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A special publication of The Lebanon

Daily Record

OUR TOWN YOUR TOWN

DISCOVER 2013-2014 VISITORS’ GUIDE TO LEBANON & LACLEDE COUNTY

LEBANON ★ MO


FREEDOM CELLULAR “Your Original Hometown Authorized Agent”

Carl Lowrance - Agent/Owner • Sales Manager Amy Scruby 417-531-2168 or 417-531-2167 9:30-6 Mon.-Fri. • 10-3 Sat. • 242 S. Jefferson


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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Just the facts Population Lebanon: 14,474 Laclede County: 35,636 U.S. Census Bureau (2010) Location Known as the Crossroads of the Ozarks, Lebanon sits near the population center of the United States, 45 miles from Springfield and 165 miles from St. Louis. Beginnings Lebanon, first known as Wyota after the American Indians who roughed the trail here, took its name from the Tennessee hometown of one of its leading citizens, the Rev. Benjamin Hooker. For more information, contact: The Lebanon Daily Record 100 E. Commercial St. Lebanon, Mo. 65536 Phone: (417) 532-9131 Fax: (417) 532-8140 Online: www.lebanondailyrecord.com www.ozarkregionalonline.com

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Welcome to our hometown! Lebanon, Mo. offers a little something for everyone

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elcome to Lebanon, a great place to do just about anything! From our top-notch airport to the envy of any city, the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center; from our library to Bennett Spring State Park, the top-drawing state park in Missouri — the reasons for coming to Lebanon are numerous. The reasons for staying are even more so. It’s a great place to live, work, do business, play, or just visit. We’re glad you’re here, and we’re certain you’ll enjoy your time here. Lebanon is the county seat of Laclede County, but before there was a Lebanon or Laclede County, the

Wyota and Osage Indian tribes roamed the area. The first white settler in this area was Jesse Ballew in 1820 when he built his log cabin on the east side of the Gasconade River. Other early settlers include Henry Anderson, William Montgomery, William Gillespie, William Tweedy, Leonard Eastwood, Jesse Williams, Spencer O’Neil, Josiah Tygart, Aaron Span and James Campbell. Laclede County was surveyed between 1835 and 1840 before becoming an actual county on Feb. 24, 1849. Lebanon was first called Wyota for the early Indians of the area, but was changed to Lebanon at the request of a local minister, Rev. Benjamin Hooker, in honor of his hometown of Lebanon, Tenn.


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Lebanon really came into its own as a town in the 1850s. During the Civil War, Lebanon was continually occupied, usually by Union troops trying to protect the telegraph line on the “Wire Road,” which was basically a path marked or carved out by Indians. In the late 1920s, Route 66 was born and roughly followed that same path. Today the road is Interstate 44. The railroad came to Lebanon in 1869. The Frisco Railroad built the station a mile away from the main part of town because the city fathers had refused to donate land to them. A “new” town grew parallel to the tracks and Lebanon on the hill started to decline. Perhaps the most unique piece in Lebanon’s history is the magnetic water. A worker digging a new city water well in 1889 found that his tools could pick up nails. The water had magnetized them. Bathing in the magnetic waters was said to have healing powers and visitors came to bathe in them. The Gasconade Hotel was built to accommodate them and no grander building has ever been seen in Lebanon. The frame structure could house up to 500 guests, who were transported from the depot via an electric railroad. Never a great success, the Gasconade burned after only 10 years. Another important building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, is the Ploger-Moneymaker House. Built in 1870 by a Pennsylvania architect, the two-story, white-framed house was purchased in 1903 by Professor Frederick Ploger. He served as Lebanon’s superintendent of schools and later as its mayor. Ploger’s daughter, Minnie Moneymaker, occupied the house until her death in 1969. Today it is adjacent to the grounds of Wallace Park and is owned by the Lebanon Genealogy Society. Two important politicians have made their homes in Lebanon. Richard Parks Bland, a native Kentuckian, represented Missouri in Congress from 1872-1899 and was a leading Democratic candidate for president in 1896. Phil Donnelly was a hometown boy who became the first man in Missouri history to serve two terms as the state’s governor. Donnelly occupied the Governor’s Mansion from 1945-49 and again from 1953-57 (consecutive terms were prohibited at the time). Harold Bell Wright, author of “The Shepherd of the Hills,” served the First Christian Church as pastor from 1905-07,

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the time period when his most famous work was published. Wright set his next book, “The Calling of Dan Matthews,” in the fictional town of Corinth. Lebanon residents recognized many similarities with their town, however, and weren’t happy with the depiction of their city. Lebanon was also the childhood home of playwright Landford Wilson. His first hit, “The Hot L Baltimore,” ran for 1,166 shows and won the New York Drama Critic’s Circle Award and the Obie Award and was adapted into

a television series in 1975, earning Wilson his first Tony Award nomination. He would go on to write numerous other successful plays, including “The Fifth of July,” “Talley’s Folly,” and “Talley and Son.” In 1980, “Talley’s Folly” was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and received a Tony Award for Best Play. Wilson was nominated a third time in 1983 for “Angels Fall.” He would go on to win numerous other awards. Lebanon often provided the backdrop for Wilson’s plays.

Open Mon. -Sat. 11 am-3 pm • 5 pm-9 pm Closed Sundays

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Content

Cover Design: Randy Waterman Ferris Wheel Photo: Alva Hazell

66 50

72

90

10

REDI for business in Lebanon, Laclede County

44

Kickin' Asphalt at I-44 Speedway

60

The wild side of Laclede County

14

Best in the barrel business

34

Great Days at GreatLife

74

Get back to Nature at Bennett Spring

22

A class Act since 1984

58

You are in Yellowjacket country

83

A day just for the kids at Bennett Spring


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Making the impossible. . .

POSSIBLE! B E F O R E

STARNES

Welcome to our hometown! A message from our mayor

elcome to Lebanon, Missouri! We’re glad to see you. Lebanon is a great place to visit or live. We’ve got some of the best locally-owned restaurants, and shopping and attraction destinations in Missouri. If you’re looking for a new hometown or for a weekend getaway, look no further than Lebanon. Lebanon prides itself on its unique history, including the historic “Mother

Auto Insurance Welcome A F T E R

STARNES

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Body & Glass Road,” Route 66, and no visit to the Lebanon-Laclede County area is complete without a stop at Bennett Spring State Park. Our slogan is “Friendly People, Friendly Place,” here in Lebanon, and I’m sure you will see why when you See ‘Welcome’/ page 8

22115 Rt. 66 • Lebanon, MO Now Doing Front End Alignments

588-3159 www.starnesauto.com


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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Making the Right Move is Easy with Brown

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We’re waiting for that call that will change your life!

568 Lynn • Lebanon 877-533-5200

417-533-5200 bob brown gri, broker/owner Retired Military

Welcome to our hometown From page 7 stop off at some of our unique local businesses. Our community also has a rich history in aluminum boat manufacturing, a legacy that began in 1960 with J.B. Appleby and Appleby Boats. Lebanon was dubbed the “aluminum boat capital of the world,” many years ago by former U.S. Senator Christopher “Kit” Bond. The nickname stuck, and the boat manufacturing industry floods the local economy with millions of dollars each year. Life tends to be a little “laid back” in Lebanon, but that doesn’t mean it is boring. There’s always something going on! The Lebanon area is home to not one, but two race tracks. Weather you are into dirt track racing or a paved oval, our speedways are sure to please any fan. Lebanon’s parks offer hours of family fun. For the Frisbee golf enthusiasts, we offer two courses, and for those who might like to take the kids or grandpa fishing, we have the newly renovated Nelson Lake. Lebanon is also only 12 miles from the state’s premier trout fishing park, Bennett Spring State Park. A new stateof-the-art hatchery shows visitor just how we grow those lunkers here in the

Ozarks. The Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center is the pride of our town, and guests can see events of all types there. Concerts, theatrical productions, home shows, monster trucks and rodeos are just a few of the events that are booked almost weekly at the CCC. The CCC is also a great spot for corporate meetings, shows or conventions, and if you are looking for a place to have a wedding or other special event, look no further than the Cowan Civic Center. Our staff is always ready to help with your plans. No trip to Lebanon would be complete without a stop at the LebanonLaclede County Library’s recently renovated Route 66 Museum. The exhibits feature a unique look at Route 66, complete with a service station with an antique car at the vintage gas pumps. It also boosts a diorama “Dream Village,” that is a must-see for any Route 66 enthusiast, photos and other artifacts from the Mother Road. There is so much to see and do in Lebanon, you’ll never be bored. If you don’t want to take my word for it, come visit us in Lebanon and let us, show you our part of the “Show Me State.”

Lyle Anderson Mayor


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Ozark Visions Costume Shoppe &)XZr-FCBOPO .0 

Open Year Round for Costumes, Masks, Makeup, Accessories, Contacts, Jewelry and Footwear.

BALLOONACY!

Welcome to Lebanon and Laclede County Crossroads of the Ozarks

he Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce is happy to welcome you to Lebanon and Laclede County. While visiting, prepare for a host of things to do from antique shops to antique malls, dining, downtown shopping, retail stores and Factory Stores of America Outlet Mall. If you’re looking to get your kicks on Route 66, stop by the Route 66 Museum and Research Center for a trip through yesteryear. How about a walk in the park? Bennett Spring State Park; scenic, beautiful and a stocked trout stream await you at one of Missouri’s oldest and favorite state parks. We have an abundance of reasons for you to spend time in the area.

T

Balloon bouquets and decor for every occasion. Birthdays, Anniversaries, New Baby, Get Well, Weddings, Congratulations and Just ‘Cause.

Unique Arrangements for Extraordinary People!

Of course, Lebanon and Laclede County is also a great place to live, work and do business. Whether you are new to the area, visiting or are looking to start a business here, call the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce and let us assist you. Contact us toll free at 1-888-5885710 or on the web at www.lebanonmissouri.com. Our office is located at 186 North Adams, if you should choose to stop by. Whatever you do we are sure you will agree with what people all over the Midwest say about Lebanon. “Friendly People, Friendly Place."

Darrell Pollock

Executive Director Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce

Ozark Nightmares Haunted House www.ozarknightmares.com

Fright awaits this Halloween season, Open the last weekend in September and every weekend through October, and of course Halloween Night! “Come to Our House...or We’ll Come to Yours!�


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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

REDI for business in Lebanon, Laclede County The good things that attracted the Stombaugh family to Missouri are the some of the same things Laclede County’s economic development czar plans to use to entice new employers to the area, along with making Lebanon a Work Ready Community. Mark Stombaugh took over the helm at Lebanon Regional Economic Development Inc. at the beginning of February 2012. Lebanon Regional Economic Development Incorporated, or Lebanon-REDI, is a not-for-profit, 501c(6) corporation organization that was formed in 2004 to be the economic development organization for Lebanon and Laclede County. Previously known as “America’s Heartland Economic Partnership,” the organization is funded by the City of Lebanon, Laclede County and the private sector. The mission of Lebanon-REDI, according to its website, is “to strengthen the Laclede County economic base and increase the standard of living of all residents through retention, expansion, attraction and development of primary jobs and capital investments.” Since taking over, Stombaugh has concentrated a good deal on meeting with the business and company owners in Lebanon and Laclede County, developing the relationships he’ll count on as he sells the local area to prospective employers. “There’s a lot of unique assets to the community,” Stombaugh said shortly after taking the helm. “I think I probably view them differently from most anyway, because I turn around and promote those assets, but I still look at the asset as a potential resident” They came first to Missouri as tourists after living and working in Indianapolis, See ‘REDI’/ page 38

Serving All Your Appliances needs For

54 YEARS

Proudly offering Major Brands You Love At Prices You Can Afford.

Jacobsen Appliances, INC. 713 S. Jefferson Lebanon, MO 65536

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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OVER Years of Specializing in Hatching and Shipping Chicks. Chicks Ducks Turkeys Geese Bantams Guineas Game Birds Peafowl Rare Breeds

Come and get it!

It’s our mission to enhance your life by providing you with quality poultry. For showing, for meat, for enjoyment, for eggs, for pets.

Wagons for Warriors is a fun way to help out wounded military members

M

ore than 1,000 people from Lebanon and the surrounding area mingle with cowboy cooks, chow down on some vittles and support their heroes on the Saturday of the Memorial Day weekend every year. In 2013, the third annual Wagons for Warriors event drew more patrons and chuck wagons than ever to the Laclede County Fairgrounds, organizer Steve Hull said. “We served over a thousand people,” he said. “We’re getting more wagons. That’s one of the secrets, to get enough wagons here to cook for everybody.” The event raises money for helping local veterans and their families through the Mid Missouri Chapter of the Association of the United States Army Wounded Warrior Fund. Thirteen chuck wagons, some from Laclede County and others from Oklahoma, Texas and Indiana, set up at the fairgrounds the night before and start cooking at the crack of dawn. See ‘Wagons for Warriors’/ page 12

Clifford & Lena Smith 1936

Jeff, Clifton & Nancy Smith 2012

Cackle Hatchery 411 W. Commercial

417-532-4581

www.cacklehatchery.com


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Wagons for Warriors From Page 11 Many of the wagons and their operators are champions of various chuck wagon cooking competitions. Starting at noon Saturday, they serve up everything from beans and cornbread to succotash to stew to shish kebobs. “People did extra bread this year and extra cobblers, but we ran out of everything again this year, but I didn’t really hear anybody complain that they didn’t get to eat,” Hull said. “I think everybody had a good time. The food was all good.” Hull said that the sales of tickets, sponsorships and donations for the 2013 event totaled more than $15,000 for the Wounded Warriors. The Wagons for Warriors event is becoming a fixture in the Lebanon community. “I think it’s starting to catch on now that in Lebanon on Memorial Day weekend, there’s something fun for people to do,” Hull said. “We had the kids’ events this year, the stick-horse races and some of the other activities for kids.” Hull said a lot of people contribute to making the event work every year. “We couldn’t do this without the wagons, we couldn’t do this without the sponsors, and it would be no fun without the people showing up to eat. It’s a big team, and when we all work together, it makes it a huge success,” he said. “These wagons, most all of them are museum-quailty wagons,” Hull said. “They are authentic and historically correct, so it is a good chance for people to come out and see the chuck wagons, how they are and how they are supposed to be and visit with the cooks. It is also a perfect opportunity to help our wounded warriors. ... It is a win-win. You make a little donation for some food, get a good meal and feel good about what you did.” Hull said he and many of the other wagon owners became aquatinted at similar events in Texas. “We are all close friends,” Hull said, adding that he is not turned down very often by wagon owners to attend the Lebanon event. “We all actually go to San Antonio (Texas) every year and cook for the wounded warriors at MEDCOM (United States Army Medical Command), and I got one new wagon from there this year. As soon as they found out what we were doing, they said they wanted to join up. He’s coming from about 100 miles south of San Antonio, Texas. That’s a long way.” Hull added that a couple of other wagons wanted to make the trip to Lebanon but didn’t have enough time to plan for this year’s event, so they have already staked their claim for next year. “This is the perfect weekend to have this,” Hull added. “It is Memorial Day weekend and Memorial Day is about veterans. This is just a perfect way to come and pay tribute to our wounded warriors and our veterans.”

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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Living Healthy The Natural Way

Meadow View Par 3 Great golfing at an affordable price just west of town

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eadow View Par 3 offers golfers an opportunity to use nearly every club in their bag, as well as a chance at a hole-in-one on nearly every hole. Family owned and operated for the past 10 years, Meadow View is located just 3 miles west of Lebanon off of Missouri 64, and features nine holes ranging from 75 to 234 yards. The course is affordably priced, from $7.50 for nine holes, and $12.50 for 18 holes. The club house offers a public area, restrooms and an inviting atmosphere. For more information, call Marty or Beverly Sauerbrei at 533-7273.

Vitamins • Herbs • Organic Foods • Natural Supplements • Weight Loss & Much More For The Whole Family.

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Nature’s Best Pet Shop & Grooming

Lebanon’s Full Line Pet Store 555 E. Elm • Chalet Village 417-588-3678 Monday - Friday 9:30-5:00 Saturday 9:30-4:00


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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

The best in the barrel business Independent Stave, Boswells honored as state's first centennial business

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or a little more than a century, white oak barrels made in Lebanon have been giving a distinct flavor to some of the world’s top whiskeys and wines. In 2012, the state of Missouri honored Independent Stave Company and its owners, the Boswell family, as the state’s first recognized centennial business. The Missouri Department of Transportation erected a sign in front of the barrel-making company, or cooperage operation, last year, so that anyone driving down Jefferson Avenue in Lebanon would know about the company’s historic feat. Former state representative Darrel Pollock sponsored the bill that allowed for the recognition. Pollock argued that the state should be honoring century businesses just as it does century farms. “To me, if they’ve been in our state and part of our community for that Enter a world where amount of time, they’ve done a huge A anything can happenamount of economic development in Full Service the world of books. our area and that’s more than a lifeBook time achievement — that’s about three Open a book and take Store lifetimes of achievement,” Pollock your mind to another place. said at the time the recognition was + Magazines announced. Pollock added that the longevity + Toys of the company is not only something + Games for All Ages that local businesses can look up to Featuring but one that businesses across the New & Used 727 S. Jefferson • Lebanon EBANON state can see as an example of how to Books (Inside The Smitty’s Shopping Center) run a business. He said despite regu417-532-2500 lations and competition, ISC has been Mon.-Thurs. 9-6 • Fri. 9-8 • Sat. 9-6 able to compete on an international level for decades. “To continue to grow and expand like they have is quite a testimony to the business model that they have. I think we can learn something from them as a state, how longevity and what that does for our state,” Pollock ALSO SERVING said. “We, as legislators, have used Hartville • MansÅeld • Bolivar economic incentives and tax credits Camdenton • Seymour • Lebanon to draw businesses into the state from Mt. Rose Memorial Park other states and these guys have never done that. The ability to navigate that for 100 years shows that they have found the right path to success.” T.W. Boswell founded the T.W. FUNERAL HOMES 417-532-4061 Boswell Stave Company in Winona in

L

B O

O K

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Serving with Integrity and Pride... Our Future Stands as ConÅdent as Our Past...

HOLMAN HOWE


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

1912. The company provided staves to other cooperage companies. The company adopted it’s current name in 1936. In the 1950s, T.W. Boswell’s son, J.E., opened up the company’s first cooperage company in Lebanon. Although the company has since expanded its business to the state of California, South America, Europe, Africa and Australia, four generations later, the family still headquarters its business from Lebanon. “Missouri has been our home since the very beginning. With quality as our standard, and innovation as our passion, we look forward to serving our customers and local communities for generations to come,” ISC President Brad Boswell has said about his company. The company is famous for its white oak barrels that house many different types of wines and whiskeys. Half of the company’s business comes from the whiskey or bourbon business. It supplies barrels for companies like Jim Beam, Wild Turkey and Maker’s Mark. The other half of ISC’s business comes from the wine industry. It not only makes the barrels that house the wine, but also producing the wine itself. The company owns distilleries and wineries across the globe. ISC’s barrels not only hold the spirits, but ISC said that its white oak barrels also give the alcohol its texture, aroma and taste. In Lebanon, ISC is known not only for its famous products, but also for its generosity to the community. Anyone who went to the Lebanon R-3 School District or has children in the system is no stranger to the last name Boswell. From Boswell Elementary School to Boswell Auditorium at the Lebanon High School, the Boswell family has helped the schools in one way or another. The giving back doesn’t stop with the schools. There is also Boswell Park and the accompanying Boswell Aquatic Center. Across the street from ISC is Mother’s Garden, which is dedicated to Lois K. Boswell. Every holiday season, the Boswell family and ISC decorate the park and hang lights.

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S Lebanon has

And now a word from our tourism director ...

something for everyone

u & You o Y g n i Help

r Family Stay

Y H T L A HE Since 1991

“Where you’re never treated like an ordinary Joe.”

• Drive Thru • Delivery • Medical Supplies • Vitamins • Health & Beauty • All Major Insurance Accepted • Nursing Home Service • Computerized Prescription Service

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

hopping, fishing, tubing, camping, hiking, dining, sightseeing or how about floating your cares away? Whether you’re here for business or pleasure; we have something for everyone in and around Lebanon, Missouri! Lebanon is located in the scenic Ozarks of south-central Missouri, directly on Interstate 44. It is home for more 14,000 residents, and the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center; this multi-purpose facility will accommodate conventions, trade shows, and expositions, sporting events, theatrical productions and business meetings. Come enjoy a demolition derby, bull riding, country music concert, county fair, gun show or even a community garage sale in our Cowan Civic Center. The YMCA is housed in the Cowan Civic Center, and is one of the largest not-for-profit community service organizations in the Ozarks. It is equipped with a gymnasium and a large multi-purpose sports facility, which includes an amazing NCAA approved lap pool and a tennis court. Lebanon is a great place to visit; our historic downtown features many unique shops. Lebanon has many outlet stores, like Factory Stores of America, or Shepherd Hills Factory Outlet, the world’s largest dealer of top-selling Case Knives. The huge store offers Ozark Walnut bowls and a vast selection of home décor items. The Heartland Antique Mall is the largest between Joplin and St. Louis, with more than 250 dealers, a Russell Stover’s candy outlet, and cheese & wine shop plus numerous other family-owned antique shops. Lebanon was an important stop along historic Route 66, the winding long stretch from Chicago to the Pacific Ocean. The often romanticized Mother Road inspires in many of us something buried deep within us. Some may see Route 66 as a link to our parents and grandparents, others perhaps feel the sense of freedom


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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that the road provided to those early travelers. Most of the original auto courts and cafes are long gone, but a few sites still exist and can be visited along the historic highway in Laclede County. Along with driving the mother road you can learn more about the historic route in Lebanon’s world renowned Route 66 Museum and Research Center. Every weekend from April through September, the race is on at I-44 Speedway, part of the NASCAR

Whelen All-American Series, and Midway Speedway with its fast and wild dirt-track racing, two popular courses. Lebanon is also conveniently located near Bennett Spring State Park. The pristine beauty of the park is a natural attraction. Besides fishing, this popular and scenic park offers 12 miles of hiking trails, Niangua River float trips, interpretive center, a rustic dining lodge, hatchery tours, cabins and condos, or you can just pitch up

a tent, whichever your preference you’ll find dozens of campgrounds and RV parks throughout the area. No matter when you visit, we’ll welcome you with open arms. For more information contact the Tourism Office for the City of Lebanon at toll free 1-866-LEBANON, or visit our website at www.lebanonmo.org.

Judy Fortner Lebanon Tourism Director

School of Performing Arts Dreams C e r e h ome True W Take dance classes at a certiÀed studio which has been educating students in Central Missouri for 30 years.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

THE RIDE OF A LIFETIME Offering the freedom of the road for more than 40 years in Lebanon

O

zark Harley Davidson employees come rushing from all directions at the sound of a clanging bell. “Road Glide going to Jeff City!” the bell ringer

announces. The employees applaud and cheer, and a customer stands in their midst grinning from ear to ear. He has just become a proud owner of

a new Harley-Davidson. After the celebration, the new Harley owner is taken around the store to meet people in each department and is offered a gift from each. He poses for a picture, which will be posted on the company’s website. Then, before leaving with his new bike, the customer makes a final stop in the service department, where he is fitted with his new bike. The celebration is just part of the

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customer service at Ozark Harley-Davidson, according to General Manager Lora Crowe and Ashley Jackson, marketing and general merchandise associate. That’s because owners Jack and Debi Fleming want every customer to feel special, they said. “It’s pretty spontaneous when they ring that bell,” Jackson said. The celebration is fun for both the employees and the customer. “They’re so excited about getting a bike, even if it’s their sixth or seventh one,” Crowe said. It’s the unique experience that keeps customers coming back to Ozark Harley-Davidson, sometimes passing other dealerships to get there, Jackson and Crowe said. “We’ve got some pretty loyal customers that travel from Springfield, Rolla and even Arkansas,” Crowe said. “We strive to give them a unique experience to try and make them part of the family.” The “family” includes each of the almost 30 people employed at the Lebanon and Osage Beach stores.


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Ozark-Harley Davidson became the Fleming family’s business 15 years ago. Jack and Debi Fleming owned a trucking company in the Kansas City area for many years, but their real passion was motorcycles. Jack Fleming got his first bike when he was 16 and his first Harley in 1977. Jack and Debi Fleming’s first date was on a motorcycle, and the family vacations were always on the back of a bike, according to information from the company’s website, www.ozarkharleydavidson.com. In 1997, the family made the decision to leave the trucking business. After Jack Fleming learned that previous owners Don and Pat Grimm, who had owned it since the 1970s, were ready to sell the Harley-Davidson dealership in Lebanon. The Fleming family, which includes son Jef Fleming and daughter Melissa Jemes, agreed to enter the Harley-Davidson world on a full-time basis. But it wasn’t a simple matter of taking possession of the front door key. The Flemings had to apply to Harley-Davidson to become a dealer, a process that took several months to complete. The deal became official on Sept. 1, 1998, and the Fleming family moved to Lebanon from Smithville. The store was originally located at 740 S. Jefferson Avenue, but as the business expanded, the Flemings had a new building constructed and in 2001 moved to the business’ current location at 2300 Evergreen Parkway. The business and the Ozark HarleyDavidson family have continued to grow. In 2005, the Flemings added a second dealership in Osage Beach and between the two locations, there are about 23 employees. That number increases to 30 after seasonal employees are added at Osage Beach to accommodate the peak riding season and the annual Bikefest. “We’re not family, but we’re like part of the family,” Crowe said. She has been working with the Flemings for 11 years and Jackson has been with Ozark Harley-Davidson for six years. While Jef Fleming oversees both locations and Melissa Jemes is the general manager, Jackson’s job is to keep up with Ozark Harley-Davidson’s busy calendar. The business is active in the community and a pavilion added to the back of the property has become a popular site for special events. Jack Fleming has hopes to See ‘Ozark Harley’/ page 100

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Numbers you need to know A quick guide to city, count offices; area school districts UTILITIES ■ LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE — 1400 E. Route 66. (417) 532-3164. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY DISTRICT NO. 1 — North and West of I-44. (417) 532-

3171. ■ DISTRICT NO. 3 — South and East of I-44, (417) 532-4525. ■ CITY OF LEBANON — (417) 532-2156.

GOVERNMENT OFFICES ■ LEBANON CITY HALL — 400 S.

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Madison. (417) 532-2156. ■ KENNETH E. COWAN CIVIC CENTER — 500 E. Elm. (417) 5324642. ■ MISSOURI DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY — 2639 S. Jefferson. (417) 532-6146. ■ MISSOURI DIVISION OF FAMILY SERVICES — Highway 5 south of the airport. (417) 532-3137. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY CLERK — Voter registration. Laclede County Government Center, 200 N. Adams. Application by mail also is possible. (417) 532-5471. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT — 405 Harwood Ave. (417) 532-2134. ■ LACLEDE COUNTY COMMISSION — Laclede County Government Center, 200 N. Adams. (417) 532-4897. ■ SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION.—South Highway 5. (417) 532-9136.

LICENSE BUREAU ■ LACLEDE COUNTY LICENSE BUREAU — 219 N. Adams in the Saeger Centre. (417) 532-5075. A person moving to Missouri has 30 days to transfer automobile tags at the Lebanon License Bureau. The test for a new Missouri driver ’s license must be taken immediately after establishing residency. Call for times and locations.

LIBRARY ■ LEBANON-LACLEDE COUNTY LIBRARY — 915 S. Jefferson. (417) 532-2148.

EMERGENCY SERVICES Dial 911 to connect to emergency services in City of Lebanon and all of Laclede County. Here are other important phone numbers: ■ MISSOURI STATE HIGHWAY PATROL, City Rt. 66, Lebanon, (417) 532-6682; if no answer, call (573) 3682345. ■ POLICE non-emergency, (417) 532-3131. ■ FIRE non-emergency, (417) 5322104. ■ SHERIFF, (417) 532-2311. If no answer, call (417) 588-3237.


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Yea Rou r nd

SENIOR CENTER

CA

■ HUGHES SENIOR CENTER — 460 W.Fifth St. (417) 532-3040. Care Coordinator program, call (417) 5329719.

M

PUBLICATIONS ■ LEBANON DAILY RECORD — 100 E. Commercial. Published Sunday through Friday, plus on-line version at www.lebanondailyrecord.com. Trout Talk, published monthly during the summer by Lebanon Publishing Co. The EXTRA advertising supplement. The Weekly Trader. (417) 532-9131.

ND

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PG RO

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■ MERCY HOSPITAL LEBANON — (417) 533-6100. ■ COPE — Shelter for victims of domestic violence. Hotline number (417) 532-2885. Non-emergency number is (417) 533-5201.

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PUBLIC SCHOOLS ■ LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS — The Lebanon R-3 School District is Accredited with Distinction by the state of Missouri. Its campuses serve more than 4,250 students in grades. See page 18 for building names, addresses and phone numbers. GRADES 10-Adult: Lebanon Technology & Career Center, 777 Brice St. (417) 532-5494. PARENTS AS TEACHERS, Maplecrest Elementary (former pre-K building), (417) 532-3822. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION, Esther Elementary, 1200 Clark St., (417) 532-3961. LEBANON ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION CENTER, 1015 N. Jefferson, (417) 533-3824. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION LEARNING CENTER, 1015 N. Jefferson, 532-8470. R-3 CENTRAL OFFICE, 1310 E. Route 66, 532-9141. TRANSPORTATION OFFICE: 1020 Clark St., 5329371. MAINTENANCE OFFICE, 1020 Clark St., 532-3250. ■ SURROUNDING DISTRICTS — Joel E. Barber C-5 School, Rt. 2, Lebanon, (417) 5324837. Gasconade C-4 School, Falcon, (417) 532-4821. Plato R-5, (417) 458-2171. Conway R-1, high school - (417) 589-2941, elementary(417) 589-2171. Richland Public Schools, (573) 765-3241. Stoutland R-2 Schools, (417) 286-3719.

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PRIVATE SCHOOLS ■ CHRISTIAN LIFE ACADEMY, 380 S. Washington Ave. (417) 588-2495 or (417) 588-2308. ■ TABERNACLE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY, 929 Springfield Rd. (417) 532-4412.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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Sherry Green opened up Act II in 1984 on Commercial Street across from the post office. Green said she first got the idea to open up the consignment shop, which sells people’s used clothing for a percentage of the sale, because Lebanon didn’t offer that type of business. “It was just something I always wanted to do, and there weren’t any in Lebanon. So, I thought I’d give it a try and see how it goes,” Green said. Green fondly remembered her late husband, Chuck Green, who she said didn’t quite have faith in the business in the beginning or for several years after for that matter. “He’d always say, ‘It will never make it. It’ll never make it,’” Green said. “It took several years, but he finally changed his mind.”

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Green believes that the success of the store is directly linked to the economy. “People just aren’t able to afford new clothes,” Green said. She added that parents on a budget have helped. “Our kids clothes are some of our best sellers.” Since its opening, the clothing consignment store has moved up and down Commercial Street as the business grew and needed more space for its inventory of men’s, women’s and children’s clothing and everything that goes along with it. A few years ago, it settled into its current location at 213 W. Commercial St. Through the years, many people have become loyal to Act II, according to Green. “We’ve had really good customers. There are people who have been shopping here for 30 years,” she said. See ‘Act II’/ page 95

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Lebanon's crown jewel

Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center ... THE place to hold events The people of Lebanon decided in the late 1990s they needed a cultural hub, a place they could hold everything from weddings to graduation ceremonies to plays and concerts. They voted for a Capital Improvements Tax that funded the building of the Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center, which is named for a former mayor of the city. Now, 15 years after it was built, not a weekend goes by that something isn’t going on at the CCC. It holds a theater, an exhibition hall, an atrium, meeting rooms and the Lebanon Family YMCA. Considered by many to be “the crown jewel of Leba-

non,” it also hosts the Wall of Honor, which depicts dozens of citizens who have contributed greatly to the community. The variety of events and activities at the CCC is amazing, says Lebanon Tourism Director Judy Fortner. While the city’s main tourism draws are outdoors, warm weather activities such as visiting Bennett Spring State Park and cruising on old Route 66, the CCC brings visitors to the city year-round. “If we didn’t have the Cowan Civic Center, we wouldn’t have an indoor facility big enough to house events that can bring people to the area. We


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

saw that this year when we had three major events in January. It was packed,” Fortner said. The CCC started the year with championship bull riding, a demolition derby and arena motocross events. “We had those three events in January when people are ready to get out and do something,” she said. “I don’t think many people realize all the weddings and receptions that go on here. I’ve been in this building since February of last year, and I don’t think there’s been a week that this facility is not used,” Fortner said. “Either they’re doing something in the atrium — a wedding or reception — or there’s a dance or a play, or there’s somebody putting on a concert in the theater. Even the parking lot is used for the movies, the outdoor theater.” A couple times a year, the city hosts a drive-in movie, projecting a family film against the side of the building. The parking lot also has been the venue for car shows and motorcycle shows. In late July each year, the rafters reverberate as two back-to-back gospel music events take place. Probably the most popular event for the CCC is the Brumley Gospel Sing, a four-day concert event that has taken place there every August since 2006. The Brumley Sing draws top-shelf gospel artists and their fans from all over the country. The Brumley Sing moves in a week after the Gospel Spectacular, which is hosted by a well-known trio from Lebanon, the New Horizons. The Spectacular draws groups from all over the Midwest. The CCC also serves as the site for the Missouri State Horseshoe Pitching Championship, a humongous community wide garage sale twice a year, gun shows, educational seminars about everything from alpaca wool to economic development, a high-school percussion artists competition and the annual Miss Merry Christmas pageant. New in 2013 is a twice yearly Get Prepared Survivalism Expo, which took place in February and July. The expo featured everything from alternative energy to self-defense techniques to freeze-drying food at home. “Our biggest challenge is getting the word out,” Fortner said. “Everybody doesn’t read the newspaper, listen to the radio, get on our Facebook page or go to the city’s website. Those are our four avenues of getting it out, besides putting out fliers.” Most of the events come to Lebanon because of local people who have suggested the CCC to their promoters as

PAGE 25

a venue, Fortner said. The city also advertises the facility. “Anything we can do to fill our hotels is great, because it gives us more money to promote everybody else’s events,” she said. The CCC is run by Operations Manager Deryl Wilson, who “does an amazing job. He has a loyal staff, and you know they’re loyal because he does a good job,” Fortner said. “I work with each of the organizers to help them promote their events, and they are very happy with the service they get.”

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PAGE 26

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Just ripe for the picking Family brings new life to local blueberry farm he Highway 64 Blueberry Farm, located at 15334 Mo. 64, has been under new proprietorship since 2011, and customers have been picking juicy blueberries every summer since they opened. Blueberry pickers can stop by Wednesday through Sunday from mid June to the end of July during the blueberry season. The new owners came from Fort

T

Bragg, N.C. Jeanell Stuckey’s husband, James Stuckey, is active duty military and now works at Fort Leonard Wood. “It was very overgrown (when the Stuckey's bought the farm). This is the first year we got it fully cleaned out. We are going to plant 200 bushes in the fall because they were dead or missing when we moved in,” Jeanell Stuckey said. Stuckey also said last year’s

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extreme, record-setting heat and drought played their parts in them killing some plants in the Stuckey’s second year. Last year, with the drought, the picking season started in early spring, the third week in May and was finished by mid-June. Usual picking time is mid June through the whole month of July. “The blueberries wouldn’t ripen even with water because it was so hot,” she said. “We lost about a third of the crop last year.” As on most everyone in the area growing produce, this summer shines more favorably on the Stuckey’s fruitful enterprise. “This year ’s unusual spring prolonged us about a week. … We started a week later,” Stuckey said. So sometimes it just depends on how a season turns out. In 2013, though the late start, the Stuckeys expected a somewhat normal ripening period as unripened light yellow and pink blueberries abound on the plants near Independence Day. From the condition in which the Stuckeys inherited the farm and struggles with last year ’s summer, the future and the present seem to have a positive outlook. “Bouncing back from last year, this year the farm has about a 60 percent crop, which means there are 200 bushes missing, plus the remaining bushes we have are not fully up to par, I guess you would say,” Stuckey said. It will take them a few more years to get the soil just right where the plants need to be.


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

“One hundred percent is the goal,” she said. Jeanell and James have three children – Bree (18), Dalton (17) and Morgan (6) – it is a family business. By July 4, 2013, Dalton Stuckey, was already picking around 40 gallons five days a week … with a little help from kid sister Morgan and other hired hands. “Yes, the berries are selling quickly,” he said. “We wake up in the morning and come out and pick blueberries. ... We weed the rows, keep blueberries off the ground that fall and water the plants when they need it.” Dalton is the one who usually mows the farm, which takes in itself around five hours. When asked if Jeanell has had any previous experience growing blueberries, or any other similar fruit … not really. “I grew up on a farm, but it was soybean, rice, corn – not berry farms – in Arkansas,” she said. So jumping in with both feet when her husband was relocated to Fort Wood a few years ago, the Stuckeys did their research and sought local guidance. “We had a guy who has a (blueberry farm) out in Grovespring come down and help us with the soil and what we were supposed to do and how much we should be selling them for,” she said. In 2013, the u-pick category of price, blueberries at the farm were $3.50 per pound. Pre-picked berries were $9 for 2 pounds. At the stand located at the end of the blueberry patch, shoppers can also purchase homemade blueberry pie, jumbo blueberry muffins and blueberry lemonade. Beginning when berries are ready, around mid June, hours of operation at the Highway 64 Blueberry farm is 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday. The season extends through until the end of July. For more information, call 417942-0647.

PAGE 27

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Get your kicks on Route 66

Take a step back in time at the Route 66 Museum

The Route 66 Museum, located in the Lebanon-Laclede County Library, 915 S. Jefferson Ave., saw improvements throughout the previous year, and it touts continued improvements on into the future. The renovations completed this last year has allowed the story of the historic road to be better

told and allowed Lebanon-Laclede County Route 66 Society to display additional items in a more secure environment. The idea for the improvements completed and forthcoming came after president of the society Cathy Dame, museum curator Mark Spangler, and Route 66 Society members

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Bill and Deanna Wheeler visited other museums in the recent past. They were impressed with what they saw, especially three museums at Fort Leonard Wood. The group thought that more items could be displayed and be more secure than they had been in the past, and now that has become


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 29

a reality. The hope is that by providing a more secure setting, more people may consider donating items. Anyone who visited the museum last year will notice the change this summer. Instead of walking into an open space, visitors are now led through the progression of the road, from a period dating back before any plans for pavement were ever laid. Besides doing research on the history of the road, Spangler has been the key builder of the project. The museum has always had three major vignettes – a gas station, a diner and a cabin. Of the three, the cabin and diner are now enclosed displays. “Two things are finished that we had started last year. The tourist cabin … we originally had a vignette up in this area, and we ended up moving it into the back. We always wanted [the cabin] to look more like a cabin,” he said. And Spangler is also working on the diner, which is largely complete now. But the tourist cabin is probably the most notable update. Other than that Spangler is still working on exhibits up at the front of the entrance. The cabin was constructed with knotty pine interior walls from the Rock Court, which was located behind the Wyota Inn, who also donated the material. “We started with the actual paneling, and then constructed the cabin around it,” he said. “It represents what a tourist cabin would have looked like anywhere up and down the route – a small white-framed cabin.” Also forthcoming will more divided spaces to create walkways, which will help with echos and reflections on the displays

and vignette glass. “We will probably add some background music at some point, appropriate to the period,” Spangler said. He also said the museum did get a piece out of the old welcome to Lebanon, “Our Town, Your Town” sign, the steel base pole. “We had two of those in Lebanon. One up on Millcreek, which is what that piece is out of, and one down on Springfield Road. When they re-did Elm Street, they came across it … and we said we would like to have it here in the museum. The part (with the words) that was totally above the ground, that is totally gone: it was destroyed and scrapped and never will be seen again. Naturally with any curator, a little historical context is fitting for trying to comprehend this national treasure winding through hundreds of miles of the United States. “Route 66 in the purest sense is just from 1926 through 1956, just a 30-year span. We can see it and appreciate it, but without knowing what was before it, we don’t really see the importance of it,” Spangler said. Long before it became the Mother Road, Route 66 was a trail that was blazed first by prehistoric men, then it became a Native American trail between the southwest Missouri area and the Mississippi River area near St. Louis. After settlers arrived, the trail became rock and dirt farm road. One of the road’s first known monikers was the Springfield Road. Then it was known as the Old Wire Road because the See ‘Museum’/ page 94

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PAGE 30

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

STARVY CREEK


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 31

Just a little festival Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival draws thousands to nearby Conway

E

very year, thousands of avid bluegrass fans brazenly ignore the midsummer heat and flock to Bluegrass Road in Conway, Mo., for the sake of attending a series of outdoor concerts. This phenomena is known as the Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival. Starvy Creek was never intended to become the massive event it is today. On the contrary, it started out in 1985 as music party on the farm of Don and Bobby Day. Don Day explained, “I was just going to invite a few friends in, then one of them suggested, ‘Why don’t you just have a little festival?’ So we did that, and it just kept going. But I didn’t really plan what it has turned out to be.”

So instead of having a private party for just family and friends, the Days invited the public. That first year, the festival had about eight campers. Then year after year, it gradually got bigger, until the Day’s farm became the Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park. See ‘Bluegrass fans’/ page 89

ten


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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

e l b e r c a a t i s o ' t n I

C

Annual Our Town, Your Town event draws thousands

elebrate summer in Lebanon with food, games, free entertainment and fireworks at the annual Our Town, Your Town Celebration. Sponsored by the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce, the second annual event was held at a different venue from 2012’s inaugural celebration at the Floyd W. Jones Memorial Airport. This year those taking part made their destination Lebanon I-44 Speedway. Approximately 5,000 came out to the event to experience all it had to offer, along with featured races on the speedway track, according to Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Darrell Pollock. And though last year ’s and this year ’s events were both

successes, logistics worked a little better at I-44 Speedway. “The parking situation was easily handled because (I-44 Speedway) is set up for that type of event,according to Pollock. “We had people that walked into the airport last year. … It was not a terrible situation. It went fairly smoothly without incident


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 33

last year, but [I-44 Speedway] does that every week.” Pollock also said that at the gate taking admission, there were many coming in that had never been to the racetrack before, which was good for the hosting I-44 Speedway. Laclede County’s Relay for Life teams offered many of the games and food in 2013, just like it did last year. Last year’s entertainment saw vocal groups and other stage performers, but this year’s entertainment offered a little something different, including racing and a motorcycle stunt team. “This year we had the Motocross MX Stunt team doing different tricks. They would go up ramps and do multiple flips or fly through with one hand on the handle,” he said. The event had big explosions in the sky, again – a mainstay at the speedway. Pollock said those who put on the event look to enhance it from year to year, which account for the few differences from last year, including the venue change; but they try to keep the staple fare. However, things do not

always go as desired. “We look to keeping the main parts of the Our Town, Your Town goal: having food vendors, business vendors. … We tried a hot air balloon last year, but the wind was just not conducive. We would not have been able to do it [this year], either. It was just enough breeze … that thing has to have almost no breeze. It would have looked great back there on the hill, … but we would not have likely been able to let that go up either this year,” he said. When asked if he and the other organizers were already looking toward next year’s event, Pollock said maybe a little. But mostly they are saying, “Boy, this one’s done,” he said. “It is a lot of work, and a lot of energy … good energy. We pour a lot into it because we take it very seriously. We want to do a community-type event that is just a lot of fun … so people in the community can enjoy themselves.” Pollock said it could potentially be back at the I-44 Speedway next year, but it is a little too early to tell. Yet, deliberations will begin shortly for next-year’s Our Town, Your Town event. For more information about Our Town, Your Town, contact the Chamber office at 417-588-3256.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Great days at GreatLife

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ooking for an opportunity to play championship golf or break a sweat in a state-ofthe-art fitness facility at an affordable price? A fixture in the Lebanon community for more than 60 years, Lebanon GreatLife Golf and Fitness is a semi-private, 18-hole championship

golf course located two miles west of Lebanon and nine miles east of Bennett Spring State Park on Hwy 64. GreatLife offers memberships (single, couple or family) for $29 per month, which includes access to all GreatLife facilities, whether you’re from Springfield, Kansas City, To-

peka, Kan. or elsewhere. For the past 60 years, the course has provided a challenging golf experience for players of all abilities and is open year round, with the exception of Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, weather permitting. In recent years, the course has undergone a makeover, that not only

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includes the new name, but new membership rates and a fitness center. The course features a driving range, putting green, and chipping green with three sets of tees stretching to 6,435 yards. Gently rolling hills offer a track that affords elevation changes, large contoured greens, water hazards, a large “sinkhole” on the Par 3, Sixteenth hole, and numerous options in shot selection on the Par 4s and 5s. The Par 4, Fourth hole presents an opportunity to cut a 90 degree dogleg left over trees with your drive to possibly reach the green or play it as a conventional Par 4. The Ninth and Eighteenth holes share a huge green divided by a large bunker, that can make for some interesting, lengthy putts. With a mix of tight, tree-lined fairways and some that are more forgiving, the course definitely presents a variety of play. The clubhouse features a snack bar and gives golfers an opportunity to relax, and the grounds also feature a swimming pool and tennis courts. The state-of-the-art fitness center is open 24/7 to all members and includes cardio, free weights and circuit training. There are certified instructors that provide a variety of fitness classes, including spinning and zumba, and a certified massage therapist is available by appointment. Membership includes access to all other Great Life locations. Currently, Great Life has 18 facilities in Kansas City, Leavenworth, Topeka, Junction City, Abilene and Salina, Kan. Deer Lake, of Springfield, has also joined GreatLife, offering Lebanon members a local course to try their hand on. More information is available at www. lebanonmissourigolf.com, or by calling the club at 417- 532-2901.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Brumley Gospel Sing calls Lebanon home

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four-day music event that takes place in Lebanon’s Kenneth E. Cowan Civic Center and features well-known gospel artists like Dailey and Vincent, Little Roy and Lizzy, Jeff and Sherri Easter and Greater Vision. The sing is named in honor of Albert E. Brumley, a southern gospel songwriter who composed several popular gospel songs, including “I’ll Fly Away” and “Turn Your Radio On.” In 1969, J.D. Sumner decided that Brumley should be honored for his contributions to gospel music. So, with the help of two of Brumley’s sons and Brumley himself, Sumner organized the first Brumley Gospel Sing. For 32 years, the Brumley Gospel Sing took place in Springdale, Ark. Then in 2001, it moved to Fayetteville, Ark. In 2006, it was ready for another

new location. At that time, Laclede County Presiding Commissioner Danny Rhoades approached the event’s organizers about holding the sing in the Civic Center, and they accepted. Apparently, the organizers were pleased with their decision. “It’s been wonderful,” Duane Garren, director of marketing and promotion for the Brumley Gospel Sing, told the Lebanon Daily Record in 2011. “The facility is perfect; it’s just what we need. The town is — it’s just great. For everything that we do, it really couldn’t be better.” However, the benefits go both ways: Lebanon is equally happy to have the privilege of hosting Brumley. According to Lebanon Tourism Director Judy Fortner, the Brumley Gospel

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Sing is Lebanon’s biggest tourism event. She estimates that 5,000 people attend the show each day, and that 80 percent of those people are from out of town. “They fill not only our county, but two or three neighboring counties,” Fortner said. “They stay as far away as the (Lake of the Ozarks), Rolla, St. Robert, Marshfield, Springfield. They drive an hour from wherever they stay, so it’s massive; it’s not just affecting Laclede County.” Of course, such an influx of tourists generates revenue for local businesses. Fortner said that all types of lodging in the area are generally full during the Brumley Gospel Sing, and local restaurants do a booming business. Some music fans who don’t want to fight the crowd to reserve a hotel room come in recreational vehicles and need to refill their large gas tanks at Lebanon convenience stores. Those who do not want to fight the crowd in a restaurant augment the business of local grocery stores. In addition, many of the Brumley Gospel Sing attendees go shopping at some point during their stay. In general, Fortner approximates that the average tourist spends between $90 and $150 each day, so having that many tourists in town for a minimum of four days gives Lebanon’s economy quite a boost. “We do realize what they bring, and we’re happy to have them here,” Fortner said of the visitors attracted by Brumley. Fortner said that the economic benefits aren’t the only reasons that Lebanon is so willing to welcome the visitors from the Brumley Gospel Sing. “These are a special type of visitor. They’re family-oriented; they’re very loyal,” Fortner stated. With all that these visitors offer to Lebanon, it is only fitting that Lebanon would have something to offer them in return. “What they love about Lebanon, the Brumley family and the guests, is that it’s still a hometown feel. It’s not hard to get around. They like being welcomed and not feeling like they’re a bother. "They like being welcomed and being able to enjoy their time while they’re here instead of being in a major metropolis at an event like this,” Fortner said.

PAGE 37

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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From Page 10 Ind. for a few years. They enjoyed Bennett and other natural resources when they visited the area. There came a time about seven years ago when both were at points in their careers during which it made sense to relocate. “So we just kind of made a jump, and here we are - seven years later. Not a real systematic approach to it, I know,” Stombaugh said. In Indianapolis, Mark worked for the American Funds mutual fund family, doing marketing and support work for the brokerage community that sells its mutual fund products. Then the Strombaughs gravitated toward Jefferson City where Mark’s skills were a good match for the state Department of Economic Development, where he worked for more than five years. He has been here in Lebanon for well over a year. “Last year was an exciting year on a lot of fronts for this community,” Strombaugh said. “We worked hard to solidify commitments for significant investments and the exciting news of new job opportunities.” At the mid-way mark of this year, real opportunities, such as 200,000 new or repurposed square feet of production space in the community to happen over the next couple of years, has become a reality. “The additional capacity and capital investment in facilities and equipment will help spur other growth within our community,” he said. In this grueling economy, Stombaugh knows he has one of the toughest conceivable jobs. So he has to pull out all the stops. He is also focussing on educating the community in order to make a more apt work force attracting not just jobs, but good jobs. “Anything we can do today to improve our position or our ability to attract growth will pay enormous dividends down the road,” he said. “One of those long term focuses where we have enlisted the support of many throughout the community is ensuring we have the available and qualified labor force to meet our future needs. “Laclede County has come together in a comprehensive manner to discuss our common goals around workforce development,” Stombaugh said. “This area is going to benefit greatly with the See ‘Business’/ page 86


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 39

Mission completed at technical center Community generosity, support helps students build their own classroom

T

hanks to help and support from the community and local businesses, students in the Lebanon Technology and Career Center Building Trades program were given the chance to not only learn a trade but to also help future generations of carpentry students. For years, Building Trades students, which are made up of high school students from Lebanon and surrounding communities, Niangua, Conway, Stoutland and Hartville, built homes in lots that were donated to the school. LTCC would sell the home and then use that money to start work on the next home. When the students weren’t work-

ing on a building project or if inclement weather prevented them from being outside, the students had to

cram themselves into a mobile classroom in LTCC’s parking lot. Inside See ‘LTCC’/ page 41

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

It's now easier A than ever to go to college in Lebanon Enriching Our Community Through Education! Adult Education & Literacy/GED Classes Auto Collision Technology Building Trades Community Education Classes CNA-Certified Nurse Assistant Customized Training for Business/Industry EMT Basic Machine/Manufacturing Technology Restaurant Management (Pro-Start) Agriculture Education/FBMA Automotive Technology Business Education Computer Repair & Networking CMT-Certified Medication Technician Early Childhood Education Careers Practical Nursing Welding Technology

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partnership between Ozarks Technical Community College and Missouri State University means Lebanon students can get a four-year degree right where they live. Construction finished up this summer at the OTC Lebanon Center’s Reuben and Mary Lou Casey Hall, which is named after its 2010 donors, completing the renovation of the building that was once an open warehouse. The conversion added six additional classrooms, restrooms and an office area. Some of those classrooms and the office are utilized by Missouri State University, which is partnering with OTC to allow students to have the option to continue their education after receiving a two-year associate’s degree from OTC. “Basically what it is going to do is allow the students to have easier access, where they can interact between both schools and end up not only graduating with an associate's degree but also at least a bachelor’s degree,” said Kermit Clay, outreach coordinator for MSU’s Lebanon operations. While MSU students could achieve a bachelor’s degree from MSU at the Nelson Education Center, they couldn’t do it with the ease that they will be able to at OTC, Clay added. OTC currently offers the following programs at the school: Associate of Arts, Associate of Arts in Teaching, Early Childhood Development, Business and Marketing, Manufacturing Technology, Industrial Maintenance Technology and Machine Tool Technology. Upon completing their first two years of higher education at OTC, students can now enroll with MSU to work toward a Bachelor of Science in General Business or Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. Students who have already obtained a degree and would like to further See ‘A 4-year degree’/ page 42


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 41

LTCC students complete classroom project From Page 39 the room, there wasn’t enough room for the teacher to do any kind of demonstrations, nor was there room to store all of the program’s tools. If the students were preparing for a competition, they would have to set up the carpentry contest practice projects in a gymnasium. Lee Sing took over as instructor for the program in 2010. The next fall after his students completed the house they’d been working on, Sing approached the Lebanon R-3 School Board with the idea of having his students build their own shop building. The board approved the project in December 2011 and work started in April 2012. At the end of the 2012-2013 school year, the students were finally able to finish up the 40-by-80 feet building. Inside the metal building is a 20-by40 feet classroom, which includes an office and bathroom. The rest of the building is a shop area and storage. LTCC had originally thought the project was going to cost up to $90,000, but because of help from the community and area contractors and suppliers, the building ended up only costing $35,000. Businesses helped by donating money, time, labor and materials or providing substantial discounts. Some contractors even spent time with the students, giving them some hands-on training in specialty trades like electrical work, heating and cooling and concreting. “There were a lot of people who donated their time, their effort and their money, and without it, this wouldn’t have been possible,” Sing said during a building dedication ceremony held in May 2013. The building itself is named The Walter and Renee Harke Building Trades Facility, after its main benefactors. The Harkes donated $15,000 to the project shortly after it was approved by the school board. Sadly, Walter Harke passed away before the project could be completed. “(Walter Harke) wanted to help those that were willing to help themselves and make a difference in the lives of others. This facility will allow

Mr. Sing to do just that for many years to come,” said LTCC Director Keith Davis during the dedication. Another big help to the project was a $14,731 grant from Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation and SkillsUSA. The Toolbox for Education grant was used to put the finishing touches on the building, including building a porch and doing landscaping work. Davis said that LTCC was the only school While the Building Trades’ classroom is new, LTCC is far from it. The local tech school has been a Lebanon staple for more than 40 years. Davis, who was both a student and then a teacher at the center before joining the administrative team, has said that although there have been many changes over the years, one thing has

stayed the same. “The vision has always been the same - to offer technical educational training to the patrons and students of the community and surrounding communities,” Davis said. The school was built across from the Lebanon High School in 1971 with help from state funds and agreements from area schools. Since then the building has been expanded many times. In the 1980s it was connected to the Lebanon High School when the Boswell Auditorium was built. It now holds classes for not only Lebanon students, but also high school students from around the area, including Niangua, Conway, Stoutland and Hartville. In total, more than 900 students use the facility each school day. See ‘LTCC’/ page 85

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

A 4-year degree waits at OTC and MSU From Page 40 their education with a masters degree program. MSU will offer a Master of Business Administration, as well as master’s and specialist degrees in educational administration. “This is going to give a seamless transition from your freshman year on forward with our close partner, Missouri State University,” OTC Chancellor Dr. Hal Higdon said during a ceremony in May. MSU will offer classes in the form of traditional classes and iTV (interactive TV) classes. The iTV classes allow students to interact in real time with a professor in Springfield who is teaching through a video that is streamed to Lebanon. “They can interact in real time with the instructor, share papers — everything they could do in a real class,” Clay said. There also will be classes that blend live and iTV classes. This fall won’t be the first time that MSU and OTC shared the same building. Both were at one time housed at the Nelson Education Center adjacent to Nelson Park. OTC moved out of the building after the Caseys donated two industrial buildings on Route MM in late 2009. Last month, the Caseys, who are from California, donated the 50 acres of land surrounding the buildings, bringing up the total value of the family’s gift to OTC to $3.1 million, the biggest gift in the college’s history. Along with the Casey’s gift, Howard and Jan Fisk gave $25,000 and will have a conference room named in their

ce Sin 6 197

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honor. Lebanon businessman Jeff Carr gave $15,000 in honor of his father, Kenneth Carr, and a classroom will be named after the father. Hattie Brown, an OTC Foundation Board of Directors member, gave the school $10,000 through the Coca-Cola Bottler’s Foundation. Another $15,000 came from an anonymous donor. The campus opened up in fall 2011 with 13 classrooms, computer labs, a student lounge and student services department at Casey Hall. A second building includes workforce development and technical education classes. The finishing of Casey Hall, which will allow MSU to move into the Lebanon Center, was paid for with a $500,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Economic Development Loan and $100,000 of OTC’s own funds. Adding MSU to the mix may only be just the beginning of OTC’s expansion in Lebanon. Last month the college announced a master plan that would utilize the extra land donated by the Caseys. The plan, which has no start date, includes extra buildings for general education classes, OTC’s Allied Health program, agricultural services building, administrative offices and an arboretum. The plans also call for a fountain and several other water features. For more information, visit www.otc.edu/lebanon or call (417) 532-5044. We provide long and short term care for seniors who can no longer live independently. Physicians are on call, licensed nurses under the supervision of a registered nurse. Our facilities are State-Licensed by the Missouri department of Health & Senior Services.

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Nelson Education Center

Drur y continues the tradition

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or nearly 20 years, people in Lebanon have been able to get a Drury University education right in their hometown. Drury University offers traditional and online courses at the center, located within Nelson Park at 531 W. Bland Road. Drury started offering classes to Lebanon’s junior high students in 1986. Ten years later, the school opened the Drury University College of Continuing Professional Studies in the Nelson Education Center. Currently, the university offers about 50 courses per semester and allows students to receive associate degrees. Through a combination of online and traditional classes, students can also earn a bachelor’s degree in 22 different programs. In associate’s degree programs, the university offers foundations in education, communications, psychology and business. For more information about Drury’s Lebanon offerings, call (417) 532-9828 or visit www.drury.edu/lebanon. Nelson Education Center is also the home of Doodlebugs Playhouse Childcare and Education Center. The Lebanon City Council approved the faith-based, nonprofit organization taking over the 7,900 square feet area in May 2011, and the daycare started moving in the following month. Doodlebugs replaced Ozarks Technical Community College, which left the center earlier that year after OTC moved to its own

campus on Route MM. The Doodlebugs Playhouse Childcare and Education Center offers full-time and part-time daycare and preschool for children up to the age of 5. It also provides after-school daycare for children in grades kindergarten through sixth. Doodlebugs is open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call (417) 533-LOVE. Nelson Education Center also used to be the home of Missouri State University and Ozarks Technical Community College. The two higher education institutions have banded together and now each operate out of OTC’s Lebanon Center on Route MM. Drury University currently does not have plans to expand its services at the Nelson Education Center.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

KICKIN' ASPHALT NASCAR short-track racing returns to I-44 n its fourth year since switching from dirt back to asphalt, Lebanon’s I-44 Speedway has returned to its roots as a member of the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series next year. The marquee track operates on Saturday nights and Late Models is the track’s top division. The track remains within the family of the late Bill Willard, who built and opened it in 1983. Willard’s sons Bradley and David now own the speedway. Kevin Greven became the general manager this year. A longtime leader within the motorsports industry, Greven charted the new course for the track’s 30th season in 2013. “When we looked at the possibilities for our track, drivers, fans and sponsors, the NASCAR Whelen AllAmerican Series offers the most to all of them,” Greven said. I-44 Speedway was part of the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series from 1989-2001. During that time the speedway was the home track for fivetime NASCAR Whelen All-American Series national champion Larry Phillips. Phillips competed full-time

I

u Long Term/Skilled

at Lebanon I-44 during three of those national championship seasons (1989, 1995-96). He also won five Lebanon NASCAR Late Model track titles. Phillips’ other national championships came while he raced primarily in upstate Missouri in 1991-92. One of many young drivers Phillips mentored, Jamie McMurray — now a six-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Series winner — won the Lebanon track

u Hospice

championship in 1997. Multi-series NASCAR driver Mike Wallace, the youngest brother of Rusty and Kenny Wallace, won a track and NASCAR regional championship there in 1990. Other Lebanon NASCAR Late Model track champions include Kirk Shaw, Russell Phillips (who is not related to Larry), Steve Shive, Ken Dickinson and Tim Swearengin. See ‘I-44 Speedway’/ page 46

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I-44 Speedway again part of NASCAR From Page 44 Willard built and opened Lebanon I-44 as a dirt track in 1983, then paved it and joined NASCAR in 1989. The track returned to a dirt surface from 2003-2009, before the clay was removed to go asphalt racing again in 2010. The NASCAR Whelen All-American Series is NASCAR’s national championship program for weekly short track auto racing. The series encompasses more than 50 speedways across the United States and Canada. NASCAR-licensed Division I drivers at I-44 Speedway are eligible to compete for NASCAR Whelen AllAmerican Series championships and point fund awards at the track, state or

province, and national levels. NASCAR-licensed drivers in each track’s NASCAR-sanctioned support divisions compete for points in the NASCAR Finalist program. The program brings added recognition to drivers in NASCAR Divisions II-V. I-44 Speedway runs many special

events throughout the race season as well as an exciting weekly show that consists of the Late Models, Modifieds, Sportsman, Road Warriors and the Chargers with special appearances by the United States Super Truck Series, Pro National Baby Grand Cars, ASA Racing special events and various Concerts. Missouri’s only weekly asphalt racing oval, I-44 Speedway is located four miles east of the Lebanon city limit on Historic Route 66. Patrons using Interstate 44 may take Exit 135 and then drive approximately one mile east on Route 66 to the track’s main entrance. Additional information about the track’s racing schedule may be found on the facility’s official website, www.i44speedway.net.

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IF YOU LIKE YOUR RACING DIRTY... Midway Speedway offers family-friendly entertainment uilt and opened in late June 2004, Midway Speedway in Lebanon offers families and fans a family environment and good old fashioned close dirt track racing action at an affordable price for both drivers and fans. The 3/8ths mile semi-banked oval brings fans close to the action and offers several fan interaction events throughout the racing season, such as bike races for the kids, and on-track autograph sessions where fans can go on the track and meet and greet the driv-

B

ers competing, as well as other events. Located six miles east of Lebanon and on Route B, the track has hosted many different touring groups, including Regional Late Model specials, Sprint Car events and other types of motorsports, as well as its regular schedule since opening full time in 2005. The Speedway, which moved its race night from Friday to Saturday in 2012, also features a go-kart dirt track with a Friday racing schedule and a Motocross track, which host different types

of pit bike and motorcross events on selective dates. The weekly Saturday racing events include Factory Stocks, two different types of Modified classes, Pure Stocks and Wingless Sprints. The Speedway has seating capacity of 3,000 fans and also features a VIP seating tower section which can be rented on a race-by-race basis or for the season. Ticket prices start at $10 for adults and children ages 7-and-under are free. See ‘Midway Speedway’/ page 76

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

A little taste of Jersey

Fresh bread and pizza made daily at Cornerstone since 1980 f you asked Cornerstone Subs and Pizza owner Mike Horton why people keep coming back to the restaurant after more than 30 years, he’d point to the fresh homemade bread. Since Cornerstone opened in September of 1980, employees have made fresh bread and dough for their signature pizzas and subs. “We don’t just bake the bread freshly. We actually freshly make the bread from scratch every day,” Horton said. “Anybody can take a loaf of bread, throw it in the oven and have fresh-baked bread. The difference is we actually make it by hand every e day.” or St Valley View The store was first opened on ine North Madison Avenue where Larry’s Liquor • Beer • W Cream Cones Barber Shop is currently located. It Hand Dipped Ice Kitchen Tested. Family Approved. • Wood Ice Groceries • was opened by Mike Horton’s brother Curt Horton and his wife Debbie BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER who had recently moved to Missouri Homemade Pies • Brisket • Ribs • Steaks from New Jersey. While sub and pizza Prime Rib • Rainbow Trout • Tilapia • Seafood shops were common on the east coast, The Best Sandwiches in the Area!• Catering Available they were unheard of in Lebanon, Mike Horton said. “There just wasn’t anything like that out here,” he said. They were BBQ & Steakhouse bringing a little New Jersey flavor to Located on Hwy. 64 between Lebanon & Bennett Spring State Park the Ozarks, he added. Although he didn’t own it at the time, Horton had a hand in Cornerstone from the very beginning. He used to work for his brother making bread in the morning before the restaurant opened. “The bread recipe (that is still used today) is actually mine. I actually developed all that for them when they • Payday Loans •Title Loans originally opened,” Horton said. The business stayed in the Horton • Fast • Easy family for about two years before being purchased by a couple of customers who fell in love it, Harry and 1745 S. Jefferson (across from Wal-Mart) Christine Lefferts. Horton said Harry Mon. - Fri. 9-5 • Sat 9-12 Lefferts was a cash register salesman

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who used to come into the shop to eat a lot. He, who was also from the east coast, liked the restaurant so much he had to buy it. Shortly after purchasing the restaurant, the Lefferts moved Cornerstone just down Jefferson Avenue from its current location to the Bailey’s Shopping Center where there is now a laundry mat. It stayed at the shopping center from about 1983 to 1986 until moving to its current location at 399 S. Jefferson Ave, which had previously been a popular steakhouse and later a video game arcade before Cornerstone settled in. Mike Horton and his mother Karen purchased the business in 2004 from the Lefferts. While Cornerstone has changed its location a few times, its kept what keeps people coming back. Many of the same sandwiches and pizzas that were served in 1980 are still served today. “We’ve added some sandwiches and pizza toppings, but we haven’t changed a whole lot,” Horton said. Some of the original sandwiches are still top sellers for the restaurant. Horton said the ham and cheese is the best seller with the cheese steak a close second. While people think of Cornerstone by the food that is in its name, subs and pizza, sometimes their other fare is the most popular. “Some days the strombolis outsell everything else,” Horton said. Cornerstone only makes traditional hand-tossed pizza and still uses a brick oven to make them. Horton said brick ovens are famous for giving pizzas the best flavor. “It’s a little slower cook time. The flavors actually have time to cook in a little more,” Horton said. “The old conveyor belt ovens are a lot faster and you can put a lot more pizzas out, but they just don’t have the same quality and flavor.” Horton doesn’t foresee many changes on the horizon for Cornerstone, as he says, “If it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” but he said he would like to expand offerings to his customers. Horton said he is dabbling with implementing gluten-free bread and dough for people with gluten allergies. Horton decided to start offering gluten-free options because he has a gluten allergy. “I’m a guy who owns a sandwich

PAGE 49

shop but can’t eat a sandwich,” Horton joked. Along with the food, he thinks his staff keeps people coming back. Horton said there is a friendly atmosphere at Cornerstone, where customers are treated like family and friends. “We try to treat everybody the same. We don’t care if you’re the poorest person in town or the richest person in town,” Horton said. He added that he likes getting to know his customers and he said that is the key to success in the restaurant business.

“If you don’t enjoy people then get out of the restaurant business,” he said. Besides the food, Cornerstone is known for its Kids Corner which features drawings from young customers. Horton said the Cornerstone landmark just happened without any planning. “Just out of a whim, she decided to hang up a kid’s picture, and it’s been going strong ever since. Kid’s have hung up their pictures there for nine years now,” Horton said. He hopes that kids will hang their art up on the wall for many years to come.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Come play in Lebanon! Our town features 9 parks that cover more than 100 acres

T

he Lebanon Parks and Recreation Department features nine parks that cover more than 100 acres. Located within these parks are 27 holes of disc golf, nine baseball/softball fields, several playground areas, three paved walking trails, 11 shelters, the Boswell Aquatic Center, Nelson Pond and a skate park. The Parks Department also works with various groups like the YMCA, American Red Cross and other civic organizations to host various events that include 5k runs, drive-in movies, baseball and softball tournaments and

Kids’ Fishing Day. The Lebanon Parks Department has a co-ed volleyball league for adults, basketball leagues for grades 4 through adult and numerous baseball and softball leagues for players of all ages. The Parks Department has also partnered with USSSA to host numerous baseball and softball tournaments. The Parks Department has also partnered with the Lebanon Family YMCA to host the Boo Bash, a Halloween celebration, the Eggstravaganza, an Easter Day celebration, and Kids’ Fishing Day.

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Held at Nelson Lake in June, the Lebanon Parks Department’s Kids’ Fishing Day is a catch-and-release event that always draws a big crowd. The third-annual Eggstravaganza in 2013 drew 2,500 attendees and its egg hunt featured 50,000 Easter eggs stuffed with goodies. The Lebanon Parks are open daily from 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Atchley Park Located on North Mo. 5, Atchley Park features four baseball/softball fields with spectator seating, concession stand and restrooms, a fenced playground, four horseshoe pits, as well as two lighted shelters. The park also features the Jared Hilton Memorial Disc Golf Course, an 18-hole course that features PDGA standard goals. The course is home to several tournaments each year, bringing disc golf enthusiasts from around the state to compete. The park has two entrances, off both Hwy 5 in the front of the park, and Lynn Street in the back of the park, but no through traffic is allowed. Ample parking is provided. Several weddings are scheduled each year at the gazebo

(Andy’s Pavilion) and is perfect for small concerts.

Boswell Park Located on Historic Route 66, Boswell Park was originally known as Maplecrest Park. The park now bears the name of its largest benefactor, the Boswell Family, donated $100,000 in the late 1970s to provide matching funds to build the outdoor pool. It was then that it was named after James E. Boswell, Jr. (1937-1955). The park features three lighted shelters for picknicking, a baseball/softball field with spectator seating, concession stand and restrooms. Boswell Park has a fenced in playground, two lighted tennis courts, a basketball court, two horseshoe pits and a nine-hole disc golf course. The park features a children’s play fountain and is home to the Lebanon Family YMCA’s Boswell Aquatic Center.

Boswell Aquatic Center Located in Boswell Park, the the Lebanon Family YMCA’s Boswell Aquatic Center is a popular place to cool off in the summer. The pool complex is complete with two 26-foot water slides, a kiddie pool, a main pool, shade structures and a recently renovated bathhouse. See ‘Lebanon's parks’/ page 84

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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round the nation, locally owned businesses are slowly being replaced by large chain stores, but some hardy mom-and-pop establishments survive nonetheless. Owned by the same family for nearly 80 years, Lebanon’s Dryer’s Shoe Store is one business that has weathered the sands of time. Dale Dryer, the first member of the Dryer family to own the store, bought it from Sam Huer in 1936. Dryer already owned a shoe store in Mountain Grove, which he had founded in 1929, but he purchased the Lebanon store

to expand his chain. He then left it in the hands of Willis Loring, who ran the store, and Melvin Gilley, who specialized in shoe repair. Since then, the Dryer’s Shoe Store chain has passed through the hands of three generations, and today the stores are owned by Dale Dryer’s grandson Steve Dryer. When speaking about the store in its original state, Steve Dryer talks about its promotions. These include giving free shoes to customers who can guess the number of grains a rooster can eat in four minutes or for guessing how many pennies can fit in a shoe belonging

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to Robert Wadlow, the world’s tallest man. According to Steve Dryer, promotions are an important tool for drawing customers into the store. “In a store like this you’ve always got to have something to draw a little bit of interest, you know, especially now,” he stated. By “a store like this,” Dryer means small, independent stores. Like many other industries, the shoe business is slowly being overrun by big companies that make it hard for small businesses to compete. Dryer explained that Dryer’s Shoe Store was once the only shoe store in Lebanon, but now the city boasts a variety of shoe retailers; however, Dryer’s is still the only independently owned store in town. Most of the changes that the business has seen are intertwined with this change in the industry. “There’s not a lot of wholesale salesmen coming around and opening accounts with companies,” Steve Dryer said. “A lot of times they’re going to just bigger companies or bigger guys. It used to be that they would travel around, and

there was a lot of small stores in each town, and the wholesalers would come and sell to those stores -- there wasn’t a lot of big chains, and that’s changed.” Additionally, the fewer small stores remain, the harder it gets for those that have survived. Steve said, “We used to have a wholesale business. We had like 150 different independent retailers, you know, and then we all bought together -- it was kind of a coop type deal. You know, now all those people over the years have retired and got out as it gets rough, especially since 2008.” In a world where larger stores have more buying power and the internet offers convenience, Dryer’s has had to find ways to distinguish itself from other businesses. "You have to carry a little bit better shoes, something different,” Steve explained. Although he understands why it might be tempting to buy the cheapest shoes available, Steve believes that, in the end, buying high-quality shoes is more beneficial to the See ‘Dryers’/ page 76

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Since 1933 ...

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For three generations, the Brown family has been providing AnheuserBusch beverages to people all over Missouri. Over the years, the company has expanded from a small distribution center in Lebanon to four sites across the state that distribute not just Anheuser-Busch beers but a variety of beverages, including Monster Energy drinks. One thing has stayed the same since the company was founded in 1933: the Brown family. “We’re a third generation family business,� said Missouri Eagle CEO

Charles “Charlie� Brown. “You just can’t beat a family-owned business because the people running it have the greatest interest in its success.� Charlie Brown’s father Charles Brown started the Charles E. Brown Beverage Company, which later became Missouri Eagle, in 1933 in Aurora right after the end of Prohibition that same year. The move to Lebanon didn’t happen for another seven years, and it took asking Charles Brown more than once. A friend of Charles Brown, Edwin

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Woodfill, who was also from Aurora, owned a Coca-Cola bottling company and Budweiser distribution company in Lebanon. He was trying to get out of the beer business and asked Charles Brown, who was already a beer distributor in Aurora, to take over, but he declined. A few years later in 1939, Gussie Busch, whose grandfather co-founded Anheuser-Busch, encouraged Brown to move his operations to the Fort Leonard Wood area. The fort was just beginning construction at the time. “You kinda did whatever Mr. Busch said,� Charlie Brown said. At that time, “there wasn’t anything in Waynesville or St. Robert,� Brown said, so his father stayed at the Nelson Hotel in Lebanon. Since he was staying at the hotel in Lebanon and already knew the Woodfill family in town, Charles Brown decided to make Lebanon his new home. In April 1940, the Charles E. Brown Beverage Company opened up its new headquarters in Lebanon. The distributor was located at 308 W. Commercial St., where the Commerce Bank garage is currently located. The company serviced Laclede, Pulaski, Camden, Miller and Dallas counties. Commercial Street was the company’s home for three decades. In November 1970, the Brown Beverage Company moved to its current location at 242 Route MM. Current CEO and Chairman Charlie Brown has been with the company for more than 50 years. He started working with his father in 1962. When he took over, the Lebanon office had 10 employees. It has grown to nearly 70


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

employees at the Lebanon distribution alone. Starting in the 1980s, Brown Beverage began branching outside of its immediate service area. On Dec. 29, 1984, Charlie Brown was in Flordia when he received a call asking if his company was interested in taking over the Nevada Anheuser-Busch distribution center. Brown Beverage took over the company in March 1985. The company’s next big expansion happened in 2003 when the company purchased a new location and merged with another company. The Charles E. Brown Beverage Company merged with the Marquart Beverage Company of Washington, Mo., which was also a long-running family company. Together the companies acquired the Larry Hickey Distributing Company of Joplin. “They wanted to keep their name, and we wanted to keep our name. So, we arrived at a common ground and partnered under Missouri Eagle, LLC,” Charlie Brown said. With the acquisitions and mergers, the company went from serving five counties in the immediate area to include seven more counties in the Nevada area and five more counties around Joplin. Brown said his company basically serves the southwest portion of the state that touches Arkansas, Oklahoma and Kansas. “We’ve got quite a wide distribution,” he said. Not only has Missouri Eagle expanded where it distributes drinks, it has also increased the types and brands of products it delivers all around Southwest Missouri. In 2011, Missouri Eagle became non-exclusive, meaning it could distribute more than just Anheuser-Busch products. The company now distributes everything from wine to root beer to energy drinks. “When we became a non-exclusive, we took on all these other products simply because the market demanded it. We needed a full truck going out and those items were hot at the moment,” Charlie Brown said. One of their biggest brands besides Anheuser-Busch is Monster Energy drinks. According to Charlie Brown, Missouri Eagle is the second largest Monster distributor in the country. “We have such a unique market with Fort Leonard Wood that we’ve

PAGE 57

become one of the top Monster distributors in the United States,” he said. Missouri Eagle isn’t done expanding its service area and products. Charlie Brown said that when he entered the business, he was excited about the opportunity and grew the business. He said he sees that same drive in his children, Ed Brown, who is the company’s chief operating officer, and Brad Brown, who is the company’s vice president/manager of the Lebanon center. “When my sons, Ed and Brad

started coming back into the business, they had the same attitude,” Charlie Brown said. He added that Missouri Eagle is contemplating another expansion, but it isn’t “in the making” yet. “We know where we’d like to expand, but whether we’re able to do that or not remains to be seen,” he said. Charlie Brown and his company have been awarded and recognized many times over in the past few See ‘Missouri Eagle’/ page 82

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BE PART OF THE SWARM marks for test scores, attendance and graduation rates among many other indicators, to be awarded with the distinction. The district provided an education to about 4,600 students in 2012-2013 across its six schools. Lebanon’s schools used to be divided up among neighborhood elementary schools that all went to one high school. In the 1980s, the schools were changed so that certain grades went to certain schools. Joe D. Esther Elementary School, which is the district’s newest school, houses pre-K through first grades, Maplecrest Elementary School houses the second and third grade, Boswell Elementary School is fourth and fifth, Hillcrest School is sixth grade, the Lebanon Junior High School is seventh and eighth grade and the Lebanon High School, Lebanon Technology and Career Center and Lebanon Alternative Education School all educate high school students. Lebanon High School and LTCC also

The Lebanon R-3 School District has been accredited with distinction for the past decade. The 2012-2013 school year marked the tenth year in a row that the local district achieved the distinction. The Missouri Association of School Administrators recognized the district with the Distinction in Performance for Improved Achievement award for that year. “It’s a huge deal for us because that is us measured up against the state standards to get that every year. It takes in consideration your achievement scores, your graduation rate, attendance, and all those areas are important to us at the school district,” Lebanon R3 Superintendent Dr. Duane Widhalm has said. In order to qualify for the award districts had to achieve at least nine of the 14 academic performance standards in their Annual Performance Report, which includes performance bench-

teach students from surrounding sending schools. Both Joel E. Barber and Gasconade school districts only have classes up to the eighth grade. LTCC also has many programs for adults in many technical fields and for-fun classes. The district’s Central Office is located at 1310 E. Route 66. The administration team headed up by Widhalm also includes assistant superintendents Michele Hedges and Dr. Brad Armstrong, Director of Special Programs Dr. Tammy Lupardus, Chief Financial Officer Joe Knapp, Maintenance Director Lester Caps, Transportation Director Max Starnes, Food Services Director Bob Albright, Communications Director Deborah Moore and Technology Director Dr. Charles Smith Jr. The board normally meets at 5:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday of the month at Central Office. For more information about the district, visit www.lebanon.k12.mo.us.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

The Wild Side The Lebanon-Laclede County area is a virtual sportsman's paradise with varied species of wildlife, hunting or fishing opportunities

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open areas of the state, but the tree-covered parts of the county produce bountiful harvests of deer and turkey each hunting season. Crisscrossing this terrain is a venous network of streams of varying size which, in addition to providing aesthetic beauty, offer an abundance of fishing opportunities for floaters, waders and bank anglers. Of course, these same habitats that are home to popular game species are also home to the myriad of small mammal, reptile, amphibian and songbird species that reside in this part of the state for all or part of the year.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Laclede County’s natural world has always been graced with variety, as evidenced by data gleaned from earlysettlement descriptions of this area. In pre-settlement times, it’s estimated the county contained slightly more than 40 square miles of native prairie. Though that comprises a seemingly insignificant six percent of the county’s land mass, this figure becomes more interesting when you look at surrounding counties. Draw a line straight west from Laclede County on that same pre-settlement map and you’ll find counties with increasing amounts of prairie; draw a line straight east and the amount of prairie decreases. That means when the first settlers came to Laclede County, they found an area situated squarely on the line where the eastern forests met the western tall grass prairie. Because of that, early settlers in Laclede County found a mixed bag of wildlife: Forest-friendly species such as the timber wolf, black bear and ruffed grouse blended with bison, elk, prairie chickens and other animals that preferred native grasslands. Those creatures may be gone (or, in the case of the black bear, greatly reduced in number); but today’s outdoors enthusiasts can still find an abundance of species in this area. People in the Lebanon area need look no further than the Coleman Memorial Conservation Area on the south end of the city. This 64-acre site features 38 acres of forest and 24 acres of grassland area that is in the process of being restored with native plants. A 1.8-mile hiking trail provides good opportunities to view deer, turkey, songbirds and other animals. No hunting is allowed at the Coleman Area. Wildlife viewing opportunities also exist at the Osage Fork Conservation Area, approximately four miles south of Lebanon, and on the four tracts of the Bear Creek Conservation Area five miles northeast of Lebanon. It should be noted See ‘Wildlife’/ page 93

PAGE 61


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very spring Lebanon’s artists go outdoors to share their art with Mother Nature’s creations. Art in Bloom, formerly known as Art at the Farm, is held in the spring at Marilyn’s Nursery and Garden Center, 27081 Missouri 5. “If you enjoy a good time with your children and would like to expose them to local talent and art of the Ozarks, Art in Bloom is a good opportunity,” said Brenda Perkins, a local artist and member of the Lebanon Art Guild. “It’s a great place to start a cultural adventure.” Art lovers not only get a chance to support local artists by purchasing works created by local artists, but they also get a chance to meet the people behind the work. Local artists from a variety of disciplines and styles, including painters, wood carvers, basket weavers, jewelry makers, potters and photographers, showcase their talents, give tips and pointers, and demonstrations to the public during the festival. “If you want a unique gift, this is where to go because you won’t find the art anywhere else in the world,” Perkins said. There also is music and poetry throughout the weekend. Art in Bloom isn’t just for adults. A children’s activities tent is set up to give kids something to do while their parents and grandparents peruse the art. Inside the tent, children are able to make their own art. The two-day event culminates with an art auction. Artists from the guild donate a piece of work to be auctioned off to support the Lebanon Art Guild and Gallery, which is a not-for-profit organization that operates solely on donations and volunteers. A 50/50 raffle drawing is also held during the auction. Vendors are welcome at the Art in Bloom. The fee for non-members of

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“If you want a unique gift, this is where to go because you won’t find the art anywhere else in the world,” Perkins said. There also is music and poetry throughout the weekend. Art in Bloom isn’t just for adults. A children’s activities tent is set up to give kids something to do while their parents and grandparents peruse the art. Inside the tent, children are able to make their own art. The two-day event culminates with an art auction. Artists from the guild donate a piece of work to be auctioned off to support the Lebanon Art Guild and Gallery, which is a not-for-profit organization that operates solely on donations and volunteers. A 50/50 raffle drawing is also held during the auction.

Vendors are welcome at the Art in Bloom. The fee for non-members of the Lebanon Art Guild and Gallery is $20. Booths are available on a first-come, first-served basis. “We love it when people come out and sell things. It makes it more fun,” Perkins said. Along with taking proceeds from the sale, the guild also accepts donations, which are tax deductible. Perkins said the many things that the Lebanon Art Guild and Gallery does would not be possible without donations. In addition to Art in Bloom, the guild also hosts an annual citywide student art show and a COPE art show, as well as jam sessions, meetings and classes. The guild’s goal is to be a cultural gathering place. “We really need support. We

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Lots of family fun at the fair!


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 65

Adventure awaits at the Laclede County Community Fair From bucking bulls to bumper cars, the Laclede County Community Fair has a little adventure for everyone. Held every year in mid-July, each night at the fair offers something new for fair-goers to experience. New in 2013 was the Southern Roughstock Cowboy Rodeo. Cowboys tried their best to last 8 seconds during one of about 40 bull rides through the night. The Laclede County Fair has hosted a rodeo before, but it has never had a bull ride only event, according to Fair Board President Glenn Raef. “It’s just something different to kick off the fair and put a little bit of a rodeo flavor into it,” Raef said. “What’s a county fair without a rodeo?” The rest of the week was filled with Laclede County Fair standards, including the antique tractor pull and the Sleeper Lawn and Garden pull. Also popular are the Tuff Truck and 4-wheeler Rodeo. In the Tuff Truck competition, local drivers can compete with their pickups to see whose vehicle is supreme. A little quieter is the draft horse pull, another featured event.

“The truck pull and tractor pull are the big ones. Those are our two big nights,” Raef said. The main events may be a good show at the end of the fair, but it’s the carnival rides, the ferris wheel and other manner of rides that spin round and round and go up and down that attract the young and young at heart to the fair. For the third year in a row, Sonshine Amusements of Alabama provided the carnival rides. “They do a good job, they’re clean, they’re neat, they’re courteous, their rides are very well taken care of, they’re a good, good group of people to work with,” Raef said. He added that the fair board is happy to be working with them because finding a good carnival provider can be hard. One of the things that sets Sonshine apart is the quality of rides. Raef said some of the rides come from another carnival in St. Louis. The centerpiece of the carnival rides is the giant ferris wheel, which was once located on Michael Jackson’s famed Neverland Ranch. See ‘Fair’/ page 79

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BENNETT SPRING STATE PARK


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 67

From Brice to Bennett How a small milling town became a popular tourist spot ennett Spring State Park is one of Missouri’s first and most popular state parks, attracting a growing number of tourists every year. The third largest natural spring in the state of Missouri pumps 100 million gallons of water each and every day. Anglers from around the nation wade in the spring’s waters in search of lunker-sized trout, and those looking for adventures in camping and canoeing come in droves each year, but there was once a time when Bennett Spring State Park was simply known as Brice, Mo. During the 1920s when America was enjoying prosperity following World War I, Bennett Spring (then known as Brice) was one of many areas considered by state planners to be preserved as a state park. A Dec. 12, 1924, article in the Laclede County Republican stated that Lebanon Chamber of Commerce President O.A. Mayfield requested that the state consider Bennett Spring as a possible state park site. The article said the first parcel of land, 8 1/2 acres, belonging to Josie Bennett Smith would became a part of Bennett Spring State Park. The land was purchased from Mrs. Smith on Dec. 27, 1924. Several weeks later, another contract was signed between William Sherman Bennett, Mrs. Smith’s brother, and the Next to

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Brice becomes Bennett Spring State Park From Page 67 state for the sale of 565.33 acres. Of that land, 427 acres can be traced as belonging to James Brice, who settled there in 1837. The land where today’s park store, office, dining lodge and hatchery buildings stand once belonged to the Bennett family. Records indicate that James Brice came here from Illinois in search of produc-

tive land and a healthful climate. He decided to stay at the beautiful spring area, which reportedly teemed with wildlife. Elk, deer, wild turkeys, buffaloes and even panthers were said to drink from the enormous spring. Brice homesteaded 160 acres, which included the spring, and eventually homesteaded additional acreage that included all of the land and spring

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branch area. He built the first mill in the vicinity where early-day farmers brought their corn for grinding. The mill eventually was washed away during a violent rainstorm and flood. Brice, the first permanent settler in the Bennett Spring area, died in 1855 and is buried in the Bennett Cemetery. The Bennett family later settled at the spring area on land known as the Elmer Conn farm, site of the present Sand Springs Motel and Restaurant. The enterprising Peter Bennett built a mill at the spring outlet and Niangua River, which also was washed away in a rainstorm and flood. Bennett built a second mill known as Bennett’s Mill during the Civil War years, and it became a center for tradesmen and farmers. The mill was too small to accommodate the increase in business, so Bennett built a third mill and included a carding machine that prepared wool for the spinning wheel. He also built a sawmill in one section of the mill. As business continued to grow, Bennett decided to construct a three-story building, and he purchased equipment for it in St. Louis. Since the railroad track went only to Rolla, Bennett and his employees had to meet the train there and haul the equipment to Brice in ox-driven wagons — a slow process over the rocky fords of that time. Peter Bennett married Anna Brice, the daughter of homesteader James Brice. After Brice’s death, Peter and Anna inherited the property. When Peter Bennett died in 1882, his son, William Sherman Bennett, continued to run the mill. Bennett’s daughter, Josie Bennett Smith, operated a hotel at Brice for many years. The Bennett Mill was destroyed by fire in 1895. The last mill at Brice was built by Dr. John B. and Freeman Atchley. Others who operated the mill in later years were J.E. Kelly, Mr. Runge and B.J. Usery. The mill stood as a landmark at Bennett Spring for sightseers and tradesmen alike. The Civilian Conservation Corps, which worked in the area during the 1930s, improved the mill. However, it later was destroyed by fire. The CCC also


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

constructed a log dam, foot trails, a new bridge and many other buildings at the park. The spring valley already had become a popular camping site in the late 1800s as an area where farmers waited their turns at the mill. According to a Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) brochure, campers would fish, hunt or visit with local townspeople to pass the time. By the turn of the century, recreation was gaining in importance at Brice. According to the DNR brochure, in 1900 the Missouri fish commissioner introduced 40,000 mountain trout into the spring, and a privately owned fish hatchery was built in 1923, the year before the state bought the spring and some of the surrounding area for a state park. The Brice Post Office originally was built as a log building on the river bank and named after James Brice. In later years, it was located in a general store operated by William Sherman Bennett and his wife, Louie. The name of the post office was changed to Bennett Spring in 1939 and finally was discontinued in 1965. Arlie Bramwell was the last postmaster at Bennett Spring. It was reported that in the early 1900s, William Sherman Bennett had a number of cans of young trout emptied into the spring. The trout thrived in the cold waters, attracting many fishermen. Brice was the location where famed author Harold Bell Wright completed work on his classic novel, “The Shepherd of the Hills." Wright also wrote “The Calling of Dan Matthews" while he lived in Lebanon. In that book, Wright’s “Gordon’s Mill" actually was Bennett’s Mill. Today, one off the oldest original buildings at Bennett Spring in the Bennett Spring Church of God, organized in 1917 through the influence of William Sherman and Louie Boles Bennett, who donated land for the church site. In the 1950s, stone veneer was applied over the wooden structure. It is the only original building that was in old Brice. “Aunt Louie’’ Bennett was pastor of the church for many years. Today, Bennett Spring Church of God is a very active church and is visited by many fishermen staying at the park each trout season. See ‘Bennett Spring/ page 87

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Winter weather, high gas prices may have kept some anglers away on March 1 The tradition continued on March 1, 2013 at Bennett Spring State Park when just over 1,000 anglers cast their lines into the stream for Opening Day 2013. The crowd was much less than nearly the 2,000 that had been anticipated to greet the opening siren, perhaps because of the winter storm that blew through the area earlier in the week and dumped several inches of snow, but for those who did brave below freezing temperatures, it was the dawn of a new year at the state park. For some, March 1 was their first Opening Day at Bennett Spring, while for others it is a time-honored tradition of camaraderie and family, with the fishing being almost secondary. David Boedker of St. Charles, Mo. has been coming to Bennett Spring for 20 years. He and a group of friends were waiting near their usual spot behind the hatchery office at about 5:30 a.m.

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“It’s just a tradition,” he said. “I am a little late this morning getting here, so my friends are all down there in front, but it’s the same group of guys every year. They’ve been doing it for 30 years.” Wally Kolkmeier of St. Charles, Mo. and his son, also Wally Kolkmeier of Old Monroe, Mo., were actually fishing on Opening Day for the first time together. “It’s kind of special,” the senior Kolkmeier said. “There is actually another Kolkmeier here today — my dad. It’s the first time we have all been together (for Opening Day). This is actually only the second time I have been down on Opening Day to fish.” The group said they didn’t mind the cold for Opening Day and were actually excited about their prospects for the morning. “There’s not nearly as many people here this year,” the younger Wally Kolkmeier said, adding that he opted to take advantage of Opening Day being on a Friday to have a three-day weekend. “That’s always good,” added Morgan Tucker of Wentzville, Mo. “This is actually my first time on Opening Day, so this is great.” When asked if a larger crowd would cause him to rethink Opening Day, Tucker said it wouldn’t. “Just coming out with these guys is great,” he said. At about 6 a.m. honorary whistler blower Don Brown of Lebanon was getting instructions from the park’s hatchery manager, Mike Mitchell, about his duty of officially kicking off the season. Brown has been fishing at Bennett Spring State Park for more than five decades and was headed to the stream to do a little fishing of his own, as well as help his granddaughter. “This is real nice,” he said. “I’ve been coming here for 56 years now. Bennett Spring is home to us. It’s in the backyard of Lebanon (Mo.). There are lots of other state parks, but this one is the nicest.” When asked if he was nervous about sounding the opening siren,

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Brown quickly replied that he was up to the task. “Nah... (Mitchell) showed me how to do it,” he said. “If it don’t work, then it’s his fault.”

After 56 years of coming to the park on Opening Day, Brown said he has found much more than fishing memories. “March 1 is the kickoff of trout season, and some years might be different than others, but they are all pretty much the same,” he said. “It’s really the camaraderie and the friendships.” He went on to say that seeing his son, Brian, and granddaughter, Matlyn, fish on Opening Day has been his best memories. The Brown family utilized Bennett Spring all year, so the park has become a friend of the family. “We don’t use it enough,” he said. “We should be down here every weekend. We need to be outside more, not inside.” Once Brown, whose family owned the E.L. Brown and Sons Sporting Goods on Commercial Street in Lebanon. Mo. for many years, finished his honorary whistle blower duty, he was going to fish with his family, but he really didn’t care if he caught anything. “If I catch a lunker, it would tickle me to death,” he said. “If I just catch four fish it will tickle me to death. If I don’t catch anything, it will tickle me to death. Just being here is enough.” As the clock ticked closer to 6:30 a.m., more spectators gathered in the hatchery office to watch Brown kick off the festivities of Opening Day, including local law makers, officials from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources and the Missouri Department of Conservation. Just prior to the official start, Mitchell presented Brown with the traditional No. 0001 tag that is reserved for the honorary whistle blower each year. Brown said he planned to put that to good use later in the day. With only a few seconds left, those who crowded into the office began the countdown. “Ten, nine, eight, ... “ everyone said in unison, breaking into applause and cheers when Brown was given the See ‘Opening Day’/ page 79


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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Fishing opportunities for all anglers

F

ishing is a sport that is enjoyed by countless people of all ages, genders and walks of life. But it is also a sport that some have been unable to enjoy because physical disabilities have made it difficult for them to make their way to a stream. Thanks to donations from people from around the state, as well as efforts from the Missouri Conservation Heritage Foundation and the Missouri departments of Conservation and Natural Resources, those with disabilities have a new, handicapped-accessible place to cast their lines at Bennett Spring State Park. A formal dedication for the new ramp and fishing platform, which was ready for the March 1 Opening Day, was held on May 4, 2013. For some donors and state officials, it was the first time they had seen the platform,

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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prompting reactions of joy and satisfaction, knowing that their efforts and donations have, and will continue to have, a positive impact on the lives of anglers with physical limitations. The MCHF actually began a fundraising effort to construct a fishing and viewing platform below the dam near the hatchery office in 2011. The goal of $45,000 for the project was surpassed with more than $60,000 being raised, prompting an effort to construct the handicapped accessible ramp and platform, which is across the stream from the hatchery office, just below the dam. David Reynolds, president of the MCHF board, was among those on hand for the event and was quick to call the ramp and platform a “dream come true.” “It is wonderful and turned out even better than we expected,” he said. “It’s great to be able to come over on this side (of the stream). It’s great to be able to see people fish off of it. I was up here the other day and there was a man in a wheelchair who was out there fishing from it. That’s what its all about.” While there are other handicapped-accessible areas for anglers at Bennett Spring, Reynolds said the new area gives angers an opportunity to fish at the dam, perhaps for the first time.

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“It is probably the best area to fish,” he explained. “They can throw (their lines) up, and roll off the water coming off the dam and catch a lot of fish.” He added that the platform will also allow other anglers, not just those who may have physical disabilities, to fish in an area that he considered nearly inaccessible. “It makes it more accessible for everybody,” he said. “I think it is a winwin, and I have had a lot of comments about it.” Reynolds added that if it weren’t for the donations of those who love Bennett Spring State Park, the ramp would not have been possible. “In my opinion, Bennett Spring State Park is the crown jewel of all of our state parks,” he said. “This really just shows the partnership of the citizens and the DNR, the Department of Conservation and the Heritage Foundation. They all came together for this and that is what is really wonderful. “The neat thing is that a lot of people donated in dedication to loved ones who loved this park. We have a family who donated See ‘Ramp’/ page 78

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Get back to nature

Center offers unique look at Bennett T

he Bennett Spring Nature Center has seen more visitors than one can possibly count in its more than 40-year history. Originally intended to be the trail-head of the park, the center included living quarters, kitchen facilities and bathrooms for the naturalist stationed there. Since then, it has become much more than the original contractors intended. Before its construction, the area was quite bare. What is now a forest with trails and an amphitheatre was once a large hayfield used by the farmers that had inhabited the area since the days of the Brice Township. In 1969, the original nature center was converted into a feed center for the fish hatchery, and the current Nature Center opened its doors. The Center was one of the first centers built in Missouri for the sole purpose of being a nature center. George Kastler served as the natu-

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ralist from 1969 to 1979, followed by Doug Ladd (1980-1985) and is presently served by Diane Tucker (since 1986). For much of its existence, the Nature Center was seasonal, but has since changed to being open full time. In the late 1970s, the amphitheatre was constructed, allowing the naturalists to conduct outdoor demonstrations and shows. In 1985, new exhibits were constructed as part of the first major update to the Center. When the living quarters were removed, the remaining bathrooms were converted for patron use. During this time, the center’s original flat roof was converted to a pitched one. Originally, the St. John’s Wort planted along the sidewalk was intended to be kept small, but was removed soon afterwards because of security is-

sues. Shrubs were planted behind the center in the open field about the time it stopped being mowed. In the early 1990s, several large Viburnum shrubs at the corner of the center were moved to another location in the park and the wooden welcome sign between the flag poles was taken out a few years ago. In March 2008, the center received a major overhaul. Most of the exhibits installed by Chase Studio in 1985 were ‘refreshed’ with lighting, technological and text updates. Exhibit additions included the interactive exhibit with springs, the mill structures and the current park map. In its younger days, the park had far less amenities and camping was done on a greater scale on all sides of the nature center, causing it to be the


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Catching Comfort Since 1995!

use. During this time, the center ’s original flat roof was converted to a pitched one. Originally, St. John’s Wort was planted along the sidewalk and was intended to be kept small, but it was removed soon afterwards because of security issues. Shrubs were planted behind the center in the open field about the time it stopped being mowed. In the early 1990s, several large Viburnum shrubs at the corner of the center were moved to another location in the park, and the wooden welcome sign between the flagpoles was taken out a few years ago. In March 2008, the center received a major overhaul. Most of the exhibits installed by Chase Studio in 1985 were "refreshed" with lighting, technological and text updates. Exhibit additions included the interactive exhibit with springs, the mill structures and the current park map. In its younger days, the park had far fewer amenities, and camping was done on a greater scale on all sides of the nature center, causing it to be the focus of the park. While many additional features have been added in the years since the Center ’s construction, the Nature Center still offers a great deal of information, fun exhibits, guided nature walks and programs. For additional information about the Nature Center, call (417) 5323925.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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Dryers From Page 55 customer. “This is a blue collar town, which is great. A lot of people are working. But they don’t know if they’re going to be working in two or three months,” He acknowledged. “You know, you go out and you don’t want to spend a lot of money on something. You want to have something at a good value. If you buy good quality -- usually buying a good quality shoe or something like that is cheaper in the long run. It’ll last you longer, and they feel better on your feet so you can work better.” Besides its inventory of high-quality shoes, Dryer’s offers an atmosphere of customer service that isn’t available online. “You can come in and try stuff on, make sure they fit,” Steve explained. "You get personal service.” Ironically, another attribute that has helped Dryer’s to hold on is its age. “We’ve been established in this town, and we have a lot of customers that came in here as kids, and now they bring their kids in,” Steve said. “We’ve been here. And we try to offer people a better quality of shoe.” In the end, it’s businesses like Dryer’s Shoe Store that really benefit when people shop locally. Steve Dryer stated, “People (need to) support their local stores because they’re going to all be gone if they don’t.”

Midway Speedway From page 47 Among the special events scheduled at Midway are the Spring Fling, a special Fourth of July fireworks show, Fawl Brawl and the season ending Cotton Classic. After opening in 2004, Midway went through an extensive makeover during that off season to the current configuration today and gives the fans and visitors an up-close feeling of the on-track close action between the drivers. The Midway racing season starts in early April and runs through early November. For additional information, visit the track website at www.lebanonmidwayspeedway.com or contact owners Jack and Dana Jones at 417-594-0594.


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Something fishy going on Hatchery improvements complete at Bennett Phase II of the renovations at the Bennett Spring State Park Hatchery that began more than a year ago are complete, and the updates will help hatchery employees be more efficient in their duties, as well as increase trout production. Last year, visitors to the park’s hatchery noticed many empty raceways, the water canals that separate the trout by age, outside of the hatchery. All of the trout had been moved east, and the western raceways had been drained so that improvements could be made. “Our old raceways had gravel bottoms in them. They poured concrete in the bottoms of the raceways that didn’t have concrete in them,” Bennett Spring Hatchery Assistant Manager Julie Caffey said. The old concrete walls were being eroded away, and the original gravel bottoms were pooling up at the end of the raceways, causing water to slow down. See ‘Hatchery’/ page 80

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Ramp makes the waters of Bennett Spring State Park accessible to all From Page 73 in the name of their father and a trout club in Columbia that raised $5,000 in recognition of two members.” Projects such as this, Reynolds added, shows how important the outdoors and Bennett Spring State Park are to the people of Missouri. “People from all over the state donated to this,” he said. “People from St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, Cape Girardeau and local folks all donated to this. Hopefully, this is one of many projects to come. I think this park is near and dear to so many people. I have had people tell me that they came down here with their granddad, and this is where they caught their first fish. It’s the memories that they have.” Sharyn Fry of Columbia and her late husband, Jerry Case, shared a love for the outdoors and fishing at Bennett Spring State Park. They also shared physical limitations that sometimes made it difficult to fish. Case died in 2012, so his friends and fishing buddies from his trout club, MidMissouri Trout Unlimited, raised $5,000 to honor him at his beloved Bennett Spring. “My husband and I loved to come down

here,” she told The Daily Record. “We loved to fish all the time. We were totally independent and loved to fish, so it meant a lot to know that there was going to be another (accessible platform) down here and that there would be another area to fish. (Case) would be very happy about this. Being able to enjoy this area is wonderful, and being able to have a secure area to fish ... This area will be different to fish than any other area.” Bennett Spring State Park Superintendent J.D. Muschany said the ramp is a valuable addition to the park. “When you see people using it who are in a wheelchair or have mobility issues, it’s really nice to see that. It’s in a great location and has a good design. You need to have something that is flat and that is a hard surface so it will last for a long time. “It is really nice for all of the donors who stepped up and made the donations to make the project possible.” Being at the park daily, Muschany said he sees the platform in use daily by handicapped and able-bodied anglers. As the season progresses, he thinks there will be more and more people who will utilize

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the structure. “It’s a great place to fish,” he said. “It’s like the old saying, if you build it, they will come.” Among the state officials on hand of the ceremony was MDC Director Bob Ziehmer. He said fishing in Missouri’s waterways is all about access, so providing citizens who might have limited mobility with another access point will only improve the area. “I think this is incredible,” he said. “I would encourage people to pause and look at Bennett Spring and this amazing recourse that it is to the state of Missouri. It is one of the world-class outdoor resources that we have. ...Through the gracious donations of many, be they businesses or individuals, they provided the resources to build this platform that will provide fishing access for many folks who might not get to enjoy fishing at Bennett Spring. That is very special.” For more information on the handicapped accessible ramp and platform, go to http://missouriconservationheritagefoundation.org/content/BennettSpringUpdate.php.

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Opening Day From Page 71 signal to ring in the season. Brown said few words, but the smile on this face was eloquent enough. Following the official opening, Mitchell said he was a little surprised about the low turnout for the opening siren, but that was good news for those who did come out. “When I was there at about 6 (a.m. at the park office) there was only about 1,070-some tags sold. Maybe it was the weather, but regardless, we put out about 7,000 fish. There should be some really good fishing today, and hopefully we will have a great start to the season. It’s always nice to get another season started. You have people like Mr. Brown who have come here for years, and taught their family to come here, and that’s what it’s all about. We like to serve the public, and hopefully they enjoy what we do.”

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Fair

From page 65 “They have some big rides. They have rides for everybody there,” Raef said. Another addition that Sonshine brings to Laclede County is bumper cars. The past provider didn’t bring that attraction with them, Raef said. The carnival begins on the second day of the fair and runs through the end of the fair week. “You can go to the carnival, buy a wristband and ride all night,” Raef said. It also wouldn’t be a true fair without some competition. Every day and night people from all over show off their skills in raising animals, making crafts or cooking delicious foods. “We’re up overall on the market animals. We’re up just a bit from what we were last year,” Raef said. He added that while numbers are down in dairy cattle, which he said

is a “sign of the times,” they are up quite a bit in the pig competitions. According to Raef, the fair board considers itself a civic organization that is helping out the youth of the community with the fair. By showing livestock or getting involved in the other competitions, children learn some invaluable lessons. “It teaches them responsibility, it teaches them showmanship, it teaches them a little bit of economics, animal husbandry. It’s a life lesson,” Raef said. The fair board gives out $15,000 to $17,000 worth of ribbons between the home economic and livestock competitions, according to Raef. “That’s why we have to charge what we charge. Not a dime of that goes anyplace else,” Raef said. “If we can break even or make $2,000 or $3,000, we’re doing good. It’s just enough to start us up for the next year.”

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Hatchery improvements complete From Page 77 “It was also very hard to work (the raceways) with one person, because the bottoms were so uneven,” she said. “We also added 20 feet of a settling basin, which will settle the waste, facilitating collecting that waste.” The driveways between the raceways were also resurfaced. “It did have asphalt. Now it is concrete between them. They put a new outlet and wider, bigger floodgates in the back of the raceways, too,” Caffee said. “It makes it easier to drive up and down the raceways while working.” Renovations of the hatchery began well over one year ago as a way to achieve the state’s Trout Plan, which has a goal of increasing trout production at Bennett by 20 percent. The Missouri Conservation Commission approved the plan back in 2003. In 2012, Bennett Spring Hatchery Manager Mike Mitchell hoped that

all of the renovations now completed would bump trout production from the park’s 350,000 per year to half-amillion trout per year.

According to Caffey … mission accomplished. Phase II was more of remodel and maintenance for the park, unlike the earlier part of the construction. A major part of the plan was a brand new hatchery, which allows for larger numbers of spawned trout, indoor spawning and public viewing. The new facility had a grand opening in September 2011. The hatchery, which is more than three times larger than the old facility, is a 4,000 square foot building that includes double the egg jars at 12, almost double the troughs at 20 and more than double the rearing tanks with 10. Indoor spawning may help increase production by lowering trout deaths cause by outdoor spawning. In the indoor spawning process, fish eggs and sperm (or milt) are protected from ultraviolet rays from the sun, which can kill them. The bigger

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facility will help cut down on fish crowding, which can cause death from disease, bacteria and stress. Another new feature that sets the hatchery apart from the previous building is multiple large viewing windows along the side of the building. The building is available for public tours at 10 a.m. on the first and third Saturdays of every month. The

tours are free and open to the public. Group tours can also be arranged. Both phases of the more than $2.37 million in renovations were 75 percent funded through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Sport Fish Restoration Program. The rest of the funds were derived from a combination of MDC tax dollars and trout tag fees.

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Missouri Eagle continues a family tradition From Page 57 decades. Charlie Brown and his son, Ed, have both served on the Anheuser-Busch Advisory Panel, which includes about 15 wholesalers from the United States. The company has received numerous awards from the brands it distributes and locally from the Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce. “We don’t like to brag about that. It’s not awards. It’s efforts,” Charlie Brown said. Charlie Brown also believes in giving back to the community. In 2010, Brown and his company were inducted into the Lebanon Area Sports Hall of Fame for the years of helping student athletes and for supporting the Lebanon athletic program. “You can’t just take all the time. You have to give back to the community,” Charlie Brown said. Many in the Brown family have also served the community through public office. Charlie Brown served on the Lebanon City Council and Lebanon Park Board, as did his son, Ed. Son, Brad, and his wife, Hattie, served on the Lebanon R-3 School Board. “You need to give back to the community whenever you can,” Charlie Brown said.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

A day just for kids Hatchery, park staff cater to young anglers each May with free fishing, activities during Kids Fishing Day The weather may have been cold and rainy on May 4, 2013 but that didn’t stop several hundred young anglers who braved the elements for the

chance at a lunker at Bennett Spring State Park. May 4 was the annual Kids Fishing Day, which brought an estimated 600

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PAGE 83

kids out to the park. Julie Caffey, assistant manager of the park’s hatchery and the Kids Fishing Day organizer, said the unseasonably cool weather, not to mention an occasional snowflake, might have kept some families away from the park. “It is not May 4 weather, so that will have an impact on our attendance,” Caffey said Saturday. While the March 1 Opening Day is a long-standing tradition of many anglers who fish the banks of Bennett Spring State Park, Caffey said Kids Fishing Day is kind of an Opening Day for kids. “For some, it starts their summer off,” she said. “It’s always a good time... We have had a lot of out-oftown guests.” Caffey said families from as far as Kansas and Arkansas traveled to the park for the annual event. “We have a family from Wellsville, Kan., that comes in every year,” she said. “They just love it, their kids enjoy it and they just keep coming back.” Children are welcome to fish throughout the park during Kids Fishing, but the youngsters often converge on the one-day only kids only zone, which is from hatchery outlet through Zone 2 and past the the Suzy Hole in Zone 3. In an effort to ensure that each child has the opportunity to catch a fish, hatchery staff sort of stack the deck. “In the kids only area, we put in 1,800 stocking sized fish and 40 lunkers, which is about a 2 pound average,” Caffey said. “We also stocked See ‘Kids Fishing’/ page 88


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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Lebanon's parks offer family fun for all From page 51 YMCA members receive free access to the pool, which is otherwise $4 for adults and $3 for children ages 3-13.

Gasconade Park Located at the corner of Fourth Street and Harrison, Gasconade Park was Lebanon’s first park. One shelter was built years ago, and the Lions Club added playground equipment. The park has a quarter-mile walking track, dedicated to Emma LaBlank, who has a long history of serving food to senior citizens in the area. A second shelter house was built on the foundation of the original bathhouse of the old pool. The park features a basketball court and green space for neighborhood children and old alike.

several baseball diamonds. The park features four baseball fields with bleachers, concession stand and restrooms, as well as a multi-purpose field for youth football and soccer with bleachers, concession stand, four horseshoe pits, a lighted skate park, and two lighted shelter connected by a fence for child safety that are also equipped with 20 amps of electricity each.

Palmer Park Is a lovely green space located on the southern side of the Cowan Civic Center. The area contains a gazebo that is a popular picnic spot, and is a good relaxation place after a walk on the trail surrounding the Civic Center. The park is located at 500 E. Elm.

Spiller Park

Harke Park Located on National Avenue just off Fremont Road, Harke Park is one of Lebanon’s newest parks, Harke Park is named in honor of the generosity of Walter and Rene Harke. The park features a beautiful gazebo that includes lights, 20 amps of electric and a barbeque grill, a half-mile paved walking trail, a fenced playground with state-of-the-art equipment, restrooms that are heated in the winter, a one-mile walking trail, a picnic area with two barbecue grills and a soccer field.

Is a small neighborhood park on Spiller Street near the water tower. Features a quiet green space with playground equipment and picknicking areas.

Wallace Park Lebanon’s newest park, Wallace Park, was the result of a gift from St. John’s/Breech Medical Center after a new hospital replaced Wallace Hospital on Harwood Ave. The park features a playground, a small gazebo for picknicking and additional amenities are planned.

W.T. Vernon Park

Nelson Park Nelson Park features a small catch and release only fishing pond for senior citizens or kids under 16 years of age, and

Located in the original tower part of town on Mayfield Street, Vernon Park features a shelter, a playground and restrooms.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 85

LTCC From Page 41 LTCC offers courses in auto body/collision and repair, automotive mechanics, computer repair/ networking, construction, culinary arts, early childhood development, practical nursing, welding, agriculture and many more areas. Along with certification in select areas, the school also offers articulation credits, which are credits given to students based on work done at LTCC if they go to a spe-

KEEPING IN TOUCH We’re at the corner of Commercial Street and Jefferson Avenue in downtown Lebanon. We’re open 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. You can reach us by: Mail: P.O. Box 192, Lebanon, Mo., 65536 Telephone: (417) 532-9131 Fax: (417) 532-8140 Publication No. USPS 308-320 PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT LEBANON, MO 65536 WE BELIEVE: The Daily Record upholds civic pride in city, state and nation and stands for civic freedom, along with honesty in public affairs, for true principles, right men and right causes under whatever banner they might appear. Dalton Wright President, Publisher and CEO Published daily except Saturday, New Year’s, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Postmaster: The subscription rates include delivery/ postage, state and local taxes. Subscribers become the owners of the Lebanon Daily Record before it is mailed or delivered and assume the risk of loss or damage at that time. Postmaster: Send address changes to Lebanon Publishing Co. Inc., P.O. Box 192, Lebanon, Mo. 65536.

cific college like Ozarks Technical Community College. For example, students in the early childhood development program at LTCC who then go to OTC for one semester will receive 22 credits from OTC. LTCC also offers dual credit with some colleges. LTCC offers several fun and hob-

by-type courses. Some that have been offered in the past are photography, cooking and Tai Chi. The lifestyle enrichment classes average $55, and some are less or more, based on how long the class takes. For more information, call the LTCC at 532-5494 or visit its website www.lebanon.k12. mo.us/ltcc.

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Business is a priority Lebanon From Page 38 new and improved higher education facilities and course offerings available from OTC, Drury, and MSU. Their growth in this community is a huge asset, according to Strombaugh, and he will continue to work with the K-12 school districts, those higher education providers, and the business community in order to make a Work Ready Community. “This framework provides a thirdparty verification of base levels skills needed for almost any career. As we work to better quantify and build on our capabilities, we can use that information to set ourselves apart from other communities,” he said. Stombaugh replaced former president Ben Jones, who resigned in

October 2011 to take a position with City Utilities in Springfield as manager of economic development. While Jones is widely known as a great “people person,” Mark Stombaugh is comfortable in the promotional aspect of his job as well, despite being a self-described “numbers guy.” “I think most of the work at the

DED, it’s a combination of promoting the assets and promoting the opportunities that are available in the community and the state of Missouri,” he said. “There’s a lot of draws for individuals to live in Missouri and in Laclede County, and there should be a lot of draws for businesses too.” Strombaugh said he has enjoyed his time and experiences in the community since he started the job. “The great direction and challenges from our community leaders at all levels has made it an exciting time. I am thankful for the feedback and input of so many and look forward to continuing to build on some of these opportunities. ... I am excited to be a part of that growth here in our community. There is always room for growth.”

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 87

Bennett Spring: From a milling community to a premier trout park From Page 69 In 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the Works Project Administration (WPA) were two new programs implemented by the U.S. government to put people to work during the Great Depression. Much work was done at Bennett Spring starting in November of that year. The crews’ first tasks were to build barracks for themselves. They built a new dam, a bridge, a dining lodge, six cabins, a store and post office building, shelters, houses, roads and trails. They also renovated the old Atchley Mill. The men also constructed a second set of gravel-bottomed hatchery rearing pools and in 1935 built a new section onto the hatchery building. After the men left in 1938, they dismantled all but one of their barracks. Through the years most of the development at the park has taken place outside of the park’s boundaries as individuals built cabins, hotels, campgrounds and many other businesses. In 1969, Arlie Bramwell sold his wood and stone cabins to the

state. Ralph Usery’s cabins were razed. Splan’s Resort was once a very busy place there. Vogel’s Resort was acquired by the state in 1980. In 1969, the Nature Interpretive Center opened at the park with George Kastler as the first naturalist, and in 1982 the park dedicated a new office and store building close to the dining lodge on the site of the original Brice. Later the park’s Niangua entrance was renamed the Bramwell Entrance in honor of Arlie Bramwell. An additional 1,650 acres of land to the south of the current state boundary was purchased in November 1988 to provide watershed protection for Bennett Spring itself as well as the park area. Each year has brought more improvements. One of the latest improvements is a new state-of-the-art hatchery facility, and new concrete-bottomed rearing pools. Now, at 3,216 acres, the state park that arose around Peter Bennett’s spring continues to delight all comers.

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PAGE 88

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Kids Fishing offers a day filled with fun for the whole family From Page 83 the rest of the park with about 1,300 fish, so we stocked it pretty heavy. So, according to our normal stocking rates, that is fish for about 800 kids.” While the trout were in the stream, conditions of the water may have made it a little difficult for some to catch a fish. “The water is up and it is a little cloudy, but the main thing is that they get their line deep,” Caffey said. “But, I have seen several good stringers out there and a lot of kids catching their limits.” Kids Fishing is the only opportunity some children have to go fishing, so the hatchery and park staff, as well as the event’s volunteers, strive to make sure they have a good time. “It is very important to get the kids interested in the outdoors,” Caffey said. “We had several people who came in (Friday) night and got tags and goodie bags who said they had never been here before and wanted to know that the procedure was. ... We just have new people every year, and that is great.” While there was lots of fishing going

on down by the stream, children — as well as their parents — had the opportunity to venture up to the area near Shelter B where educational displays were featured. The World Bird Sanctuary of St. Louis, the Bennett Spring Nature Center and the Missouri Department of Conservation were among the agencies on hand. Volunteers also gave fish cleaning and cooking demonstrations. The Ozark Fly

Fishers also helped youngsters learn how to tie their own flies. “It is really just a good day,” Caffee said. “The best part about it is that is all free. We hope that this event will really get kids and their families interested in the outdoors and just keep coming back to Bennett Spring for many years to come. We want to get them interested in fishing, the outdoors and just seeing what the park has to offer.”


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 89

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From Page 31 “After about the third year, we started hiring the top-name bands,” Day said. “Doyle Lawson has been here -- I think this will be his 25th year in a row.” Don Day can’t recall any monumental changes in the running of the festival. He stated, “We started out doing a bluegrass show, and basically we’ve just stayed with that.” However, if there weren’t any noticeable changes, there must have been some incremental ones. The festival that started out as a music party with eight campers now draws about 2,000 to 2,500 people each day that the festival runs. There is now a festival in September and one in July. Some things really haven’t changed: Don and Bobbie Day still organize the details of the festival themselves, although they have help from their sons and daughter. As big as the festival has grown though, planning for it is an all-year effort. Day said he thought the festival was good for the local economy. “There’ll be people here probably from 20 different states, and they come in and just spend several days here in Missouri, and they spend money, and there’s a lot of business done here through them, and sales tax revenue, and all that.” However, the real purpose of the festival is to provide entertainment. “I’d just encourage people, if they like bluegrass music, to come. That’s basically the reason to come,” Day stated. The Starvy Creek Bluegrass Park is located at 2229 Bluegrass Road, Conway, Mo. The Starvy Creek Bluegrass Festival does not allow alcohol, electric instruments or chairs with backs taller than 38 inches. Pets are allowed on leashes, but not in the concert area. For more information, go to www.starvycreek.com.

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PAGE 90

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

‘You can grow those things in Missouri?’

Conway couple’s jab at aquaculture results in annual harvest festival riving along South Dallas County Line Road in the Conway area, one will come along the well kept home of Stephen and Janie House. Across the road, there are a couple of ponds where Janie House said anyone is welcome to fish, but one smaller pond is special. It is so special for everyone to see just what they have in that one-quarter acre body of water each and every September. That’s when the Houses host their annual shrimp harvest.

D

Yes, a shrimp harvest. The couple operates County Line Shrimp, located at 1247 S. Dallas County Line Road in Conway. They actually began raising shrimp, freshwater prawns, about eight years ago, and the 2013 event will be their seventh public-invited harvest. How did the couple get into freshwater shrimp farming? All by chance. “We started doing it because we saw someone who was doing it in Dixon,” Janie said. “My husband (Stephen) read about it and said, ‘We

can do that.’” Stephen House traveled to Dixon for the Show-Me Shrimp Farms annual Shrimp Fest and he was hooked. “He came back and was just raving about it,” Janie House said. “We started researching and visited another (producer) in southeastern Missouri, and we looked at theirs. We went back the next year and watched their harvest, then we came home and started planning our ponds.” In an effort to continue to learn more about their product, the couple


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

attended numerous aquaculture conferences and seminars in various states, but after a couple of years, they felt they had their shrimp husbandry down pat. “It’s pretty easy,” Janie said. “Everyone made it out to be really hard. You had to check your oxygen level, your pH level and you had to do that every day to make sure things were perfect. Well, we did that maybe the first year and after that we just kind of threw them in there and threw out some feed. We’re not nearly as particular as we were at first because we know they will grow out there. When we first started, I just couldn’t see how they were going to grow here, and everyone said, ‘Oh they will.’ After the first two or three years, I saw that they would.” Janie House said her family also questioned the production of shrimp in Conway. “They said, ‘You can do that here?’” she recalled. “Once they got into it, everyone loves it.” The Houses receive their stock from a shrimp nursery in Texas and typically stock the last weekend in May or the first weekend in June. After stocking, the tiny, transparent shrimp, which Janie House said are only about an inch long, are pretty much left alone to grow. “You have to make sure your temperature is right because if the water is under 60 degrees, they will die,” she said. “We usually like to have ours at about 65 degrees, but after that you just have to feed them twice a day.” The size of the harvested shrimp varies, and the ideal size is 10 shrimp per pound. The couple traditionally harvests the third weekend in September and sells their fresh shrimp by the pound to harvest guests. “We go out pretty early and start draining the (shrimp) pond into the other pond, and that’s how you catch them,” Janie explained. “We have a catch basket, and some people do like to help because it gets really, really frantic when they are all coming out at once. We put in 4,500 shrimp, and those are all coming out at one time. Some people just pitch in because we have to take baskets up the bank.” After the shrimp are pulled from the pond, they are then placed into a clear water bath to clean them and their alimentary tracts. “From that point, we weigh them and sell them. People have really found they

PAGE 91

can get into helping us, the kids particularly. They just gather around the big watering tanks and play with them. It’s really neat.” The event ends when the pond is emptied, which is at about 3 p.m. They also present their customers with information on how to clean, preserve and cook the shrimp. When asked if she ever thought she would be a “shrimp farmer,” she laughed. We don’t make a lot of money with it; we don’t make hardly any money with it. It is just such fun, and we enjoy it so

much,” she said. In addition to the shrimp, the Houses also allow visitors to fish their larger pond, which is stocked with fish like bluegill and bass. To get to County Line Shrimp from Lebanon, take Interstate 44 east to the Conway exit. Turn right, and travel about 1/2 mile to Route Y. Turn left onto Route Y and travel about 2 miles to Starvy Creek Road. Once on Starvy Creek Road, take an immediate left onto Dallas County Line Road and travel 1 1/2 miles to the shrimp harvest. Signs will be posted.

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PAGE 93

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Wildlife abound in Laclede County

From Page 61 these areas have no designated trails and are popular spots for deer hunters in the fall archery and firearms seasons and turkey hunters during the spring firearms season. Nearby nature-viewing and hunting opportunities also exist at 7,180-acre Lead Mine Conservation Area, a Missouri Department of Conservation site in Dallas County. Like hunting and nature viewing, anglers in this area also have options. Trout fishing enthusiasts can satisfy their angling appetites at Bennett Spring State Park and at the managed trout area on the Niangua River downstream from the park in Dallas County. Stream anglers in pursuit of bass should check out the Missouri Department of Conservation’s smallmouth management area on the Osage Fork of Gasconade River, a 36-mile stretch of stream that runs from the Skyline Drive bridge near Orla to the Gasconade. The Lake of the Ozarks and other nearby reservoirs offer angling opportunities to those who like to fish large impoundments. More information about opportunities for nature-viewing, hunting and fishing can be found at the Missouri Department of Conservation office at 2350 S. Jefferson in Lebanon, 417-532-7612 or the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Southwest

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OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

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From Page 29 telegraph followed the railroad, which took the same path as the original trail. About a quarter of a century before, there were national highways. “People struggled with how to build good roads, where to put them and how to pay for them,” Spangler said. “Before we got to Route 66, we decided on a path, and that’s where it took us. It took us a long time to get there as a people.” In part, the museum wants to show people the efforts that took place to have a highway system. That’s why Route 66 was so important, according to Spangler. “It was the test period for what we have chosen, and it worked. As a result, we have Interstate 44 out here now. It happened all over the country. It was not just Route 66; it was not the one and only – it just became the most famous,” he said. The path through the museum includes artifacts that will help tell the story of the road’s progression. The society has a collection of items to help tell the story of how early motorists traveled, from their clothing to the cooking and camping utensils they needed in order to survive when there were no motels. Also, during all of last year’s refurbishing, a gift shop “slipped in,” according to Spangler. “Since last year we also have a new gift shop. It is not technically ‘the museum,’ but it is linked to the museum and certainly part of the library. It is a huge deal for us.” Spangler said the gifts range from Route 66 merchandise, local crafters’ products and good-ol’ made-in-theU.S.A. souvenirs and gifts. “We are continuing work in the museum, and continuing work on the gift shop as well,” he said. The museum is open to visitors 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. There is no admission charge, but donations are welcome. Visitors also are encouraged to sign the guest book.


OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

PAGE 95

Act II

From page 22 In 2000, Green brought her daughter Melanie Matlock into the fold as a partner, but it wasn’t Matlock’s first experience with the business. Act II was Matlock’s first job. She’d been working there since she was 16. “She wasn’t very happy about it then,” Green said. Green has since retired and Matlock has taken over the business completely. During an interview, Matlock jokingly asked her mother to come back, but Green said she is enjoying retirement too much. “Now, I can’t get you to come back to work,” Matlock said with a laugh. Matlock might not be so lucky as to have a family member who wants to continue the Act II legacy. Matlock has children, but they’re boys. “It’s really boring to them,” she joked. “But you never know, I didn’t really want to get into the clothing business either.” Another important aspect of Act II is giving back to the community, according to Matlock. Twice a week, Act II donates clothing to Crosslines Ministries, which distributes the clothing to people in need. The business also donates jeans to Sole Hope, which uses old jeans to make shoes for children in Uganda. Act II’s current location has a long history before it became one of Lebanon’s longest running consignment shops. While cleaning out a back room, Matlock, found a little evidence of the building’s long history. A wooden plank, presumably from a crate, that has “Ben F. Store” and the address stamped on it along with the name “Walton” scrawled in marker across it was in the room. The store was the location of the Ben Franklin store, which was the predecessor of Walmart. Sam and Bud Walton opened the store on West Commercial Street in 1960.

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2013 Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce

Membership Listing

A.M. PYROTECHNICS (417) 267-3799 AABLE LOCK & BLADE (417) 588-5811 ACT TWO, LLC (417) 588-3881 ADVANCE PHYSICAL THERAPY (417) 991-3440 ADVANCED DENTAL (417) 588-2221 ADVANTAGE INSURANCE SOLUTIONS, LLC (417) 532-8800 AFFORDABLE FAMILY DENTISTRY (417) 588-1690 ALL ABOUT BEAUTY (417) 588-3080 ALL AMERICAN WASTE (417) 532-1600 ALLIED WASTE SERVICES / MODERN SANITATION (573) 346-3637 ALVIN JACKSON’S USED CARS (417) 532-2186 ALWAYS FLOWERS & PLANTS LLC (417) 532-5959 AMERICAN RED CROSS (417) 533-8121 AMERICAS BEST VALUE INN (417) 532-3133 ANYTIME FITNESS (417) 849-1541 APPLEWOOD LANE CORP. (417) 532-2774 ARVEST BANK 417-533-3886 BACK TO HEALTH CHIROPRACTIC (417) 532-2986 BAILEY’S PARTY POTTIES (417) 532-4940 BANK OF KANSAS CITY (417) 657-0202 BARTON ENGINEERING CO. INC. (417) 588-4138 BAYS CHIROPRACTIC (417) 532-6251 BEAR TRAILER MFG, INC. (417) 286-3300 BENNETT SPRING INN (417) 588-9110 BENNETT SPRING STATE PARK (417) 532-4307 BEST WESTERN - WYOTA INN (417) 532-6171 BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU (417) 862-4222 BEVERLY VOTE (417) 532-9763 BIG DAVE’S ITALIAN ICE (417) 531-8067 BIG SARGE’S TOP DOGS (417) 531-0184 BILL’S FARM & HOME (417) 532-7158 BIRD MOVING & STORAGE (417) 532-4661 BLAKE, TIM AND DAWN (417) 718-7100 BLEACHER BUMS (417) 533-7741 BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA (417) 883-1636 BRAND LAW FIRM (417) 991-3550 BRASS MONKEY PRODUCTIONS (417) 664-3601 BRISTOL CARE INC (THE ESSEX) (660) 287-4536 BUFFALO WALLOW ANTIQUES/LA TEA DA (417) 288-2476 CACKLE HATCHERY (417) 532-4581 CAMBARLOC ENGINEERING & MANUFACTURING (417) 532-4601 CARMECO, INC. (417) 532-6133 CASEY’S GENERAL STORE #1083 (417) 532-9918 CASTLEWOOD STUDIOS (417) 532-2329 CC’S IMPORIUM, LLC (417) 291-6684 CELLULAR CONNECTION (417) 532-0012

CENTRAL BANK (417) 532-2151 CENTRAL MONEY SERVICES INC. (417) 532-2151 CENTURY 21 LACLEDE REALTY (417) 588-1200 CENTURYLINK (417) 334-9253 CHRISTIAN HEALTHCARE LEBANON SOUTH (417) 532-5351 CITY OF LEBANON (417) 532-2156 CLAIM (417) 533-5017 CLAYTON’S INC D/B/A B & D AUTO TRUCK PLAZA (417) 588-2282 CMC - CLINICAL MASSAGE COMPANY (417) 664-2490 COLE-N-SONS TIRE & AUTO, INC. (417) 588-4468 COLUMBIA COLLEGE (573) 329-4050 COMMERCE BANK, N.A. (417) 532-2161 COMMUNITY BAPTIST (417) 532-8421 CONCRETE TRANSFORMATIONS LLC (417) 588-5889 CONSOLIDATED ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC. (417) 588-9562 COPE (417) 533-5201 COURT PROBATIONARY SERVICES (417) 533-0887 COX HEALTH CENTER (417) 532-8700 CROCKER CHIROPRACTIC CENTER (417) 532-9166 CROSS CREEK CHURCH (417) 650-0647 CROSSLINES MINISTRY, INC. (417) 588-3559 CROW PAINT & GLASS INC. (417) 532-3551 CUSTOM ARCHERY SUPPLY LLC (417) 532-2744 D & L SELF SERVICE SHOES (417) 632-4312 DAN WATERMAN CPA (417) 532-7135 DAYS INN (417) 532-7111 DETROIT TOOL & ENGINEERING (417) 532-2141 DETROIT TOOL METAL PRODUCTS (417) 532-2142 DICKEY’S BBQ (417) 532-4227 DIGITAL SILVER (417) 533-5172 DIRECT PRIMARY CARE CLINICS LLC (573) 933-0870 DIRECTORATE OF MORALE WELFARE & RECREATION (573) 596-0118 DIVA ENVY’S CORNER FASHION BOUTIQUE & SCREEN PRINTING (417) 322-4243 DOMINO’S (417) 588-7070 DONALD FARM & LAWN (417) 532-2011 DOVE SENIOR CENTER (417) 426-5411 DOWCO, INC (417) 532-4219 DOWD’S CATFISH & BBQ (417) 532-1777 DOWNTOWN LEBANON OPTIMIST CLUB (417) 588-2219 DRURY UNIVERSITY (417) 532-9828 DRYER’ S SHOE STORE (417) 532-5781 E-Z DISPOSAL (417) 533-7870 EAST GATE EXPRESS (417) 532-8112 EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS (417) 532-2687 EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS (417) 588-2286

EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS (417) 588-9108 EL SOMBRERO MEXICAN RESTAURANT (417) 588-0279 ELECTRONIC SOLUTIONS (417) 588-9228 ELITE AUTO BODY (417) 718-7207 ELM STREET EATERY (417) 588-2700 EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC (417) 588-8600 EMPIRE ENERGY (417) 532-9153 EVANS SALES (417) 589-0237 FALCON FLOOR COVERING (417) 532-3118 FAMILY EYECARE ASSOCIATES (417) 532-2562 FCS FINANCIAL (417) 588-5828 FFO HOME (417) 532-8896 FIDELITY COMMUNICATIONS (417) 588-7841 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH (417) 532-7168 FIRST FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH (417) 532-6728 FIRST UNITED METHODIST (417) 532-7153 FIXED TO STAY HEATING & COOLING (573) 458-5644 FLASHBACK PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO, INC. (417) 532-4455 FORT WOOD HOTELS (573) 451-3203 FRANK & CAROL ROAM (417) 664-7426 FRANKIE D’S DINER (417) 991-3838 FREEDOM HOME CRAFTERS (417) 532-7768 G & A METAL BUILDINGS (417) 532-6450 G-3 BOATS / SKEETER PRODUCTS (417) 588-9787 GALLERIA FINE JEWELRY (417) 532-9766 GARNER & ASSOCIATES (417) 532-9491 GARY’S FIREWORKS (417) 588-7300 GET-ER-DUN-JON’S (417) 588-3126 GINGER’S HOMETOWN PHARMACY (417) 532-9110 GIRL SCOUTS OF THE MISSOURI HEARTLAND,INC. 1-877-312-4764 X1106 GLEN CUMMINS (417) 532-5522 GOFORTH EXPRESS L.L.C. (417) 532-9773 GRAVEL BAR AND GRILL (417) 532-7291 GRAVEN CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM (417) 532-3157 GREAT SOUTHERN BANK (417) 532-9168 GREAT WALL (417) 588-9907 H & R BLOCK (417) 532-4113 H.E.P. SUPPLY CO., INC. (417) 532-9183 HAIRY’S SALON (417) 588-9588 HALF A QUARTER RANCH (417) 322-3383 HAMPTON INN (417) 533-3100 HAPPY TRAILS RV CENTER (417) 533-7530 HAPPY TRAILS RV PARK, LLC (417) 532-3422 HARDEE’S (417) 588-9707 HASH, BILL (417) 532-6342 HEARTLAND ANTIQUE MALL (417) 532-9350

HEAVEN SCENT BAKERY (417) 533-5500 HELTON’S HOME FURNISHINGS (417) 532-7888 HENDERSON HEATING & COOLING (417) 532-2779 HERITAGE BANK OF THE OZARKS (417) 532-2265 HEY JUDE AIRBRUSH (417) 532-3145 HIDDEN VALLEY OUTFITTERS 417-533-5628 HILLTOP K-9 BOARDING LLC (417) 532-8109 HILTON BAIL BONDING (417) 532-9722 HOGAN LAND TITLE CO. OF LACLEDE COUNTY (417) 532-5333 HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS (417) 532-1111 HOLMAN-HOWE FUNERAL HOME (417) 532-4061 HOMETOWN VIDEO (417) 532-2561 HOSPICE COMPASSUS (417) 532-0372 HUGHES SR CENTER (417) 532-3040 I-44 SPEEDWAY (417) 224-7074 IMPACT DIRECTORIES (573) 552-8399 INDEPENDENT STAVE COMPANY (417) 588-4151 INTEGRITY HOME CARE (417) 380-6834 IVEY ROOFING, INC. (417) 532-6612 JACKSON BROTHERS OF THE SOUTH, LLC (417) 209-9900 JACOBSEN APPLIANCES, INC (417) 532-7152 JAMMIE LITTY (417) 532-7548 JC BENAGE (417) 532-7546 JEFFRIES ABSTRACT & TITLE INSURANCE (417) 532-7189 JENKINS VETERINARY SERVICE (417) 532-7200 JOE’S PHARMACY INC (417) 532-7128 JON M KRAUSE DDS (417) 588-2562 JONESY’S ANTIQUES (417) 532-2006 JUSTICE FURNITURE (417) 532-6136 KJEL/KBNN (417) 532-9111 KMST (573) 341-6930 KTTK - NEW HORIZONS BROADCASTING (417) 588-1435 LAR C (417) 588-1577 LACLEDE COUNTY FAIR (417) 322-5349 LACLEDE COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER (417) 532-5471 LACLEDE COUNTY HEALTH DEPT. (417) 532-2134 LACLEDE COUNTY LAND TITLE, LLC (417) 588-0155 LACLEDE COUNTY LANDLORDS’ ASSN (417) 532-4035 LACLEDE COUNTY PREGNANCY SUPPORT CENTER (417) 532-8555 LACLEDE COUNTY REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMITTEE (417) 532-5783 LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE (417) 532-3164 LACLEDE INDUSTRIES (417) 588-3241 LACLEDE LITERACY COUNCIL (417) 532-6697 LACLEDE MUTUAL INSURANCE (417) 588-1857 LAKE PRINTING (573) 346-0600 LEATHER BOUTIQUE (417) 532-0380 LEBANON AREA FOUNDATION (417) 532-8868


2013 Membership Listing Continued... LEBANON ART GUILD & GALLERY (417) 532-1895 LEBANON BIBLE & BOOK STORE (417) 532-9516 LEBANON BOOKS (417) 532-2500 LEBANON COLLEGE OF COSTMETOLOGY (417) 532-8522 LEBANON COMMUNITY GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB (417) 532-2901 LEBANON CONCERT ASSOCIATION (417) 588-3574 LEBANON FAMILY CHURCH (417) 533-3655 LEBANON FAMILY YMCA (417) 588-1177 LEBANON FARMERS MARKET (417) 726-5690 LEBANON FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH (417) 718-5621 LEBANON HOST LION’S CLUB (417) 532-6502 LEBANON PHONE CENTER & ALARM INC (417) 532-9819 LEBANON PROPERTIES I, II AND III (417) 588-4005 LEBANON PUBLISHING COMPANY (417) 532-9131 LEBANON PUMP SERVICE (417) 532-2030 LEBANON R-III SCHOOLS (417) 532-9141 LEBANON READY MIX (417) 532-6179 LEBANON REDI (417) 533-5627 LEBANON RITZ 8 THEATRE (417) 588-9724 LEBANON ROTARY (417) 531-1246 LEBANON SENIOR APARTMENTS (417) 883-7887 LEBANON SOCCER ASSOCIATION (417) 718-8191 LEBANON SUNDANCE APARTMENTS (417) 533-7604 LEBANON TECHNOLOGY & CAREER CENTER (417) 532-5494 LEBANON-LACLEDE COUNTY LIBRARY (417) 532-2148 LIBERTY REALTY 417-532-1277 LIFEPOINT CHURCH (417) 991-2911 LIL COUNTRY STORE (417) 532-2578 LINDSAY CHEVROLET (417) 532-3114 LINDSAY FORD (417) 532-3146 LITTLE CEASARS PIZZA (417) 532-4786 LOWE ALUMINUM BOATS (417) 532-9101 LOWE’S (417) 588-6970 LSK LEBANON (417) 588-3550 M & M SIGNS AND DESIGNS (417) 532-4040 MADISON STREET GRILL (417) 532-0120 MARILYN’S NURSERY & GARDEN CENTER (417) 532-9574 MARINE ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS (417) 588-3128 MARY KAY BEAUTY CONSULTANT, SAM STONER (417) 588-2390 MATTAX, NEU, PRATER EYE CENTER (417) 588-2400 MAURICES (417) 532-3767 MAZZIO’S ITALIAN EATERY (417) 588-2227 MCDONALDS OF LEBANON (417) 532-6144 MEEK’S BUILDING CENTER (417) 588-3223 MEMORIAL CHAPEL AND CREMATORY (573) 774-6111 MERCY CLINIC - EYE SPECIALIST (417) 533-6540 MERCY FAMILY PHARMACY (417) 533-6770 MERCY HOME HEALTH (417) 830-4063 MERCY HOSPICE (417) 588-5900

MERCY HOSPITAL LEBANON (417) 533-6100 MERS GOODWILL (417) 862-5005 METALTECH PRODUCTS, INC (417) 426-5577 MID-MISSOURI BANK (417) 588-1000 MID-MISSOURI CREDIT UNION (417) 533-5368 MID-MISSOURI INSURANCE (417) 532-5800 MID-MISSOURI RESPONSIBLE BREEDERS (417) 718-4182 MID-TOWN STORAGE (417) 650-1004 MIKE LIGHT INSURANCE AGENCY (417) 588-5123 MILLER LAW OFFICE (417) 588-8566 MISSOURI CAREER CENTER (417) 532-6146 MISSOURI EAGLE (417) 532-6157 MISSOURI ENTERPRISE BUSINESS ASSISTANCE (573) 364-8570 MISSOURI OZARKS COMMUNITY ACTION (573) 765-3263 MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY (417) 532-0518 MORAN, JUANITA ENGLAND (417) 532-5130 MORGAN MUSIC (417) 588-1970 MOTT AUTO INC (417) 532-3914 MR C’S ROUTEPOST & RT 66 SODAS (417) 588-4455 MUDSLINGERS (417) 532-6030 MUNGER MOSS MOTEL (417) 532-3111 NANCY BALLHAGEN’S PUZZLES (417) 286-3837 NATURE’S PANTRY (417) 533-3608 NEIGHBORHOOD’S INC (417) 533-5080 NIANGUA RIVER OASIS (417) 532-6333 NOBLE HUDSON & SONS (417) 532-3921 NORMAN’S JEWELRY & BRIDAL (417) 532-2291 NORTHRIDGE PLACE (417) 532-9793 O’NEIL& O’NEIL ATTORNEYS AT LAW (417) 532-2101 O.H.M DEVELOPING (417) 532-4253 OCCS (417) 533-3221 OSAGE CANOE (417) 532-7288 OTC (417) 532-5044 OZARK CUSTOM CRATES, LLC (417) 589-6659 OZARK DENTAL STUDIO (417) 718-4240 OZARK HARLEY DAVIDSON (417) 532-2900 OZARK MEDIA (573) 336-7620 OZARK VISIONS/OZARK HAUNTED HOUSE (417) 532-1002 OZARKS COCA-COLA/DR. PEPPER (417) 532-7131 PAGE OFFICE SUPPLY (417) 532-4012 PAGE PRINTING (417) 532-6232 PARTY TOWN LLC (417) 532-1718 PAUL DAVIS RESTORATION (417) 588-5880 PC PLUS, INC. (417) 588-9584 PENMAC PERSONEL SERVICES (417) 588-8990 PERENNIAL DESIGN CO. 417-588-GIFT PERSONAL FINANCE COMPANY (417) 991-3077 PIG PEN BBQ (417) 991-2505 PIZZA HUT (417) 588-2239

POLK CITY DIRECTORY (417) 882-3948 PRICE CUTTER (417) 532-7188 QUALITY HEATING & AIR (417) 532-6239 RANDALL SUTTER, ATTY. AT LAW (417) 532-6123 RE/MAX NEXT GENERATION, LLC (417) 991-3333 REAGAN REHABILITATION (417) 718-0712 REAL LIVING A HELPER REAL ESTATE (417) 533-3571 REALTY EXECUTIVES OF LEBANON (417) 588-5706 REGIONAL HOSPICE (417) 532-5139 RELAY FOR LIFE OF LACLEDE COUNTY (417) 531-4142 RESULTS ADVERTISING (417) 533-7741 RIVERFRONT CAMPGROUND & CANOE RENTALS (417) 588-3386 ROBERT S. SHOTTS, INC. (417) 588-7877 ROGERS AUTO WRECKING SALVAGES, INC (417) 532-3731 ROUTE 66 THRIFT & GIFT (417) 532-1747 S.C.O.R.E. (417) 718-7100 SAND SPRING RESORT (417) 532-5857 SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS (417) 532-9782 SCRUBS ON SITE BY L & M (417) 588-4316 SENATOR MIKE PARSON (573) 751-8793 SHADEL’S COLONIAL CHAPEL (417) 532-6161 SHELTER INSURANCE AGENCY - KIMBERLY BREEDEN (417) 532-4329 SHELTER INSURANCE AGENCY - RALPH PITTS (417) 532-6106 SHEPHERD HILLS FACTORY OUTLET (417) 532-7000 SHERRY SHAMEL (417) 532-2416 SHERWIN WILLIAMS (417) 532-2529 SHIP N SHOP (417) 872-8037 SHOW ME CLEAN CARWASH AND DOGWASH (417) 718-1482 SIMPLICITY COFFEE, TEA & MORE (417) 532-1703 SMC ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. (417) 532-8861 SO-MO TRANSPORTATION COMPANY (417) 532-3031 SONIC (417) 532-6330 SPECTACULAR PRODUCTIONS (417) 288-8548 SPORT & SPINE REHAB (573) 443-0290 STARR DISTRIBUTING MIDWEST, INC (417) 588-9809 STATE FARM INSURANCE - FRED HYNES (417) 588-2777 STATE FARM INSURANCE - SCOTT CHASE (417) 588-1555 STATE REPRESENTATIVE DIANE FRANKLIN (573) 216-2359 STATE REPRESENTATIVE SANDY CRAWFORD (417) 345-2958 STEAK N’ SHAKE (417) 532-2795 STEVE JACKSON (417) 532-2471 STILES ROOFING (417) 532-2050 STOWE, LYNN (417) 588-9274 STRYKER ORTHODONTICS (417) 532-9532 STUDIO C PRODUCTIONS (417) 741-2218 STURDEVANT ACRES BED & BREAKFAST (417) 588-3112 SUMMIT NATURAL GAS (800) 927-0787 SUPER 8 MOTEL (417) 588-2574

SUTHERLANDS LUMBER COMPANY (417) 588-8900 T’S REDNECK STEAKHOUSE (417) 532-3519 T-REX TREE SERVICE (417) 532-5858 TANFASTIC EUROPEAN TANNING (417) 533-7300 TERRA VETERINARY SERVICE (417) 532-9147 THE DURHAM COMPANY (417) 532-7121 THE MEBRUER LAW FIRM (417) 532-3177 THE PARLOR SALON (417) 588-4217 THE REAL ESTATE COMPANY (417) 588-1110 THE SALVATION ARMY (417) 532-5135 THE UPS STORE (417) 532-7355 TIM PARSON’S AUTO SALES (417) 532-8853 TIMBER CREEK ESTATES (417) 533-1129 TITAN PROPANE (417) 532-2121 TOTAL HIGHSPEED INTERNET SERVICES 417-851-1107 TOUCH PROMOTIONS GROUP (573) 374-6200 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH (417) 532-3433 TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (417) 532-2717 TRIUMPH ENGRAVING SHOPPE (417) 533-7661 TRUE CONSTRUCTION (417) 588-3235 TYRELL & PRESTIDGE LAW, LLC (417) 208-5885 UNIFIRST CORP (417) 865-1629 UNITED INSURORS (417) 588-4121 UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI EXTENSION CENTER (417) 532-7126 US BANK (417) 588-4111 US CELLULAR (417) 588-2822 VALUE TIRE CENTER (417) 532-9164 VERIZON WIRELESS - Z WIRELESS (417) 532-4725 VF OUTLET (417) 588-4142 VIDIE’S CATERING (417) 588-5452 W.T. VERNON HOUSING CORP. (417) 532-9733 WAL-MART STORE #14 (417) 588-2268 WALL CONSTRUCTION (417) 532-3679 WALTERS, STAEDTLER & ALLEN CPA’S (417) 532-5941 WCA WASTE CORPORATION OF MISSOURI INC. (417) 426-5004 WEAVER AUTO SALES (417) 531-0547 WELCOME WAGON (573) 308-6019 WHIRLWIND RANCH (417) 533-5280 WILKINSON PHARMACY (417) 532-9431 WILL BRADLEY (417) 532-7784 WILLARD ASPHALT PAVING, INC. (417) 532-7107 WILLARD QUARRIES (417) 532-7107 WORLD FINANCE CORP (417) 532-9660 YOUNG SIGNS (417) 532-3253


28

23 PETE’S PLACE AT ONE-EYED WILLY’S 24 READINGS FLY SHOP 25 MACCREED’S ART GALLERY

29

26 REDBEARD’S RANCH 27 RIVERFRONT CAMPGROUND & CANOES 28 RIVERWOOD RESORT 29 SAND SPRING RESORT 30 SPRINGVIEW FLY SHOP / ORVIS MOTEL 31 THOMPSON’S RV PARK 32 WEAVER’S CAMPGROUND & MOBILE HOME PARK 33 VOGEL’S HOMESTEAD RESORT 24 30


PAGE 100

OUR TOWN, YOUR TOWN 2013

Ozark Harley-Davidson offers customers their own adventures From page 19 expand the site even further by clearing the acreage to create a motorcycle campground, Jackson and Crowe said. The pavilion has been the site of an annual kids’ event, an Oktoberfest, Relay for Life functions and New Hope Church also has held an event there. Ozark Harley-Davidson participates in the annual COPE Chili CookOff, a major fundraiser to support victims of domestic violence and also hosts an annual Support the Troops Ride. Along with supporting local service organizations, Ozark Harley-Davidson offers something extra for riders of any age. The biggest event held is the USO Ride with between 200 and 300 bikes. Riders of any level can take advantage of classes and events held at Ozark Harley-Davidson. Every Harley owner is eligible to join the Harley Owner Group (H.O.G.). The local chapter, Ozark Mountain H.O.G.,

holds monthly meetings and dinner and lunch rides, as well as educational seminars ranging from accident scene management classes to road captain training to assisting those who want to “organize their own adventure.” Each of these events are held at the Ozark HarleyDavidson Pavillion. Crowe said there has been an increase in women riders, and Ozark Harley-Davidson welcomes them into the family, too.

Each year, experienced women riders and members of Ladies of H.O.G. are invited to speak so those new to riding can learn more to make the experience more enjoyable and safer. Experienced women riders also can get refresher tips. The unique customer service, involvement with the community and good business sense all contributed to Ozark Harley-Davidson’s survival the recent economic crisis. “We had to watch our expenses, laid off a little bit and just held on to ride it out just like everybody else,” Crowe said. It helps to be part of the national Harley-Davidson family, too. “I think Harley has taken more of the market share. Harley’s name is out there,” Crowe said. The company also offers bikes for any budget and as many accessories can be added as a person would like, she said. Harley-Davidson is marking its 110th year in business and the Flemings will observed their 15th anniversary in 2013.

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Our Town, Your Town 2013-14  

A guide to Lebanon, MO & Laclede County.

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