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Neil Twenter retires Page 38

Lebanon schools Page 44

Cowan Civic Center Page 59

Official welcome!

Lebanon-Laclede County Library

A little wild

Mayor Josh Ray writes about why he loves Lebanon and why you will too. ........................................PAGE 4

There are about 100,000 reasons to visit the local library. ......................................... Page 18

Hunting, fishing and photography opportunities abound in the area. ......................................... Page 66

'Life-changing chicken'

New gospel sing

Christmas parade

Lebanon welcomes a new restaurant, Slim Chickens, to town. ......................................... Page 11

Organizers are launching a new gospel sing event at the Cowan Civic Center. ......................................... Page 31

The town shuts down for the annual parade to kick off the holiday season. ......................................... Page 73

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

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New City Council members swear in at City Hall.

Welcome to our town! Welcome to Lebanon, Missouri! We are a growing community, focused on growth and community engagement. Lebanon has a rich history, stretching back to before American/European settlers entered the area. We are proud of this history, and continually look forward to what the future holds. Even before it existed as a town, Lebanon and the surrounding area’s travelers used a worn trail, beginning with the Wyota and Osage Indians. During the Civil War, this trail became the "Wire Road” due to the installation of telegraph lines along the trail between St. Louis and Springfield. In the late 1920s, it became the world famous Route 66. Today, the trail lives on as Interstate 44. Lebanon has consistently been a major stop along this trail. Lebanon is a fantastic mix of culture, industry, service, history and progress. We are one of the lowest cost of living areas in the United States, yet we have a fine modern hospital, a top-of-the-line community college in Ozark Technical Community College (plus satellites for Drury University and Missouri State University) and a budding small business and retail scene. Our entertainment and leisure options continue to grow, with a movie theater next door to our top-notch library and Route 66 museum. There are a handful PAGE 4

of hobby/game shops, outdoor activities such as town celebrations in the summer, Christmas in the Park in the winter, and a great fishing/hiking spot a few short miles down the road in Bennett Spring. Mayor Josh Ray Our school system continues to modernize, plus there are numerous private schools in town to help students achieve their goals. I would be remiss if I didn’t point out the multitude of religious and non-profit organizations in town, too. Lebanon has a citizenry that endeavors to serve! As the youngest elected mayor in our town’s history, I am a testament to the forward progress of our community. We endeavor to retain our best and brightest, attract ambitious individuals and families, encourage and motivate our citizens, and engage our community. Our town is your town, should you choose to stay or visit. I look forward to serving you.

City Hall 401 S. Jefferson Ave. Lebanon MO 65536 Ph: (417) 532-2156 Fx: (417) 532-8388 Office Hours Monday - Tuesday 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. or by appointment City Hall Hours Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

— Mayor Josh Ray mayor@lebanonmo.org OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


A great place to do business The Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce is happy to welcome you to Lebanon and Laclede County. While visiting, prepare for a host of things to do from antique shops to antique malls, dining, downtown shopping, retail stores and The Mall. If you’re looking to get your kicks on Route 66, stop by the Route 66 Museum and Research Center for a trip through yesteryear. How about a walk in the

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

park? Bennett Spring State Park; scenic, beautiful and a stocked trout stream await you at one of Missouri’s oldest and favorite state parks. We have an abundance of reasons for you to spend time in the area. Of course, Lebanon and Laclede County is also a great place to live, work and do business. Whether you are new to the area, visiting or are looking to start a business here, call the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce and let us assist you.

Contact us toll free at 1-888588-5710 or on the web at www. lebanonmissouri.com. Our office is located at 186 North Adams Ave., if you should choose to stop by. Whatever you do, we are sure you will agree with what people all over the Midwest say about Lebanon: “Friendly People, Friendly Place.”

— Darrell Pollock Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce Director

Chamber Director Darrell Pollock

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Lebanon Technology and Career Center (LTCC) Director Keith Davis (right) presents Brian Thompson, president and chief executive officer of Lebanon Regional Economic Development Inc. (LebanonREDI), with a “distinguished service award” for the organization’s continued support of LTCC programs. Lebanon-REDI contributed $650 in funding to LTCC to help the center provide the National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) testing to 17-year-old students again in 2016.

REDI for growth! Lebanon-REDI handles economic development for Lebanon and Laclede County

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'More than ever before, the economic development process requires everyone playing their important role.' comes to working together to make progress. “A simple trip around the community today versus the same time a year or 18 months ago will show the signs of growth,” he said. “Eyesores are gone. In some cases, new vibrant establishments are in their place. We have several new retail outlets that weren’t here as recently as 12-18 months ago. “We’ve also seen several of our industries expand, adding to their physical footprint here as well as to payroll,” he added. “And companies continue to strongly look at Lebanon and Laclede County as a strong market for their future endeavors. These are all positive indicators for our economy.” Laclede County has especially seen a turnaround in employment factors. The county’s unemployment rate has

reached its lowest monthly levels since 2007-08 and its labor force is its largest since 2009. “We have jobs and those positions are getting filled,” said Thompson. “But again, we can’t rest and think all is going to be well forever. We must continue working together to make sure that we are preparing our next generation.” Thompson praised efforts of local educators from secondary and post-secondary school districts throughout the county for working hard to help students be college and career ready. “Our schools are working hard to find ways to better educate our youth,” said Thompson. “There is no super easy solution, but we have hard working instructors and administrators at all levels constantly looking at new programs to help build our workforce for today and beyond.”

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public-private par tnership formed to help Lebanon and Laclede County prosper, Lebanon Regional Economic Development, Inc. (Lebanon-REDI) has served as a key partner in the economic development process since its inception. Originally named America’s Heartland Economic Partnership in 2004, the entity became Lebanon-REDI in 2010 with a mission “to strengthen the Laclede County economic base and increase the standard of living of all residents through retention, expansion, attraction and development of primary jobs and capital investments.” According to Lebanon-REDI President/ Chief Executive Officer Brian Thompson accomplishing this mission requires “all hands on deck.” “More than ever before, the economic development process requires everyone playing their important role,” said Thompson. “Companies looking to bring jobs to a community or even existing businesses with expansion plans want to know that a location is willing to plan and develop its future.” Thompson said that recent success stories indicate that Lebanon and Laclede County are on the right track when it

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


Annually, Lebanon-REDI partners with Lebanon Technology and Career Center (LTCC) by providing partial funds to help LTCC remain a testing site for the National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) examination. LTCC tests 17 and 18-year-old students each year, giving them an extra advantage especially for those who will move directly into the local labor pool upon high school graduation. The NCRC measures a test taker’s ability in areas of applied mathematics, reading for information and locating information. Lebanon-REDI also has a strong working relationship with the three higher education institutions that have a presence in Lebanon and L aclede County – Ozarks Technical Community College (OTC), Missouri State University and Drury University. “We are beyond REDI CEO for tunate for a Brian Thompson community of our size to have three higher educational entities with a presence here,” he said. “Not only are they here, but in many situations they work together, which is not always the case in other communities.” T hompson said that par tners throughout the community, county,

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

A recent addition to Lebanon-REDI’s region and state are critical to keep Lebanon and Laclede County moving in ability to support local economic development efforts has been a marketing the right direction. “We could really go on and on about push that has included a regular column how many entities and organizations are in the Lebanon Daily Record, outreach to b o t h o n involved in the line and radio economic demedia in the velopment pro'Our main goal is to help the area, and the cess from our company remove barriers creation of a city and county new Facebook governmental that stand in their way of page for the oragencies to lobeing successful.' ganization. cal nonprofits “ T he ecoand charitable nomic develorganizations to the faith based community, it truly opment story of Lebanon and Laclede is everyone,” he said. “And Lebanon and County needs to be told,” said ThompLaclede County are certainly blessed son. “We have used all of these assets to to have a strong base to support our do a better job with this.” He said he is easily proud of how the growth efforts.” One of Lebanon-REDI’s primary community has used the Lebanon-REDI functions is to assist companies with Facebook page to spread important expansion or growth opportunities. This messages such as job fairs, employment is accomplished through a number of availability in the area and more. “Lebanon and Laclede County really means, according to Thompson. “We do our best to help out in what- stepped up to the plate,” he said. “If one ever manner is needed,” he said. “It could person was able to find work or become be as minimal as a letter of support to a better informed about a job opening company that is applying for a grant or through a social media posting, a media certificate of need to a state governing column or press release, then it was body, or as detailed as physically helping more than worth every moment spent an industry official fill out paperwork on such efforts.” For more information on Lebanonfor state or federal incentives. Our main goal is to help the company remove bar- REDI, contact Thompson by phone at riers that stand in their way of being suc- (417) 533-5627, by e-mail at brian@ cessful. Each case is unique and we are lebanonredi.com, in person at 200 East glad to help as best we can in whatever Commercial (Allen Building) in Lebanon, or visit www.LebanonREDI.com. ■ way that ends up taking shape.”

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Nice place to visit ...

... Great place to live! Lebanon and Laclede County offer a little something for everyone shows and expositions, sporting events, theatrical productions and business meetings. Come enjoy a demolition derby, bull riding, country music concerts, the county fair, a gun show or even a community garage sale in our Cowan Civic Center. The YMCA is housed in the Cowan Civic Center and is one of the largest not-forprofit community service organizations in the Ozarks. It is equipped with a gymnasium and a large multi-purpose sports facility, which

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includes an amazing NCAA approved lap pool and a tennis court. Lebanon is a great place to visit; our historic downtown features many unique shops. Lebanon has many outlet stores like The Mall and Shepherd Hills Factory Outlet, the world’s largest dealer of top-selling Case Knives. The huge store offers Ozark Walnut bowls and a vast selection of home décor items. The Heartland Antique Mall is the largest between Joplin and St. Louis, with more than 250 dealers, a Russell Stover’s candy outlet, and numerous other family-owned antique shops. Tourism Director Lebanon was an Bruce Conklin important stop along historic Route 66, the winding long stretch from Chicago to the Pacific Ocean. The often romanticized Mother Road inspires in many of us something buried deep within us.

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hopping, fishing, tubing, camping, hiking, dining, sightseeing — or how about floating your cares away? Whether you’re here for business or pleasure, we have something for everyone in and around Lebanon, Missouri! Home to more than 14,000 residents, Lebanon is located in the scenic Ozarks of south-central Missouri, directly on Interstate 44. It is also home to the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center, a multi-purpose facility that accommodates conventions, trade

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


Some may see Route 66 as a link to our parents and grandparents, others perhaps feel the sense of freedom that the road provided to those early travelers. Most of the original auto courts and cafes are long gone, but a few sites still exist and can be visited along the historic highway in Laclede County. Along with driving the Mother Road you can learn more about the historic route in Lebanon’s world-renowned Route 66 Museum and Research Center. Every weekend from April through September, the race is on at I-44 Speedway, part of the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series and Midway Speedway with its fast and wild dirt-track racing, two popular courses. Lebanon is also conveniently located near Bennett Spring State Park. The pristine beauty of the park is a natural attraction. Besides fishing, this popular and scenic park offers 12 miles of hiking trails, Niangua River float trips, interpretive center, OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

a rustic dining lodge, hatchery tours, cabins and condos, or you can just pitch up a tent, whichever your preference you’ll find dozens of campgrounds and RV parks throughout the area. No matter when you visit, we’ll welcome you with open arms.

For more information contact the Tourism Office for the city of Lebanon at toll free 866-LEBANON, or visit our website at www.lebanonmo.org. — Bruce Conklin Tourism Director

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On the way: Grand slams! Lebanon folks like to travel see their Kansas City Royals and St. Louis Cardinals, but if all goes well, they'll soon be able to experience a grand slam right at home.

In the summer of 2015, it was announced that a new Denny's Restaurant was being proposed at the site of the Brentwood Motel at 1320 S. Jefferson Avenue. As of the summer of 2016, the old motel has been demolished and all the zoning and other procedural issues have been settled. No timeline for the project had yet been announced, but local people were hoping construction would begin soon. The proposed Denny’s is planned to be a 4,400 square foot building. The new restaurant will be slightly smaller than

its neighboring Hardee’s, which is 4,600 square feet. The plan includes building a 105-feet sign on the lot’s edge near Jefferson Avenue. The plan also includes expanding the current lot to add more shared and Denny’s exclusive parking spots. There also will be a new retaining wall built around the new parking area. Initial plans called for an exit on Cedar Crest Drive, which runs behind the site, parallel to Jefferson Avenue, but the additional exit was switch to Cherokee Street after concerns were voiced about the extra traffic in the residential area. ■

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On the way: 'Life-changing chicken!'

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have limited freezer space, as most of their items save things like french fries are never frozen. The meat used to make the restaurant’s chicken tenders always comes from a bird that has been butchered within the past 14 days. The chain also doesn’t mechanically process its chicken tenders, so every tender comes from a single piece of meat. “We have top of the line chicken. None of our competitors are doing what we are doing,” said Brian Simowitz, the vice president of franchises for Slim Chickens.

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growing Arkansas-based southernstyle chicken restaurant chain will be opening its second Missouri location right here in Lebanon. “We’re excited to introduce to Lebanon what we call 'life-changing chicken,'” said franchisee Scott Purcell of Chicago. Purcell and his partners recently founded the Slim Chickens Missouri (SCMO) Development Group after purchasing the franchise rights for most of Missouri from Joplin to the St. Louis area. Currently the company has only one location in Missouri in Independence. The corporation, which is based in Fayetteville, Ark., has retained the rights to develop the Kansas City, Mo., area. SCMO chose Lebanon as its first franchise location because the group likes the town’s strategic location within its territory, being about halfway between both ends of the area. The group also fell in love with the location, which is on Elm Street right off of the Interstate 44 127 mile marker exit. “The I-44 corridor is very important to us. Lebanon is the halfway point and the gateway to the Ozarks,” Purcell said. Construction of the Lebanon restaurant began in May 2016 and was expected to finish, weather permitting, around the end of September or beginning of October. The project was being constructed by the Colorado-based company, Crossland. Purcell describes Slim Chickens as something in between fast food and casual dining, calling it “quick casual.” Customers will order from a counter and then their food is brought to their tables. Slim Chickens’ claim to fame is that its food is always fresh. The restaurants

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Construction worker Steve Black shovels ready mix concrete around a manhole while fellow worker Bob Mercer and Mike Luthy watch. Preliminary work for Slim Chickens was in early June as construction workers from Crosslands Construction Co. put on their hardhats despite the hot weather.

Along with its tenders, Slim Chickens sells chicken and waf es, wraps, salads, grilled chicken and wings. To go along with the tenders, SlimChickens offers up a plethora of dipping sauces. “Our guests can change the avor up with every bite,” Simowitz said. They also don’t skimp on dessert. Some of the chain’s most popular items are its desserts, like cheesecakes and brownies that are served in Mason jars. Next month, SCMO hopes to break ground on its second franchise in Columbia. The franchise group plans to build 10 franchises within the territory over the next ve to six years. “We’re really excited to be part of the franchise in its early stages. We really believe in the brand,” Purcell said. Slim Chickens was started in 2003 in Fayetteville, Ark., in a garage by buddies Tom Gordon and Greg Smart. Since then, the restaurant chain has expanded to 35 locations in states across the Midwest. According to Simowitz, the brand started to push its expansion in the past couple years and hopes to expand to 600 restaurants within the next decade. ■

901 Cowan Dr Lebanon, MO 65536 (417) 588-9787 PAGE 12

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


GET YOUR KICKS! Lebanon celebrates its heritage as a pit stop on the Mother Road

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Missouri’s portion of Route 66 followed an old Native American trail between southwest Missouri and the Mississippi River area near St. Louis. Later, it became a farm road, and was eventually called the Old Wire Road because of the telegraph lines that followed the railroad, which in turn followed the original trail.

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Exit 123 - Off I-44 17505 Route 66, Phillipsburg, MO 65722 PAGE 13


Museum of the 'Mother Road' Local area celebrates its Route 66 heritage with a facility inside the library

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“Route 66 wasn’t the only highway, it wasn’t the longest, it wasn’t the first, it just became perhaps the most famous, perhaps because of some quirky little things that happened,” Spangler explained. To begin with, promotors were exceptionally active in trying to draw attention to the road for economic purposes. A more specific event that helped launch Route 66 to its current fame was

the publication of John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath.” The novel follows the members of the fictitious Joad family as they head toward California in an attempt to flee the Dust Bowl via — you guessed it — Route 66. Besides nudging the highway into the limelight, the book also coined the term “The Mother Road” in reference to Route 66.

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ost people know enough to visualize neon and chrome at the mention of Route 66, but if you really want the lowdown on the Mother Road, then Lebanon’s Route 66 Museum is a must-see. Located in the Lebanon-Lacede County Library, 915 S. Jefferson Ave., the museum is one of only two museums in Missouri that are dedicated entirely to Route 66. The other one is in Times Beach. 'Route 66 wasn’t “ You won’t the only highfind just a ton way, it wasn’t of these out there,” museum the longest, it curator Mark wasn’t the first. Spangler said It just became of the museum. “Some commuperhaps the nities celebrate most famous, their Route 66 perhaps because connection, and others do of some quirky not. Some are little things that catching on and happened.' actively developing that; we started that process s dozen years ago when we had the idea to do the museum, so we’re kind of ahead of the curve.” Although Route 66 probably wasn’t much different from other interstate highways in its day, a series of circumstances caused it be one of the most well-known roads from an era when the United States’ infrastructure was just beginning to take shape.

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move allowed the library to have much more space than it had had before; in fact, it had a little space to spare. Route 66 Society member Bill Wheeler had some ideas about what the facility could do with that space. “I would say this was his idea. If you could credit any one individual, Bill was the one that approached the library about doing this,” Spangler stated. The library board approved of Wheeler’s idea, and the Route 66 Museum was born. Today, visitors to the museum can see a variety of displays, including three vignettes: one of a gas station, one of a diner and one of a tourist cabin. The museum also boasts a diorama of the intersection of Route 66 and Highway 5 as it looked in the 1940s.

Good Food

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Another popular culture reference to the highway came in the 1960s in the form of a television show simply titled “Route 66.” “It was just a couple of guys in a convertible just out goofing around on Route 66, which kind of hearkens into the whole ‘Get your kicks on 66’ the whole song that kind of made it famous as far as a sound to go along with it. “ Spangler said of the show. “But that’s part of the problem. So many people think that’s it — ‘Get Your Kicks on 66’ — and there’s so much more to it. You can slice it and dice it in so many ways besides just a place to have a good time.” Lebanon’s Route 66 museum originated in 2004 when the library moved from a smaller building into its current location, which was once a K-Mart building. The

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Spangler stated, “Now there’s nothing that remains of (the buildings shown in the diorama), but because the family was careful about documenting their businesses, we have just a fabulous set of photographs of what was one of the jewels in our community of the Route, the Nelson Hotel and Dream Village. And we’ve got just a fabulous set of photographs — you seldom see a place documented that well with photographs.” The museum also has a variety of artifacts, including a switchboard from the office of the Munger Moss Motel and a piece of sign post from one of the “Our Town, Your Town” signs that used to mark the edge of the city. “We had two of these signs at the entrances to Lebanon over Route 66,” Spangler explained. “They were beside Route 66 trying to beckon folks into town. ... And unfortunately we lost those signs. When the route changed directions they were dismantled and scrapped and are now gone. When we redid Elm Street, they came across one of the supports, the one up on the east side of town, so that’s as close as we can come to having a piece of the original sign.” New to the museum since last year are two glassed-in displays, one describing different types of pavement that road builders considered using, and another one explaining the Good Roads Movement, which was the immediate precursor to Route 66. Spangler addressed the Lebanon Rotary Club’s weekly meeting in November 2015 on the current state and future of

Lebanon’s heritage tourism. Lebanon's new Route 66-themed park under construction at Boswell Park compliments the projects on which the Route 66 Museum and Research Center has been working, he said. Much has been changed in the museum. New walls have been added, as well as the number of items on display. “If you have not been to the museum lately, go check that out. It has steadily been improving and getting better as the weeks go by,” Spangler said. The continuing construction of the museum proceeds as time and money are available.

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Although the museum continues to be a work in progress, it receives a large number of visitors. According to Spangler, the Route 66 Museum draws people from around the world. “You would be gratified to see the amount of people that come to the museum with no more advertising than we are able to do. We have a worldwide audience for that and it seems like it is growing every year. It’s very gratifying to see people interested in the things that you spend so much time on,” Spangler said. Another improvement at the library is the new gift shop. A good museum always has a good gift shop, and Spangler said that he believes the new gift shop is a wonderful contribution for the tourism aspect of the museum. “I’m going to say that you are not going to see a nicer gift shop than ours. You just will not. We have all been working very hard on it, and it seems to have paid off. We set out to make this special and we’ve done everything we can to do that,” Spangler said. The gift shop features a wide variety of items, both functional and artistic. There are candles, books, tableware, jewelry, paintings, prints and everything related to Route 66. “If you truly want a unique gift that you will not find anywhere else, we have something for you,” Spangler said. Besides the traditional Route 66-themed items, the gift shop is actively trying to have American-made traditional arts and crafts. Spangler hoped to add wallets, purses and journals, all handmade. “The next time you need to buy a wallet for someone, remember the gift shop. You can buy a wallet that is made right down the road in Marshfield,” Spangler said. Preserving Lebanon’s history is very important to Spangler, he said. Although his work isn’t done, he hopes what is already accomplished is something the community can take pride in. “Every area has its own history that is interesting and relevant. However, not every area choses to focus on that … I would hope that our heritage and things around us are not only things that we care about, but also something that we care to present to people that come to visit us,” Spangler said. ■ OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


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100,000 reasons to visit Whether it’s leisure reading, family research or a look back in time, visitors can find it all and then some at the Lebanon-Laclede County Library. County History and the 1888 Goodspeed history of the county that includes a number of biographies of prominent residents and original settlers. A photocopier and microfilm readerprinters are available for patrons or visitors at the library’s cost. The library subscribes to Heritage Quest, an online genealogical database that carries all U.S. censuses, as well as lists of books and articles about family history and images of Revolutionary War pension records. Library cardholders have free access. Visitors can log on with the library’s computer for two hours with a $2 visitor’s card. The Missouri Room microflm collection, available free, contains all Missouri census records and many rolls of micro-

filmed local newspapers, including the Laclede County Republican, the Lebanon Rustic-Republican and all editions of The Daily Record. Three reader-printers are available for researchers at library cost. There are also old editions of the Lebanon High School Magnet yearbook and Polk City Directories for many years. Besides genealogical materials, the room is full of books and magazines containing Missouri and Ozark history. There are Missouri Blue Books, official manuals, dating from 1889 to the present. There is also a four-volume “Ozark Folksongs, a collection by Vance Randolph that was published in the 1940s.

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The library is home to over 100,000 items, according to director Kathy Dame. There is wireless Internet service, books on tape, large print books, DVDs, videos, a children’s room and many research resources, like those found in the Missouri Room, the hot spot for genealogists and history buffs. The Missouri Room houses obituary books published by the Laclede County Historical Society. These include obituaries for Laclede County residents, but are invaluable resources for anyone seeking clues about their ancestors. Marriage records and cemetery record books compliment that research, as do copies of published family histories. There are two volumes of the Laclede

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


Library hours are from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.

Best selling books by authors with an Ozark connection are also located in the room. There is “Shepherd of the Hills,” written by Harold Bell Wright while he lived in Lebanon and the “Little House” series written by Laura Ingalls Wilder, who lived at nearby Marshfield in Wright County. The room is ideal for researching Missouri, with information on caves, the capital, flowers, archeology, geology and other subjects. The library is also a place for fun educational programs for all ages. Every year, the library sponsors a themed summer reading program for children, from the first of June to the end of July. For adults, the library offers free computer classes with basic computer, using the Internet and Powerpoint. The library works closely with the Laclede Literacy Council, which offers tutoring from kindergarten through adult.

Free classes offered by the council include English as a Second Language, basic literacy, jail and probation tutoring, citizenship and GED. With the Route 66 Museum located inside the complex, it is already a favorite of fans of the Mother Road. For highway and map enthusiasts, there is a complete library of road maps, dating from the 1900s to present. The collection is growing as more and more maps are being donated or loaned the library. A relatively new attraction at the library is the addition of the Kinderhook Treasure gift shop, which is filled with numerous unique items. The building is handicapped accessible. More information about the library is available by calling (417) 532-2148 or visiting the website at www.lebanon-laclede.lib. mo.us. ■

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Mother Road icon turns 70 As it kicks o its eighth decade of serving travelers along Route 66, there remains no more recognizable landmark along the Mother Road than Lebanon's Munger Moss Motel.

PAGE 20

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


Historic motel was opened by Pete and Jesse Hudson in 1946

Since 1983 - Our 33rd Year

when a four-lane highway bypassed Devil’s Elbow, Pete Hudson saw the writing on the wall, so he bought the Munger Moss name, its barbecue recipe and moved the business into Lebanon alongside Route 66. The Hudsons arrived in Lebanon in the summer of 1945, and by 1946 they had expanded their operation by building seven buildings situated in an arc around the barbecue restaurant. Each building consisted of two sleeping cabins connected by a garage in the middle. In 1957, they expanded again, filling in the spaces between the buildings and adding a total of 25 more cabins. The Munger Moss Motel also had the first swimming pool in town — the same one that the motel still uses.

▼ ▼

A Lebanon Route 66 landmark celebrated its 70th anniversary in business in April 2016. Ramona Lehman, co-owner of Munger Moss Motel, invited the public out to celebrate a piece of not only Lebanon’s history but also the Mother Road’s with food, music and dancing. Along with recognizing the motel's 70 years in business, Lehman and her husband Bob were celebrating owning the business for 45 years. Ramona says that fate had a hand in she and her husband purchasing the motel in 1971. Pete and Jesse Hudson originally opened Munger Moss Motel in 1946. Previously, the name “Munger Moss” had belonged to the Munger Moss Barbecue, a restaurant in Devil’s Elbow. However,

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nothing,” Ramona Layman remembered. “It was so many places where the snow was piled way up and then blowing. If you drove through this, you couldn’t see. It was zero visibility.” During that blizzard, Bob Lehman was headed toward home after working with a grain salesman when he hit another car. “He never talked to those people. He got out, and a car hit him,” Ramona stated. “Well, them two walked through and they found another guy. They ended up going with this guy down to a farm place -- there were 30 people that spent that night at that farm place.” While Bob was hunkered down in on someone else’s farm, Ramona was working in a doctor’s office and the four Lehman children were with their grandmother. Ramona Lehman got of work at 4 p.m. and laboriously crept home in her car. It took her 45 minutes to drive 12 miles to her home, and once she got there, she couldn’t make it to pick up her children from their grandmother’s house.

“The next afternoon when (Bob) got home, he looked at me, and he said, ‘We’re moving, and we’re moving south.’” The Lehmans had discussed the idea that it might be fun to run a hotel, so they decided to act on that thought. The began their search in southern Iowa, and then in April 1971 a realtor that the Lehmans knew suggested that they look at a hotel that was for sale in Springfield. It was actually by chance on their way back from Springfield that they discovered the Munger Moss. Ramona explained, “On the way back, we stopped in Lebanon and met Tim Compton, who was a realtor here. They were gassing up, we were gassing up, and Tim brought us over here to meet Pete and Jesse (Hudson).” The Lehmans spent about an hour and a half touring the Munger Moss Motel and talking to the Hudsons before they continued on their journey home. Ramona Lehman estimates that it was only two days later that they called the Hudsons and made an offer.

▼ ▼

Meanwhile, fate was nudging current owners Bob and Ramona Lehman toward their future lives as hotel owners. The Lehmans started out as farmers in Iowa, but eventually Bob discovered that he was allergic to cattle and hogs. Because of this, he began focusing more on the side of agriculture that involved plants and also got a job driving a grain truck for Martin Feed Company. Then came the winter of 1970-1971. “I remember New Year’s Eve Day -- it was so foggy,” Ramona Lehman reminisced. The winter as a whole wasn’t just foggy, though; it was snowy. Lehman remembers one snowstorm that year produced waistdeep accumulation and that once the roads were cleared, people drove around with brightly-colored pieces of cloth tied to their car antennas so that other motorists would be able to see them over the snow at intersections. Then there was a second blizzard at the end of January 1971. “When that wind hit, you couldn’t see

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The Lehmans moved to Lebanon on May 31, 1971, just a few days after the school year finished for their children, they took over the hotel on June 1. That was the beginning of a lifetime at Munger Moss and all the memories that came with it. “I had four little munchkins, little children, I think my youngest was 7 and Mary Jo was just starting junior high. The kids grew up here. They helped. They learned how to make beds. I can remember my little boys stomping their feet, ‘What do I have to make beds for, Mama?’ I says, 'You’re going to make somebody a good wife someday, boy.’” The hotel has went through a rough period or two, although it also had its heyday. “I’d say there was a time where Munger Moss was the motel,” Lehman stated. “The restaurant also was up here then too, and I think the barbecue made it famous because I remember the first years going down to Texas someplace and talking to people. They knew exactly where Munger Moss was at because they’d stopped there to eat.” However, Lehman explained that as newer, fancier hotels came to town, they drew business away from the older motels. Likewise, Interstate 44 supplanted Route 66 as the preferred way to travel through Lebanon. In the early 1980s, the government decommissioned Route 66 and took down all the old Route 66 signs. When times seemed rocky for the motel, Ramona always hearkened back to something that Pete Hudson, the motel’s original owner, had told her. “I remember Old Pete telling us, you know, the winters would get low and slow

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

and he loved to play cards and he’d come Moss Motel saw its first Route 66 pilgrim in in and we were playing 21,” Lehman said. approximately 1988 or 1989. Then in 1990 “That one winter night he said, ‘Stop worry- a group of Missouri state lawmakers wrote a ing, Ramona. This place has always made it; bill to make Route 66 a historic highway. Today, the people who stay at the this place will continue to make it.’ So when things got slow and tough, he sat on my Munger Moss are pleased that the motel hasn’t changed much shoulder and I could since the glory days of hear him saying, ‘Stop 'The people that travel the Mother Road. worrying, Ramona.This “ The people that place will make it.’” Route 66 are good travel Route 66 are The Munger Moss people. They like what good people. They Motel did make it, and you’ve got. They don’t like what you’ve got,” eventually something remarkable began to tell me I’m an old place Lehman said. “ They tell me I’m an happen. People began or falling apart or any- don’t old place or falling to take a new interest thing like that.' apart or anything like in Route 66. Ramona that. They don’t steal Lehman isn’t sure why from you. They’re just this happened, but she pleased and happy that you’ve kept the thinks it was a grassroots movement. “I think part of it was the interstate place. And that makes you feel good, that, was completed. It bypassed so many cities, you know, I have done something worthand all of a sudden people start looking, while to preserve something, because not and there’s a momentum going,” Lehman everybody knows what motel rooms were stated. “Especially the towns that were kind like way back when.” Over the years the hotel business has of bypassed all of a sudden, like out West, they just having things to do with it. Then had its ups and downs, but the Lehmans you had people organizing like the Missouri stuck with it and have been able to improve association, the Oklahoma association. I but also preserve the historic hotel over years. The biggest change has been making don’t know.” Lehman said that in the 1980s Quinta the rooms energy efficient, but at the same Scott and Susan Kelley wrote a book about time, they’ve tried to keep it as classic as Route 66. Then Michael Wallis wrote “The possible. The rooms still contain the original tile and pink bathtubs. Mother Road.” After 45 years, the Lehmans are just “(Wallis’ book) wasn’t really a traveling guide, but all of a sudden here comes people. about ready for retirement. In the spring They’ve got this book, and by cracky, we’re of 2016 they began looking for a buyer to going to find what’s written in here and so carry on the tradition. “We feel like it’s time to hang it up, but forth. It was just a round robin. Things just we won’t abandon the motel,” Ramona keep growing and multiplying.” Lehman estimates that the Munger Lehman said. ■

PAGE 23


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Every year on Memorial Day Weekend, cowboy cooks from Missouri and several other states come to Lebanon with a single purpose: to help the heroes who have been hurt.

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Chuck wagons come from all over the country to rustle up some vittles to support injured veterans

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ore than 3,000 people attended the Wagons For War r iors event in 2016, raising a record amount of funds to help wounded military members.

Around 15 honorary veterans from Missouri Veteran’s Home of St. James as well as two Word War II veterans were bussed in and given a reserved table. “When we heard that those veterans were going to make it, we all got pretty excited. Those veterans are why we hold this event, and everyone showed their appreciation to them in their own way. I was told that they all had a good time listening to the music and eating the food. That’s all that matters,” Hull said. He knew the event was going to be a success at around 10 a.m. Saturday morning.

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The sixth annual Wagons for Warriors event drew more patrons and chuckwagons Wagons For than ever to the Warriors is a Laclede County Fairgrounds. benefit for the “ We still Fort Leonard can’t believe the Wood chapter amount of people that came of the Associato the event ,” tion of the U.S. said Wagon for Army's WoundWarriors organizer Steve Hull. ed Warriors “Ever y year it fund. seems to get better and better.” Hull said that with ticket sales, sponsorships and donations, over $30,000 was raised for the warriors in need. After the bills are paid, the remaining amount will be donated to veterans in a variety of ways. “Our main goal is to serve veterans in need. Our workers are strictly volunteers and we do the best we can to give the money to those that truly need it.,” Hull said. Wagons For Warriors is a benefit for the Fort Leonard Wood chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army's Wounded Warriors fund.

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OVER

“We had a massive crowd early on Saturday. The honorary veterans were there and the place was packed well before we prayed over the food and the dinner bell rang,” he said. In the past, cooks underestimated the amount of food needed to be prepared, and some of the patrons walked away with empty stomachs. A record 32 authentic chuck wagons from nine states made the trip this year. Many of the wagons and their operators are champions of various cooking competitions with their award winning dishes. In addition to the wagons, each cook brought a team of helpers to help prepare their campfire creations. According to Hull, the increased number of wagons and helpers provided more than enough food. “It’s nice when everyone gets to have as much food as they want, and a variety of whatever they wanted. We had over 3,000 people Saturday, and everyone got their fill. If anyone left on Saturday still hungry, it’s their own fault,” he said. Hull said that each person he talked to told him something different that they enjoyed. The largest line at the event waited for Rafter R Chuckwagon, hosted by Lebanon-area residents Glenn and Jennifer Raef, who served chicken fried steak and various sides and cobblers. “Some of the lines were longer than others, but everyone had a lot of people at their wagons. Everyone has their favorite. A lot of people like the tomato cobbler that was prepared by Goode Ranch from Hamilton, Texas.” Hull said he didn’t get a chance to talk to that many patrons, but he did hear positive feedback from the chuck wagon cooks. “Every person I talked to that had traveled from a different state to be here spoke highly of the event, and more importantly, the people of Lebanon. They had nothing

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but great things to say.” While the event was a success, Hull already was looking forward to next year’s. He said that multiple cooks informed him that they would be bringing more

wagons next year, and more food. “Next year we are going to concentrate on kids. We had more things for the kids this year, but we think we can do better, and we can’t wait,” Hull said. ■

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Thousands of avid bluegrass fans brazenly ignore the midsummer heat every year, flocking to Conway, Mo., to attend a series of outdoor concerts known as the Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival.

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The 31st annual Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival took place over three days at the end of June at Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park at 2229 Bluegrass Road near Conway, about 22 miles southwest of Lebanon. In 2016, the event included performances by Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver, Dailey and Vincent, the Spinney Brothers, the Bluegrass Martins and the Lonesome Road Band as well as seven other bands. Starvy Creek was never intended to become the massive event it is today. On the contrary, it started out in 1985 as music party on the farm of Don and Bobby Day. Don Day explained, “I was just going to invite a few friends in, then one of them suggested, ‘Why don’t you just have a little festival?’ So we did that, and it just kept going. But I didn’t really plan what it has turned out to be.”

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So instead of having a private party for just family and friends, the Days invited the public. That first year, the festival had about eight campers. Then year after year, it gradually got bigger, until the Days' farm became the Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park. Don Day can’t recall any monumental changes in the running of the festival. “We started out doing a bluegrass show, an basically we’ve just stayed with that,” he said. However, if there weren’t any noticeable changes, there must have been some incremental ones. The festival that started out as a music party with eight campers now draws about 2,000 to 2,500 people each day the festival runs. There is now a festival in September as well as the one to kick off July. Some things really haven’t changed: Don and Bobbie Day still organize the details of the festival themselves, although they have help from their sons and daughter. As big as the festival has grown though, planning for it is an allyear effort. Day said he thought the festival was good for the local economy. “There’ll be people here probably from 20 different states, and they come in and just spend several days here in Missouri,

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and they spend money, and there’s a lot of business done here through them, and sales tax revenue, and all that.” However, the real purpose of the festival is to provide entertainment. “I’d just encourage people, if they like bluegrass music, to come. That’s basically the reason to come,” Day stated. The Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park is

located at 2229 Bluegrass Road, Conway, Mo., about 22 miles southwest of Lebanon. The Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival does not allow alcohol, electric instruments or chairs with backs taller than 38 inches. Pets are allowed on leashes, but not in the concert area. For more information, go to www. starvycreek.com. ■

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New gospel music event comes to town In November 2015, the City of Lebanon announced that in 2016 the Brumley Gospel Sing would take place in Tulsa, Okla., rather than in Lebanon as it had for the past 10 years. However, it also announced that the city, along with Duane Garren of

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the Gospel Gab emcee service, would be planning its own gospel sing to take the place of the Brumley event. “We are promoting Lebanon in a big way,” Garren said at an informational meeting to discuss the new enterprise. “You can have a great event, but if the town’s not behind it, it’s not going to do much.” The Lebanon Gospel Music Get-Together was scheduled for Aug. 3-6, 2016, and featured many of the same perfromers Garren that made the Brumley event a success for so many years, including the Booth Brothers, Goodman Revival and the Mark Trammel Quartet.

Some of the other scheduled acts were the Inspirations Quartet, Pat Barker, the Blackwood Brothers, the Anchormen and Dixie Echoes. Organizers also planned for the new event to have a few logistical differences from the Brumley Gospel Sing. Vendors were to set up in the lobby of the Civic Center rather than in the gym, the event would start at 6 p.m. each night, and an intermission would take place after each group performs. “I kind of knew this day would come,” Garren said of the Brumley family’s decision to move their event. “I didn’t think it would be this soon, to tell you the truth. And I’m looking forward to seeing that room there filled to capacity as soon as possible. Will it happen in 2016? I don’t know; I’m a realist. But I think in two to three years we’ll be seeing it sold out.” ■

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A tradition of nobility Shepherd Hills taps local businessman Noble Hudson for its commemorative knife in 2015

While other communities might argue a couple of those, there's little doubt that the Lebanon community is the best place in the world to be a Case Knives aficionado. The Case Celebration in the Ozarks is a day long event for Case Knife enthusiasts and their families. Held annually the first Saturday after Labor Day at Shepherd Hills Cutlery in Lebanon, it attracts folks from all over the country who love Case knives. Every year, Shepherd Hills features a special knife at the Celebration in honor of a local person who has contributed greatly to the community in the estimation of the Reid family. Shepherd Hills Vice President Rod Reid said his family always tries to pick “people who are the fabric of Lebanon. They make this town what it is.” “We always pick someone who has

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When the Reids started thinking about who would be honored with a special knife at their company's celebration in 2015, the best candidate wasn't hard to find. had a very positive impact on the community,” said Reid when the honoree was announced in 2015. “Over the years, it has been totally different kinds of people, because it takes all of us to make a community.” Noble Keith Hudson, owner of Noble Hudson & Sons Feed, Seed and Fertilizer, died in July 2014. He was the immediate and obvious choice for a commemorative knife at the 2015 Case XX Celebration in the Ozarks, according to the Reid family.

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Randy Reid said. “We think it’s true that the people make the place,” put in Becky Reid. Noble Hudson’s widow, Bonnie Hudson, was overwhelmed when the Reids broached the idea of the special knife to her. “It brought us all to tears. ... It’s truly a special, special thing,” she said. Noble K. Hudson was born in 1941 to Noble B. and Ruby Hudson in Pocahontas, Ark. When he was a toddler, his family moved to West Plains where his father worked in the feed business. The family moved to Lebanon and bought the Lebanon Produce store when Noble K. was 10. Noble K. Hudson grew up helping out in his father’s feed store, working in the mill, making deliveries or working in the office. Customers came to recognize his ready smile and positive outlook. When the original store burned in 1956, Noble helped his father build the business anew until it was better and stronger than before. As a young man, Noble enjoyed working on cars and anything else with an engine. After he graduated high school, he attended Mechanics Trade School in

'He was a big guy but with a quiet voice. I don’t know that he ever raised his voice to anyone, even when he probably should have. That’s just the way Noble was.' Kansas City, gaining knowledge and experience that would serve him well with the trucks and equipment of his business. He also served in the U.S. Army National Guard. Bonnie Hudson was Bonnie Holman when she first met Noble Hudson. She worked doing the books for his father, Noble B. Hudson, at the feed store on west Commercial Street. She and Noble K. Hudson married in 1962 and had three sons, Noble William, David and Casey. She and Noble K. Hudson bought the business from his father in 1973 when the senior Hudson retired.

▼ ▼

“In the beginning, we didn’t do special people. We did Route 66, magnetic water, things like that. But then as we all got older and began losing friends and business people, we turned to that,” said Ida Reid, founder and president of Shepherd Hills Cutlery. “It seemed like the community got more excited about a commemorative knife for an individual that they had a relationship with as opposed to the magnetic well or the Gasconade Hotel editions that we did,” company Vice President

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Randy, Ida, Becky and Rod Reid pose for a photo in front of their store, Shepherd Hills Factory Outlets, in Lebanon. Bonnie Hudson said she hopes when people hold the commemorative knife, they will remember her husband’s best qualities. “Just how good he was, and kind, and honest. He treated everyone the same,” she said. “He was a big guy but with a quiet voice. I don’t know that he ever raised his voice to anyone, even when he probably should have. That’s just the way Noble was.” While he wasn’t overly demonstrative, those who knew him well could tell if something was bothering him, however. “When he’d come across the railroad tracks going to the feed mill, if he was stepping over both tracks in one stride, you better find something to do,” said David Hudson. “He was upset about something. It was kind of an inside joke to us when we were working in the feed mill. How many tracks was he clearing? “If he just stepped over each individual track, he was just walking around, but if he was clearing both tracks with one stride, you better pick up a shovel or a broom,” David Hudson said. Noble K. Hudson was a member of the Lebanon Rotary Club and the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce, he worked with the FFA and other youth programs and served on the Laclede County Fair Board. He and Bonnie raised beef cattle, feeder pigs and turkeys for many years. He was always quick to help out a neighbor or customer who had a question or problem related to their own farming operations. “My dad had four things in his life: his family, feed, farmers and friends, and that was it,” David Hudson said. “Those four things covered my dad his whole life, right there. Family, feed, farmers and friends. That’s all he really cared about.” ■ OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

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Zombie Walk benefits domestic violence agency Every year, a horde of area residents morph into undead monsters and trudge through town with a single purpose in mind: to help victims of domestic violence. The seventh annual Zombie Walk took place in early June 2016. Walkers assembled at the Mills Center, shambled down Elm Street to Jefferson Avenue, then turned around and shuffle back to the Mills Center for the Zombie Prom. The Elm Street route was a change from previous years when the walk took place on Commercial Street. "We thought we'd expand the walk a little bit, and maybe we could get some more exposure by being on a more traveled street," organizer John Benner explained. Zombie The Zombie Walk Benner and Prom are a fundraiser for Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment, Lebanon's domestic violence shelter, more commonly known as COPE. Participants dress as zombies and parade down the street in order to raise money through sponsorships, donations and pledges. Following the walk, the zombies can attend the Zombie Prom at the Mills Center. Benner said that people are not required to dress as zombies for either the walk or the prom, but it is more fun if they do. This year, the prom had a picnic theme with red checkered table cloths and a red, white and blue color scheme. Benner said that organizers hoped the event would raise about $2,000 overall. "It's always a good time to see everybody in their various outfits dressed up as their zombies, and it's also fun to see the reaction," Benner said. "I know when we were walking down Jefferson (Ave.) there were actually people who would park and then bring out their lawn chairs and watch us march by." ■

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

PAGE 37


'You've got to take care of people.' Car sales entrepreneur focused on service for 35 years in Lebanon ing upper income apartment rentals in St. Louis, Florida and Oklahoma, but he wanted out. "I was working for people in St. Louis, and I was doing pretty good for them, and I didn't appreciate ... the integrity of some of the people I worked for," Twenter said. "I just got tired of working for people — kind of gutsy. I just thought, I just want to work for myself." The problem was that Twenter didn't have the capital to start his own apartment rental business in St. Louis, and since smaller towns generally don't have the population to support that industry, a change of profession became necessary. On Dec. 24, 1975, Twenter met a childhood acquaintance in a bar, and the man

suggested that Twenter enter the car business. "It hit: That's interesting," Twenter remembered. "And my immediate thought was — my immediate thought — was, 'You've got to take care of people.' And I've been that way all my life, still am. You've got to take care of people, and car dealers have a habit of not doing that." In February 1976, Twenter purchased a Chevrolet dealership in Sweet Springs, which he proceeded to operate for five years. However, it eventually came time to set up shop in a bigger town. "I didn't want to stay in Sweet Springs because it wasn't a growing town, and I sold out to my partner," Twenter explained.

▼ ▼

A

longtime Lebanon businessman handed the keys to his company over to a Camdenton colleague in the spring of 2016, leaving the industry with his head held high. After 35 years in business, automotive dealer Neil Twenter sold Twenter's Automotive Superstore to Sakelaris Ford of Camdenton. "It says a lot for these people, Sakelaris, who are coming in here," Twenter said. "I felt that they would take care of my people and my customers." While Twenter's Automotive Superstore has been a part of Lebanon's business community for three and a half decades, it hasn't always been that way. About 40 years ago, Neil Twenter was manag-

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towns, half the stores were vacant. In other words, downtown Lebanon seemed progressive. And and all these towns had the Walmarts, and Walmart was here. But downtown, the small entrepreneurs, the backbone of the community, was full. That was very critical." Once Twenter decided to move to Lebanon, his mind was made up for good. Shortly after Twenter settled on his current location, a car dealer from Neosho offered to sell his business, but Twenter was no longer interested. Twenter related, "He said, 'I'm ready to sell.' I said, 'I'm ready to go to Lebanon and

put a deposit on a deal tomorrow.' He said, 'Well, you ought to come down and look at it anyway.' I said, 'No, I'm tired of looking.' I thought this fit the bill. "Another town a week later might have been a better deal, but I was ready to stay here. There was enough about it to keep me here. I didn't even go to Neosho; I never have been there," Twenter said. Twenter purchased his business in February 1981. Since then, he said, many things have improved, including the quality of cars being manufactured, the amount of support from car factories and the skill level of his sales staff.

▼ ▼

Twenter was looking specifically for a town with a population of about 10,000 and a dealership that sold more than just Chevrolet vehicles. Over a period of three months, he looked at approximately 15 dealerships in three states, but none of them fit the bill. Then he found Lebanon. At the time, the city had about 10,000 residents, according to Twenter, and more importantly, it was what he called "progressive." "It didn't have a lot of slummy look," Twenter stated. "Main street in those days — and it still is — did not have vacant stores. Main street in so many of those

PAGE 39


He also added onto his business about 13 years ago. However, one thing that hasn't changed is Twenter's philosophy about his business. "I still focus on that service," Twenter said. As the son of a school teacher, Twenter began as an outsider to the car business, and that status actually helped him to be a better car dealer, he said. "I think like a buyer," Twenter explained. "I've always been that way, and I'm kind

of pleased that I'm like that. ... I hate that people go into a dealership and get jacked around." After 35 years, Twenter said the car dealership was where he wanted it to be, but it was time for him to leave. "I will be 76, and I'm kind of a worker, but I probably need to cut back a little," Twenter said, adding that his son is more interested in the property business than in the automobile business. According to Twenter, people have always approached him about selling his

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business, but he began listening to offers about two years ago. Sakelaris, he said, was the only potential buyer that even came close to meeting his standards, and while he will miss his customers and employees, he is excited about the future of the business he built. "These people will keep it up; I'm sure of that," Twenter said. "I'm leaving with my head held high. I've got good employees. They're taken care of. (Sakelaris) will probably sell more cars, he'll make more money, and I've got a good successor." ■

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A slanted facial wall, a Ford emblem and the name of the business greet visitors to Lindsay Ford’s new building.

Years

Lindsay operates new Ford facility Anyone shopping for a new Ford vehicle in Lebanon will now do so in a sleek new facility, thanks to upgrades at the local dealership. Lindsay Ford officially moved into its new building in early August 2015 after nearly a year of construction. According to Lindsay Ford owner Darrell Lindsay, the dealership had been operating out of its old building for a little more than 21 years, and Ford decided it was time for an upgrade. “Ford was wanting all the dealers to upgrade their facilities, so that’s where we got into the idea of doing that,” Lindsay said. In order to get ideas for the new building, Lindsay and office manager Shane Schuenemeyer visited three dealerships in Illinois, Missouri and Kansas. Planning for the new building began about nine months prior to the beginning of construction work in December 2014,

Lindsay said, and the business changed the design of the building about three times. “Ford has to approve (the plans),” Lindsay said. “They have to approve the way their buildings look; they want them all to look the same. And of course we were doing stuff on the inside they didn’t like maybe one plan and we changed it around.” Elements that are required in every Ford dealership include a slanting facial wall on the front of the building, as well as required colors for decor on the inside of the building and a specific type of wood for salespeople’s desks. Lindsay said that the new building is more user-friendly than the old one. Schuenemeyer added, “It’s more room, more square footage, laid out better, just all the way from the parts department, service department, the front end — just everything easier.” ■

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Local Schools ■ Lebanon R-3 Central Office 1310 E. Route 66 Superintendent Dr. David Schmit Phone: 417-532-9141 www.lebanon.k12.mo.us Office hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Joe D. Esther Elementary School 1200 Clark Avenue Pre-K-1st grade Principal Sheila Moore Phone: 417-532-3961 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Maplecrest Elementary School 901 Maple Lane 2nd and 3rd grades Principal Bryan Campbell Phone: 417-532-2641 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Boswell Elementary School 695 Millcreek Road Fourth and fifth grades Principal Rachelle Jennings

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Phone: 417-532-3091 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Lebanon Middle School 2700 Buzz Pride Dr. Sixth through eighth grades Principal Tom Merriott Phone: (unavailable) Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ■ Lebanon High School 777 Brice St. Grades nine through 12 Principal Kevin Lowery Phone: 417-532-9144 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Lebanon Technology and Career Center 757 Brice St. Grades nine through 12 Director Keith Davis Phone: 417-532-5494 Office hours: 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Lebanon Alternative Education Center, Lebanon Adult Education and Literacy Center

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1015 N. Jefferson Ave. Grades nine through 12 Coordinator Scott Williamson Phone: 417-533-3824 Office hours: 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ Parents as Teachers 911 Maple Lane, adjacent to Maplecrest Elementary School Prenatal to 5-years-old Coordinator Sherri Nichols Phone: 417-532-3822 Other schools in the county ■ Joel E. Barber C-5 School District 16050 Route KK Grades pre-K to eighth Superintendent Tina Nolan Phone: 417-532-4837 ■ Gasconade C-4 School District 32959 Route 32 in Falcon Grades pre-K through eighth Superintendent Jim Bogle Phone: 417-532-4821 ■ Laclede County R-1 District 726 W. Jefferson Ave. Superintendent Mark Hedger Phone: 417-589-2951

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Lebanon voters showed their support for education in early 2014, approving a $32.5 million investment in the future of the youth of the community. As of early summer in 2016, the construction of a new Lebanon Middle School was nearly complete, and the school was expected to open in the fall. Photo courtesy of Mark Gregory

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Pictured is the entrance to Hillcrest Elementary, one of two schools being replaced by the new middle school.

First students will attend new middle school in 2016 In the summer of 2016, kids in grades six through eight were preparing to be the first-ever students in a brand new middle school. Lebanon voters approved a $32.5 million bond issue for the Lebanon R-3 School District in early 2014. The money was used for constructing the Lebanon Middle School, which will replace the aging Lebanon Junior High School and the sixth-grade building, Hillcrest School. The approval of the project, which meant raising the district’s tax levy by 37 cents, came after a hard fought campaign by district supporters and a lengthy facilities study by the district that showed the issues facing two of the district’s oldest schools. “Those yes votes confirm that Lebanon wants high-quality education for its kids, and this evening proved that. ... Thanks to the yes votes, thousands of Lebanon kids will have the opportunity to attend a middle school that is safe and secure, and a middle school that supports learning for sixth, seventh and eighth grade,” then-Lebanon R-3 School District Superintendent Dr. Duane Widhalm said following the district’s victory. The building will be 155,700 square feet with the capability to accommodate 1,200 students in classrooms and 1,400 in commons areas. Each grade will have its own “pod” or wing of the building, and the grades will share the common areas. There will be a practice football field outside the school, a practice track and two gymnasiums within the school. One of the gymnasiums also will serve as a tornado shelter. The new school was constructed on a 45-acre plot of land on Fremont Road between the roundabout and Regal Beloit. Work began in early 2015. The middle school is planned to be finished in time for students to start utilizing it in the 20162017 school year. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

PAGE 47


Area students can get a four year degree right here at home offered a two-year associate’s degree, will now be able to give its students an option to continue into a specific degree program.

“Basically what it is going to do is allow the students to have easier access, where they can interact between both schools and end up not only graduat-

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ing with an associate's degree but also at least a bachelor’s degree,” said Gib Adkins, outreach coordinator for MSU’s Lebanon operations. W hile MSU students could achieve a bachelor’s degree from MSU at the Nelson Education Center, they couldn’t do it with the ease that they will be able to at OTC, Adkins added. “This is going to give a seamless transition from your freshman year on forward with our close partner, Missouri State University,” OTC Chancellor Dr. Hal Higdon said when the partnership was announced. The area that MSU moved into was a previously unfinished area of the campus. An open warehouse space was converted into six additional classrooms, restrooms and an office area. MSU offers classes in the form of traditional classes and iTV (interactive TV) classes. The iTV classes allow students to interact in real time with a professor in Springfield or 1 of 14 other locations in 4 states who is teaching through a video that is streamed to Lebanon. “They can interact in real time with the instructor, share papers — everything they could do in a real class,” Adkins said. There also will be classes that blend live and iTV classes.

▼ ▼

Although Lebanon is a relatively small town, students with big city university ambitions can fulfill their dreams without ever leaving their community. T hanks to a par tnership between Ozarks Technical Community College and Missouri State University, Lebanon students can receive a four-year degree in many fields, including elementary education, criminal justice, communications and general studies. MSU, which used to be locally housed at the Nelson Education Center, moved into the OTC Lebanon Center’s Reuben and Mary Lou Casey Hall, which is named after its 2010 donors, in the summer of 2013 and opened up for classes the following fall. OTC, which

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


This isn’t the first time that MSU and OTC shared the same building. Both were at one time housed at the Nelson Education Center adjacent to Nelson Park. OTC moved out of the building after the Caseys donated two industrial buildings on Route MM in late 2009. In 2013, the Caseys, who are from California, donated the 50 acres of land surrounding the buildings, bringing up the total value of the family’s gift to OTC to $3.1 million, the biggest gift in the college’s history. The campus opened up in fall 2011

with 13 classrooms, computer labs, a student lounge and student services department at Casey Hall. A second building includes workforce development and technical education classes. The finishing of Casey Hall, which allowed MSU to move into the Lebanon Center, was paid for with a $500,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Economic Development loan and $100,000 of OTC’s own funds. Adding MSU to the mix may only be just the beginning of OTC’s expansion in Lebanon. The college has announced

a master plan that would utilize the extra land donated by the Caseys. The plan includes extra buildings for general education classes, OTC’s Allied Health program, agricultural services building, administrative offices and an arboretum. The plans also call for a fountain and several other water features. MSU had been offering college courses in Lebanon for 15 years. It started offering classes at the Lebanon Technology and Career Center before moving to the Nelson Education Center. ■

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Drury University holds classes at LTCC

Lebanon's Drury University offices have moved to Commercial Street, and classes are being conducted at the Lebanon Technology and Career Center.

The Lebanon campus of Drury University moved for the second time in a year in 2016. In May the administrative offices for Drury's Lebanon campus set up at 122 East Commercial St., which is across the street from the post office. Classes continued to take place at the Lebanon Technology and Career Center, which is where they were conducted the previous semester. The satellite campus used to be in the Nelson Education Center, but when the City of Lebanon sold the building to Tracker Marine in October 2014, Drury needed to find a new home. Lebanon Campus Coordinator Millie Gann said that the university has plans for its future in Lebanon. "Drury's not leaving Lebanon; Drury's staying here, and we hope to expand in the future and continue offering our programs here," Gann stated. The university moved its administrative office to 1135 W. Elm St. in June 2015, and when the school year started, it began conducting night classes at the Lebanon Junior High School. At the time, the university planned to

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remodel the Elm Street location to create classrooms, but the plans have changed. "We moved because the building that we were in, we decided, was not probably going to work out to build classrooms in for us," Gann explained. "So we decided to continue having classes at LTCC for awhile, and we'll probably do that for another year or so anyway." After finishing its fall 2015 semester in the junior high building, Drury began renting space at the LTCC for the spring semester, and Gann said the latter location is a better fit. "The (LTCC) classrooms are beautiful; they fit our students well," she stated. "We were at the Junior High for one semester. The desks are small and our students are adults, so we thought, 'This isn't quite working as well as it should.' And the tech school seems to fit our needs better." Drury University first opened its Lebanon campus in 1986 at the Lebanon Junior High School. It moved to the Nelson Education Center in 1996 and remained there until last year. The Lebanon campus is what Drury calls a "launch site," which means that students can either earn a variety of associate's degrees or begin work on bachelor's degrees to be finished later at another campus. The campus offers both 16-week classes and block classes, which present 16 weeks worth of of information in eight weeks. Drury University also provides dual credit and dual enrollment in Lebanon. A dual credit class is a class offered through the high school that counts for both high school and college credit. Dual credit students pay tuition to the college, but the cost is lower than what a college student would pay. Dual enrollment allows a high school-aged student to take classes through the college, also for a reduced rate. ■

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Gasconade Park Located at 4th Street and Harrison, Gasconade Park was Lebanon’s first. One shelter was built years ago, and the Lions Club soon added playground equipment. The park currently houses the Hughes Senior Center, for which the city donated land. The park has a quarter-mile walking track, dedicated to Emma LaBlank, who has a long history of serving food to senior citizens in the area. A second shelter house was built on the foundation of the original bathhouse of the old pool. The park has a play area with equipment and a ball field. Gasconade Park provides green space for neighborhood children and areas for picnicking. The Lebanon Parks Department turned its attention to upgrades at Gasconade in 2016, sending out a survey to area residents to find out what they'd like to see there. A dog park and a walking trail were some of the favored ideas for the space.

Spiller Park

▼ ▼

A small neighborhood park on Spiller Street near the water tower. It is a small, quiet green space with playground equipment and picnicking areas.

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Boswell Park

44

▼ ▼

Originally known as Maplecrest Park, this area now bears the name of its largest benefactor. It is located on Historic Route 66 and in 2016 was being transformed for a Route 66 theme. After a donation from the Boswell family the park changed names. The family donated $100,000 in the late 1970s to provide matching funds to build the outdoor pool. It was then named after James E. Boswell, Jr. (1937-1955). The park includes three shelters for picnicking, a baseball field with spectator seating, concession stand, batting cages and restrooms. It also has a well-utilized one-mile walking trail. It also includes two lighted tennis courts, an outdoor basketball court and a disc golf course. The crown jewel of the park is the Boswell Aquatic Center. The pool complex, located inside the park, is complete with two 26-foot water slides, a kiddie pool, a main pool, shade structures and a recently renovated bathhouse. Since the aquatic center opened in May 2008, thousands of pool-goers have lined up to splash around in the cool water. The original pool was built in the 1970s and had undergone little in the way of improvements in 30 years of public use. The $1.1-million pool project included the renovation of the earlier facilities and the addition of several new pool features. The renovation was funded by the Capital Improvement Tax that was approved by Lebanon voters in February 2007.

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has said that he would like for at least part of the funds from the sale to go toward preserving the history of Route 66. The refurbished park will also include three 10-by-20 foot Route 66-themed murals. The murals, which will cost $75,000, are expected to be paid for through fundraising conducted by the local Route 66 Society. The rest of the improvements include renovations to the ballfields and restrooms as well as a new playground.

▼ ▼

Originally the Route 66 theme project was intended as a small "pocket park" inside Boswell Park, but in the summer of 2015 the Lebanon Park Board decided to expand the project to make the rest of Boswell Park Route 66-themed as well. Part of the funding of the funding for the project is coming from the city’s sale of the Nelson Education Center to Tracker Marine. The center was on land that the Nelson family originally donated to the city, and Nelson family descendent Bruce Owen

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W.T. Vernon Park Located on Greenleaf Street. It has one shelter for picnics, a restroom facility and a playground.

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larly features hot dogs, beverages and a bounce house. Wilburn said that Kids Fishing Day usually draws between 200 and 250 children. "I think it's a great way to spend some time with the family, get out and enjoy the parks," Wilburn said in anticipation of the event in 2016. "We've had a lot of updates to Nelson Park over the last few years, so they can come out and see what we've done to the park and have a good morning with their family."

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Bordered by Maple Lane, Bland Road, and Kent Drive. Nelson Park offers four softball and baseball fields, a concession stand, restrooms, a skate park and a small fishing pond for senior citizens or kids under 16 years of age. There is also a multi-purpose field (for Mighty Mite football), bathroom facilities for that area and a concession stand. There is spectator seating, plenty of parking, lots of green space and two shelter houses connected by a fenced play area for child safety. Nelson Park plays host every year to the city's Kids Fishing event sponsored by the city Parks Department and the Missouri Department of Conservation. According to Lebanon Assistant Parks Director Elliot Wilburn, kids ages 15 and younger are welcome to fish in Nelson Pond on a catch-and-release basis for one Saturday morning in June. Prior to the event, organizers stock the pond with hundreds of catfish and bluegill. Although the young fishermen can't keep their catches, the Conservation department offers prizes for the biggest fish in different age ranges on that day. Kids who have their own fishing poles and bait are encouraged to bring them, but the Missouri Department of Conservation has some poles on hand for those who don't own one. In addition to fishing, the event regu-

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Atchley Park Located on North Missouri 5. The park has four ball fields, restrooms, three park shelters, a fenced playground area and a disc golf course. A lighted walking trail surrounds the park. There are entrances at the back and front of the park. Ample parking is provided. Several weddings are scheduled each year at the gazebo. With the recent relocation of the playground at Atchley Park, the Lebanon Park Board was tasked with finding a practical solution for the empty space. After much consideration, the board agreed for the old playground space to be renovated into a dog park. “We’ve been thinking about a dog park for a number of years. It was just always a matter of where to put it. We had discussed doing something at Gasconade (Park) a long time ago. Between finding the right location, fencing, water, restrooms and other hindrances, we never knew where to put it,” said Parks Director John Shelton. According to Shelton, the public has been wanting a dog park in Lebanon for some time. “We’ve had a lot of people asking about it and calling. It really seemed like more and more interest was being expressed over the last couple of years. Then as we became more dog-friendly in the parks with stations and other added things, it just seemed like more and more people were asking for it,” Shelton said. Shelton added that the inspiration of Helen Cowan was one of the main driving

points behind the park. “Mrs. Cowan enjoyed walking her dog in Atchley Park. I mean, she was out there all the time walking her puppies regardless of the weather. Rain, snow, cold and everything else, she was religiously out there,” Shelton said. "It’s really a great area. There is lots of shade, which is very important when deciding on an area for a dog park. You don’t want the dogs out in the exposed sun in the summertime without a shaded area. ... I really think it’s going to be a great fit for a park and a perfect contribution to the parks of Lebanon,” Shelton said. Lebanon's canine population seems to agree.

Wallace Park Lebanon’s second newest park was the result of a gift from St. John’s/Breech Medical Center after a new hospital replaced Wallace Hospital on Harwood Avenue. The land from the old hospital was given to the city, and most of the building was demolished. Wallace Park also has beautiful new playground equipment and a small gazebo for picknicking. The Lebanon Community Band and Choir perform at the park every summer.

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Harke Park Named in honor of the generosity of Walter and Rene Harke, Harke Park is located on National Avenue just off Fremont Road. It includes a half-mile paved walking track. The park also has a beautiful gazebo, play areas with state-of-the-art playground

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Lebanon GreatLife Golf and Fitness is a semi-private, 18-hole championship golf course located 2 miles west of Lebanon and 9 miles east of Bennett Spring State Park on Missouri 64. For the last 60 years, the course has provided a challenging golf experience for players of all abilities and is open year round, with the exception of Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, weather permitting. In recent years, the course, previously known as Lebanon Community Golf and Country Club, has undergone a makeover, that not only includes the new name, but new membership rates and a fitness center. The course features a driving range, putting green, and chipping green with three sets of tees stretching to 6,435 yards. Gently rolling hills offer a track that affords elevation changes, large contoured greens, water hazards, a large “sinkhole” on the Par 3, Sixteenth hole, and numerous options in shot selection on the Par 4s and 5s. The Par 4, Fourth hole presents an opportunity to cut a 90 degree dogleg left over trees with your drive to possibly reach the green or play it as a conventional Par 4. The Ninth and Eighteenth holes share a huge green divided by a large bunker, that can make for some interesting, lengthy putts.

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With a mix of tight, tree-lined fairways and some that are more forgiving, the course definitely presents a variety of play. The clubhouse features a bar, the 19th Hole, and gives golfers an opportunity to relax, and the grounds also feature a swimming pool and tennis courts.

The state-of-the-art fitness center is open 24/7 to all members and includes cardio, free weights and circuit training. There are certified instructors that provide a variety of fitness classes, including spinning and zumba, and a certified massage therapist is available by appointment.

Membership at GreatLife includes access to all other GreatLife facilities, including locations in Springfield, Kansas City, Topeka, Kan. and elsewhere. More information is available at www. lebanonmissourigolf.com, or by calling the club at 532-2901. ■

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The people of Lebanon

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▼ ▼

They voted for a Capital Improvements Tax that funded the building of the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center, which is named for a former mayor of the city. Now not a weekend goes by that something isn't going on at the CCC. It holds a theater, an exhibition hall, an atrium, meeting rooms and the Lebanon Family YMCA. Considered by many to be "the crown jewel of Lebanon," it also hosts the Wall of Honor, which depicts dozens of citizens who have contributed greatly to the community. The variety of events and activities at the CCC is amazing. While the city's main tourism draws are outdoor, warm weather activities such as visiting Bennett Spring State Park and cruising on old Route 66, the CCC brings visitors to the city yearround.

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The indoor facility is big enough to house numerous events that bring in visitors. Demolition derbies, bull riding events and the state horseshoe pitching and cornhole championships take place there each year. Sporting events such as youth wrestling and roller derby also take place there. The CCC serves as a venue for the Lebanon High School graduation ceremony and hosts various plays for schools in the theater. Local lovebirds also take advantage of the site for weddings and receptions. Event the parking lot is used for car shows and outdoor movies for the community.

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Probably the most popular event for the CCC has been the Brumley Gospel Sing, a four-day concert event that took place there every August since 2006, drawing top-shelf gospel artists and their fans from all over the country. In 2016, the Brumley Gospel Sing is moving elsewhere, but Lebanon is

planning its own gospel music extravaganza for the CCC. The CCC also serves as the site for a humongous community wide garage sale twice a year, gun shows, educational seminars about everything from alpaca wool to economic development, a high-school per-

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PAGE 64

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


The Lebanon Daily Record and the newspapers that preceded it have served the Lebanon area continuously for 150 years. One of the first known newspapers printed in Lebanon was The Clipper, a small, short-lived paper published in the 1860s. Several other newspapers sprang up in the early days of Lebanon. Most lasted only a short time. To trace the roots of the Lebanon Daily Record, you have to go back to 1866 when the Laclede County Republican was established by Major A.F. Lewis. As evident by its name, the newspaper had very strong Republican views. The paper was sold and changed names several times. J.E. MacKesson bought it in 1892, and he and his family operated the Republican for more than 30 years. Another early paper that is part of The Daily Record's heritage was the Lebanon Rustic, established in 1873. The Milton Fullers operated this paper the longest number of years of any of its owners. The Rustic and Laclede County Republican were combined in 1935 when a stock company, under the name of the Lebanon Publishing Co. Inc., purchased the Laclede County Republican, the Lebanon Rustic and the Lebanon Times. The Times

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had been published for a short time by Paul "Pete'' Page. The papers combined under the name of the Rustic-Republican, with Fred May as editor and publisher of the company and Paul Page as manager. Lebanon's first daily paper with paid circulation was The Lebanon Daily News, established in 1936 by Mr. and Mrs. Fred May. The first issue of The Lebanon Daily Record hit the streets Aug. 6, 1945. In August 1946, Ozark Newspapers Inc. purchased the Rustic-Republican and Daily News from Col. and Mrs. Fred May. The businesses were consolidated under the name of Lebanon Publishing Co. Inc., with the weekly paper continuing as the Lebanon RusticRepublican and the daily as The Lebanon Daily Record. In 1953 Lebanon Publishing Co. was purchased by the late O.R. Wright, father of current owner and president Dalton Wright. Dalton Wright purchased the newspaper in 1972. He has been active in community activities for three decades as well as serving as president of the Missouri Press Association in 1986 and the National Newspaper Association in 1998. In 2000 he was inducted into the Missouri Press Association Hall of

Fame. The last issue of the Rustic-Republican was published Sept. 25, 1975. Since then, The Lebanon Daily Record has been the only "legal" newspaper — a newspaper qualified by law to publish legal notices — in Laclede County. The newspaper and its predecessors have been published at various locations on Commercial Street in Lebanon most years since 1866. In February 1973, the office was moved from 221 E. Commercial to 290 S. Madison. By the end of 1996, Lebanon Publishing Co. reached another milestone when it announced the purchase of the historic Lingsweiler building at 100 E. Commercial. After a year of construction and renovation in an attempt to return the 1912 structure to as close to its original condition as possible, the company moved its news, advertising, composing and business departments in the spring of 1998. Other departments, including the pressroom, remain at 290 S. Madison. The LDR publishes daily Monday through Friday and puts out a Weekend edition on Saturdays. For subscription information or information about placing a classified ad, call (417) 532-9131. ■

PAGE 65


Take a walk on the

WILD SIDE

habitats that are home to popular game species are also home to the myriad of small mammal, reptile, amphibian and songbird species that reside in this part of the state for all or part of the year. Laclede County’s natural world has always been graced with variety, as evidenced by data gleaned from earlysettlement descriptions of this area. In pre-settlement times, it’s estimated the county contained slightly more than 40 square miles of native prairie. Though that comprises a seemingly insignificant six percent of the county’s land mass, this figure becomes more interesting when you look at surrounding counties. Draw a line straight west from Laclede County on that same pre-settlement map and you’ll find counties with increasing amounts of prairie; draw a line straight east and the amount of prairie decreases.

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V

ariety has long spiced the outdoor landscape of Laclede County and the surrounding area, and the same holds true today. Whether you find enjoyment in nature by hunting, fishing, photographing animals or merely admiring the birds that visit your backyard feeder, you’ll find this area rich with wildlife diversity. The forests that comprise more than 40 percent of Laclede County’s landscape may have proven to be detrimental to the establishment of large crop fields like those found in more open areas of the state, but the tree-covered parts of the county produce bountiful harvests of deer and turkey each hunting season. Crisscrossing this terrain is a network of streams of varying size, which, in addition to providing aesthetic beauty, offers an abundance of fishing opportunities for floaters, waders and bank anglers. Of course, these same

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That means when the first settlers came to Laclede County, they found an area situated squarely on the line where the eastern forests met the western tall grass prairie. Because of that, early settlers in Laclede County found a mixed bag of wildlife: Forest-friendly species such as the timber wolf, black bear and ruffed grouse blended with bison, elk, prairie chickens and other animals that preferred native grasslands. Those creatures may be gone (or, in the case of the black bear, greatly reduced in number); but today’s outdoors enthusiasts can still find an abundance of species in this area. People in the Lebanon area need look no further than the Coleman Memorial Conservation Area on the south end of the city. This 64-acre site features 38 acres of forest and 24 acres of grassland area that is in the process of being restored with native plants. A 1.8-mile hiking trail provides good opportunities to view deer, turkey, songbirds and other animals. No hunting is allowed at the Coleman Area. Wildlife viewing opportunities also exist at the Osage Fork Conservation Area, approximately four miles south of Lebanon, and on the four tracts of the Bear Creek Conservation Area five miles northeast of Lebanon. It should be noted these areas have no designated trails and are popular spots for deer hunters in the fall archery and firearms seasons and turkey hunters during the spring firearms season. Nearby natureviewing and hunting opportunities also exist at 7,180-acre Lead Mine Conservation Area, a Missouri Department of Conservation site in Dallas County. Like hunting and nature viewing, anglers in this area also have options. Trout fishing enthusiasts can satisfy their angling appetites at Bennett Spring State Park and at the managed trout area on the Niangua River downstream from the park in Dallas County. Stream anglers in pursuit of bass should check out the Missouri Department of Conservation’s smallmouth management area on the Osage Fork of Gasconade River. More information about opportunities for nature-viewing, hunting and fishing can be found at the Missouri Department of Conservation office at 2350 S. Jefferson in Lebanon, 417-532-7612 or the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Southwest Regional Office at 2630 N. Mayfair Ave. in Springfield, 417-895-6880. Francis Skalicky is the media specialist for the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Southwest Region. For more information about conservation issues, call 417-8956880. ■ OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

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buffaloes and even panthers were said to drink from the enormous spring. Brice homesteaded 160 acres, which included the spring, and eventually homesteaded additional acreage that included all of the land and spring branch area. He built the first mill in the vicinity where early-day farmers brought their corn for grinding. The mill eventually was washed away during a violent rainstorm and flood. Brice, the first permanent settler in the Bennett Spring area, died in 1855 and is buried in the Bennett Cemetery. The Bennett family later settled at the spring area on land known as the Elmer Conn farm, site of the present Sand Spring Motel and Restaurant. The enterprising Peter Bennett built a mill at the spring outlet and Niangua River, which also was washed away in a rainstorm and flood. Bennett built a second mill known as Bennett’s Mill during the Civil War years, and it became a center

for tradesmen and farmers. The mill was too small to accommodate the increase in business, so Bennett built a third mill and included a carding machine that prepared wool for the spinning wheel. He also built a sawmill in one section of the mill.

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ust a few miles west of Lebanon is Bennett Spring State Park, one of Missouri’s first and most popular state parks, which attracts a growing number of tourists every year. The third largest natural spring in the state of Missouri pumps 100 million gallons of water each and every day. Anglers from around the nation wade in the spring’s waters in search of lunker-sized trout, and those looking for adventures in camping and canoeing come in droves each year, but there was once a time when Bennett Spring State Park was simply known as Brice, Mo. During the 1920s when America was enjoying prosperity following World War I, Bennett Spring (then known as Brice) was one of many areas considered by state planners to be preserved as a state park. A Dec. 12, 1924, article in the Laclede County Republican stated that Lebanon Chamber of Commerce President O.A. Mayfield requested that the state consider Bennett Spring as a possible state park site. The article said the first parcel of land, 8 1/2 acres belonging to Josie Bennett Smith, would became a part of Bennett Spring State Park. The land was purchased from Mrs. Smith on Dec. 27, 1924. Several weeks later, another contract was signed between William Sherman Bennett, Mrs. Smith’s brother, and the state for the sale of 565.33 acres. Of that land, 427 acres can be traced as belonging to James Brice, who settled there in 1837. The land where today’s park store, office, dining lodge and hatchery buildings stand once belonged to the Bennett family. Records indicate that James Brice came here from Illinois in search of productive land and a healthful climate. He decided to stay at the beautiful spring area, which reportedly teemed with wildlife. Elk, deer, wild turkeys,

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to meet the train there and haul the equipment to Brice in ox-driven wagons — a slow process over the rocky fords of that time. Peter Bennett married Anna Brice, the daughter of homesteader James Brice. After Brice’s death, Peter and Anna inherited the property. When Peter Bennett died in 1882, his son, William Sherman Bennett, continued to run the mill. Bennett’s daughter, Josie Bennett Smith, operated a hotel at Brice for many years. The Bennett Mill was destroyed by fire in 1895. The last mill at Brice was built by Dr. John B. and Freeman Atchley. Others who operated the mill in later years were J.E. Kelly, Mr. Runge and B.J. Usery. The mill stood as a landmark at Bennett Spring for sightseers and tradesmen alike. The Civilian Conservation Corps, which worked in the area during the 1930s, improved the mill.

However, it later was destroyed by fire. The CCC also constructed a log dam, foot trails, a new bridge and many other buildings at the park. The spring valley already had become a popular camping site in the late 1800s as an area where farmers waited their turns at the mill. According to a Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) brochure, campers would fish, hunt or visit with local townspeople to pass the time. By the turn of the century, recreation was gaining in importance at Brice. According to the DNR brochure, in 1900 the Missouri fish commissioner introduced 40,000 mountain trout into the spring, and a privately owned fish hatchery was built in 1923, the year before the state bought the spring and some of the surrounding area for a state park. Continued on page 72

▼ ▼

As business continued to grow, Bennett decided to construct a three-story building, and he purchased equipment for it in St. Louis. Since the railroad track went only to Rolla, Bennett and his employees had

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Contined from page 70 The Brice Post Office originally was built as a log building on the river bank and named after James Brice. In later years, it was located in a general store operated by William Sherman Bennett and his wife, Louie. The name of the post office was changed to Bennett Spring in 1939 and finally was discontinued in 1965. Arlie Bramwell was the last postmaster at Bennett Spring. It was reported that in the early 1900s, William Sherman Bennett had a number of cans of young trout emptied into the spring. The trout thrived in the cold waters, attracting many fishermen. Brice was the location where famed author Harold Bell Wright completed work on his classic novel, “The Shepherd of the Hills." Wright also wrote “The Calling of Dan Matthews" while he lived in Lebanon. In that book, Wright’s “Gordon’s Mill" actually was Bennett’s Mill. Today, one of the oldest original buildings at Bennett Spring is the Bennett Spring Church of God, organized in 1917 through the influence of William Sherman and Louie Boles Bennett, who donated land for the church site. In the 1950s, stone veneer was applied over the wooden structure.

PAGE 72

It is the only original building that was in old Brice. “Aunt Louie’’ Bennett was pastor of the church for many years. Today, Bennett Spring Church of God is a very active church and is visited by many fishermen staying at the park each trout season. In 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the Works Project Administration (WPA) were two new programs implemented by the U.S. government to put people to work during the Great Depression. Much work was done at Bennett Spring starting in November of that year. The crews’ first tasks were to build barracks for themselves. They built a new dam, a bridge, a dining lodge, six cabins, a store and post office building, shelters, houses, roads and trails. They also renovated the old Atchley Mill. The men also constructed a second set of gravel-bottomed hatchery rearing pools and in 1935 built a new section onto the hatchery building. After the men left in 1938, they dismantled all but one of their barracks. Through the years most of the develop-

ment at the park has taken place outside of the park’s boundaries as private individuals built cabins, hotels, campgrounds and many other businesses. In 1969, Arlie Bramwell sold his wood and stone cabins to the state. Ralph Usery’s cabins were razed. Splan’s Resort was once a very busy place there. Vogel’s Resort was acquired by the state in 1980. In 1969, the Nature Interpretive Center opened at the park with George Kastler as the first naturalist, and in 1982 the park dedicated a new office and store building close to the dining lodge on the site of the original Brice. Later the park’s Niangua entrance was renamed the Bramwell Entrance in honor of Arlie Bramwell. An additional 1,650 acres of land to the south of the current state boundary was purchased in November 1988 to provide watershed protection for Bennett Spring itself as well as the park area. Each year has brought more improvements. Now, at 3,216 acres, the state park that arose around Peter Bennett’s spring continues to delight all comers. ■

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


Christmas Parade rolls through downtown Around the third week

of November each year, Lebanon kicks off its holiday season on a Saturday morning by shutting down downtown.

▼ ▼

Thousands of residents of the city and the surrounding area line both sides of West Elm Street and North Jefferson Avenue as 100-plus floats and other participants roll by. “The Lebanon Christmas Parade is one of the largest continuous parades in southwest Missouri and potentially probably all Missouri,” says Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce Director Darrell Pollock. “It’s continually one of the best attended. It’s free. It’s a great way to get in the holiday spirit and the Christmas spirit.

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“We have it right before Thanksgiving, too, so you get to be able to be in the holiday spirit for Thanksgiving with your family, and then we go right into the Christmas time, and it’s just a great time to just get out and just enjoy that,” Pollock said. The parade route begins at Boswell Park and continues east on Elm Street before turning north on Jefferson Avenue and eventually ending at Sixth Street. ■

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Making a difference Hometown Heroes recognizes those who have gone out of their way to help

F

or more than a dozen years now, Lebanon and Laclede County have set aside a special morning each year to honor people in the community who have made positive changes in the lives of others — everything from teaching someone to read to saving a drowning person's life. "All we need is for people to just tell us the stories," said organizer Merri Hess. "I'll call them and get more detail. I'll find the pictures, we'll do the video, we'll do all of that if we just have the story ideas." Nominees can be either adults or children, and they can also be organizations such as churches. The only requirement is that the nominee has to either live in Laclede County or has to have performed their act of heroism there. "The sky's the limit. Anybody who has an impact on people, on our community, those are the people we're looking for to recognize ..." Hess said. Those who are selected are honored at a special Hometown Heroes Breakfast at the Cowan Civic Center. "Our hardest obstacle in the beginning is to get people to think of the people and Hess then to actually make that call," she stated. "And that's why I started saying, 'Just call me at the bank and I'll sit down and type it right then." And that way it's done and over with. But it truly does just take a few minutes. If people will just slow down, if you're in your car and and you think of something, something sparks an idea, call me, email me — whatever — and it doesn't have to be offlcial. Don't think about that; we just want to hear the stories." All Hometown Heroes nominees will receive a letter of recognition whether they are chosen or not. Hess stated, "Hometown Heroes is, if nothing else, a very basic way to say thank you. A lot of times when someone does something nice for you, it's so hard to show your gratitude, and it's hard for most people to accept that help, certainly the recognition is even harder. But when they are nominated for Hometown Hero, they get a letter says you've been nominated for a Hometown Hero and you can see your nomination story by contacting us or whatever." Each year, the proceeds from the Hometown Heroes Breakfast go to support the Lebanon area Red Cross. "Hometown Heroes is a way to help those people who are out there in our community making a difference through kindness or courage or basically being unselflsh, which is what the Red Cross does every day. So this is a way to get those people who are out there making a difference, (get) them the recognition they deserve," Hess stated. OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-2017

PAGE 75


Numbers to know UTILITIES ■ LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE — 1400 E. Route 66. (417) 532-3164. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY DISTRICT NO. 1 — North and West of I-44. (417) 532-3171. ■ DISTRICT NO. 3 — South and East of I-44, (417) 532-4525. ■ CITY OF LEBANON — (417) 5322156. GOVERNMENT OFFICES ■ LEBANON CITY HALL — 400 S. Madison. (417) 532-2156. ■ KENNETH E. COWAN CIVIC CENTER — 500 E. Elm. (417) 532-4642. ■ MISSOURI DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY — 2639 S. Jefferson. (417) 532-6146. ■ MISSOURI DIVISION OF FAMILY SERVICES — Highway 5 south of the airport. (417) 532-3137. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY CLERK — Voter registration. Laclede County Government Center, 200 N. Adams. Application by mail also is possible. (417) 532-5471.

FULL SERVICE PHARMACY

■ LACLEDE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT — 405 Harwood Ave. (417) 532-2134. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY COMMISSION — Laclede County Government Center, 200 N. Adams. (417) 532-4897. ■ SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION.—South Highway 5. (417) 5329136. LIBRARY ■ LEBANON-LACLEDE COUNTY LIBRARY — 915 S. Jefferson. (417) 532-2148. EMERGENCY SERVICES Dial 911 to connect to emergency services in City of Lebanon and all of Laclede County. Here are other important phone numbers: ■ MISSOURI STATE HIGHWAY PATROL, City Rt. 66, Lebanon, (417) 532-6682; if no answer, call (573) 3682345. ■ POLICE non-emergency, (417) 5323131. ■ FIRE non-emergency, (417) 5322104. ■ SHERIFF, (417) 532-2311. ■ MERCY HOSPITAL LEBANON, (417) 533-6100. ■ COPE — Shelter for victims of domestic violence. Hotline number (417) 532-2885. Non-emergency number is (417) 533-5201. SENIOR CENTER ■ HUGHES SENIOR CENTER — 460 W.Fifth St. (417) 532-3040. Care Coordinator program, call (417) 532-9719. PUBLICATIONS ■ LEBANON DAILY RECORD — 100 E. Commercial. Published Sunday

Educational Toys and Gifts Missouri Made Candles Wall Decor • Scarves • Jewelry

through Friday, plus on-line version at http://www.lebanondailyrecord.com. Trout Talk, published monthly during the summer by Lebanon Publishing Co. The EXTRA advertising supplement. The Weekly Trader. (417) 532-9131. PUBLIC SCHOOLS ■ LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS — The Lebanon R-3 School District is Accredited with Distinction by the state of Missouri. Its campuses serve more than 4,250 students. See page 44 for building names, addresses and phone numbers. ■ GRADES 10-Adult: Lebanon Technology & Career Center, 777 Brice St. (417) 532-5494. ■ PARENTS AS TEACHERS, (417) 532-3822. ■ EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION (417) 532-3961. ■ LEBANON ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION CENTER (417) 533-3824. ■ ADULT BASIC EDUCATION LEARNING CENTER 532-8470. ■ R-3 CENTRAL OFFICE 532-9141. ■ TRANSPORTATION OFFICE 5329371. PRE-SCHOOL PROGRAMS Public and private, including: ■ Head Start, 313 W. Elm, (417) 5324989. ■ ABC Academy, 300 N. Madison, (417) 588-2531. ■ Bullfrogs & Little Fishes Preschool, (417) 588-2131 or (417) 532-9876. ■ MOCA Head Start, Richland, (573) 765-5592. ■ LEEP (Laclede Early Education Program) serving preschool children with developmental delays. (417) 5326528.

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PAGE 76

CONVENIENT DRIVE-THRU • NEXT TO MAZZIO’S

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1040 W. ELM ST. Lebanon, MO 65536

D&A PA I N T & T R U C K A C C E S S O R I E S

417-532-6198 www.dasalesonline.com

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2016-17


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And while you’re here, grab a bite to eat at one of these fine restaurants.

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(417)588-5898 1087 S. Jefferson Ave.

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417-532-3519 • 221 Park Ave., Lebanon, MO

417-588-7893

E S E B U FF E T N I H C GREAT WALL Sun.-Thurs. 11-9 • Fri. & Sat. 11-9:30

417-588-9907 • 1921 W. Elm, Lebanon (In front of Hampton Inn) • I-44 Exit 127

850 S. Jefferson Ave.

25416 Granite Ln.


2016 Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce

Membership Listing

1709 THE COYOTE (573) 317-8000 ACCESS HOME HEALTH (417) 532-3719 ACT TWO, LLC (417) 588-3881 ADELMAN TRAVEL (417) 532-8282 ADVANCED DENTAL (417) 588-2221 AFFORDABLE FAMILY DENTISTRY (417) 588-1690 AIRBLAST INFLATABLES (417) 664-2302 AL SAMONS MOBILE HOME SALES (417) 532-2125 ALDI INC. ALL AMERICAN WASTE (417) 532-1600 ALLEN & RECTOR, P.C. (417) 532-8300 ALVIN JACKSON’S USED CARS (417) 532-2186 ALWAYS FLOWERS & PLANTS LLC (417) 532-5959 AMERICA’S CARMART (417) 532-2831 AMERICAN RED CROSS (417) 533-8121 AMERICAS BEST VALUE INN (417) 532-3133 ARVEST BANK 417-533-3886 BACK TO HEALTH CHIROPRACTIC (417) 532-2986 BAILEY’S TV - RADIO SHACK - INTEGRATION EXCELLENCE (417) 532-9290 BANK OF KANSAS CITY (417) 657-0202 BAYS CHIROPRACTIC (417) 532-6251 BEAR TRAILER MFG, INC. (417) 286-3300 BELL PLUMBING (417) 533-5328 BENNETT SPRING CAMPGROUND (832) 312-7379 BENNETT SPRING INN (417) 588-9110 BENNETT SPRING STATE PARK (417) 532-4307 BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU (417) 862-4222 BEVERLY MILLER BLAKE, TIM AND DAWN (417) 718-7100 BNC NATIONAL BANK (417) 532-2635 BOAT TOWN BREWER (417) 533-2306 BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA (417) 883-1636 BRAND LAW FIRM, PC (417) 991-3550 BRISTOL CARE INC (THE ESSEX) (660) 287-4536 BUTLER SUPPLY (417) 533-3131 BUZZ CUTS BARBER SHOP (417) 718-1554 C & C FARM AND HOME (417) 532-7158 CACKLE HATCHERY (417) 532-4581 CAMBARLOC ENGINEERING & MANUFACTURING (417) 532-4601 CARMECO, INC. (417) 532-6133 CASEY’S GENERAL STORE #1083 (417) 588-3994 CASTLEWOOD STUDIOS (417) 532-2329 CELL PHONE SAVERS (417) 533-3000 CENTURY 21 LACLEDE REALTY (417) 588-1200 CENTURYLINK (417) 334-9253 CHEN’S CHINESE SUPER BUFFET & HIBACHI (417) 991-3777 CHOICES IN HEALTH & LIFE (417) 532-3360 CITY OF LEBANON (417) 532-2156

CLAIM (417) 533-5017 CLEMENT TRUCK DRIVING ACADEMY, LLC (417) 589-2351 CLIFTON’S WESTSIDE CAFE (417) 532-7742 CLOSE TO MY HEART (417) 345-5839 COLE KARR COLE-N-SONS TIRE & AUTO, INC. (417) 588-4468 COMMERCE BANK, N.A. (417) 532-2161 COMMUNITY BAPTIST (417) 532-8421 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC. (417) 588-9562 CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING SERVICE (417) 881-7966 COPE (417) 533-5201 COURT PROBATIONARY SERVICES (417) 533-0887 COVER & HILTON LAW, LLC (417) 588-0104 COX HEALTH CENTER (417) 532-8700 CRITICAL CONTINGENCIES LLC (417) 588-9095 CROCKER CHIROPRACTIC LLC (417) 532-9166 CROSS CREEK CHURCH (417) 650-0647 CROSSLINES MINISTRY, INC. (417) 588-3559 CROW PAINT & GLASS INC. (417) 532-3551 D & A SALES (417) 532-8615 DA VINCI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT (417) 991-2499 DAN WATERMAN CPA (417) 532-7135 DAVID LAYMAN INSURANCE GROUP (417) 533-5444 DAVID MILLSAP (417) 830-2654 DAVIS, MIKE (417) 588-4138 DICKEY’S BBQ (417) 532-4227 DIGITAL SILVER (417) 533-5172 DIRECTORATE OF MORALE WELFARE & RECREATION (573) 596-0118 DOMINO’S (417) 588-7070 DOWCO, INC (417) 532-4219 DOWD’S CATFISH & BBQ (417) 532-1777 DOWNTOWN LEBANON OPTIMIST CLUB (417) 588-2219 DOWNTOWN TREASURES (417) 718-8223 DRURY UNIVERSITY (417) 532-9828 DTE - (DETROIT TOOL & ENGINEERING) (417) 720-8108 EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS JEFFREY MYERS (417) 532-2687 EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS JIM KUENY (417) 588-2286 ELECTRONIC SOLUTIONS (417) 588-9228 ELISABETH CORTESE (803) 305-5941 ELIZABETH PETTITT (417) 664-1064 ELM STREET EATERY (417) 588-2700 EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC (417) 588-8600 EMPIRE ENERGY (417) 532-9153 EXPRESS STOP STORES (417) 532-8112 EZ-DISPOSAL (417) 533-7870 FACTORY CONNECTION (417) 532-2454 FALCON FLOOR COVERING (417) 532-3118

FAMILY EYECARE ASSOCIATES (417) 532-2562 FANTASTIC SAMS (317) 937-6232 FCS FINANCIAL (417) 588-5828 FERRELLGAS (417) 588-2843 FFO HOME (417) 532-8896 FIDELITY COMMUNICATIONS (417) 588-7841 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH (417) 532-7168 FIRST FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH (417) 532-6728 FIRST STATE COMMUNITY BANK (417) 532-2151 FIRST UNITED METHODIST (417) 532-7153 FLASHBACK PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO (417) 532-4455 FORT AWESOME POWERSPORTS (417) 532-9253 FORT LEONARD WOOD FAMILY COMMUNITIES (573) 329-0122 FORT WOOD HOTELS BY EHRHARDT PROPERTIES (573) 451-3203 FORUMDENTAL 417-532-7166 FREEDOM HOME CRAFTERS (417) 532-7768 FRIENDLY FIREARMS (417) 588-9280 G-3 BOATS / SKEETER PRODUCTS (417) 588-9787 GALLERIA FINE JEWELRY (417) 532-9766 GARNER & SMITH INSURANCE (417) 532-9491 GARY’S FIREWORKS (417) 588-7300 GET ER DUN JON’S (417) 533-3569 GIOVANNI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT (417) 532-0959 GIRL SCOUTS OF THE MISSOURI HEARTLAND,INC. 1-877-312-4764 X1106 GLEN CUMMINS (417) 532-5522 GOFORTH EXPRESS L.L.C. (417) 532-9773 GRAVEL BAR AND GRILL (417) 532-7291 GRAVEN CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM (417) 532-3157 GREAT CIRCLE (417) 350-4435 GREAT LIFE GOLF & FITNESS (417) 532-2901 GREAT SOUTHERN BANK (417) 532-9168 GREAT WALL (417) 588-9907 GUARDIANS OF THE CHILDREN (GOC) (417) 241-8254 H & R BLOCK (417) 532-4113 H.E.P. SUPPLY CO., INC. (417) 532-9183 HAIRY’S SALON (417) 588-9588 HAMPTON INN (417) 533-3100 HAPPY TRAILS RV CENTER (417) 533-7530 HAPPY TRAILS RV PARK, LLC (417) 532-3422 HASH, BILL (417) 532-6342 HATZCO INDUSTRIES (877) 879-4289 HEALTH MARKETS (417) 322-0275 HELTON’S HOME FURNISHINGS (417) 532-7888 HENDERSON HEATING & COOLING (417) 532-2779 HERITAGE BANK OF THE OZARKS (417) 532-2265 HIDDEN VALLEY OUTFITTERS 417-533-5628 HILLS OF THUNDER PISTOL TRAINING (417) 650-7069

HIPPIE HOLLER VAPORS (417) 379-6236 HOGAN LAND TITLE CO. OF LACLEDE COUNTY (417) 532-5333 HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS (417) 532-1111 HOLMAN-HOWE FUNERAL HOME (417) 532-4061 HOMETOWN PHARMACY (417) 532-9110 HOSPICE COMPASSUS (417) 532-0372 HUGHES SR CENTER (417) 532-3040 IMPACT DIRECTORIES (314) 336-3090 INDEPENDENT STAVE COMPANY (417) 588-4151 INFUZE CREDIT UNION (417) 533-5368 INTEGRITY HOME CARE (417) 991-2882 IVEY ROOFING, INC. (417) 532-6612 JACKSON BROTHERS OF THE SOUTH, LLC (417) 209-9900 JACOBSEN APPLIANCES, INC (417) 532-7152 JAFRA INDEPENDENT CONSULTANT, LEANNA CRISWELL (417) 322-2212 JAMMIE LITTY (417) 532-7548 JARED ENTERPRISES (417) 877-7900 JEFFRIES ABSTRACT & TITLE INSURANCE (417) 532-7189 JOE’S PHARMACY INC (417) 532-7128 JON M KRAUSE DDS (417) 588-2562 JONES AUTO & TRUCK PLAZA (417) 588-2282 JONESY’S ANTIQUES (417) 532-2006 JORDAN VALLEY COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER (417) 334-8337 JUNE & BEYOND BOUTIQUE (417) 532-7467 JUSTICE FURNITURE (417) 532-6136 KCI CONSTRUCTION COMPANY (417) 588-9200 KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN (417) 532-7300 KIWANIS CLUB OF LEBANON (417) 588-9228 KJEL/KBNN (417) 532-9111 KMST (573) 341-6930 KTTK - NEW HORIZONS BROADCASTING (417) 588-1435 LAR C (417) 588-1577 L-LIFE FOOD BANK 417-991-FOOD (3663) LACLEDE COUNTY FAIR (417) 322-5349 LACLEDE COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER (417) 532-5471 LACLEDE COUNTY HEALTH DEPT. (417) 532-2134 LACLEDE COUNTY LAND TITLE (417) 588-0155 LACLEDE COUNTY LANDLORDS’ ASSN (417) 532-4035 LACLEDE COUNTY PREGNANCY SUPPORT CENTER (417) 532-8555 LACLEDE COUNTY REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMITTEE (417) 532-5783 LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE (417) 532-3164 LACLEDE INDUSTRIES (417) 588-3241 LACLEDE LITERACY COUNCIL (417) 532-6697 LACLEDE MUTUAL INSURANCE (417) 588-1857 LAKE PRINTING (573) 346-0600 LEBANON ARBOR CARE, LLC (417) 532-5050


2016 Membership Listing Continued... LEBANON AREA FOUNDATION (417) 532-8868 LEBANON ART GUILD, GALLERY & MORE (417) 532-1895 LEBANON BOARD OF REALTORS (417) 588-9777 LEBANON BOOKS (417) 532-2500 LEBANON COLLEGE OF COSMETOLOGY (417) 532-8522 LEBANON CONCERT ASSOCIATION (417) 588-3574 LEBANON FAMILY CHURCH (417) 533-3655 LEBANON FAMILY YMCA (417) 588-1177 LEBANON FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH (417) 718-5621 LEBANON GOSPEL MUSIC GET-TOGETHER (417) 236-9090 LEBANON HOST LION’S CLUB (417) 532-6502 LEBANON HUMANE SOCIETY (417) 532-9671 LEBANON PHONE CENTER & ALARM INC (417) 532-9819 LEBANON PROPERTIES I, II AND III (417) 588-4005 LEBANON PUBLISHING COMPANY (417) 532-9131 LEBANON PUMP SERVICE (417) 589-2023 LEBANON R-III SCHOOLS (417) 532-9141 LEBANON READY MIX (417) 532-6179 LEBANON REDI (417) 533-5627 LEBANON RITZ 8 THEATRE (417) 588-9724 LEBANON ROTARY (417) 531-1246 LEBANON SENIOR APARTMENTS (417) 883-7887 LEBANON SOCCER ASSOCIATION (417) 718-8191 LEBANON SOUTH NURSING & REHAB (417) 532-5351 LEBANON SUNDANCE APARTMENTS (417) 533-7604 LEBANON-LACLEDE COUNTY LIBRARY (417) 532-2148 LIFEPOINT CHURCH (417) 991-2911 LINDSAY CHEVROLET (417) 532-3114 LINDSAY FORD (417) 532-3146 LITTLE CAESARS PIZZA (417) 532-4786 LOWE ALUMINUM BOATS (417) 532-9101 LOWE’S HOME IMPROVEMENT (417) 588-6970 LSK LEBANON (417) 588-3550 MARTIN’S DISCOUNT CIGARETTES, LLC (417) 531-0999 MARGARET RUSSELL (417) 532-5326 MARY KAY BEAUTY CONSULTANT, SAM STONER (417) 588-2390 MATTAX, NEU, PRATER EYE CENTER (417) 588-2400 MCDONALD’S LEBANON II (417) 532-3653 MCDONALDS OF LEBANON (417) 532-6144 MEEK’S BUILDING CENTER (417) 588-3223 MEMORIAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORY (573) 774-6111 MERCY CLINIC - EYE SPECIALIST (417) 533-6540 MERCY FAMILY PHARMACY (417) 533-6770 MERCY HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE (417) 830-4063 MERCY HOSPITAL LEBANON (417) 533-6100 METAL PLUS CONSTRUCTION, LLC (573) 247-2629 METALTECH PRODUCTS, INC (417) 426-5577 MID-MISSOURI BANK (417) 588-1000 MID-MISSOURI INSURANCE (417) 532-5800 MID-MISSOURI RESPONSIBLE BREEDERS (417) 718-4182

MID-TOWN STORAGE (417) 650-1004 MIDWEST BASEMENT TECH (573) 693-9448 MIGHTY OAK LODGE (417) 288-9258 MIKE LIGHT INSURANCE AGENCY (417) 588-5123 MISSOURI CAREER CENTER (417) 532-6146 MISSOURI EAGLE (417) 532-6157 MISSOURI ENTERPRISE BUSINESS ASSISTANCE (573) 364-8570 MISSOURI OZARKS COMMUNITY ACTION (573) 765-3263 MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY - LEBANON (417) 532-0518 MOFWB MISSIONS (417) 532-6537 MONEY CONCEPTS (417) 344-0044 MOORE LAW (417) 532-7800 MORAN, JUANITA ENGLAND (417) 532-5130 MORGAN MUSIC (417) 588-1970 MRS. OLIVER’S WEDDINGS (417) 844-2166 MUNGER MOSS MOTEL (417) 532-3111 NATIONAL TV SALES AND RENTAL 417-588-2236 NATURE’S PANTRY (417) 533-3608 NEIGHBORHOOD’S INC (417) 533-5080 NIANGUA RIVER OASIS (417) 532-6333 NOBLE HUDSON & SONS (417) 532-3921 NORMAN’S BRIDAL (417) 532-2291 NORTHRIDGE PLACE (417) 532-9793 OATS, INC. 1-800-269-6287 ON POINT DESIGN (417) 588-7254 OSAGIAN CANOE (417) 532-7288 OTC LEBANON CENTER (417) 532-5044 OWEN SANDBLASTING (417) 588-1338 OZARK HARLEY DAVIDSON (417) 532-2900 OZARK MEDIA (573) 336-7620 OZARK VISIONS/OZARK HAUNTED HOUSE (417) 532-1002 OZARKS COCA-COLA/DR. PEPPER (417) 532-7131 OZARKS COUNTRY KENNEL & SPA (417) 664-7625 OZARKS FARM & NEIGHBOR, INC OZARKS SPORTING GOODS INC (417) 532-4862 PAGE OFFICE SUPPLY (417) 532-4012 PAGE PRINTING (417) 532-6232 PALLETS LLC (636) 537-4934 PAUL DAVIS RESTORATION (417) 588-5880 PC PLUS, INC. (417) 588-9584 PENMAC PERSONEL SERVICES (417) 588-8990 PERSONAL FINANCE COMPANY (417) 991-3077 PIERCED (417) 532-4446 POLK CITY DIRECTORY (417) 882-3948 PREACHER BOYS SECRET SAUCE (417) 588-4686 PRECISION CUTTER & TOOL (417) 532-7729 PRICE CUTTER (417) 532-7724 PROJECT 360 YOUTH SERVICES (417) 532-3360 QUALITY HEATING & AIR (417) 532-6239 R.P. LUMBER (417) 532-7155

RANDALL SUTTER, ATTY. AT LAW (417) 532-6123 RE/MAX NEXT GENERATION, LLC (417) 991-3333 REAL LIVING A HELPER REAL ESTATE (417) 533-3571 REALTY EXECUTIVES OF LEBANON (417) 588-5706 REGIONAL HOSPICE (417) 532-5139 RELAY FOR LIFE OF LACLEDE COUNTY (417) 447-1486 REPUBLIC SERVICES OF OSAGE BEACH (573) 346-3637 RESULTS ADVERTISING (417) 533-7741 RESULTS RADIO / KZNN, KTTR, KXMO, KDAA (573) 364-2525 RIVERFRONT CAMPGROUND & CANOE RENTALS (417) 588-3386 ROBERT S. SHOTTS, INC. (417) 588-7877 ROBERT W. PLASTER FOUNDATION (417) 533-3007 ROGERS AUTO WRECKING SALVAGES, INC (417) 532-3731 RUSSELL STOVER CANDIES (417) 588-1411 S.C.A.N. SUPPORTERS OF CHILDREN WITH ADDITIONAL NEEDS, INC (417) 991-2029 S.C.O.R.E. (573) 346-5441 SAND SPRING RESORT (417) 532-5857 SAWYER TIRE INC 417-991-3590 SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS (573) 528-6358 SENATOR MIKE PARSON (573) 751-8793 SHADEL’S COLONIAL CHAPEL (417) 532-6161 SHADOW OF THE NERD (417) 650-8086 SHATTERED IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY 417-588-1825 SHELTER INSURANCE AGENCY - KIMBERLY BREEDEN (417) 532-4329 SHELTER INSURANCE AGENCY - RALPH PITTS (417) 532-6106 SHEPHERD HILLS FACTORY OUTLET (417) 532-7000 SHOE SENSATION #618 (417) 532-1131 SHOW ME CLEAN CARWASH AND DOGWASH (417) 718-1482 SKATE CORRAL (417) 533-4642 SONIC (417) 532-6330 SPECTACULAR PRODUCTIONS (417) 288-8548 ST. CLAIR OF THE OZARKS (417) 849-9081 STARLITE LANES, LLC (417) 532-4262 STATE FARM INSURANCE - FRED HYNES (417) 588-2777 STATE FARM INSURANCE - SCOTT CHASE (417) 588-1555 STATE REPRESENTATIVE DIANE FRANKLIN (573) 216-2359 STATE REPRESENTATIVE SANDY CRAWFORD (417) 345-2958 STEAK N’ SHAKE (417) 532-2795 STEVE JACKSON (417) 532-2471 STOWE, LYNN (417) 588-9274 STRYKER ORTHODONTICS (417) 532-9532 STUDIO C PRODUCTIONS (417) 741-2218 STURDEVANT ACRES BED & BREAKFAST (417) 588-3112 SUMMIT NATURAL GAS SUPER 8 MOTEL (417) 588-2574 SUTHERLANDS LUMBER COMPANY (417) 588-8900 T H ROGERS LUMBER COMPANY (417) 532-9181 T’S REDNECK STEAKHOUSE (417) 532-3519 TERRA VETERINARY SERVICE (417) 532-9147

THE DURHAM COMPANY (417) 532-7121 THE FLIRTY FROG, LLC (417) 413-3365 THE GYM 24/7 (417) 991-2066 THE MALL (417) 532-2643 THE MEBRUER LAW FIRM (417) 532-3177 THE PARLOR SALON (417) 588-4217 THE REAL ESTATE COMPANY (417) 588-1110 THE SALVATION ARMY (417) 532-5135 THIRTY ONE GIFTS (512) 393-4032 THISTLEWOOD FLOWER MARKET (417) 532-2333 TIMBER CREEK ESTATES (417) 533-1129 TITAN PROPANE (417) 532-2121 TOTAL HIGHSPEED INTERNET SERVICES 417-851-1107 TRANSWORLD BUSINESS ADVISORS OF MISSOURI (417) 322-6460 TREETOPS ADVERTISING (660) 221-7745 TRI-COUNTY CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING (573) 368-5933 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH (417) 532-3433 TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (417) 532-2717 TRIUMPH ENGRAVING SHOPPE (417) 533-7661 TRUE CONSTRUCTION (417) 588-3235 UNITED INSURORS (417) 588-4121 UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI EXTENSION CENTER (417) 532-7126 US BANK (417) 588-4111 US CELLULAR (417) 588-2822 USO OF MISSOURI, INC. FORT LEONARD WOOD USO (573) 329-2039 VETERAN’S HOMESTEAD (417) 849-7754 VF OUTLET (417) 588-4142 VIC OR SYBL SLAUGHTER (417) 532-9691 VIDEO DIRECT SATELLITE & ENTERTAINMENT 866-680-8433 VIDIE’S CATERING (417) 588-5452 VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (417) 895-5858 W.T. VERNON HOUSING CORP. (417) 532-9733 WAL-MART STORE #14 (417) 588-2268 WALL CONSTRUCTION (417) 532-3679 WALTERS, STAEDTLER & ALLEN CPA’S (417) 532-5941 WCA WASTE CORPORATION OF MISSOURI INC. (417) 426-5004 WEAVER AUTO SALES (417) 532-3550 WHIRLWIND RANCH (417) 533-5280 WHITEHILL ENTERPRISES (417) 483-0566 WILL BRADLEY (417) 532-7784 WILLARD ASPHALT PAVING, INC. (417) 532-7107 WILLARD QUARRIES (417) 532-7107 WINSUPPLY OF LEBANON 417-532-0456 WOMEN’S FUNCTIONAL HEALTH & HORMONE CENTER 573-693-1516 WORLD FINANCE CORP (417) 532-9660 X MIND DESIGNS & CATERING (417) 268-9652


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ADVENTURES CAMPGROUND & FLOAT TRIPS BJ FORD’S ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES BARCLAY PUBLIC ACCESS BENNETT SPRING PUBLIC ACCESS BENNETT SPRING INN CASTAWAY CAMPGROUND CEDAR RIDGE CAMPGROUND BENNETT SPRING CAMPGROUND BENNETT SPRING CAMPGROUND FORT BENNETT CANOE RENTAL & TRADING POST FORT NIANGUA RIVER RESORT FAMILY CROSSING MOBILE HOME VILLAGE / THEBENNETT BENNETT SPRING ROOM GRILL 11 BENNETT SPRING GRILL 12 HO-HUMM CAMPGROUND & CANOE RENTAL 13 IDLE TIME RV PARK & CAMPGROUND 14 LACLEDE WHOLESALE CO. GIFTS & COLLECTIBLES 15 LARRY’S SPORTING GOODS & CEDAR RESORT 16 MAGGAR’S CANOE & CORKERY CAMPGROUND 17 MENAGERIE CAMPGROUND 18 MOON VALLEY PUBLIC ACCESS 19 NRO NIANGUA RIVER OASIS SPRING GRILL 20 OAKBENNETT HILL CAMPGROUND 20A VALLEY VIEW RV 21 ONE-EYED WILLY’S 22 PEACEFUL VALLEY RV PARK 23 PETE’S PLACE AT ONE-EYED WILLY’S 24 READING FLY SHOP 25 MACCREED’S ART GALLERY 27 RIVERFRONT CAMPGROUND & CANOES 28 RIVERWOOD RESORT 29 SAND SPRING RESORT 30 SPRINGVIEW FLY SHOP / ORVIS MOTEL 31 THOMPSON’S RV PARK 32 WEAVER’S CAMPGROUND & MOBILE HOME PARK 33 VOGEL’S HOMESTEAD RESORT


First State Community Bank aims to help every customer reach their specific financial goals. Whether you’re starting your child’s first savings account or are expanding your business, we’re here to help with all the products and services you need. Plus, our team is made up of local people who care about our community and its future. That’s why we have a genuine passion for the social and civic needs of our great community. Welcome to Lebanon! Remember, that when it comes to your finances, success starts here.

Welcome to Lebanon 2016-2017  

Visitors Guide to the City of Lebanon and Laclede County, Missouri

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