the same thing because we have people that eat here every day or every other day," Swiss Inn co-owner Lonnie Strutton stated. "They're

just used to having everything tasting the same and having the same products. So I just kept everything just the same. It's worked for like 50 years."

PAGE 31


The Swiss Inn is shown here 50 years ago when it was known as Mr. Swiss. The Swiss Inn is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, and according to co-owner Judy Strutton, many of the restaurant's customers have been eating there for years and bring their children and grandchildren. "Our workers know almost all of our customers," Judy Strutton said. "A lot of (customers) are repeat customers. Sometimes we can write their orders down before they even get in the building." The Swiss Inn originally opened 50 years ago as a Mr. Swiss. Lonnie Strutton estimates that the Mr. Swiss franchise once had 400 or 500 stores nationwide, including four in Springfield. However, the franchise went bankrupt in the late 70s, leaving the Lebanon location on its own. The

Struttons changed the name of the restaurant to Swiss Inn in 1978 after being told that they would be sued if they continued using the Mr. Swiss name. Lonnie Strutton's parents Harry and Berniece Strutton were the original owners of the Mr. Swiss in Lebanon. The couple had previously owned Sayers Hardware on Commercial Street, but according to Lonnie Strutton they sold the hardware store after being being offered so much for it that they didn't want to refuse. Consequently, Harry Strutton was "kind of" retired when the people constructing the Swiss Inn building told Mr. Swiss that Strutton might be a potential franchisee. Lonnie Strutton said that he isn't sure why his father decided to buy the

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Lonnie and Judy Strutton sit down at Swiss Inn while Lonnie's mom Bernice stands behind them. restaurant, but said that Harry Strutton was still fairly young and speculated that he just wasn't ready to retire. "He might have been looking for some type of business to get back into," Lonnie Strutton said. At that time, Lonnie Strutton was 18 years old and had a job pressing pants at H.D. Lee. Judy, his future wife, was 15 and in high school. Both of them worked at the restaurant at nights and on weekends after it opened. "Back then we were a lot busier because they didn't have (fast food restaurants)," Lonnie Strutton stated. "We had a lot more people working, and we were open a lot later."

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In 1968, Lonnie and Judy Strutton moved to Rolla to run a second Mr. Swiss that Harry Strutton had purchased. Lonnie Strutton estimates that it was about 1971 when his brother Larry Strutton returned from serving in the military and took over the restaurant in Lebanon. However, Larry Strutton died in 1975, so Lonnie and Judy Strutton sold the restaurant in Rolla and returned to the one in Lebanon. "My mom and dad really wanted us to move back to Lebanon for grandkids and stuff," Lonnie Strutton said. Around the time that the Swiss Inn left the franchise in 1978, the Struttons made one of the rare changes to the business when they introduced the Swiss Inn's Collin Wilson works in the kitchen of Swiss Inn in 2017. signature steak sandwich. "People come from all around," and it helps them with meeting people The Strutton's daughters Lisa Fox Judy Strutton said. "There's a guy that and gives them confidence." and Cheri Wilson, now teachers in comes from St. Louis all the time to Lonnie Strutton noted that the the Lebanon R-3 School District, both get (a Big Swiss Steak). People come business has also had multiple generaworked at the Swiss Inn when beginin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if they're flying with their relations of employees outside the Strutning when they were about 10 or 11 tives, they'll come in and buy some to ton family. years old, and the Strutton's three take with them on the plane." Over the years, the owners of the grandchildren mark a fourth generaLonnie Strutton added that one Swiss Inn have continued running the tion that has contributed to the busiman takes 15 or 20 sandwiches to a business the same way, and they have ness. relative in Louisiana each year, and tried to keep the products the same as "It's a lot of fun working with your another person takes about 10 sandwell. kids and your grandkids," Judy Strutwiches per year to Iowa. "It's about the the same quality as ton said. "It's the only place in the whole when we opened," Lonnie Strutton Regarding her daughters, she United States where you can get one said. "We always go for quality instead added, "They could make the shakes with the same sauce we put on it," of the cheapest stuff you can buy." â&#x2013; and cook the food and stuff like that, Lonnie Strutton said.

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Lebanon's 'crown jewel'

The Cowan Civic Center holds events all year The people of Lebanon

decided in the late 1990s they needed a cultural hub, a place they could hold everything from weddings and graduation ceremonies to plays and concerts.

They voted for a Capital Improvements Tax that funded the building of the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center, which is named for a former mayor of the city. Now not a weekend goes by that something isn't going on at the CCC. It holds a theater, an exhibition hall, an atrium, meeting rooms and the Lebanon Family YMCA. Considered by

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many to be "the crown jewel of Lebanon," it also hosts the Wall of Honor, which depicts dozens of citizens who have contributed greatly to the community. The variety of events and activities at the CCC is amazing. While the city's main tourism draws are outdoor, warm weather activities such as visiting Bennett Spring State Park and cruising on old Route 66, the CCC brings visitors to the city year-round. The indoor facility is big enough to house numerous events that bring in visitors. Demolition derbies, bull riding events and the state horseshoe pitching and cornhole championships take place there each year. Sporting events such as youth wrestling and roller derby also take place there. The CCC serves as a venue for the Lebanon High School graduation ceremony and hosts various plays for schools in the theater. Local lovebirds also take advantage of the site for weddings and receptions. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


The CCC also serves as the site for a humongous community wide garage sale twice a year, gun shows, educational seminars about everything from alpaca wool to economic development, a high-school percussion artists competition and the annual Miss Merry Christmas pageant. Most of the events come to Lebanon because of local people who have suggested the CCC to their promoters as a venue. The city also advertises the facility. â&#x2013; OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

PAGE 35


Boat Town brews local craft brews

Bart Guyer offers up a Boat Town Brewery craft beer. Guyer is part-owner of the local brewery.

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place for people to visit and enjoy craft beer together, that's how the proprietors describe Boat Town Brewing. Bart Guyer and Dale Korn are the owners and brewers for the business, which is located at 18146 Campground Road in Phillipsburg. They are both longtime brewing enthusiasts and say it's the kind of relaxed setting they have always enjoyed themselves. "This is deďŹ nitely a place where you're not going to ďŹ nd televisions and electronic media that's going to distract you from sitting around and having a good conversation with your friends and family," Dale said. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


Left, Bart Guyer and Dale Korn make several types of craft beers in these tanks. Right, Guyer and Korn, the owners and brewers at Boat Town Brewing in Phlllipsburg, sit at a picnic table in the beer garden area of the brewery. "It's not the vibe of a sports bar, it's more of a country or English pub where people gather together to talk and enjoy good beer." Dale said it's the kind of place he and Dale used to look for in craft breweries. "We made this the way we wanted it to be, the vibe and environment, this is what we wanted for us," he said. Customers can sit around in an outdoor beer garden setting or come inside the brewery for some additional seating. They say the business is first and foremost a craft brewery. "We are very particular that it's quality beer," Dale said. "That's important to us and it's one of the key elements of what we do. I think people agree because we have a huge following that comes out every week." They serve beer, along with a selection of ales, lagers and barrel-aged products, as well as some locally-produced wine and mead. They also serve some sodas, snacks and various non-alcoholic beverages. On Fridays and Saturdays, vendor trucks come out to serve different types of foods. In addition to all that, they want to provide an enjoyable family environment. "This is the kind of place where you can bring your family, your kids, people bring their dogs, and play the games outside, enjoy the sun and have a cold beer," Dale said. The brewery is in a repurposed building near Interstate 44 that formerly served as a diesel repair shop and later a home for bulk foods, then auto parts and finally an auction house. Their sign says "established 2015," but Dale points out that was when they actually OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

received their government license to produce alcohol. "That's the big initial step, nothing else is going to occur without that," he said. They actually opened the brewery on April 3, 2016. They say it was the natural extension of their longtime interest in brewing beer. "It got to the point where we had such elaborate home breweries and brewed so much beer that it seemed the next logical step was a microbrewery," Bart said. Dale said they talked about it for four or five years before applying for the license. "There's a lot infinitely more involved than we ever thought initially," Dale said. "It was a huge process." Bart added, "The scale of what we thought we were going to do definitely increased and probably didn't increase enough given how successful craft beer has been." "Local people like fresh local craft beer

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


Students look over a copy of the Daily Record during a class tour of the newspaper office. The Lebanon Daily Record and the newspapers that preceded it have served the Lebanon area continuously for 150 years. One of the first known newspapers printed in Lebanon was The Clipper, a small, short-lived paper published in the 1860s. Several other newspapers sprang up in the early days of Lebanon. Most lasted only a short time. To trace the roots of the Lebanon Daily Record, you have to go back to 1866 when the Laclede County Republican was established by Major A.F. Lewis. As evident by its name, the newspaper had very strong Republican views. The paper was sold and changed names several times. J.E. MacKesson bought it in 1892, and he and his family operated the Republican for more than 30 years. Another early paper that is part of The Daily Record's heritage was the Lebanon Rustic, established in 1873. The Milton Fullers operated this paper the longest number of years of any of its owners. The Rustic and Laclede County Republican were combined in 1935 when a stock company, under the name of the Lebanon Publishing Co. Inc., purchased the Laclede County Republican, the Lebanon Rustic and the Lebanon Times. The Times had been published for a short time by Paul "Pete'' Page. The papers combined under the name of the Rustic-Republican, with Fred May as editor and publisher of the company and Paul Page as manager. Lebanon's first daily paper with paid circulation was The Lebanon Daily News, established in 1936 by Mr. and Mrs. Fred May. The first issue of The Lebanon Daily Record hit the streets Aug. 6, 1945. In August 1946, Ozark Newspapers Inc. purchased the Rustic-Republican and Daily News from Col. and Mrs. Fred May. The businesses were consolidated under the name of Lebanon Publishing Co. Inc., with the weekly paper continuing as the Lebanon Rustic-Republican and the daily as The Lebanon Daily Record. In 1953 Lebanon Publishing Co. was purchased by the late O.R. Wright, father of current owner and president Dalton Wright. Dalton Wright purchased the newspaper in 1972. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

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He has been active in community activities for three decades as well as serving as president of the Missouri Press Association in 1986 and the National Newspaper Association in 1998. In 2000 he was inducted into the Missouri Press Association Hall of Fame. Da l to n Wr i g h t ' s s o n , M a t t Wright, was named publisher of the newspaper in 2017. Wright has made a push in the newspaper for a renewed focus on local news with no national news reported in the newspaper. The last issue of the Rustic-Republican was published Sept. 25, 1975. Since then, The Lebanon Daily Record has been the only "legal" newspaper — a newspaper qualified by law to publish legal Matt Wright, the third generation of the Wright family to run the newspaper, notices — in Laclede County. The was recently named publisher of the Daily Record. newspaper and its predecessors have been published at various lishing Co. reached another milestone the spring of 1998. Other departments, locations on Commercial Street in Leba- when it announced the purchase of the including the pressroom, remain at 290 non most years since 1866. In February historic Lingsweiler building at 100 E. S. Madison. 1973, the office was moved from 221 E. Commercial. After a year of construcThe LDR publishes daily Monday Commercial to 290 S. Madison. tion and renovation in an attempt to through Friday and puts out a Weekend By the end of 1996, Lebanon Pub- return the 1912 structure to as close edition on Saturdays. For subscription information or into its original condition as possible, the company moved its news, advertising, formation about placing a classified ad, composing and business departments in call (417) 532-9131. ■

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Take a walk on Lebanon's

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ariety has long spiced the outdoor landscape of Laclede County and the surrounding area, and the same holds true today. Whether you find enjoyment in nature by hunting, fishing, photographing animals or merely admiring the birds that visit your backyard feeder, you’ll find this area rich with wildlife diversity. The forests that comprise more than 40 percent of Laclede County’s landscape may have proven to be detrimental to the establishment of large crop fields like those found in more open areas of the state, but the tree-covered parts of the county produce bountiful harvests of deer and turkey each hunting season. Crisscrossing this terrain is a network of streams of varying size, which, in addition to providing aesthetic beauty, offers an abundance of fishing opportunities for floaters, waders and bank anglers. Of course, these same habitats that are home to popular game species are also home to the myriad of small mammal, reptile, amphibian and songbird species that reside in this part of the state for all or part of the year. People in the Lebanon area need look no further than the Coleman Memorial Conservation Area on the south end of the city. This 64acre site features 38 acres of forest and 24 acres of grassland area that is in the process of being restored with native plants. A 1.8-mile hiking trail provides good opportunities to view deer, turkey, songbirds and other animals. No hunting is allowed at the Coleman Area.

Wildlife viewing opportunities also exist at the Osage Fork Conservation Area, approximately four miles south of Lebanon, and on the four tracts of the Bear Creek Conservation Area five miles northeast of Lebanon. It should be noted these areas have no designated trails and are popular spots for deer hunters in the fall archery and firearms seasons and turkey hunters during the spring firearms season. Nearby nature-viewing and hunting opportunities also exist at 7,180-acre Lead Mine Conservation Area, a Missouri Department of Conservation site in Dallas County. Like hunting and nature viewing, anglers in this area also have options. Trout fishing enthusiasts can satisfy their angling appetites at Bennett Spring State Park and at the managed trout area on the Niangua River downstream from the park in Dallas County. Stream anglers in pursuit of bass should check out the Missouri Department of Conservation’s smallmouth management area on the Osage Fork of Gasconade River. More information about opportunities for nature-viewing, hunting and fishing can be found at the Missouri Department of Conservation office at 2350 S. Jefferson in Lebanon, 417-532-7612 or the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Southwest Regional Office at 2630 N. Mayfair Ave. in Springfield, 417895-6880. Francis Skalicky is the media specialist for the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Southwest Region. For more information about conservation issues, call 417-8956880.

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Gone fishin' Bennett Spring draws thousands to Laclede County every year J Spring State Park was simply known as Brice, Mo. During the 1920s when America was enjoying prosperity following World War I, Bennett Spring (then known as Brice) was one of many areas considered by state planners to be preserved as a state park. A Dec. 12, 1924, article in the Laclede County Republican stated that Lebanon Chamber of Commerce President O.A. Mayfield requested that the state consider Bennett Spring as a possible state park site. The article said the first parcel of land, 8 1/2

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acres belonging to Josie Bennett Smith, would became a part of Bennett Spring State Park. The land was purchased from Mrs. Smith on Dec. 27, 1924. Several weeks later, another contract was signed between William Sherman Bennett, Mrs. Smith’s brother, and the state for the sale of 565.33 acres. Of that land, 427 acres can be traced as belonging to James Brice, who settled there in 1837. The land where today’s park store, office, dining lodge and hatchery buildings stand once belonged to the Bennett family.

An o

ust a few miles west of Lebanon is Bennett Spring State Park, one of Missouri’s first and most popular state parks, which attracts a growing number of tourists every year. The third largest natural spring in the state of Missouri pumps 100 million gallons of water each and every day. Anglers from around the nation wade in the spring’s waters in search of lunker-sized trout, and those looking for adventures in camping and canoeing come in droves each year, but there was once a time when Bennett

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Records indicate that James Brice came here from Illinois in search of productive land and a healthful climate. He decided to stay at the beautiful spring area, which reportedly teemed with wildlife. Elk, deer, wild turkeys, buffaloes and even panthers were said to drink from the enormous spring. Brice homesteaded 160 acres, which included the spring, and eventually homesteaded additional acreage that included all of the land and spring branch area. He built the first mill in the vicinity where

early-day farmers brought their corn for grinding. The mill eventually was washed away during a violent rainstorm and flood. Brice, the first permanent settler in the Bennett Spring area, died in 1855 and is buried in the Bennett Cemetery. The Bennett family later settled at the spring area on land known as the Elmer Conn farm, site of the present Sand Spring Motel and Restaurant. The enterprising Peter Bennett built a mill at the spring outlet and Niangua River,

which also was washed away in a rainstorm and flood. Bennett built a second mill known as Bennettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mill during the Civil War years, and it became a center for tradesmen and farmers. The mill was too small to accommodate the increase in business, so Bennett built a third mill and included a carding machine that prepared wool for the spinning wheel. He also built a sawmill in one section of the mill.

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As business continued to grow, Bennett decided to construct a three-story building, and he purchased equipment for it in St. Louis. Since the railroad track went only to Rolla, Bennett and his employees had to meet the train there and haul the equipment to Brice in ox-driven wagons — a slow process over the rocky fords of that time. Peter Bennett married Anna Brice, the daughter of homesteader James Brice. After Brice’s death, Peter and Anna inherited the property. When Peter Bennett died in 1882, his son, William Sherman Bennett, continued to run the mill. Bennett’s daughter, Josie Bennett Smith, operated a hotel at Brice for many years. The Bennett Mill was destroyed by fire in 1895. The last mill at Brice was built by Dr. John B. and Freeman Atchley. Others who operated the mill in later years were J.E. Kelly, Mr. Runge and B.J. Usery. The mill stood as a landmark at Bennett Spring for sightseers and tradesmen alike. The Civilian Conservation Corps, which worked in the area during the 1930s, improved the mill. However, it later was destroyed by fire. The CCC also constructed a log dam, foot trails, a new bridge and many other buildings at

the park. The spring valley already had become a popular camping site in the late 1800s as an area where farmers waited their turns at the mill. According to a Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) brochure, campers would fish, hunt or visit with local townspeople to pass the time. By the turn of the century, recreation

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was gaining in importance at Brice. According to the DNR brochure, in 1900 the Missouri fish commissioner introduced 40,000 mountain trout into the spring, and a privately owned fish hatchery was built in 1923, the year before the state bought the spring and some of the surrounding area for a state park.

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The Brice Post Office originally was built as a log building on the river bank and named after James Brice. In later years, it was located in a general store operated by William Sherman Bennett and his wife, Louie. The name of the post office was changed to Bennett Spring in 1939 and finally was discontinued in 1965. Arlie Bramwell was the last postmaster at Bennett Spring. It was reported that in the early 1900s, William Sherman Bennett had a number of cans of young trout emptied into the spring. The trout thrived in the cold waters, attracting many fishermen. Brice was the location where famed author Harold Bell Wright completed work on his classic novel, “The Shepherd of the Hills." Wright also wrote “The Calling of Dan Matthews" while he lived in Lebanon. In that book, Wright’s “Gordon’s Mill" actually was Bennett’s Mill. Today, one of the oldest original buildings at Bennett Spring is the Bennett Spring Church of God, organized in 1917 through the influence of William Sherman and Louie Boles Bennett, who donated land for the church site. In the 1950s, stone veneer was applied over the wooden structure. It is the only original building that was in old Brice. “Aunt Louie’’ Bennett was pastor of the church for many years. Today, Bennett Spring Church of God is a very active church and is visited by many fishermen staying at the park each trout season. In 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the Works Project Administration (WPA) were two new programs implemented by the U.S. government to put people to work during the Great Depression.

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

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Much work was done at Bennett Spring starting in November of that year. The crews’ first tasks were to build barracks for themselves. They built a new dam, a bridge, a dining lodge, six cabins, a store and post office building , shelters, h o u s e s , ro a d s and trails. They a l s o re n o v a t e d the old Atchley Mill. The men also constructed a second set of gravel-bottomed hatchery rearing pools and in 1935 built a new section onto t h e hatchery building. After the men left in 1938, they dismantled all but one of their barracks. Through the years most of the development at the park has taken place outside of the park’s boundaries as private individuals built cabins, hotels, campgrounds and many other businesses. In 1969, Arlie Bramwell sold his wood and stone cabins to the state. Ralph Usery’s cabins were razed. Splan’s Resort was once a very busy place there. Vogel’s Resort was acquired by the state in 1980. In 1969, the Nature Inter pretive Center opened at the park with George Kastler as the first naturalist, and in 1982 the park dedicated a new office and store building close to the dining lodge on the site of the original Brice. Later the park’s Niangua entrance was renamed the Bramwell Entrance in honor of Arlie Bramwell.

An additional 1,650 acres of land to the south of the current state boundary was purchased in November 1988 to provide watershed protection for Bennett Spring itself as well as the

park area. Each year has brought more improvements. Now, at 3,216 acres, the state park that arose around Peter Bennett’s spring continues to delight all comers. ■

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Happy Trails start just outside Lebanon Dan Kucsik is proud of the businesses he co-owns at the 123 exit. He, his dad Julius, who has passed, and step-mother Carol started the Happy Trails RV Center about 20 years ago and a similar ownership group bought the former KOA Campground in 2009, turning it into the Happy Trails RV Park. Kucsik spends most of his time at the Happy Trails RV Center.

Dan Kucsik stands in front of the family business Happy Trails RV Park located at the 123 exit of Interstate 44. “We have one of the largest rental fleets in the state,” Kucsik said. This is a sharp contrast to the way the business stared.

“We just basically started with consignments at the time and brought in a small amount of new inventory,” he said. He slowly grew the new inventory over time. Happy Trails RV Center is a dealer for Flagstaff, made by Forest River, and K-Z owned by Thor, two of the bigger manufacturers of RVs. One of the services Kucsik offers is delivering an RV to camping spot. For example, customers call the RV Center and ask for RV at a certain camping ground in Branson. Kucsik has it delivered prior to their arrival and picks it up when they are through. Kucsik does a lot of his rental business in the Springfield and Branson area and is considering moving the rental part of the business to Springfield.

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His sales unit would stay at the 123 exit where he sells class A RVs the size of a commercial bus, much smaller tent campers and many sizes in between. He sells and rents the full line. He can also order handicapped-accessible trailers. Some RV owners ask Kucsik to rent out their RV to his customers. “All of our units in the fleet are owned by individuals. We split the rental income with them when they go out, so we put their unit to work for them,” Kucsik said. Renters have to be a least 25, but no chauffeur’s license is required. He and Carol expanded the Happy Trails RV Center in 2007. It has a full service department ready to service anything RV-related. He has 11 full-time employee with 3 part-timers and 1 more to be added soon. Buyers or renters don’t have to go far to test out their RV. The Happy Trails RV Park is a few yards away. He is in the process of improving the park. By removing some rental cabins near the little lake stocked with fish, RV owners have even more premium sites. Kucsik has updated the Park’s store and the activity room used to host groups. The RV Park has more than its fair share of amenities: a pool, a nature and dog walk, picnic tables, of course, a sand volleyball court, free WiFi, a laundry and the General Store with soda, snacks, RV parts and evening pizza are just a few. Courtney Okragly and Jamey Painter are the managers of the park. Most of Kucsik’s customers are travelers looking for a place to stay the night, but he sees some folks who enjoy an extended stay in the Park. Kucsik will park an RV in the Park

Carol Kucsik and son Dan Kucsik stand in front of one of their campers at Happy Trails RV Center located at the 123 exit of I-44. for renters and move it back to the RV center when they are done. Both businesses are on the same road as the Boat Town Brewery with the Route 66 Antique Mall nearby.

Kucsik like the way the number of businesses are growing at the 123 exit of I-44. “We are kind of a hidden gem here, “Kucsik said.

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Every year on Memorial Day Weekend, cowboy cooks from Missouri and several other states come to Lebanon with a single purpose: to help the heroes who have been hurt. Maintaining A Beautiful Lawn Just Got Simple.

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Chuck wagons come from all over the country to rustle up some vittles to support injured veterans Old fashioned, campfire foods served from traditional chuck wagons draws hundreds of people to Lebanon each year, raising thousands for wounded veterans. During the eighth annual Wagons for Warriors held in May 2017, teams of chuck wagon cooks from around the country were able to raise $40,000 for wounded warriors. They brought in $30,000 the year before. Organizer Steve Hull, a Vietnam-era Navy veteran, dressed in full cowboy regalia as did most of the chuckwagon owners and servers who presented authentic cowboy cuisine to a large crowd. After buying a $10 ticket, the holder could sample food from the many chuckwagons. Lunch featured a wide variety of foods from chili, beef and hog jowls to a variety of cobblers cooked in Dutch ovens.

Connie Moll prepares to serve braised beef tips and rice during the 2017 Wagons for Warriors.

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Don Collop is the "cookie" and his daughter Tanya, is his "hoodlum" for their chuckwagon team. One of Wagons for Warriors recent contributions to veterans was a therapy dog for the USO, a 176-pound European great Dane that can soothe shattered nerves with a look. Dana Bowman, slated to parachute in during lunch canceled due to bad weather as well as mechanical problems with his plane, but he was on hand to

unfurl the huge flag he had planned to open in mid-air during his jump for a patriotic display to honor veterans. Bowman, a member of the Golden Knights, lost his legs in a parachuting accident but rejoined the Golden Knights thanks to high-tech prostheses. Buck Taylor, an actor probably best known for his role as Newly the gun-

smith turned deputy turned medic on “Gunsmoke,” participated in the event because he loves “our military, and I want to honor those who have fallen.” He said he was proud to do anything for this nation’s military and that his admiration extends to “policemen, fire fighters, first responders, the works.”

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Top, Robert Taylor, middle, is about to receive a plaque commemorating his WWII service from Dana Bowman and Buck Taylor. Above, veterans and bikers Jim Hepler and David Cypret pose for a picture. He also said, “Lebanon is a very patriotic place and all of this that we’re here today for is to honor the fallen ones who have given their lives for freedom.” Bowman and Taylor presented Robert Taylor, Cheryl Taylor Hull’s uncle and a WWII veteran, with a plaque for his service. He was part of the crew of the “St. Louis,” an escort carrier that was sunk by a kamikaze pilot during the battle of Leyte Gulf.The Finley River Boys from Springfield provided live music for the event. Many of the chuckwagon owners and operators are veterans themselves. Hoss Tillman is a veteran from Olathe, Kan. He and his wife Connie Moll started coming to the event after a fellow wild OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

west show enthusiast invited him. He said he was willing to do “anything I can do to help our veterans.” Moll admitted that Tillman is the better cowboy cook, but she said she had her specialities such as desserts. Their lunch menu was braised beef tips over rice, hog jowls, beans and cornbread and bourbon-crusted peach cobbler. John Byrum, wagon co-owner with wife Barbara, traveled from Perkins, Okla. He said, “It takes a lot from the town to put something on like this and support our veterans. It’s a labor of love because we get to go home tomorrow night and sleep no problem because of service men and women that keep everything safe and keep our freedoms so we can do something like this.”

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Lebanon's outdoor hidden gem Coleman Memorial Conservation Area is a little slice of the great outdoors right in the middle of the city

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Tucked away between two businesses on Evergreen Parkway is a one-of-akind destination inside Lebanon city limits for hikers, bikers and adventurers of all ages. According to Missouri Department of Conservation Research Forrester Steven Laval, the Coleman Memorial Conservation Area is a 64-acre hidden gem that is beneficial to everyone who visits it. “I think the Coleman area has something for everyone who enjoys being outside,” Laval said.

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


“It’s great for hiking, seeing wildlife, and for educational eld trips. And it’s even more special when you consider it’s location and the history behind it.” Before the property became a place of Wildlife Restoration, the property was home to Henry Kenneth “Hap” Coleman and Louise Evelyn (Moore) Coleman. Louise Coleman would go on to donate the land after she saw an article in the Lebanon Daily Record written about a high school biology teacher who was seeking land to be used as an outdoor classroom for group projects. Louise Coleman wanted the land to be used for educational purposes, and for those in the community who were interested in observing wildlife inside the city limits. “She wanted to make sure it went to a good cause, and to people who would love the area as much as she did,” Laval said. “She loved the idea of nding a good home for the land. I think it’s good that we have a connection to her through the property. The area has a lot of history, and I think her story adds to the OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

property in a way that makes it very special.” Laval says the MDC has worked hard to make sure the property stays as natural and unique as it Louise Coleman left it.The trail on the property is just over a mile and a half in length. When walked completely, hikers will see several types of habitats including an old growth forrest with trees that are more than 200 years old, a sink hole that’s almost 100

feet deep, and a natural grass land area that is home to deer and turkey. “We made the trails through the property, but we didn’t make any changes to it. The rest of it we try to keep natural. We have a warm season grass eld there with natural bluestem and old switchgrass. The deer love to hide there, and we have the closest you could get to an old-growth forrest in this area.”

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Each section of the land is marked on interpretive signs near the side of the trail. The signs are easy to see and feature an image example, as well as an in-depth de nition of the habitat. “It’s great to have a place like this for conservation, but it’s even better when there is information available throughout the land to teach people what they are seeing,” he added. Laval believes Coleman would be proud, as the Coleman Memorial Conservation Area is being used “exactly the way she hoped it would be.” Several times a year, science and biology classes of the Lebanon R-3 School District take eld trips to the area to learn about property, and to observe an ecosystem in person. In the past, the MDC hosted a Conservation Day at the Coleman property for middle schooler’s to learn about aquatic life, forestry and all things relating to preservation. “We always have something going on there. Now that the middle school is right there next door, we’ve connected the trail system on the property to the school athletic area. And they are using it a lot more than ever before. They use

it to walk, and all of their classes that relate to the land,” Laval explained. “It’s a natural tie-in. I think that is the neatest thing about the new school. They have a backdoor entrance to the property, and it will always be there.” Although the area is close to the Lebanon Middle School and is used to feature events for younger students, Lebanon High School biology teacher Shane Rebmann believes the area is resourceful for students and adults of all ages.“I love that place, and (I’ve) used it several times with my classes,” Rebmann said. “We’ve used the area for forestry assignments, leaf and ower projects, soil sampling, water and invertebrate collections out of the pond, and some clean up in the sinkhole. We’ve actually done quite a few different things out there. It all seems to help these kids get a rst hand experience.” Rebmann has been scheduling field trips to the Coleman Memorial Conservation Area for more than 16 years, even before the MDC managed it. In that time, Rebmann says hundreds of students have been able to observe a biological community.

This chimney at Coleman Memorial Conservation Area is all that remains of the home of Henry Kenneth "Hap" Coleman and Louise Evelyn (Moore) Coleman, who donated the land to the Missouri Department of Conservation.

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NFL STAR GIVES BACK TO LEBANON

Every year, Seattle Seahawk and former 'Jacket Justin Britt hosts a summer football camp in his hometown

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Since being recruited into the NFL, Justin Britt has been back to spend part of his summer with the youth of Lebanon. He has thus far put on three free youth football camps. The Seattle Seahawk center came home last summer for a weekend of events to raise money for his youth charity. First up was a celebrity basketball game on a Saturday. The next day, he and his crew met the youth out on the turf at ‘Jacket Stadium for a youth camp in the morning. and held a camp for the older studentathletes in the afternoon. “Well, the basketball game was just for fun and a way to bring in some people I know, former Mizzou players and NFL guys I know. I just wanted to have fun

with the community and give back,” Britt said. On hand for the weekend events was Dajon Love with the Iowa Barnstormers, Mizzou quarterback Drew Lock, rapper NowDaze, Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Amara Darboh, former Waynesville Tiger L.J. Fort who currently plays linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers, and former SMU defensive lineman Spencer Conley among others. “The foundation is called “Run the Race” because, even in this community, we all are chasing something, and that chase is our race,” Britt said. “Each one of us has our own race which is unique — “run the race” is from 1 Corinthians 9:24 and I wanted that to be the name of

it. We aren’t tied to one charity or foundation, and we aren’t tied to them all.” Britt (an NFL player who has been part of a Super Bowl with a loss to the Patriots in 2015) said he is here to give these youth in his hometown access to great football minds to grow and be their best. “Hopefully one of these kids can go on and do even better than me,” he said. Justin’s presence and the foundation are more than just encouraging kids to be better football players. He said he desires that all the kids and families in the community, often who are less fortunate. Britt feels like there is a lot he and everyone can do to partner up to make it happen.

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“And now is the just the start of it,” he said. “In the future, we look to do even more. We are partnering with S.C.A.N. (Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition) to help better their program. It is remarkable what they do,” he said. Coming back to Lebanon for a third camp, Britt admitted he doesn’t have the time to go into great depth. But he is here with his volunteers to help kids hone in on their skills as students lined up and did either offensive drills or lineman practice. “We can teach the kids technique. But really we focus on discipline and teamwork and how to be a great individual and be successful,” he said. “My job out here isn’t to teach them techniques, and I’m not a coach. My job is to teach them discipline and the traits one needs to be great. I have some coaches here to help with techniques at various positions.” “I love this community and what they did for me. I feel like this is one of the best communities because they love each other and support each other. You don’t see that much, and I’ve been a lot of places,” he said. “How much I want to give back leaves me speechless. I was in many of these players shoes. I didn’t have a lot of money growing up.” Britt also said he wants to inspire the older people in the community to be better examples and supporters of youth, for him and his crew is only here for a week or two each summer. “I plan on coming back for the camps year after year, but the entertainment like celebrity softball games or basketball games could change from year to year. Players attended Saturday for Lebanon,

Waynesville, Bolivar, Fair Grove among others in the area. Lebanon High School head coach Will Christian was on hand to express his appreciation for his former football pupil Britt. “He comes back twice a year to give back to Lebanon and southwest Missouri. I’m also excited about the crew he brings with him: Mizzou players, NFL players … any time our kids and other kids are working on getting better out on the field that is a plus,” Christian said. At the elementary camp (Saturday morning) we had Drew Lock and some Mizzou receivers and linemen, according to Christian. “On had were a lot of different influ-

ences and individuals to help kids,” he said. “We are just blessed to have Justin be here. And the elementary camps in the morning is a very important thing and is much appreciated.” Lebanon senior Leo Martinez saw it as a great opportunity to get himself out to Jacket Stadium today to take part in the camp. “It’s fun to put the work in every single day while many are just sitting at home,” he said. “Coming out here and working on our routes, even more, is going to make us better, learning what knowledge they have and it is fun.” “I just wanted to come out here and be around NFL players and learn some new things,” he said.

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FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE! Carnival rides, horse pulls, tractor pulls and farm animals galore means that its that time of year again: Laclede County Fair time!

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ach year in the second week of July, The Laclede County Fair Board brings a week of excitement to Lebanon. The fair includes livestock exhibits, a carnival and other events throughout the day at the Laclede County fairgrounds in Lebanon with the carnival opening up each night. In 2017, the fair board

added a new event, the 4-H Youth Horse Show. "The local 4-H clubs are putting it on," said Board President Glenn Raef. "That's something new this year." The carnival always begins on the Tuesday night of the fair week. "It will not be running on Monday," he said.

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"We always give them that extra day to set up on Monday. It will start on Tuesday and run through Saturday night." Also on Tuesday, events begin as the family exhibit building. There's also Senior Day at the Civic Center. Events throughout the week usually include a four-wheeler rodeo, antique tractor pull and lawn and garden pull, draft horse pull and truck and tractor pulls. Throughout the week kids will be showing off their animals, including everything from chickens to cows. Judging begins in the middle of the week with the sale of champions happening on Thursday night. On Saturday, along with more animal showing competitions, the annual Pampered Pets Contest is held. Raef said he has been involved with the fair all his life and started showing livestock there as a kid. "I've always been a part of the fair,

always have been," Raef said. "I've always had a passion for it, to help the rural youth of Laclede County, give them a place to come and show, and make some memories." He says the chance to help youth is one of the things that's drawn him to the fair. "I like the fact that we're helping kids with their projects and we're teaching them responsibility through FFA, 4-H, the home ec part of it," he said. "It gives them a chance to show off what they've accomplished with their projects."

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Enrolling this summer: Lebanon Junior Police Academy

Kids gather around a table to discuss clues to the pretend crime tehy were supposed to solve during the Junior Police Academy.

For the past eight years, officers have been teaching kids what it's like to be a member of the Lebanon Police Department Every summer, Lebanon's future police officers get a crash course into what its like to be one of Lebanon's finest. Just last summer, the Lebanon Police Department hosted the Eighth Annual

Junior Police Academy at the Mills Center. Kids ages 11-15 had fun getting detailed information about law enforcement practices and procedures.

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Officer Rodney Van Sickle has been an instructor at the Academy since its inception. “It’s a great opportunity for the kids in the community to actually see what law enforcement does instead of seeing it from the perspective of what they’ve been told,” Van Sickle said. “I think this academy is a fun way to learn about the police force in Lebanon. I have really enjoyed it,” Payton Fuller, 12, of Lebanon said. Her favorite part of the Academy was interviewing a burglary suspect prior to writing a report. Wednesday, she and the rest of the attendees practiced interviewing the victim of an X-Box One theft, played by another instructor Officer Vince Ambrose and getting the details to fill their reports with pertinent information. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


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Celebrating 15 years of connecting people with property. Officer Rodney Van Sickle Officer Jennifer Janko was on hand as well, giving good tips to the kids about all subjects. Shawn Maness, 11, enjoyed the Academy and has law enforcement plans. “I’m going to be a state trooper,” he said. The priority was on kids that had never been to the Junior Police Academy before. The week-long course covered what an officer learns in six months at a regular academy but in less depth. The topics were the same as the real academy minus gun training. The instructors taught the methodology of traffic stops, operating radar, writing reports, crime scene investigation, investigating internet crimes, DWI testing procedure and more. Guest speakers included Jarrad Jewell from the Missouri Department of Conservation, Sally Triplett from Mercy, Andy Jordan of the Lebanon City Fire Department, Don Anderson from chaplain services, and others. The instructors teach politeness, standing at attention and even marching. The kids were focused on each activity and well-behaved, according to Van Sickle. The result could be kids that go on to a career in law enforcement. All now understand what policing is all about. “The academy gives a better perspective of what police officers do in their community,” Van Sickle said. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

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Commerce Bank builds new local main branch Commerce Bank held the grand opening for its new Lebanon banking headquarters in June.

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ince our 1st Lebanon policy was issued in 1912, we have continued the same hometown service you deserve.

merce you have always known but with a more contemporary design," said Lebanon Commerce Bank President Brian Esther. The new building has 5,400 square feet of space and features an updated branch design. In addition to its full service banking center, the bank has a four-lane drive-up and an ATM. The bank has private customer consultation rooms and a technology bar with a computer work station for customers to browse products and services and access online banking. The downtown Commercial Street building was sold to the Lebanon R-3 School District whose central offices moved to the former bank building in July. However, Commerce Bank continues to offer drive thru services on the south side of the current building in a secured area. LACLEDE COUNTY’S LARGEST PLUMBING & HEATING SUPPLIER ¥ Expert Advice ¥ Quailty Products

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A Lebanon icon returns

Katie Hapner stands in front Wrinks Market holding Route 66 memorabilia that her grandfather enjoyed.

Family re-opens Wrinks Market on Route 66 It is a familiar building. Most people have noticed the white sign bearing Wrink's Market on a brick building on old Route 66. However, it hasn’t been Wrinks Market since for many years. The original owner Glen “Wrink” Wrinkle died in

2005. As his granddaughter Katie Hapner said, “The store lived as long as he did.” She has a strong connection to the store because of her grandfather and wants to see it reopen.

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“I think Wrink’s Market should be here. My grandfather loved Route 66 and all the people that came through here. That’s why he did it, and I think that’s why I want to do it. It’s for them, his customers, the people he loved so much.” She and her step-sister Sarah Carney are trying to put the store back the way it was or at least as Hapner remembers it. “It’s been a lot of long hours and taken a lot of help,” Hapner said. People that knew Wrink have either given or sold items that used to be part of the store to Hapner to help make Wrinks look like Wrinks again. She pointed to several displays some brought in by folks and others found in the basement and elsewhere. Part of the motif of the store will show Wrink’s love for Route 66. “We’ll have a bunch of Wrink’s memorabilia, and we’re having some T-shirts printed up for the Route 66 festival. We’re trying to bring it back a little bit and have fun with it,” Hapner said. The “wall of candy” and other displays provide strong memories for both her

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and Carney. Carney recalled, “We would come in after swim team when it was at the public pool. We’d come in and look at the wall of sodas and the wall of candy. My brothers Rex and Doug learned to read from reading the comics, so now it’s even more special since we’re all family. My family knew Glen before he passed and before we were family, so it’s all tradition. It’s all happy memories.” What Hapner terms a “mini-general store” will sell old-fashioned Ice cream including ice cream sandwiches, a mix of healthy and popular drinks and foods, candy and sandwiches. A deli counter continues another tradition in the front of the store. “He was famous for his bologna sandwich. We bought the same bologna he was selling back in the day, and we’re going to do the same type of sandwich on white or wheat” Hapner said. The sales rep for the meats even remembered Wrink and expedited his delivery to make Saturday’s opening with sandwiches possible. Wrink made sandwiches for Clint Eastwood, Paul Harvey and Chevy Chase. Rodney Wrinkle and his wife Cheryl Plaster Wrinkle bought the building from the Wrinkle Trust the family set up. Their daughters will run the store. The family that lives out of state doesn’t have to worry about the upkeep of the buildings and land. Glen’s wife Katie is now 88 and living in Miss. Before moving, Katie sold the things

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she wouldn’t take with her, and son Rodney purchased many of her antiques to sell in the store. Katie worked in a bank and didn’t have much to do with the store, but now her things mix with Glen’s and fill the back half of the store. Hapner discovered notes that her grandfather wrote on notebooks sprinkled around the store. One late night, Hapner came across this one: “Without faith it is impossible to please God. Learn to trust him. Exercise his gifts. Pray believingly.” Another note she found inspired her to open the store. “Keep your faith and exercise your gifts,” her grandfather wrote. She had always wondered what her gift was but noticed her passion for running a store even showed up in the garage sales she would set up like a store. Wrink loved his customers. One of his mottos found in the store said, “A traveler is not just a customer, he or she’s a friend you haven’t met yet.” Wrink was dedicated to his store and his customers. When his hips went bad, he used a shopping cart for a walker. “Everybody loved him. I didn’t realize it growing up either because I was young,” Hapner said. Hapner found it difficult to put her reason for reopening the store. “Something inside me has always wanted to do this since he passed away. Maybe it’s for all the travelers he loves so much,” she said.

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Kids take over Nelson Lake

Lebanon Parks & Rec stocks the lake each year for Kids' Fishing Day The fish at Nelson Lake dread one day each year: Kids' Fishing Day. The annual event is put on by the Parks and Recreation Department in June at Nelson Park in Lebanon. Last summer saw an exceptionally large turnout of kids, parents and grandparents.

Parks and Recreation Director John Shelton called the event a success. “This is a great event. It’s family fun. So many kids get to touch an actual fish. It’s not like going to the lake where you don’t know if you’ll catch anything or not. If you’re here early, you’re almost guaranteed to catch a

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fish,” he said. Not everyone was a fan of actually touching an actual fish. “I don’t like fish. Fish are disgusting,” said Andrea Barker. She was happy to let her dad Tim Barker have that honor while she reeled them in. Two anglers earned awards in the biggest fish competition. Serenity Aldrich caught the biggest fish of the day at 16.2 inches for the 10 and under category with Natalie Tabor winning her 11-15 category with a 13.5 inch fish. Both earned a new fishing pole for their efforts. Many of the young anglers were first-time fishermen anxious to introduce the newly stocked catfish and blue gill population to a hook and line. Some took advantage of the poles and tackle the Conservation Dept. had on hand as loaners. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


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Robert Curio and his son Tyler were first-time fishermen on Kids’ Day. They arrived late and hadn’t caught any fish before noon, but Tyler said, “It’s great and fun!” No one reported catching the one albino catfish placed in the pond Thursday. Rilei Tabor said, “Name him Ricky.” She hadn’t caught any fish and was happy about it. “I’m enjoying myself,” she said. Sheldon commented, “Moms and dads and grandparents are out with their kids outside enjoying the weather and learning a hobby they can take with them their whole life. A lot of the Lebanon economy comes from fishing, so why not teach our own kids to fish and help those industries in town.” Pam Jordan said, “We just came out to have fun and bring the grandchildren out. Some of them have never been fishing.” Her granddaughter Brooklyn Lamontagne said, “We come every year. It is fun.” Shelton said 17 prizes were awarded along with 150 Tshirts and 150 goodie cups. Arvest Bank gave out 300 hot dogs with soda and water. Kids took a fishing timeout to have races in the bounce house as well as do a lot of bouncing. Since it’s catch and release there, every day can be Kids Fishing Day at Nelson Lake.

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Still bringing joy to Lebanon after 60 years Taylor's Dairy Joy may have new owners but it still serves up the same great food Taylor’s Dairy Joy, has new owners, but the iconic Lebanon restaurant will continue to serve up the burgers, fries and milkshakes it’s always been known for. Ryan and Jodie Ritchel on April 15 tookover a business that has been in operation since the 1950s and began on Route 66. The restaurant has been through a few changes in location and ownership but continues to be known for its chicken baskets, frito pies, ice cream and other dairy treats.

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The Ritchels say they plan to keep serving the food people have liked for more than 60 years. “Taylor’s has been a Lebanon tradition for years and years,” Mr. Ritchel said. “And one of the things about Taylor’s is that the food hasn’t changed much over the years. We’ll continue to serve crinkle fries, the burgers will stay the same, as will the chicken baskets. We’re interested in maintaining the Taylor’s Dairy Joy tradition.” Ritchel said they are aware that the business is part of the area’s history. “It actually started on Route 66 before I-44 was ever here,” Mr. Ritchel said. The original owners, Kenneth and Mary Lou Alexander, operated the Dairy Joy on Route 66 between Conway and Phillipsburg. “When the interstate came through and that section of Route 66 was abandoned, the original owners made the decision to move it to Lebanon so they moved it to 101 Springfield Road, it was there for years,” Mr. Ritchel said. Over the next 60 years, the business went through five sets of owners before the Ritchels bought it. The Dairy Joy in Lebanon opened in June of 1957. In May of 1964, the Alexanders sold

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the restaurant to Gene and Irene Durbin, who operated it as Durbin’s Dairy Joy. In 1972 it was purchased by Paul and Marolyn Taylor, who renamed the business Taylor’s Dairy Joy. The Taylors’ daughter, April McDaniel and her husband, Mike McDaniel took over in the 1990s. In May 2007, Sandra Peppers and her husband Cecil purchased Taylor’s Dairy Joy. “I’m told it’s the longest-running eating establishment in the area,” Mr. Ritchel said. Mr. Ritchel said their purchase of the res-

taurant came about because they were looking for an opportunity to open an ice cream business. We’d been ice cream connoisseurs f o rever. When we heard Taylor ’s might be for sale, we thought why not get something that’s already up and running instead of a startup,” he said. “It’s a Lebanon tradition, tied to Route 66, all the history, the more we looked at it, the more we fell in love with the notion.” The Ritchels formerly had a farm in northwest Missouri and moved to Lebanon about 12 years ago. When looking for a new home, he said they looked all over southern Missouri and noticed on their map, they drawn a circle around Lebanon. “We came down here to Lebanon, we drove into the town and just looked at each other and grinned, because it felt like home,” Mr. Ritchel said. Now they are continuing a business that is a local tradition. “When Jodie and I were talking about taking over the business, we understand that this is a Lebanon tradition,” he said. “That was part of the appeal for us. People were asking, what are you going to change, well for the near term we don’t plan on changing much of anything, we’re leaving the menu as it is.”

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2 1 9 W. S eco nd St . • 532- 2228

•Sunday Morning Coffee, Doughnuts, Fellowship ..................................10:00 ish •Sunday Morning Worship ...............................10:30 am •Wednesday Night Bible Study..........................6:30 pm •Youth Services ...............................................6:30 pm •Children’s Services .........................................6:30 pm •Monthly Family Fun Night, First Sunday Night ...............................5:30 pm

The DC Comics' hero the Flash is known for being the fastest man alive, quickly saving the innocent and bringing the guilty to justice, but for local comic shop owner Loren "Doc" Smith II, the scarlet speedster is a hero for a different reason. Tales of the Flash's adventures did what several years of elementary school couldn't, they piqued his interest and helped him learn how to read. A fourth grade teacher in his Ohio hometown let him read comic books as a way to improve his reading skills. "If there was a word I couldn't read, I could look it up or figure out the story and keep track of what was going on because of the pictures," Smith said. Several years and thousands of comics later, Smith can't stop reading, and his wife, Misty Smith, said they want to share that passion with the youth of Lebanon. "We thought if we could be around kids and help them have something interesting to read, maybe that would inspire them to become better readers," Misty Smith said. Loren Smith went on to become the first person in his family to go to college and get a masters degree. He attributes the start of his success in learning to read from comic books. "Now I'm selling comics, so it's kind of gone full circle," Loren Smith said. Last summer (at the urging of Misty, who was getting slightly worried about the ever increasing number of comics piling up in their home), Loren Smith took a few boxes of his comics to Raven's Loft, another local shop that deals in everything from collectible card games to action figures, and sold them under consignment. Eventually, the Smiths started selling new comic books at Raven's Loft, and as business grew, they decided to strike out on their own. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


In October 2014, the Smiths opened up Freedom Comics on North Jefferson Avenue just a short distance from the Lebanon High School. In 2016, the business outgrew its location on North Jefferson Avenue and moved to its current, bigger location at 735 S. Jefferson Ave. in the King Cash Saver shopping center. The store is a true family business with Loren, Misty, who put her real estate career on hold for the new business, and their children (Loren III, Sampson, Rachel and Joshua) pitching in to help when they can. "Our kids are another reason we got started. They're all into the card games and they're teenagers and wanted somewhere to go and something to do," Misty Smith said. Like the heroes in the books they sell, Loren Smith, who is affectionately known as Doc by his customers, has an alter ego by day. Loren Smith is a physician's assistant. The name Freedom Comics comes from Loren Smith's patriotism, which is not only evident from the name but also the American flags that are prominently displayed outside the store. Prior to his work in the private medical industry, Loren Smith was a medic in the Army National Guard and Army, where he served a total of six and a half years. "I love my country," Loren Smith said. His wife added that the store gives out military discounts. It had been several years since Lebanon has had a dedicated comic shop, as the industry went through some hard times between the 90s and early 2000s. Loren Smith believes that with the resurgence of superhero culture, largely due to the plethora of popular superhero TV shows and blockbuster movies, comic books are back on an uptick. "It's hard to find a comic shop now, but with all the recent Marvel and DC movies, I knew there would be a demand for it now. It also kind of died out because people started reading comics digitally on their phone or Nook or whatever, but I knew that people would eventually want to hold comics again," Loren Smith said. Freedom Comics has been recognized as one of the top 3,000 dealers in the country by Diamond Comic Distributors, which provides comics and collectibles to retailers across the country. Because of the status, Freedom Comics gets access to special collectible variant covers of current issues, which often are worth quite a bit more than the regular issue. The variants have attracted customers from all over the state, the Smiths said. Freedom Comics provides a subscriber OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-2018

service for its customers. People who don't want to miss the next issue of their favorite book can become a subscriber, which along with ensuring they get the book also guarantees that they get a discount. The owners of Freedom Comics also go out of their way to find the hard-to-get collectibles that their customers want. While setting up shop at comic book conventions around the region, the Smiths have been able to capture the elusive key books for customers' collections or nabbing an autograph for an avid fan. Although comics are in the title, the books aren't the only things that the store offers to its customers. Freedom Comics also has a wide range of collectibles from statues to action figures. It also carries the latest in collectible card games and Dungeons and Dragons. While Loren's wife didn't know anything about comics when the two got together, Misty has completely immersed herself in the culture. She's even started

delving into her own creative side, creating a large variety of gaming-themed jewelry, including earrings that feature roleplaying game dice. The store has become something of a gathering spot for lovers of nerdy gaming. The Smiths have hosted Dungeons and Dragons games and playing card tournaments. They also keep a stock of all the necessary food to keep those gamers going. "We even have the nerdy gaming food," Misty Smith said. The Smiths invite all comic book lovers to come out to the store on Wednesdays, which may be hump day to most people but for a select few is known as New Comic Book Day. For those who may be new to the genre but are curious about comic books, the Smiths recommend coming to the store on Free Comic Book Day in May. On that day, which is part of a national campaign to get people interested in comics, comic book companies offer free issues of some of their hot and upcoming books.

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PAGE 75


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2017 Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce

Membership Listing

417 SATELLITE (417) 943-4070 A2Z EXTERMINATING, LLC (573) 336-4448 ACCESS HOME HEALTH (417) 532-3719 ADELMAN TRAVEL (417) 532-8282 ADVANCED DENTAL (417) 588-2221 AFFORDABLE FAMILY DENTISTRY (417) 588-1690 AIRBLAST INFLATABLES (417) 664-2302 AL SAMONS MOBILE HOME SALES (417) 532-2125 AL’S DRIVE THRU LIQUOR (417) 532-4712 ALDI INC. ALL AMERICAN WASTE (417) 532-1600 ALLEN & RECTOR, P.C. (417) 532-8300 ALPHAMEDIA (417) 532-9111 ALVIN JACKSON’S USED CARS (417) 532-2186 AMERICA’S CARMART (417) 532-2831 AMERICAN RED CROSS (417) 533-8121 AMERICAS BEST VALUE INN (417) 532-3133 ANDY’S 417 (417) 533-5801 ANYTIME FITNESS (417) 991-2525 ARIS HOME INSPECTIONS (417) 533-1399 ARMSTRONG CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION (417) 588-0598 ARVEST BANK (417) 533-3886 BACK TO HEALTH CHIROPRACTIC (417) 532-2986 BACK TO LIFE LASER PAIN CENTER (573) 693-1375 BANK OF KANSAS CITY (417) 657-0202 BAYS CHIROPRACTIC (417) 532-6251 BEAR TRAILER MFG, INC. (417) 286-3300 BENNETT SPRING CAMPGROUND (417) 322-4175 BENNETT SPRING HOMESTEAD MOTEL (417) 588-3038 BENNETT SPRING INN (417) 588-9110 BENNETT SPRING STATE PARK (417) 532-4307 BENTON & ASSOCIATES, INC (417) 531-0274 BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU (417) 862-4222 BEVERLY MILLER BLAKE, TIM AND DAWN BNC NATIONAL BANK (417) 532-2635 BOAT TOWN BREWING (417) 533-2306 BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA (417) 883-1636 BRAND LAW FIRM, PC (417) 991-3550 BRISTOL CARE INC (THE ESSEX) (660) 287-4536 BUCKLES BOBBINS AND BOLTS LLC (417)650-5043 BULLFROGS & LITTLE FISHES PRESCHOOL (417) 588-2131 BUTLER SUPPLY (417) 533-3131 C & C FARM AND HOME (417) 532-7158 CACKLE HATCHERY (417) 532-4581 CAMBARLOC ENGINEERING & MANUFACTURING (417) 532-4601 CARMECO, INC. (417) 532-6133 CASEY’S GENERAL STORE #1083 (417) 588-3994 CASTLEWOOD STUDIOS (417) 532-2329

CELL PHONE SAVERS (417) 533-3000 CENTURY 21 LACLEDE REALTY (417) 588-1200 CENTURYLINK (515) 286-5207 CHEN’S CHINESE SUPER BUFFET & HIBACHI (417) 991-3777 CHOICES IN HEALTH & LIFE (417) 532-3360 CITY OF LEBANON (417) 532-2156 CLEMENT TRUCK DRIVING ACADEMY, LLC (417) 589-2351 CLIFTON’S WESTSIDE CAFE (417) 532-7742 COLE-N-SONS TIRE & AUTO, INC. (417) 588-4468 COMMERCE BANK, N.A. (417) 532-2161 COMMUNITY BAPTIST (417) 532-8421 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC. (417) 588-9562 CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING SERVICE (417) 881-7966 COPE (417) 533-5201 COUNTRY GUNS & PAWN (417) 532-0640 COVER & HILTON LAW, LLC (417) 588-0104 COX HEALTH CENTER (417) 532-8700 CRICKET WIRELESS (713) 304-0687 CROCKER CHIROPRACTIC LLC (417) 532-9166 CROSS CREEK CHURCH (417) 650-0647 CROSSLINES MINISTRY, INC. (417) 588-3559 CROW PAINT & GLASS INC. (417) 532-3551 CVA PHOTO (417) 322-4186 D & A SALES (417) 532-8615 DAVID LAYMAN INSURANCE GROUP (417) 533-5444 DAVID MILLSAP DAVINCI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT (417) 991-2499 DENNY’S (417) 991-3300 DICKEY’S BBQ (417) 532-4227 DIGITAL SILVER (417) 533-5172 DOMINO’S (417) 588-7070 DOWCO, INC (417) 532-4219 DOWD’S CATFISH & BBQ (417) 532-1777 DOWNTOWN LEBANON OPTIMIST CLUB (417) 588-2219 DOWNTOWN TREASURES (417) 718-8223 DRURY UNIVERSITY (417) 532-9828 DT ENGINEERING (417) 532-2141 EDWARD JONES-FINANCIAL ADVISOR: JEFFREY MYERS - (417) 532-2687 EDWARD JONES-FINANCIAL ADVISOR: JIM KUENY - (417) 588-2286 ELECTRONIC SOLUTIONS (417) 588-9228 ELM STREET EATERY (417) 588-2700 EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC (417) 588-8600 EXPRESS STOP STORES (417) 532-8112 EZ-DISPOSAL (417) 533-7870 FACTORY CONNECTION (417) 532-2454 FALCON FLOOR COVERING (417) 532-3118 FAMILY BUSINESS SERVICES 1-800-275-6008 FAMILY EYECARE ASSOCIATES (417) 532-2562

FARMERS INSURANCE/HAYLEY SMITH AGENCY (417) 533-3001 FCS FINANCIAL (417) 588-5828 FERRELLGAS (417) 588-2843 FFO HOME (417) 532-8896 FIDELITY COMMUNICATIONS (417) 588-7841 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH (417) 532-7168 FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST - (417) 532-4225 FIRST STATE COMMUNITY BANK (417) 532-2151 FIRST UNITED METHODIST (417) 532-7153 FORT LEONARD WOOD FAMILY COMMUNITIES (573) 329-0122 FORT LEONARD WOOD TRANSITION SERVICES (573) 596-0131 FORT WOOD HOTELS BY EHRHARDT PROPERTIES (573) 451-3203 FORUM DENTAL (417)532-7166 FREEDOM HOME CRAFTERS (417) 532-7768 FRIENDLY FIREARMS (417) 588-9280 G-3 BOATS / SKEETER PRODUCTS (417) 588-9787 GALLERIA FINE JEWELRY (417) 532-9766 GARNER & SMITH INSURANCE (417) 532-9491 GARY’S FIREWORKS (417) 588-7300 GENESIS PURE (417) 718-1422 GET ER DUN JON’S (417) 533-3569 GIRL SCOUTS OF THE MISSOURI HEARTLAND,INC. 1-877-312-4764 X1106 GLEN CUMMINS GOFORTH EXPRESS L.L.C. (417) 532-9773 GRAVEL BAR AND GRILL (417) 532-7291 GRAVEN CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM (417) 532-3157 GRAY’S TAXI & COURIER SERVICES (417) 991-3833 GREAT CIRCLE (417) 350-4435 GREAT LIFE GOLF & FITNESS (417) 532-2901 GREAT SOUTHERN BANK (417) 532-9168 GREAT WALL (417) 588-9907 GUARDIANS OF THE CHILDREN (GOC) (417) 241-8254 H & R BLOCK (417) 532-4113 H.E.P. SUPPLY CO., INC. (417) 532-9183 HAIRY’S SALON (417) 588-9588 HAMPTON INN (417) 533-3100 HAPPY TRAILS RV CENTER (417) 533-7530 HAPPY TRAILS RV PARK, LLC (417) 532-3422 HASH, BILL HATZCO INDUSTRIES (877) 879-4289 HELTON’S HOME FURNISHINGS (417) 532-7888 HERITAGE BANK OF THE OZARKS (417) 532-2265 HICKS CONSTRUCTION CO. INC. (417) 473-6242 HIDDEN VALLEY OUTFITTERS (417)533-5628 HILLS OF THUNDER PISTOL TRAINING (417) 650-7069 HOGAN LAND TITLE CO. OF LACLEDE COUNTY (417) 532-5333 HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS (417) 532-1111 HOLMAN-HOWE FUNERAL HOME (417) 532-4061 HOMETOWN PHARMACY (417) 532-9110

HOSPICE COMPASSUS (417) 532-0372 HUGHES SR CENTER (417) 532-3040 I-44 SPEEDWAY (417) 532-2728 IMPACT DIRECTORIES (314) 336-3090 INDEPENDENT STAVE COMPANY (417) 588-4151 INFUZE CREDIT UNION (417) 533-5368 INTEGRITY HOME CARE & HOSPICE (417) 991-2882 IVEY ROOFING, INC. (417) 532-6612 JACKSON BROTHERS OF THE SOUTH, LLC (417) 209-9900 JACOBSEN APPLIANCES, INC (417) 532-7152 JAMMIE LITTY JARED ENTERPRISES (417) 877-7900 JEFFRIES ABSTRACT & TITLE INSURANCE (417) 532-7189 JOE’S PHARMACY INC (417) 532-7128 JOHN’S TECH SHOP (417) 345-7379 JON M KRAUSE DDS (417) 588-2562 JONES AUTO & TRUCK PLAZA (417) 588-2282 JONESY’S ANTIQUES (417) 532-2006 JORDAN VALLEY COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER (417) 334-8337 JOSHUA DEATHERAGE BUILDERS (417) 948-1205 JUNE & BEYOND BOUTIQUE (417) 532-7467 JUSTICE FURNITURE (417) 532-6136 KAREN GUINN24609 GRINDSTONE RD. KCI CONSTRUCTION COMPANY (417) 588-9200 KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN (417) 532-7300 KIWANIS CLUB OF LEBANON (417) 588-9228 KMST (573) 341-6930 KTTK - NEW HORIZONS BROADCASTING (417) 588-1435 LAR C (417) 588-1577 L-LIFE FOOD BANK (417)991-FOOD (3663) LACLEDE COUNTY FAIR (417) 718-2774 LACLEDE COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER (417) 532-5471 LACLEDE COUNTY HEALTH DEPT. (417) 532-2134 LACLEDE COUNTY LAND TITLE (417) 588-0155 LACLEDE COUNTY LANDLORDS’ ASSN (417) 532-4035 LACLEDE COUNTY PREGNANCY SUPPORT CENTER (417) 532-8555 LACLEDE COUNTY REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMITTEE (417) 532-5783 LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE (417) 532-3164 LACLEDE INDUSTRIES (417) 588-3241 LACLEDE LITERACY COUNCIL (417) 532-6697 LACLEDE MUTUAL INSURANCE (417) 588-1857 LACLEDE WINNELSON (417)532-0456 LAKE PRINTING (573) 346-0600 LEBANON AREA FOUNDATION (417) 532-8868 LEBANON BOARD OF REALTORS (417) 588-9777 LEBANON BOOKS (417) 532-2500 LEBANON CONCERT ASSOCIATION (417) 588-3574 LEBANON EDUCATION FOUNDATION (417) 531-0274


2017 Membership Listing Continued... LEBANON FAMILY CHURCH (417) 533-3655 LEBANON FAMILY YMCA (417) 588-1177 LEBANON GOSPEL MUSIC GET-TOGETHER (417) 236-9090 LEBANON HOST LION’S CLUB (417) 532-6502 LEBANON HUMANE SOCIETY (417) 532-9671 LEBANON PHONE CENTER & ALARM INC (417) 532-9819 LEBANON PROPERTIES I, II AND III (417) 588-4005 LEBANON PUBLISHING COMPANY (417) 532-9131 LEBANON PUMP SERVICE (417) 589-2023 LEBANON R-III SCHOOLS (417) 532-9141 LEBANON READY MIX (417) 532-6179 LEBANON REDI (417) 533-5627 LEBANON RITZ 8 THEATRE (417) 588-9724 LEBANON SENIOR APARTMENTS (417) 883-7887 LEBANON SOCCER ASSOCIATION (417) 718-8191 LEBANON SOUTH NURSING & REHAB (417) 532-5351 LEBANON SUNDANCE APARTMENTS (417) 533-7604 LEBANON-LACLEDE COUNTY LIBRARY (417) 532-2148 LEBANON/BENNETT SPRING KOA (417) 533-2616 LIFEPOINT CHURCH (417) 991-2911 LINDSAY CHEVROLET (417) 532-3114 LINDSAY FORD (417) 532-3146 LINK FAMILY MUSIC (417) 718-3606 LOWE BOATS (417) 532-9101 LOWE’S HOME IMPROVEMENT (417) 588-6970 LSK LEBANON (417) 588-3550 MARTIN’S DISCOUNT CIGARETTES, LLC (417) 531-0999 MARY KAY BEAUTY CONSULTANT, SAM STONER (417) 588-2390 MATTAX, NEU, PRATER EYE CENTER (417) 588-2400 MCDONALD’S LEBANON II (417) 532-3653 MCDONALDS OF LEBANON (417) 532-6144 MEEK’S BUILDING CENTER (417) 588-3223 MEMORIAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORY (573) 774-6111 MERCY CLINIC - EYE SPECIALIST (417) 533-6540 MERCY FAMILY PHARMACY (417) 533-6770 MERCY HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE (417) 830-4063 MERCY HOSPITAL LEBANON (417) 533-6100 METAL PLUS CONSTRUCTION, LLC (573) 247-2629 METALTECH PRODUCTS, INC (417) 426-5577 MID-MISSOURI BANK (417) 588-1000 MID-MISSOURI INSURANCE (417) 532-5800 MID-MISSOURI RESPONSIBLE BREEDERS (417) 718-4182 MIDWEST BASEMENT TECH (573) 693-9448 MIDWEST COLLISION CENTER (417) 991-3348 MIGHTY OAK LODGE (417) 288-9258 MIKE LIGHT INSURANCE AGENCY (417) 588-5123 MISSOURI BEHAVIORAL HEALTH COUNSELING ASSOCIATES (417) 588-5885 MISSOURI CAREER CENTER (417) 532-6146 MISSOURI CHEESE OUTLET (417) 991-2844 MISSOURI EAGLE (417) 532-6157

MISSOURI ENTERPRISE BUSINESS ASSISTANCE (573) 364-8570 MISSOURI OZARKS COMMUNITY ACTION (573) 765-3263 MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY - LEBANON (417) 532-0518 MOFWB MISSIONS (417) 532-6537 MONEY CONCEPTS (417) 344-0044 MORAN, JUANITA ENGLAND MORGAN MUSIC (417) 588-1970 MRS. OLIVER’S WEDDINGS (417) 844-2166 MUNGER MOSS MOTEL (417) 532-3111 MURRELL FARM SUPPLY (417) 588-3276 NATIONAL TV SALES AND RENTAL (417)588-2236 NATURE’S PANTRY (417) 533-3608 NEW AMERICAN FUNDING (573) 512-0708 NIANGUA RIVER OASIS (417) 532-6333 NOBLE HUDSON & SONS (417) 532-3921 NORTHRIDGE PLACE (417) 532-9793 OATS, INC. 1-800-269-6287 ON POINT DESIGN (417) 588-7254 ORCHARD HILLS PACKAGE STORE (417) 532-4941 OSAGIAN CANOE (417) 532-7288 OTC LEBANON CENTER (417) 532-5044 OWEN SANDBLASTING (417) 588-1338 OXFORD HEALTHCARE (417) 818-0108 OZARK HARLEY DAVIDSON (417) 532-2900 OZARK MEDIA (573) 336-7620 OZARK VISIONS/OZARK HAUNTED HOUSE (417) 532-1002 OZARKS COCA-COLA/DR. PEPPER (417) 532-7131 OZARKS FARM & NEIGHBOR, INC OZARKS SPORTING GOODS INC (417) 532-4862 PAGE OFFICE SUPPLY (417) 532-4012 PAGE PRINTING (417) 532-6232 PAUL DAVIS RESTORATION (417) 588-5880 PEGGY LOGAN AND ASSOCIATES REALTY (417) 532-7737 PENMAC PERSONEL SERVICES (417) 588-8990 PERSONAL FINANCE COMPANY (417) 991-3077 PETSENSE PIERCED (417) 532-4446 PILLAR INSURANCE, LLC. (417) 532-6050 PIT LANE SUPER LUBE (417) 532-1949 POLK CITY DIRECTORY (417) 882-3948 PRECISION CUTTER & TOOL (417) 532-7729 PREMIER AUTO REBUILDERS & TRUCK SALVAGE (417)532-5555 PRICE CUTTER (417) 532-7724 PROJECT 360 YOUTH SERVICES (417) 532-3360 PURE AIR UNLIMITED (417) 719-4274 QUALITY HEATING & AIR (417) 532-6239 R.P. LUMBER (417) 532-7155 RANDALL SUTTER, ATTY. AT LAW (417) 532-6123 RE/MAX NEXT GENERATION, LLC (417) 991-3333 REAL LIVING A HELPER REAL ESTATE (417) 533-3571 REALTY EXECUTIVES OF LEBANON (417) 588-5706 RED CARPET CLEANING, INC. (417) 322-6338

REGIONAL HOSPICE (417) 532-5139 RELAY FOR LIFE OF LACLEDE COUNTY (417) 447-1486 REPUBLIC SERVICES OF OSAGE BEACH (573) 346-3637 RESULTS ADVERTISING (417) 533-7741 RESULTS RADIO / KZNN, KTTR, KXMO, KDAA (573) 364-2525 RIVERFRONT CAMPGROUND & CANOE RENTALS (417) 588-3386 ROBERT S. SHOTTS, INC. (417) 588-7877 ROBERT W. PLASTER FOUNDATION (417) 533-3007 ROGERS AUTO WRECKING SALVAGES, INC (417) 532-3731 ROLLING HILLS JERKY OUTLET (417) 588-9613 RUSSELL STOVER CHOCOLATES (417) 588-1411 S.C.A.N. SUPPORTERS OF CHILDREN WITH ADDITIONAL NEEDS, INC (417) 991-2029 S.C.O.R.E. (573) 346-5441 SAKELARIS BUICK GMC CADILLAC (417) 532-3121 SAND SPRING RESORT (417) 532-5857 SAWYER TIRE INC (417) 991-3590 SCENTSY CANDLES (417) 839-5850 SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS (573) 528-6358 SENATOR MIKE PARSON (573) 751-8793 SHADEL’S COLONIAL CHAPEL (417) 532-6161 SHATTERED IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY (417) 588-1825 SHELTER INSURANCE AGENCY KIMBERLY BREEDEN (417) 532-4329 SHELTER INSURANCE AGENCY - RALPH PITTS (417) 532-6106 SHEPHERD HILLS FACTORY OUTLET (417) 532-7000 SHERRY SHAMEL (417) 588-0729 SHOE SENSATION #618 (417) 532-1131 SHOW ME CLEAN CARWASH AND DOGWASH (417) 718-1482 SKATE CORRAL (417) 322-1451 SLIM CHICKENS (417) 991-2552 SONIC (417) 532-6330 SOUNDLIFE HEARING TECHNOLOGIES (417) 753-2971 SPECTACULAR PRODUCTIONS (417) 288-8548 SPECTRUM DESIGNS (417) 718-1933 STAN O’DANIEL/NWTF (417) 217-0560 STARLITE LANES, LLC (417) 532-4262 STATE FARM INSURANCE - FRED HYNES (417) 588-2777 STATE FARM INSURANCE - SCOTT CHASE (417) 588-1555 STATE REPRESENTATIVE DIANE FRANKLIN (573) 216-2359 STATE REPRESENTATIVE SANDY CRAWFORD (417) 345-2958 STEVE JACKSON STOWE, LYNN STRYKER ORTHODONTICS (417) 532-9532 STUDIO C PRODUCTIONS (417) 741-2218 STURDEVANT ACRES BED & BREAKFAST (417) 588-3112 SUMMIT NATURAL GAS SUPER 8 MOTEL (417) 588-2574 SUTHERLANDS LUMBER COMPANY (417) 588-8900 T H ROGERS LUMBER COMPANY (417) 532-9181 T’S REDNECK STEAKHOUSE (417) 532-3519 TERRA VETERINARY SERVICE (417) 532-9147 THE DOGGIE SALON (417) 532-9977

THE DURHAM COMPANY (417) 532-7121 THE FLIRTY FROG, LLC (417) 650-6278 THE GYM 24/7 (417) 991-2066 THE MALL (417) 532-2643 THE MASON JAR (417) 532-0957 THE MEBRUER LAW FIRM (417) 532-3177 THE PARLOR SALON (417) 588-4217 THE REAL ESTATE COMPANY (417) 588-1110 THE REAL MCCOY CAFE (417) 288-2620 THE SALVATION ARMY (417) 532-5135 THE TIMBERS APARTMENTS-BRYAN PROPERTIES (417) 864-6303 THE UPS STORE (417) 532-7355 TIMBER CREEK ESTATES (417) 533-1129 TITAN PROPANE (417) 532-2121 TOTAL HIGHSPEED INTERNET SERVICES (417) 851-1107 TRANSWORLD BUSINESS ADVISORS OF MISSOURI (417) 322-6460 TREETOPS ADVERTISING (660) 221-7745 TRI-COUNTY CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING (573) 368-5933 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH (417) 532-3433 TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (417) 532-2717 TRIUMPH ENGRAVING SHOPPE (417) 533-7661 TRUE CONSTRUCTION (417) 588-3235 TRUELOVE QUARTET (417) 664-2161 ULTIMATE CHALLENGE PRODUCTION (870) 224-5774 UNITED INSURORS (417) 588-4121 UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI EXTENSION CENTER (417) 532-7126 US BANK (417) 588-4111 US CELLULAR (417) 588-2822 USO OF MISSOURI, INC. FORT LEONARD WOOD USO - (573) 329-2039 VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS POST 4107 (417) 260-2593 VF OUTLET (417) 588-4142 VIC OR SYBL SLAUGHTER (417) 532-9691 VIDEO DIRECT SATELLITE & ENTERTAINMENT (866) 680-8433 VIDIE’S CATERING (417) 588-5452 W.T. VERNON HOUSING CORP. (417) 532-9733 WAL-MART STORE #14 (417) 588-2268 WALL CONSTRUCTION (417) 532-3679 WALTERS, STAEDTLER & ALLEN CPA’S (417) 532-5941 WATERMAN & ASSOCIATES, LLC (417) 532-7135 WCA WASTE CORPORATION OF MISSOURI INC. (417) 426-5004 WEAVER AUTO SALES (417) 532-3550 WENDY’S (417) 588-2992 WHIRLWIND RANCH (417) 533-5280 WHITEHILL ENTERPRISES (417) 483-0566 WILL BRADLEY WILLARD ASPHALT PAVING, INC. (417) 532-7107 WILLARD QUARRIES (417) 532-7107 WISEMAN SERVICES, INC. (417) 533-5328 WORLD FINANCE CORP (417) 532-9660 X MIND DESIGNS & CATERING (417) 268-9652 YESTERDAY’S CLASSICS (417) 991-3348


Santa Claus visits Lebanon Around the third week of November each year, Lebanon kicks off its holiday season on a Saturday morning by shutting down downtown. Thousands of residents of the city and the surrounding area line both sides of West Elm Street and North Jefferson Avenue as 100-plus floats and other participants roll by. “The Lebanon Christmas Parade is one of the largest continuous parades in southwest Missouri and potentially probably all Missouri,” says Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce Director Darrell Pollock. “We have it right before Thanksgiving, too, so you get to be able to be in the holiday spirit for Thanksgiving with your family, and then we go right into the Christmas time, and it’s just a great time to just get out and just enjoy that,” Pollock said. The parade route begins at Boswell Park and continues east on Elm Street before turning north on Jefferson Avenue and eventually ending at Sixth Street.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2017-18


Committed Committed to toLebanon. Lebanon.

Committed Committed to You.

First State Community Bank aims to help every customer reach their specific financial goals. Whether you’re starting your child’s first savings account or are expanding your business, we’re here to help with all the products and services you need. Plus, we are local people who care about our community and its future. That’s why we have a genuine passion for Laclede County. Welcome to Lebanon! Remember, that when it comes to your finances, success starts here.

Success Starts Here. Lebanon | Conway Main Bank Downtown: 101 West Commercial Street North Lebanon: 950 Lynn Street South Lebanon: 1419 South Jefferson Avenue

Inside Wal-Mart: 1800 South Jefferson Avenue Conway, Missouri: 602 West Jefferson Avenue Additional ATM Available in Lebanon: Show-Me Plaza on West Elm

(417) 532-2151 fscb.com

Welcome to Lebanon 2017-2018  
Welcome to Lebanon 2017-2018  

Visitors Guide to the City of Lebanon and Laclede County, Missouri