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TWENTY TWELVE Leandro Yuan


2014

2013

TWENTY TWELVE

2011

2010

2009

2008


Contents

14

Details and Fabrication

22

Casa Della Creativita

24

Abroad

34

Mercato Novoli

36

Thermal Tests

44

Sebastopol Competition

46

Social Engineering

48

2021

Co-Lab

2020

12

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Inroduction to Design

2022

4

Silverlake Housing Studies


N

SUNSET

TO D

OW

NT OW

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Silverlake Housing Studies In Modern Housing Prototypes, author Roger Sherwood outlines thirty-two multi-family housing projects by typology. The row-house typology seemed appropriate for a mixed-use, medium density housing project sitting on prime real estate on Sunset Blvd. in Silverlake, CA. In a simple row-housing scheme all typical demands for light, privacy, air, and spaces of various sizes are present due to double orientation. Contemporary housing projects have challenged the limitations of typology to provide diverse unit types while adhering to Sherwood’s basic principles of housing. Housing units may be subdivided into modules with prototypes laid out in Kazuyo Sejima’s Metropolitain Housing Studies. These precedents provided a departure point for re-evaluation and modification of the row-house unit to provide more variety to accommodate the site and eclectic demographic. After a series of explorations, the introduction of switch back stairs in the interior of the unit provided half levels, varying ceiling heights, and distinct spaces. These spaces become kitchen, bed, bath, living and dining modules, which are defined by the width of the row-house with different volumes. The row-house party wall transforms as units exchange modules and interlock to create new unit types. Different arrangements of modules allow units to be arranged to turn corners to form a courtyard scheme, rather than a typical bar scheme in row-housing. Entrances to units face the courtyard and live-work units have an additional entrance on the street level, with storefronts lining the periphery and parking in the center. Each unit offers a variety of spatial arrangements and orientation with private yards to a variety of users.

5


Study Models Modules Kitchen/Dining 15’ x 16’

6

Living 15’ x 12’ x 15’

Bedrooms 15’ x 12’ 15’ x10’

Bathrooms 15’ x 6’ 15’ x 5’

Stairs 15’ x 7’


DN

UP

DN

UP

Second & Half Floor

UP

UP

First Floor

0

20’

Section

7


UP DN

Second & Half Floor

UP

First Floor

0

8

20’


Left Section

Right Section

Bedroom Living/Dining Terrace

Interlocked Units

9


Second Floor

Underground Parking

Ground Floor

G

rif

Pa

rk

Lucile

Sunset Blvd.

10

Bl

vd

.

Edgecliff

ith


50’

0

Third & Half Floor

Fourth Floor

0

100’

11


Flexible Skin Design

12


Details, Fabrication and Assembly

Scale 1’ = 3/8”

H

A

B J

I

C

D

E

F

G

Skin Details and Assembly

Structural Fabrication B

A

Details of Arches and Connections for Structure

C

Arch

D E F

G I

Base

B

60°

Base

C

95°

Plate

D

80°

Plate

E

70°

Plate

G

J

60° 45°

Plate Base

Other

Dimensions

Thickness

H

7’ x 6”

3/16”

J

3”

1/4”

I

1’ 7” , 45° , 45°

3/16”

I

H

Exploded Isometric

Connection

45°

F

J

Angle

A

H

Scale 1’ = 1/2” Excercise 04- EXHIBITION SPACE Instructor- Ana Escalante-Lentz Team- Leonardo Yuan, Candice Myers, Albert Escobar, Andy Chang, Corina Angeles, Sean Bell Scale 1’=1”

Ecdysis Installation Team: Corina Angeles, Sean Bell, Andy Chang, Albert Escobar, Candice Myers

13


“By consensus, the hutongs – the generic substance of the Chinese city – are most characteristic of Beijing’s ‘past’. The dilemma: building is less permanent in Asia and restoration often leads to a harsh reconstruction from zero that removes all traces of authenticity in favor of rigid, bloated rebuilding. In the name of preservation, the past is made unrecognizable.”

Rem Koolhaas, Content

14


Co-Lab Beijing is a city in conict between preservation and modernization. Priorities are given to building modern commercial and residential high rises, and rebuilding historic monuments. In the meantime, hutongs, Chinese courtyard houses, and smaller relics are abandoned and demolished for the sake of urbanization. Within the second ring road, southeast of the forbidden city, is the site of an abandoned and decaying monument to General Xie in the remains of the Fayuan Temple Backstreet Hutong. The communal mixed-use housing project restores the hutong social fabric, establishes a research facility for historic preservation, and raises the standard of living for current residents. The monument will be restored and repurposed as a community center and a museum exhibit. The surrounding hutong is demolished for its lack of structural integrity and communal housing units are built around the monument. The housing is organized by groups of modules containing six housing units, a research laboratory, and a common living space shared by approximately twelve people. As the act of historic preservation is ironically becoming prospective, the research program allows for students and professionals to actively record and catalogue the many undocumented relics and life of Beijing’s past and present. The project brings urban life back to the street level by maintaining the scale of meandering paths, and courtyards, which are non-existent in nearby modern high rises. To restore the tactile and textural quality of the hutongs, original bricks and tiles are recycled in the façade. Team: Tyler Forester, Mackenzie Johnston, Ally Polancic, Claudia Ramirez, Rena Tang

15


Current Condition of General Xie Memorial

Proposed Beijing Historic Preservation Network Cultural Heritage Protection Center

State Administration of Cultural Heritage

Jingshan Park I’ANMEN XIDAJIE DI’ANM D

BEIYUAN LU

Forbidden City

Behai Park BE DAJE XISI BEIDAJE

XIECHANG’AN JIE

Mao’s Mausoleum

IJE NEI DA MEN G AN G’ GUAN

Temple of Heaven General Xie Memorial Co-Lab

16


Site Plans

N

17


Family Components

1 Common Room 20’ x 25’ gathering space full kitchen opens to courtyard

6 Housing Modules 20’ x 15’ 2 units for students/researchers approx. for 12 people total small kitchenette small bathroom and shower

1 Research Lab 20’ x 15’ 4 workstations

18


Space Plan

General Xie Memorial

Housing Unit

Common Room

Research Lab

19


20


21


Plans, Wall Section, Details, Exploded Axon

CNC, Prepared Mold, Vacuum Form

22


1”=1’ Scale Model

23


N


Impalcatura Casa Della Creativita is a space dedicated to the creativity of young adults and international students open to the public in the historic center of Florence. The building, Palazzo Giovane was once the cloister of the adjacent church Santa Maria Maggiore. Currently as Casa Della Creativita, the building holds offices, studios, classrooms, a computer lab, and bar. In spite of hosting numerous events and meetings, the facility is working against its program, due to its lack of visibility with its entrance at the end of an alley. Impalcatura (scaffolding/framework) provides a unique storefront and optimizes space for a more efficient performance. The structure is a steel system occupying and intersecting the courtyard and alley—void—, and facilitating vertical circulation and access to the building—solid—. This allows the service/ circulation to be exteriorized, freeing up more space for the program in the existing building. The courtyard is brought down a half level for a library addition with an auditorium above. The entrance alley is a flexible gallery space with removable floor panels creating various spatial arrangements to promote exposure, leisure, and entry to the public. The emphasized planar form, the material, and modern structural grid act as a datum to the historical context, highlighting the juxtaposition of the user and environment. 25


a

b 5

Underground

a

4 b

b

3

1

2

7

7 Ground Floor

a

b

9

6

b

1

7 First Floor a

26

7


20’

0

Front of House Back of House

1. Exhibition Space 2. Computer Lab 3. Cafe/Bar 4. Kitchen 5. Library 6. Auditorium 7. Office & Administration 8. Classroom 9. W/C 10. Printshop/Production Lab

a

b

b

8

9 1

10 8

8

8

Second Floor a

8 8

Third Floor a

27


Second Floor Before: 30 m2 Classroom | Interior Circulation

Second Floor After: 45 m2 Classroom | Exterior Circulation

28


Flexible Exhibition Space

29


section a

a

b

30


section b

0

8m

31


32


33


34


35


N

36


Mercato di Novoli The northwest district of Florence, Novoli, has had missed opportunities and missteps in urban development, and is in need of revitalization. The primarily residential area is also the home of the Mercato Ortofrutticolo, a center for redistribution and wholesale of produce, meat, and fish in the Florence area. Mercato di Novoli reimagines the site as a new gastronomy center with a public market, restaurants, culinary school and library, auditorium, offices and a hotel to become a new commercial center. Recognizing that a European market thrives best under a free plan and pilotis, the ground floor is left open in a warehouse like space. This concept also ensures that all access to other program, involves direct interaction with the market level as other programs are raised to the heavier “piano nobile”. The formal process came from a series of operations beginning with creating an oval shaped piazza similar in scale with those in Renaissance city centers and placing it at the intersection of perceived paths from adjacent points of interest. Using the paths from surrounding points of interest as regulating lines, the form is subdivided, extruded, and manipulated in respect to orientation and program. Voids are subtracted from the original form to frame views to the landscape and allow for more light to the piazza center. The paths allow connections to proposed metro stations and development outlined by the city’s planning department. Concentration of the built forms allow for the rest of the site to be used for agriculture, recreation, and possible future development. Team: Austen Diliberto, Kaitlyn Wentz Fitzgerald

37


B 6.

4.

3.

A

5.

3. 2. 2. First Floor

B

1.

1.

1.

1.

1.

1.

1. Ground Floor

1. Market Floor 2. Culinary School 3. Offices 4. Hotel

38

5. Thematic Library 6. Auditorium 7. Restaurant

A


B 4.

Sixth Floor B 4.

Fifth Floor B 4. 4. 7. Fourth Floor B

4. 4. 7.

A

3.

Third Floor

B

6.

4.

3.

0

24 m

5.

A

Second Floor

39


Section A


0

20 m


Section B


0

20 m


Our team’s approach to designing an emergency shelter was to create a place of rest in an event of a disaster where people can settle their mind. A place of dreams (P.O.D.). For the mind to be at ease, optimum comfort needed to be achieved. It was a matter of addressing all of the environmental conditions of the site and controlling the air temperature, air motion, radiation, and relative humidity. We decided devise a direct gain passive solar heating system where a thermal storage mass would capture heat through a large south facing window during the day from solar radiation which would be insulated to keep the space warm at night. This would effectively flatten the temperature swings and remain cool during the day and warm at night. By having a large thermal mass low on the walls and floor air is heated by the mass and rises then dropping back down creating convection currents present within our POD keeping interior temperatures stable. To keep the POD cool, cross ventilation would be needed so operable openings were designed as well as shading screens that would block out the summer sun.

WEST ELEVATION

DATA

Part of roof can be propped open to allow natural air ventilation that exits through the top half of the double doors. At night the roof can be closed and insulated.

SUMMER

SOUTH ELEVATION

SURFACE AREA = 172 SQFT INTERNAL VOLUME = 111 CUFT SURFACE AREA/ INTERNAL VOLUME = 1.55 FLOOR AREA = 21 SQFT SOUTH GLAZING 21 SQ FT SOUTH GLAZING/FLOOR AREA = 1

During the summer, when the sun is higher in the sky,the shading systems shades the inside while athe the same time provides light to the cell.

80%

EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION Materials 1" Foam Insulation 1/2" Foam Insulation 2 x 6 Wood Stud 1/2" Plywood Plastic Sheeting Water (in bottle) Water (in mattress) Dirt 1/2" Airspace with Foil

RH 60% 0.50

Indoor VS. Outdoor Combined PMV

0.00

50

PERCENT WITHIN COMFORT ZONE 34.7% Internal 0% External

-0.50 -1.00

PERCENT OUTSIDE COMFORT ZONE 64.3% Internal 100% External

-1.50 -2.00

Blue foam lined with aluminum foil insulates the walls and roof of the structure.

WINTER

Comfort Zone Outdoor Hourly Temp Indoor Hourly Temp

-2.50

Indoor Combined PMV Outdoor Combined PMV

-3.00

During the winter, the sun penetrates the pod through the glazing and heats the thermal mass.

-3.50 -4.00

30

-4.50

Water bottles and the water mattress on the floor are the thermal mass of the pod.

-5.00

ºF ºC

50 10

60 15

70 21

With these predetermined strategies, we went to gather materials for the emergency shelter we kept in mind that in a real case of an emergency that materials should be things that are easy to find and can be recycled so we utilized reclaimed materials near the site. All of the wood was reclaimed from the storage unit behind the IDC, we gathered used water bottles as a thermal mass, and the insulation was left over from past models. All of these were factors in our design and many of the design decisions were based on the materials that we had. This was perfect in creating a low carbon footprint and reduced the list of expenses to a few items. The expenses we did make were things that might be available in a disaster for example instead of an acrylic or glass window we used painters plastic and the thermal mass on the floor would be an emergency raft or in our case an air mattress filled with water. Painter’s plastic was chosen because it diffused the light throughout the POD so more thermal mass or water bottles on the walls could receive radiant light. These materials affected our design and that was our starting point for construction. Knowing the materials we were working with, the shape and dimensions were chosen so that a one or more people may sit, stand, and lay. Then we selected a site ideal for our direct gain POD, the south-east corner of the faculty offices near the horse stabl¬¬es and pastures. Being surrounded by low to no buildings on the east, south and west, we were able to stay clear of any shadow coverage in order receive optimum sunlight exposure throughout the day. The placement

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

80 26

90 32

7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 AM AM AM AM AM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM PM AM AM AM AM AM AM

of the glazing was an obvious choice where we would have a large window to the south and east to let in light in the morning and throughout the day. The orientation and location allowed our shelter to receive the coastal and east- west winds which would come in through the door and out through an operable opening in the roof or vice versa. Not to mention the site had beautiful views to the horses, green meadows, and orange groves out in the distance. The process of construction started with grading the site and building the framing for the floor and floor joists. Most of the wood members we found were 2 x 6’s and so our walls are 6 inches thick and we used standard conventions of tilt up wood frame construction with a header, footer, studs, and blocking sheathed with ½ inch plywood. Once the framing was up we used the 3 mil painter’s plastic for the windows which we double paned with a ½ inch air space. We added rigid blue foam insulation in the floor, ceiling, walls, and doors. For the walls we inserted a 1 inch layer of insulation a ½ inch air space, a layer of aluminum foil and ¬¬then another panel of insulation. The panels where the water bottles were place in front the aluminum foil was placed on the interior face so that any sun light would be reflected back to the water to maximize radiant heat gain. We designed removable shade screens to be placed in front of the south facing window which were sized and planned to shade from May to October from 10 am to 6 pm in the year.

EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

AIR SPACE PLYWOOD SHEATHING RIGID INSULATION

A

2x6 STUDS ALUMINUM FOIL CLEAR PLASTIC B

WATER FILLED BOTTLES

WATER FILLED MATTRESS

A

B

SECTION AA

FLOOR PLAN

SECTION BB

0 6 12 18 30 1 INCH EQUALS 1 FOOT

44

42

54

N

R-Values (°F ft2 5 3 6. 0. 0 1 1 1 1.

1/2" Airspace without Foil

0.

Foil

1


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Planning for the influx of traffic in and out of the city, the SGTC provides for more sustainable alternatives to car travel. With an alternative light rail line through Sebastopol, much needed connections are made to the existing Sonoma and Marin Area Rail Transit such as stops to the Charles M. Schulz Sonoma County Airport, and Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park. The new transit will bring more people to Sebastopol as well as provide locals with a direct connection to the surrounding area.

Light Rail Transit Proposal Cloverdale

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Old Town

Cittaslow all of which promote quality, local food. To promote these ideas the SGTC will include a farmer’s market/stage, restaurants, a winery, art gallery, a viewing terrace and a culinary school. In hopes of rebranding Sebastopol as the Gastronomy and Cultural destination of Sonoma County and even Northern California attracting more business, tourism, and employment.

Park

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M

4

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150’

Apples are clearly a part of Sebastopol, with the city being home to both the Apple Blossom Festival and the Gravenstein Apple Fair as well as many orchards nearby. To reconnect and to revitalize the new Sebastopol with the old, apple trees will be planted throughout the city. Based on a 20’ x 20’ orchard grid aligned to main street, six different apple trees will be planted as way-finders and a device to educate and connect the community and visitors with the seasons of the apple. Apples are organized on the site by apple color and were chosen to provide variety in taste, color, tree size, and harvest period.

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SGTC ENTRANCE

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Pools/Bio-Swales

Indigenous Plants

Cistern

Amphitheater

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STGC

1

OPEN MARKET AND PERFORMANCE STAGE

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The master plan is separated into three different phases to assure economic stability and a smooth transition during construction. The first phase includes half of the promenade, part of the “green belt”, a parkThe CORE Project Competition ing structure with retail on ground level, mixed use buildings which housing, 4thcontain Place offices and retail, and also the construction Tec-En Team: Albert Escobar, Pavel of the SGTC as the new icon for Sebastopol.

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Culinary School 11,300 sq ftP GF

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2,800 sq ft

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The city of Sebastopol, once well know for its apple growing, must replant the apple as its symbol of commerce, nature, and culture. Sebastopol’s future must retain its charming character and past. The aim is to revitalize the city of Sebastopol by reinvigorating its rich history in agriculture, and gastronomy as well as supporting its progressive community and distinctive culture with new infrastructure and connections. The historic main street will remain intact and simply expanded with a commercial promenade loop to promote and foster Sebastopol’s small businesses and local flavor. A “green belt” connecting to Sebastopol’s Skategarden Park, Ive’s Park, Joe Rodota Trail, and Laguna Wetlands Preserve keeps the city connected to its agricultural, P recreational, and natural settings. The Sebastopol Gastronomy and Transportation Center will sit at the intersection of commercial and natural as a flagship building M to inform and spur the development of a new city center.

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The third phase will include a community of residential buildings, and the completion of the “green belt” to connect the surrounding The Sebastopol Gastronomy and Transportation Center is the convergence of the parks of Sebastopol. community’s passion for art, food, culture, sustainability, education, and recreation. The

main space is the open plan on the ground floor which will serve as the new location of the farmer’s market as well as an open public domain for the community to gather for events, swap meets, meetings, performances and more. One of the main focuses of the SGTC is the city’s involvement with gastronomy, the slow food movement, and Cittaslow all of which promote quality, local food. To promote these ideas the SGTC will include a farmer’s market/stage, restaurants, a winery, art gallery, a viewing terrace and a culinary school. In hopes of rebranding Sebastopol as the Gastronomy and Cultural destination of Sonoma County and even Northern California attracting more business, tourism, and employment.

Planning for the influx of traffic in and out of the city, the SGTC provides for more Cloverdale sustainable alternatives to car travel. With an alternative light rail line through Sebastopol, much needed connecHealdsburg tions are made to the Calistoga Sebastopol prides itself for its awareness of its environmental impact. To continue existing Sonoma with and Windsor Marinpaths, Area Rail Transit the same care, the proposed development Saint willHelen include separated bike pedesSonoma County Airport such as stops to the trian only streets, and a light rail to provide for lower impact transportation. All paving Santa Rosa Charles M. Schulz Forestdale will be permeable to allow for water retention in the soil as well as a series of pools and Yountville Sonoma County bio-swales which Sebastopol lead to a cistern for water reclaiming. The SGTC Airport, also has operandan Sonoma Rohnert Park for cross ventilation Boyes Hot able glass atrium which allows in the summer and heat retention State University in in Springs Napa Rohnert Park. The new the winter lowering energy usage of the building. Cotati transit will bring more Corona Road Sonoma people to Sebastopol American Petaluma as well as provide Canyon locals with a direct Novato North connection to the Vallejo Pools/Bio-Swales surrounding area. Hamilton

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50’

100’

Apples are clearly a part of Sebastopol, with the city being home to both the Apple Blossom Festival and the Gravenstein Apple Fair as well as many orchards nearby. To reconnect and to revitalize the new Sebastopol with the old, apple trees will be planted throughout the city. Based on a 20’ x 20’ orchard grid aligned to main street, six different apple trees will be planted as way-finders and a device to educate and connect the community and visitors with the seasons of the apple. Apples are organized on the site by apple color and were chosen to provide variety in taste, color, tree size, and harvest period.

47


Cornfield Mixed-Use Housing Current housing models correspond to certain social groups, creating distance and segregation. The problem: people follow housing rather than housing following people. Cornfield Mixed-Use Housing Development aims to attract and accommodate different users by offering units ranging from 700 to 4,000 square feet with a variety of arrangements. The development of housing units began with compositing Kazuyo Sejima’s Metropolitain Housing Studies and resulting “Tetris” project in Gifu, with Le Corbusier’s seminal Unité. The result ensures flexibility, double orientation, efficiency, and economy with the option for double height and outdoor terraces for every unit. Bedroom, kitchen, living, and dining room modules are defined by the number of bays, which subdivide the 42 foot deep slab. Within this system several permutations may be combined to make a unit with the ability to add and subtract space if necessary. The site is directly between the edge of LA River, and Historic State Park, with views of Downtown in the distance. Echoing visions outlined in “The Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan,” paths and spaces on the site aim to connect and extend the LA River and park and restore the natural ecology. In addition, the supporting community arts center explores spaces defined by the meandering form and datum lines established by the ground and river. The mixing, and juxtaposition of program, encourages interaction between residents and the general public, while maintaining privacy and security. Shared public spaces, amenities, and visual connections promote a sense of openness and community to help create a socially rich and diverse environment.

48

Los Angeles State Historic Park


d.

Broadway Blv

Los Angeles River

t.

gS

rin

Sp

N


Kazuyo Sejima Gifu Apartments

Le Corbusier Unite d’Habitation

+

UNIT 152

UNIT 244

50

UNIT 159

UNIT 122

=

UNIT 147

UNIT 223

UNIT 249

UNIT 214

UNIT 113

UNIT 150

UNIT 107

UNIT 146

UNIT 128

UNIT 204

UNIT 106

UNIT 222

UNIT 241

UNIT 226

UNIT 121

UNIT 260

UNIT 210

UNIT 131

UNIT 129

UNIT 263

UNIT 160

UNIT 105

UNIT 134

UNIT 239

UNIT 101

UNIT 124

UNIT 219

UNIT 209

UNIT 231

UNIT 254

UNIT 112

UNIT 207

UNIT 202

UNIT 265

UNIT 225

UNIT 264

UNIT 256

UNIT 201

UNIT 153

UNIT 130

UNIT 221

UNIT 109

UNIT 211

UNIT 255

UNIT 217


UNIT 132

UNIT 208

UNIT 257

UNIT 108

UNIT 153

UNIT 154

UNIT 102

UNIT 141

UNIT 117

UNIT 127

UNIT 149

UNIT 237

UNIT 231

UNIT 213

UNIT 138

UNIT 114

UNIT 161

UNIT 163

UNIT 155

UNIT 126

UNIT 117

UNIT 135

UNIT 238

UNIT 235

UNIT 214

UNIT 151

UNIT 220

UNIT 227

UNIT 251

UNIT 205

UNIT 203

UNIT 115

UNIT 136

UNIT 216

UNIT 230

51


2

1

1. North/South linear housing slab modified for views community bar edge condition modified to create a node 2. housing slab raised to reduce ground level noise & optimize views community bar lowered to connect to river 3. connect state park on ground level to park on river level

3

Housing

Community Center

1. Lobby 2. Offices/Administration 3. Computer/Copy Room 4. Mail Room 5. Lounge/Game Room 6. Clubhouse 7. Fitness Center 8. Sauna 9. Pool/Spa 10. Gardens/Patio 11. Locker Room 12. W/C 13. Bike Room Storage

14. Offices/Administration 15. Performance Hall 16. Foyer 17. Multipurpose Room 18. Music Room 19. Recording Studio 20. Rehearsal Studio 21. Computer Lab 22. Lounge 23. Teen Lounge 24. Kids Lounge 25. Game Room 26. Day Care 27. Classroom 28. Art Studio 29. Ceramics Studio 30. Lab Room 31. Wood Shop 32. Gallery 33. Patio 34. Ampitheater 35. W/C 36. Kitchen

N

0

52

128’

Housing Grid 40’ -90’


Fifth Floor 20’

Ground Floor 0’

15

19

24

27

35

16

35

18 14 12 3

6

2

5

4 12

1 25

7 11 11

27

10

9

27 3535

9

26

8

Second Floor -10’

First Floor -20’

15

30 30

16

35

27

20

36

35 35

27

27

35 17

17

33

34

22 21 33

1

23

32 27 29 28 35 35 31

13 31

53


D

E

Housing

Ameneties

Promenade & Live Work

Community Center

Structure & Circulation

Parking

Park

54

C

A

F

G

B


DN

DN

7 1 1.5 1

UP

modules bedrooms bathrooms terrace

UP

A

7 2 2 1 1

modules* bedrooms bathrooms double height terrace

12 3 2.5 1

modules bedrooms bathrooms double height

D

DN DN

9 2 2.5 1 1

UP

modules bedrooms bathrooms double height terrace

UP

B

E

DN

DN

UP

8 2 2 1

modules* bedrooms bathrooms double height

12 4 3.5 1

UP

modules bedrooms bathrooms double height

C

F

DN

DN UP

13 4 2.5 1 UP

0

modules bedrooms bathrooms double height

G

48â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

55


Access

public park

56

elevated public plaza


housing

community center

57


Expand

single

just married w/ first child

level 1

level 2

Densify

2 bedroom

level 1

level 2

58

4 bedroom

second kid

and another

in-laws move in


BEDROOM

LIVING

DINING

OUTDOOR

Facade

NORTH

North

SOUTH

South bedroom

living

dining

terrace

59



TWENTY TWELVE