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DOING Business in Hong Kong

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Table of Contents

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1.

Hong Kong Overview

4

2.

Foreign Companies Doing Business In Hong Kong

8

3.

Employment Matters

12

4.

Taxation

16

5.

Intellectual Property

20

6.

Dispute Resolution

24

7.

Insolvency

26

8.

Contact Us

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Doing Business in Hong Kong

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Hong Kong Overview

1

Hong Kong Overview

Legal System The Hong Kong legal system is based on the English common law system and on the rules of equity. There is a strict adherence to the principles of the Rule of Law and to the independence of the Judiciary. The laws in force immediately prior to the resumption of sovereignty by the People’s Republic of China (“PRC”) in 1997 have been maintained with very few exceptions, (e.g. certain specific laws relating to the national flag, calendar and anthem).

There is a strict adherence to the principles of the Rule of Law and to the independence of the Judiciary

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Political System The PRC resumed its sovereignty over Hong Kong when the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the PRC was established on 1st July 1997. The Basic Law, which is the constitution of Hong Kong, was adopted on 4th April 1990 by the National People’s Congress of the PRC. It provides that for a period of 50 years from 1st July 1997, Hong Kong will enjoy a high degree of autonomy and will be allowed to retain its current political, social, commercial and legal system including the capitalist economic and trade systems that have made it the successful international financial and business centre that it now is.

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Hong Kong Overview

Population:

7.2 million Languages:

English Cantonese and Mandarin Time Zone:

Greenwich Mean Time + 8 hours

Economic System Hong Kong operates a free enterprise, free trade, “laissez-faire� economic system with minimal government interference in any sector of the economy. This is illustrated by the very few customs duties and or tariffs levied on imported goods. Companies and individuals may also import or export capital at their own discretion and profits and dividends derived from a business in Hong Kong can be freely converted and remitted. There is no Hong Kong taxation on dividends. There are no exchange controls or foreign currency regulations (except those that relate to suspected terrorist financing and money laundering) nor are there any statutory anti-trust laws. Investment Incentives In view of the general lack of restrictions on investment in Hong Kong, there are few additional or specific incentives to encourage investment, it being felt that the low rate of taxation and favourable investment climate are sufficient to stimulate investor interest. However, from time to time the Hong Kong Government does launch special schemes to encourage investment in certain areas, those to date usually being technology related.

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Hong Kong operates a free enterprise, free trade “laissez-faire� economic system with minimal government interference in any sector of the economy 6

Doing Business in Hong Kong

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Hong Kong Overview

Financial System The Hong Kong dollar (HK$) has been pegged at HK$7.80 to US$1 since 1983. The various sectors of the financial and securities community are regulated by The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited, the Securities and Futures Commission and the Hong Kong Monetary Authority. International Relationships Hong Kong possesses full autonomy in the conduct of its external commercial relations and can therefore conclude and implement bilateral or multilateral trade agreements with states, regions and international organisations. Hong Kong is a founding member of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Hong Kong is also a member of the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) forum which aims to achieve sustained growth and development in the Asia-Pacific region through the promotion of economic interdependence and the reduction of trade barriers. Hong Kong has a number of double tax treaties, including those with the PRC, Austria, Luxembourg, Hungary, Ireland, Belgium, Thailand and Vietnam.

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Hong Kong Overview

2 The most common form of company in Hong Kong is a private limited liability company

Foreign Companies Doing Business In Hong Kong Business Vehicles A foreign company wishing to carry on business in Hong Kong can do this through: • a company incorporated in Hong Kong; • a branch office of that foreign company; or • the establishment of a representative office in Hong Kong. Also possible, but a lot less common, are sole proprietorships, partnerships and limited partnerships. Business Registration Every business in Hong Kong is required by the BUSINESS REGISTRATION ORDINANCE (Cap 310 of the Laws of Hong Kong) to obtain a Business Registration Certificate, within one month of commencing business, for its principal office address and also for any other business address in Hong Kong. If a company carries on a business using one or more business or trade names, then a Business Registration Certificate will be required for each such name. The business registration serves to notify the Hong Kong Inland Revenue Department of the establishment of any business in Hong Kong, which of course may be subject to the payment of profits tax. Special Types of Businesses Certain businesses may only be carried on in Hong Kong with a specific licence or with regulatory authority consent, in addition to the other requirements stated herein. These businesses include financial institutions, and those in telecommunications and broadcasting.

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Hong Kong Overview

There are no restrictions imposed on foreigners owning equity in Hong Kong companies or on the acquisition by foreigners of real estate in Hong Kong

Hong Kong Companies Companies incorporated in Hong Kong can be public or private and can be limited by shares or by guarantee. Companies limited by guarantee are generally set up by non-profit organisations. Companies failing to satisfy the requirements of a private limited company are public companies. Many public companies are listed on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited and are subject to additional regulations such as The Rules Governing the Listing of Companies on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited and the Hong Kong Code on Takeovers and Mergers. The most common form of company in Hong Kong is a private limited liability company. This is a company which by its constitution: • restricts the right to transfer its shares; • limits the number of shareholders to 50 (not including employees and former employees); and • prohibits any invitation to the public to subscribe for any shares or debentures in the company. The liability of each shareholder is limited to the amount (if any) unpaid on the shares held by that shareholder.

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Hong Kong Overview

There are no restrictions imposed on foreigners owning equity in Hong Kong companies or on the acquisition by foreigners of real estate in Hong Kong 10

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Foreign Companies Doing Business in Hong Kong

Acquiring a Business in Hong Kong There are two ways of acquiring a business in Hong Kong. • buy the shares of the company that owns the target business or assets; or • buy the target’s assets which constitute the business. Joint Ventures A joint venture is a commercial enterprise between two or more parties who agree to undertake a business together. Generally, each joint venturer will contribute certain resources in return for a share of the ownership and profits of the business. The most common legal structure for a joint venture is to establish a private limited liability company to conduct the joint venture business, in which the joint venturers each take a shareholding. A shareholder agreement will normally be entered into by the joint venturers regulating the business of the joint venture company and the rights and obligations of the joint venturers. Representatives : Agents, Distributors and Franchisees Apart from pyramid selling schemes which are prohibited under the PYRAMID SELLING PROHIBITION ORDINANCE (Cap 355 of the Laws of Hong Kong), there are no statutory laws or administrative procedures that regulate the appointment or activities of representatives such as agents, distributors or franchisees in Hong Kong. Relevant agreements are simply governed by common law principles of contract and agency, and the parties are free to negotiate their own terms. Foreign Investment Restrictions and Conditions There are no restrictions imposed on foreigners owning equity in Hong Kong companies or on the acquisition by foreigners of real estate in Hong Kong. Exchange Control There are no exchange controls nor is there any restriction on the repatriation of capital, profits, dividends, interest and rental income by foreign investors.

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Hong Kong Overview

3 The EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE applies equally to locals and foreign nationals working in Hong Kong

Employment Matters

General Employment in Hong Kong is less regulated than in many other jurisdictions such as those within the European Union and in the United States. The EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE details certain basic rights and protection for all employees. The EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE applies to every employee engaged under a contract of employment in Hong Kong with only a few minor exceptions, for example in relation to family members employed in family businesses and merchant seamen. The EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE applies equally to locals and foreign nationals working in Hong Kong. Trade Unions There are a number of labour organisations/trade unions in Hong Kong, but there are no closed shops. These organisations are principally established on a trade-by-trade basis, although some of the larger corporations with substantial numbers of employees have labour unions particular to that corporation. Foreign Workers All non-locals are subject to immigration controls and require employment visas before entering into employment in Hong Kong. The general rule is that a visa must be obtained from the Chinese Embassy in the country of residence of the applicant before travel to Hong Kong. A local sponsor is required (this is normally the

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Hong Kong Overview

employing company) to support the application. The sponsor is required to assume responsibility for repatriation of the employee at the expiration of the permitted stay in Hong Kong. The application should be completed and returned to the Chinese Embassy in the country of residence, which will forward it to the Immigration Department in Hong Kong for processing. Alternatively the local sponsor may submit the employee’s application to the Hong Kong Immigration Department. In considering an application, the Hong Kong Immigration Department must be satisfied that there is no suitable local candidate for the position. Where the post involves a special skill or is of a senior nature, this is not normally a problem. Summary of General Regulations Wages Statutory minimum wage legislation was introduced in May 2011 and is currently HK$28.00 per hour. Hours Except in relation to employment of young persons employed in industrial undertakings, where special regulations apply, there are no statutory provisions which prescribe maximum working hours, but this is currently under review.

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Employment Matters

Benefits – Vacations After twelve months of service, employees are entitled a minimum of between 7 days and 14 days annual leave which is determined on the employee’s length of service.

Sickness Leave Employees are generally entitled to pay sick leave at the rate of four-fifths the daily average of the wages earned by the relevant employee subject to certain conditions.

Benefits – Pensions The MANDATORY PROVIDENT FUND SCHEMES ORDINANCE requires that every employer in Hong Kong contributes an amount equal to at least 5 percent of an employee’s salary (up to a maximum salary of HK$20,000 per month) to a retirement scheme that is registered as an MPF scheme. Every employee is also required to contribute at least 5 percent of their salary (up to a maximum salary of HK$20,000 per month) to the scheme. There are a few exceptions to this general rule.

Severance Pay An employee who has been employed for not less than 24 months is entitled to severance pay if he is dismissed by reason of redundancy or if the employee is laid off with a maximum payment of HK$390,000.

Benefits – Workmen’s Compensation Employers are required to maintain insurance coverage in respect of work-related injuries but, otherwise, there is no statutory requirement to provide medical benefits. Social Security Hong Kong has a non-contributory social security system to provide a basic social safety net. No deductions are made from salaries in respect of social security contributions. Maternity Leave Subject to the qualifying requirements, female employees are entitled to paid maternity leave of 10 weeks or as provided by the terms of the employment contract, whichever is more favourable. Maternity leave pay is paid at the rate of four-fifths of the daily average of the wages earned by the relevant employee.

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The amount of any contractual gratuity based on length of service is deductible from the amount of severance pay due to an employee. In addition, that part of a retirement scheme benefit which is paid to or held in trust for the employee and which is due to the employer’s contributions may be set-off against an employee’s entitlement to severance pay. Long Service Pay Certain employees who have been employed under a continuous contract for not less than five years are entitled to long service pay on dismissal. The right to severance pay and the right to long service pay are however mutually exclusive. The amount of long service pay is calculated by reference to the age of the employee and length of service at termination subject to a maximum payment of HK$390,000. Form of Contract There is no requirement in Hong Kong for a contract of employment to be in writing. However, upon written request before commencement of employment, the employer is required to give written particulars of certain conditions of the

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Employment Matters

intended employment. where the contract of employment is in writing, the employer must provide a copy of it to the employee immediately after it is signed. The basic conditions which are required to be stated are the wages and wage period, the amount of end-of-year payment or the proportional entitlement and the length of notice required to terminate the employment. Taxation of Payment Benefits Hong Kong employees are subject to Salaries Tax taxable on “assessable income�. As such suitably tailored remuneration packages can have tax advantages for the employee without any detrimental effects on the employer’s Hong Kong Profits Tax liability, since all costs of rewarding employees should be allowable expenses deductable in chargeable profits. Immigration Procedures Hong Kong has visa-free entry for residents from over 170 countries and territories for trips ranging from seven to 180 days. Short-term visitors may conduct business negotiations and sign contracts while entering Hong Kong on a visitor visa or entry permit. To employ people from overseas it must be demonstrated that the proposed employee has special skills, knowledge or experience, not readily available in Hong Kong. An investment visa requires the Applicant, usually a successful overseas entrepreneur, to be a shareholder of a Hong Kong registered company, either by registering and setting up a company in which the applicant is the major investor or by investing in a Hong Kong-based company. Details on the viability of proposed business must be provided.

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There is no requirement in Hong Kong for a contract of employment to be in writing

The Capital Investment Entrant Scheme (CIES) requires a capital investment of not less than HK$10 million into a legitimate asset class in Hong Kong where real estate is temporarily suspended as a permissible investment asset. Applicants must also demonstrate that they can support themselves and their dependents without public assistance. Approved CIES applicants are allowed to take up employment or establish a business. Dependent visas can be obtained by spouses and dependent children (under the age of 18) of those who have obtained one of the above visas, provided they have sufficient funding to support themselves. The limit on their stay is the same as that of the applicant. Every adult and child aged 11 years or above who enters and is permitted to stay in Hong Kong for more than 180 days must apply for a Hong Kong Identity Card within 30 days of arrival. Applying for the card from the Hong Kong Immigration Department is simple and free.

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Hong Kong Overview

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Taxation

Taxes on Income There are three separate types of tax on income established by the Hong Kong Inland Revenue Department: property tax, salaries tax, and profits tax. Liability to tax, as a general rule, will arise when certain types of revenue have a source within Hong Kong. In general, revenue which arises or is derived from outside Hong Kong will not be assessed to tax by the Hong Kong Inland Revenue Department.

In general, revenue which arises or is derived from outside Hong Kong will not be assessed to tax by the Hong Kong Inland Revenue Department

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Property Tax Property tax is charged on every person who owns any building or land in Hong Kong and is computed on the rent payable in respect of such land or buildings for each year of assessment which commences on 1st April. However, there is an exemption from property tax for corporations for any income earned in respect of any property brought into charge for profits tax purposes or the corporation occupies the property for the purpose of producing profits assessable to profits tax. The rate of property tax is 15 percent (2011 / 2012 onwards). Property is also subject to rates based on an assessed rateable value for each property.

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Hong Kong Overview

Salaries Tax Salaries tax is charged on every person in respect of his income arising in or derived from Hong Kong from any office or employment. Income is deemed to include all wages, salary, leave pay, perquisites, bonus and allowances. Income also includes the rental value of a residence provided by an employer to an employee, but the employee can elect to have this rental value to be deemed to be equal to 10 percent of the total income paid by the employer to the employee (therefore reducing the tax liability if his rent allowance in fact exceeds 10 percent of his total income). Salaries tax is charged on a sliding scale with the standard rate being 15 per cent (2011 / 2012 onwards). In determining whether or not all services are rendered outside Hong Kong, no account is taken in respect of services rendered in Hong Kong during visits not exceeding a total of 60 days per year. Profits Tax Profits tax is the major tax in Hong Kong. Two tests need to be satisfied before a charge to profits tax arises. First, the taxpayer has to be carrying on a trade, profession or business in Hong Kong. Secondly, there has to be a source of profits arising in or derived from Hong Kong from the carrying on of that trade, profession or business in Hong Kong. Interest earned by companies (other than financial institutions) on deposits with an authorised institution are exempt from profits tax.

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Taxation

A taxpayer is entitled to deduct from his gross income all expenditure to the extent to which it is incurred in the production of profits assessable to profits tax.

shares or securities, whichever is higher. The minimum rate of stamp duty in respect of transfers of immovable property is 4.25 percent over a consideration exceeding HK$20,000,000.

Losses can be carried forward without limit The current rate of profits tax for companies is 16.5 percent (2011 / 2012 onwards). The profit tax rate for partnerships and sole traders is 15 percent (2011 / 2012 onwards). Other Taxes Stamp Duty Stamp Duty is chargeable under the STAMP DUTY ORDINANCE (Cap 117 of the Laws of Hong Kong). This is charged on documents effecting a transfer of shares and securities which are required to be registered in Hong Kong or the transfer or lease of land and buildings situated in Hong Kong. The rate of stamp duty in respect of transfers of shares or securities is 0.2 percent of the consideration paid on the sale or the market value of the

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The stamp duty chargeable on lease of immovable property is dependent upon the length of the lease and the rental payable under the lease. Estate Duty Since 11th February 2006, no estate duty has been payable, so no affidavits and or accounts need to be filed and no estate duty clearance papers are needed for the application for a Grant of Representation in respect of deaths occurring on or after that date. Capital Duty Capital duty is payable to the Hong Kong Companies Registry on the creation of authorised capital of a company (whether or not it is issued) at the rate of HK$1 per HK$1,000 (with a cap of HK$30,000 per issue).

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Taxation

Business Registration Tax Every business carried on in Hong Kong is required to be registered with the Business Registration Office. The annual registration fee is HK$2,600 for a principal office and HK$673 for any other office. Import and Excise Duty Hong Kong is a free port and there are no general tariffs on imported goods. However certain goods, for example, alcoholic liquors, tobacco, cosmetics, certain hydrocarbons and methyl alcohol are subject to duty if they are imported or manufactured in Hong Kong for local consumption. Other There are no withholding taxes (except on royalty income paid to overseas licensors and on payments to foreign entertainers and sportsmen who “earn� while in Hong Kong), no taxes on dividends, no taxes on any other types of income except those mentioned above, no capital gains tax, no

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gifts tax and no wealth tax. There are no exchange controls in force in Hong Kong. Tax Treaties There are few treaties for the avoidance of double taxation between Hong Kong and other countries, one of which is the PRC. The differences in the taxation systems in the PRC and Hong Kong have led to double taxation in some instances. An arrangement was entered into between the PRC and Hong Kong for the avoidance of double taxation on income, the effect of which is to tax profits attributable to a permanent establishment and provide for credits if profits are taxed in both jurisdictions. The arrangement is based largely on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) model double taxation treaties. However, there are limited agreements in relation to shipping income with countries like the United States and the United Kingdom.

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Hong Kong Overview

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Intellectual Property

General Hong Kong has comprehensive laws for the protection of intellectual property deriving from local legislation, case law and international treaties, such as the Berne, Universal Copyright and Paris Conventions. Trademarks and Passing-Off Any sign which is capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one undertaking from those of other undertakings and which is capable of being represented graphically may be registered in respect of specified goods or services.

A registrable design includes features of shape, configuration, pattern or ornament applied to an article by any industrial process

A trademark may be licensed but the licence must be in writing. Preferably, the registered proprietor should exercise proper control over the use of the mark to preserve quality and prevent dilution. Registration of the licence with the trade Marks Registry is not mandatory but failing to register may prejudice the rights of the licensee against subsequent parties who acquire interest in the mark without knowledge of the licence and may also penalise the licensee’s entitlement to any damages or accounts of profits in the case of an infringement. A registered trademark is infringed if it, or a confusingly similar mark, is used without permission of the proprietor in respect of the goods or services for which or are similar to those for which it is registered. A trademark which is entitled

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Hong Kong Overview

Hong Kong has comprehensive laws for the protection of intellectual property ...

to protection under the Paris Convention as a well-known trademark is given wider protection under our law. Protection for unregistered trademarks, names and get-up is available under the common law of passing-off where, for example, a trader misrepresents its goods or services for those of another by the use of a similar name or get-up.. Copyright In general, in order to be protected by copyright law, the work must be original, be recorded, fall within any one of the subject matters stipulated in the COPYRIGHT ORDINANCE (Cap 528 of the Laws of Hong Kong) and be connected to Hong Kong. Copyright generally lasts for the lifetime of the author plus 50 years. Copyright is infringed if the work or a substantial part of it is copied, published, performed or adapted without the consent of the copyright owner. Registered Designs A registrable design includes features of shape, configuration, pattern or ornament applied to an article by any industrial process being features which in the finished article appeal to and are judged by the eye. In order to be registered under the REGISTERED DESIGNS ORDINANCE, the design must be new. In this regard, Hong Kong requires worldwide novelty.

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Hong Kong Overview

In order to be registered under the REGISTERED DESIGNS ORDINANCE, the design must be new. In this regard, Hong Kong requires worldwide novelty 22

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Intellectual Property

Registered designs can be freely assigned and licensed. The assignment or licence should be registered with the Designs Registry. Registered designs may be infringed by the unauthorised manufacture, sale, offer for sale, hire or import of articles the same as or not substantially different from the registered design. Patents To qualify for patent registration the invention must be new in the sense that it does not form part of the state of the art at the time when the application is made. Further, it must involve an inventive step and must not be obvious to a person skilled in the art. In addition, it must be capable of industrial application and must not belong to one of the categories of excluded subject matter. Hong Kong has standard and short-term patents. A standard patent is valid for 20 years, and a short-term patent for eight years subject to a renewal fee. Patents may be freely assigned or licensed. Assignments and licenses should be made in writing and such transactions should be recorded at the Hong Kong Patents Registry. It is an infringement to make, use, dispose of, offer to dispose of, import or keep for the purpose of disposing of a patented product or process. Supplying the means to put into effect an essential element of the invention is also infringement. Knowhow Knowhow may be protected as confidential information under contract, rules of common law and equity and can be assigned or licensed. Remedies for Infringement Remedies for infringement of all intellectual property rights include an injunction, disclosure upon oath, delivery up for destruction or forfeiture, damages and/or an account of profits and legal costs. In the case of serious counterfeiting, the courts may grant orders to search premises and seize infringing goods and evidence without prior notice to the infringer. The Customs and Excise Department also has wide powers of search, seizure and arrest under the criminal provisions to enforce trademark and copyright protection.

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Hong Kong Overview

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Dispute Resolution

Litigation Litigation in the courts in Hong Kong is similar to that in England and various Commonwealth countries. It is an adversarial common law system with the legal representatives of the parties appearing before the District Court or (for cases involving over HK$1,000,000) the Court of First Instance, with machinery for appeals to the Court of Appeal, and thereafter to the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal. The judiciary is generally recognised as efficient, independent and free from Hong Kong Government interference. Provisions exist for obtaining a Default Judgment, without a trial, where the defendant does not file an acknowledgement of service or a defence within the prescribed time, and for obtaining Summary Judgement, without a trial, where there is no bona fide defence to a claim. The High Court has specialist judges hearing admiralty, arbitration, commercial, company and construction related matters.

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Many types of foreign monetary judgment obtained in the superior courts of some overseas jurisdictions (largely certain Commonwealth and Western European countries but excluding the United States) may be registered in the High Court and then enforced in Hong Kong. Arbitration Hong Kong law provides for international arbitrations (as defined in the UNCITRAL Model Law) to be governed by a slightly amended UNCITRAL Model Law, and domestic arbitrations by provisions of the ARBITRATION ORDINANCE (Cap 341 of the Laws of Hong Kong) which are similar, although not identical, to the English Arbitration Acts 1950 and 1979. The New York Convention governing enforcement of arbitral awards applies to Hong Kong. There are also arrangements for mutual enforcement of arbitral awards between Mainland China and Hong Kong similar to the New York Convention. All awards (including non-convention awards) may be enforced in Hong Kong in the same

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Hong Kong Overview

way as a judgment of the Court of First Instance, with the leave of the court. Arbitration as a means of dispute resolution has been actively pursued in Hong Kong for many years, in particular by the Hong Kong Government which inserts arbitration clauses in all its major building and civil engineering contracts. There is an arbitration centre, the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre (HKIAC), which operates panels of international and local arbitrators of experience and distinction. There is an East Asia Branch of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators of London which is heavily involved in the training of arbitrators. A local institute, the Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators, has also been set up. Commercial, shipping and building arbitrations, some very substantial, frequently take place in Hong Kong.

procedure. The Hong Kong Government, in particular, inserts mediation clauses in many contracts. The recent reform of the litigation rules in Hong Kong provides that any party who unreasonably refuses to attempt mediation to resolve a dispute may be subject to penalty costs. The HKIAC is active in promoting mediation and training mediators. It also maintains lists of accredited mediators. Other Tribunals As is the case in many comparable jurisdictions, there is a wide range of specialist tribunals and Courts dealing with land, tenancy, labour, licensing, professional disciplinary and other matters.

Mediation As an alternative to litigation or arbitration, mediation is becoming an increasingly popular

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Hong Kong Overview

7 The insolvency of a Hong Kong company will usually result in that company being placed into liquidation ...

Insolvency

The statutory provisions governing the insolvency of Hong Kong companies (and also the operations of foreign corporations registered in Hong Kong) are contained in the HONG KONG COMPANIES ORDINANCE and subsidiary legislation. The insolvency of a Hong Kong company will usually result in that company being placed into liquidation either by way or voluntary liquidation or by way of compulsory liquidation pursuant to court order on a winding-up petition presented against the company. Additional statutory provisions are applicable in the case of certain regulated industries, such as banking and insurance, and there is also power for the Hong Kong Government to petition for the winding-up of a company if considered expedient in the public interest. It should be noted that if a company becomes insolvent, the directors may be held personally liable if they have knowingly been party to the carrying on of business for a fraudulent purpose or with intent to defraud creditors.

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Contact Us

Oldham, Li & Nie, Lawyers, is a highly successful mid-sized law firm, whose commitment is to offer excellence in tailored legal services, to both corporate and private clients. We pride ourselves on having a practical approach and a results oriented outlook. Adding value to our clients’ business strategies and challenges is our first consideration, always on the time with no excuses. Much of our work involves cross border transactions.  The heads of our practice groups are experienced international lawyers, practicing in Hong Kong for many years, who are able to give clients a thorough understanding of the culture of the relevant target market. Our practice groups are committed to the highest professional standards, always work to offer practical and tailor-made solutions, in a cost effective manner, rather than providing abstract impractical legal theories having little or no relationship to the reality of the client’s situation.

Business Practice Services: • Corporate and Commercial • Dispute Resolution • Intellectual Property • Employment and Immigration • Insolvency and Restructuring • China Practice Private Client Services: • Employment and Immigration • Matrimonial and Family Law • Wealth Management • Wills, Trusts, Probate and Estate Planning • Dispute Resolution • Notary Public Services

Our niche is serving local and overseas corporate and private clients who require a combination of international skills, a professional outlook, sound local knowledge and a results oriented approach to law.

Our Offices:

Hong Kong Office 5th Floor, St. George’s Building 2 Ice House Street Central Hong Kong Tel (852) 2868 0696 Fax (852) 2810 6796 • 2845 6671

Shanghai Office Room 1114, 11th Floor Far East International Plaza, Tower B 317, Xian Xia Road, Changning District Shanghai, 200051, People’s Republic of China Tel (86) 21 6278 0612 Fax (86) 21 6278 0613

Refer to our website for more insightful and up-to-date information on doing business in Hong Kong and Greater China. Doing Business in Hong Kong The information contained in this publication is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although every effort has been27 www.oln-law.com made to ensure that the information is accurate and timely, there can be no assurance or guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act upon such information without appropriate professional advice as to the specific circumstances of any particular situation, individual, entity or transaction. The law is stated as at 2011 | © OLDHAM, LI & NIE LAWYERS


Hong Kong Overview

Hong Kong Office 5th Floor, St. George’s Building 2 Ice House Street

Shanghai Office Room 1114, 11th Floor Far East International Plaza, Tower B

Central, Hong Kong

No. 317, Xian Xia Road, Changning District

Tel (852) 2868 0696

Shanghai, 200051, People’s Republic of China

Fax (852) 2810 6796 • 2845 6671

Tel (86) 21 6278 0612 • Fax (86) 21 6278 0613

info@oln-law.com • www.oln-law.com

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