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Leawood Police 2013 Annual Report

Justice Center opens its doors

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n 1990, the Leawood Police Department, which consisted of 26 officers and 6 civilian employees, moved into the newly refurbished facility at 9617 Lee Boulevard with plenty of space to grow. Twenty one years later, the agency now consisted of 61 officers and 22 civilians and was bursting at the seams. A new home was needed. Planning for a new building began in earnest in 2006 when land for a new justice center was purchased at the corner of what was then 117th Street and Tomahawk Creek Parkway. Soon after, the city established a special retail sales tax to raise funds for the construction of the center. By April of 2010, funding from the sales tax and county public safety tax proceeds was in place and Hoefer Wysocki Architects were chosen to begin design of a new justice center. An employee committee researched other new buildings and joined with architects to ‘brainstorm’ ideas. Two years later, in May of 2012, Titan see Home, page 2

Some facts on our new home:  $21 million construction budget  62,259 sq. ft. of finished space  20,000 sq. ft. garage/sally port  254 parking stalls  Geothermal heating/cooling  Fiber optic connections without outside agencies  101 employees (83 police, 14 court/legal, 4 IT)

www.leawood.org/police


Leawood Police 2013 Annual Report

From the Chief

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s 2014 begins and we look back at 2013, a couple of things come to mind. First as a result of the community’s support and their commitment to public safety we are in a new Justice Center, a building which should meet the needs of the community for many years to come. John M. Meier This is a project that was a long time in Chief of Police coming but certainly the wait has been worth it. It’s a building that we hope you are as proud of as we are. Secondly, this past year Leawood was named one of the safest 100 cities in the US with a population over 25,000. We are proud of that acknowledgement and hope that those who live, work, or visit here feel safe. It is important to the police department that the citizens have a sense of security in their homes and neighborhoods. But beyond safety, we also have a goal to insure that the quality of life in Leawood meets the expectations of the residents. As you can imagine this is not always easy to accomplish. The activities that one neighbor enjoys may be viewed as a nuisance by another neighbor. A speeding ticket might be viewed by one citizen as the police harassing them, while another citizen feels we are not doing enough about cars speeding in their neighborhood. Our goal is not to make everyone happy, that is something that in a free society is not possible from a law enforcement perspective. It is our goal though to make sure citizens feel we have listened to their concerns and that we treat them in a professional manner. I have a great deal of pride in how the men and women in this organization do their job and the professional way we conduct our business. I believe that their interaction with the community is one of the reasons our crime rate is low. We have contacts with over 34,000 individuals over the course of a year and not everyone is going to be happy with the outcome, but I do hope and expect that they will feel that they have been treated fairly and with respect. Thank you to our community for our new quarters and please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or c om m e nt s a bou t o ur ser vi c e: https:// www.surveymonkey.com/s/BGZWSHW.

Home (from pg. 1) Built Construction was chosen by the Leawood City Council and began building the center, which would be home to not only the Police Department but also the city’s Municipal Court and Legal Departments and the IT Department, a total of 101 employees. Twenty-one millions dollars and seventeen months later, the building was complete and by November of 2013 the Leawood Police Department had a new home for the 21st Century. The results were overwhelmingly positive. “The building as a whole is gorgeous, and the space affords us the freedom of not being on top of each other and running into file cabinets all the time,” said Julie Berger, a member of the employee committee. “Having court join us is a wonderful luxury to be able to give the public and attorneys easier access of just walking down a hall from one to the other rather than going to different parts of the city.” “We get to see the response of people as they enter the building for the first time. They look up and around to see the full expansiveness of it,” added Donita Crossland, another member of the employee committee. “There have been many meetings in our Community and Training rooms. This new activity has made it busier in (the Records Unit) for us. This has been a long time coming and well worth the wait.”

How are we doing? www.leawood.org/police/citizensurvey.aspx


Leawood Police 2013 Annual Report

Day & Berger top employees Hargis earns title as the department’s Top Gun

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n recognition of their dedication, both at work and outside of work, Police Officer Paul Day and Records Specialist Julie Berger were chosen by their peers as the Leawood Police Department’s Employees of the Year. “I was shocked (when she heard her name called). I had not even thought I would be up for it,” Julie said the Civilian of the Year Award, presented at the department’s awards dinner in mid-November. “I am very honored and touched to have received such a privileged award.” A member of the department since January of 2007, Julie was recognized not only for her work greeting the public and helping to process all of the paperwork generated by officers, but also for her commitment to Special Olympics. She has been a big help in planning the department’s annual Midnight Run and Summer Olympics fundraising events. Paul Day Paul, who joined the department in June of 2006, was active in a number of areas. In addition to having one of highest arrest rates in Patrol, Paul also serves as one of the Canine Unit’s training decoys and has greatly helped in the development of the department’s two new dogs. He also managed the department’s Citizens Police Academy program this fall and has been an active participant in several other programs throughout the year. “It is a great honor to have been selected for this award (Police Officer of the Year). The recognition from my fellow employees will never be forgotten. I thank each of them, because without them I would not be the Julie Berger officer I am today,” Day said. While Paul and Julie’s were the top awards of the dinner, they were not the only ones presented. Capt. Dale Finger (Distinguished Service Award) and Information Services Director Mark Andrasik (Exceptional Service Award) received well deserved recognition for all the work they put into the city’s new Justice Center. Sgt. Brad Robbins received the department’s Lifesaving Award after joining three Leawood Fire Fighters (Capt. Mike Hoffine, Dony Bielak and Chris Hargis Jake Williams) in successfully performing CPR. The four where able to reestablish a heartbeat before MedAct even arrived and because of their efforts the man walked out of the hospital 10 days later. Officer Chris Hargis received the annual Top Gun award. It is presented to the officer who posts the best time in a challenging course that measured accuracy and speed in the use of all of the department’s firearms. Finally, a number of police employees were recognized for their years of service to the department and to law enforcement. 5 YEARS: Bradey Ewy; 10 YEARS: Erik Butler; 15 YEARS: Regina Ellis, Robert Mahon; 20 YEARS: Phil Goff, Shawn Farris, Troy Rettig; 35 YEARS: David Klingler; 40 YEARS: Dale Finger.

www.leawood.org/police


Leawood Police 2013 Annual Report

What we do each day: In 2013, Leawood officers handled 32,543 calls, a 1.8% decrease from a year ago. Among these calls were: 17,158 traffic stops  1,637 total arrests  1,374 medical calls  1,034 warrant arrests  719 crashes (0 fatal) * 134 injury crashes  652 9-1-1 calls  475 thefts  101 shopliftings  98 thefts from vehicle * 65 id thefts  264 pedestrian checks  235 DUI arrests  217 disturbances  188 check the welfare calls  133 fire calls  133 drug arrests  131 civil matter calls  129 noise complaints  113 solicitor complaints  74 fireworks complaints  67 vandalism calls  47 burglary calls

Traffic Enforcement The top citations in ‘13

Speeding (all versions) 5,664 No proof of insurance 2,155 Fail to wear Seat Belts 1,978 Expired or no license tag 1,721 Driving while suspended 483 DUI 235 Driving with expired DL 181 Switched license plates 170 Fail to maintain lane 163 No DL in possession 156 Inattentive Driving 154 Fail to stop at a stop sign 148 Fail to stop @ steady red 142 Refuse Prelim. Breath Test 136 Illegal turns (right, left, u) 120 Driving without a license 119 Unsafe turning or stopping 106 Following too closely 89 Illegal tinted windows 64 Open container of alcohol 60

Officers completed...  3,573 reports  9,435 tickets  67 car seat checks

The average per 1,000 citizens…  0.3 violent crimes  12.3 property crimes

Answering your calls The Leawood Police Department’s Communication Specialists in 2013:  answered 45,511 phone calls  of these, 9,561 were 9-1-1 calls, including 6,960 or 73% from mobile phones;  dispatched 12,657 assignments  handled 19,886 officer-initiated incidents  Created 32,543 “events” in the computer dispatch system.

Top crash locations I-435 corridor 76 103rd & State Line 20 133rd & State Line 15 112th & Nall Ave. 12 College & State Line 12 135th & State Line 9 135th & Mission Rd 9 119th & Tomahawk Creek 9 119th & State Line 8 119th & Roe Ave 8

 24 criminal threats 19 lockout calls  18 assault/battery calls  16 auto thefts  15 forgeries  8 trespassing calls  7 aggravated assaults  3 weapons violations  2 rapes  2 robberies  1 kidnappings  1 arson  0 homicides

Additional highlights of 2013... Sgt. Kirt Yoder graduated from the State of Kansas’ Certified Public Manager program in November.  The Police Department finished second in the state of Kansas in fundraising for the Kansas Special Olympics with a total of $32,481.64.  Animal Control Officers Carla Lewis (VP) and Jerry Webb (Secretary) were elected officers in the Kansas Animal Control Association. 

How are we doing? www.leawood.org/police/citizensurvey.aspx


Leawood Police 2013 Annual Report

Community Cops

Another new face

Working in our schools and the community, the police department’s three DARE/Crime Prevention officers presented:

After adding a new dog in 2012, the Leawood Police K9 unit welcomed a second new K9 in 2013. Duke retired on May 18th after seven years of service to the city. Taking his place after a six week training course with his handler, Jim Herman, at Shallow Creek Kennels (PA) was K9 Bob Earl K9 Bob Earl. Duke remained with Officer Herman in his retirement. Leawood K9s Cliff, Duke and Bob Earl completed 225 deployments last year, including 39 for outside agencies. Among the specific things they did were:  143 vehicle searches  18 tracks or area searches  10 public demonstrations  8 other narcotic searches  6 building searches  1 school searches The two canines uncovered 592.3 grams of marijuana (a 36% increase over the previous year), 4 grams of methamphetamine, 1 gram of cocaine, and 122 pieces of drug paraphernalia. The dogs assisted in the arrest of 24 felons and 45 others on misdemeanor charges.

 610 DARE lessons  189 other school presentations  30 Internet safety/Cyber-bullying classes  25 station tours  19 community education programs  5 self defense seminars  2 bike safety session  2 CPR classes

Officer Randy Wiler also continued his development of our on-line Crime Prevention Academy where residents can watch a home security video and complete a self-guided security survey. The site also contains information on ID thefts and internet safety.

Policing the Animals In 2013, Leawood Animal Control Officers handled: 1,009 calls for assistance  320 general animal reports The 3-member unit dealt with:  129 impounds, of which 55 or 43% were returned to their owner.  93 dog complaints  80 injured animals  61 deceased animals picked up  54 wildlife complaints  11 animal bite calls  9 animal neglect investigations  9 cat complaints

Alarms keep first responders busy The City of Leawood had 4,696 registered alarms in 2013. From these systems, Leawood emergency personnel were sent to investigate 1,840 alarms calls. Of these alarms, 1,328 were burglary/security alarms and included 97 panic alarms. After investigation, it was determined that only 21 of the alarms received, or 1.3%, were valid. The most frequent causes for false alarms that could be determined by officers were accidental activations by a user (350) or a door left ajar (148). Continuing our efforts to keep these numbers down, 11 False Alarm Prevention/Alarm School programs were presented and 36 systems were repaired after an activation. Finally, the Fire and Police Departments combined responded to 133 fire and 29 medical alarm calls in 2013.

www.leawood.org/police


Leawood Police 2013 Annual Report

Postal Award for Burke

In Recognition

n 2009 Detective Bill Burke was asked to become a member of a regional task force with the United States Postal Service. This task force was heavily involved in the investigation of a national organized crime group known as Operation Homeless. The group was given this name due to their “hiring” of homeless people to cash stolen and illegally manufactured checks for them. After hitting an area the group would quickly leave only to return at a later date, making them very difficult to catch. In 2011 the arrest by Leawood officers of a homeless person trying to fraudulently cash a check led to information linking the incident to the Operation Homeless group and provided information on the group. In early 2013 the Postal Service Task Force became aware the Operation Homeless group was back in the KC area. On January 31st, Leawood Officers were dispatched to a fraudulent activity call at a Leawood bank. Bill’s knowledge of the Operation Homeless group and their methods provided a coordinated response. Knowing members of the group would be waiting in the area, Bill and others saturated the area with unmarked cars and found members of the group waiting at a nearby business. This resulted in multiple members of the national crime ring being identified, arrested, and charged. For his overall work with the task force, with particular recognition given for his work investigating the Operation Homeless group, Bill was recognized as the Postal Service Task Force Investigator of the Year on September 26th. - Maj. Troy Rettig

Retirements

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MORE ROOM FOR OFFICERS — The Report Writing area of the new Justice Center (above) offers a great deal more space and sunlight for officers working on reports than the space at the old station (right).

www.leawood.org/police

Communications Officer

Fran Doll 1989-2013

Police Officer Rod Laubenstein

1994-2013

New to the Staff Police Officer

Katie Cummings

Communications Officer

Naomi Kent

2013 LPD Annual Report  

2013 annual report for the Leawood Police Department.

2013 LPD Annual Report  

2013 annual report for the Leawood Police Department.