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Cornell University AAP, January 2013 Professional Master of Architecture, MArch I Rhode Island School of Design, June 2010 Bachelor of Interior Architecture, BIA

LEA JIHYUN LEE


2012

2011

Thesis : Gastronomic Architecture Professional works–Internship

Combinatory Form–Morphosis Rigid Poro-City

2010

Red Hook Justice Center : The Courthouse as Community Interface The Exposure : Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre by Renzo Piano

Immanent Architecture–Allied Works

3

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30


2009

2008

Providence Public Library

36

39

42

45

2007

High Seas : Luxury Cruise Ship

48

51

54

57

60

Ramen Restaurant | Sake Bar

63


gastronomic architecture material to immaterial Independent Design Thesis Cornell University AAP, Fall 2012 John Zissovici & Andrew Lucia


Inspired by a disjunction between the visual and the bodily/tectonic perceptions of food in molecular gastronomy, this thesis seeks to break the preconceived notions of how material is typically used in the field of architecture. By analyzing inherent conditions, behaviors, and responses of the chosen material, wood veneer, the palette of conventionally available, generic architectural material goes beyond its limitations; it expands and generates a new recipe of application while maintaining the original ingredient. The thin and flat surface radically changes its state and transforms into a rigid but soft fabric-like structure while aggregated as a column, which is one of basic components of building structures, offering beyond a mundane, normative experience from our preconception.


Spherification Apple Juice Caviar Step 1. Blend 1/2 tsp of sodium alginate with 8 oz of apple juice. Step 2. Pour the mixture through a strainer into an empty bowl. Allow it to rest for 10 minutes. Step 3. Mix 2-1/4 cups of water with 1 tsp of calcium lactate. Step 4. Fill a pipette with the apple juice mix, and slowly release drops into the calcium lactate bath. Step 5. Let the apple juice caviar sit in the bath for 1 minute, stir gently. Step 6. Scoop out the caviar with a spoon and place into a cold water bath. Step 7. Let the caviar sit in the water bath for 5 minutes. Step 8. Remove the caviar from the bath draining as much water as possible. Gelification Fruit Juice Spaghetti Step 1. Combine the following in a pot: – 1/3 cup of water – 1/2 cup of fruit juice (without any pulp) – 1/2 tsp of agar-agar Step 2. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat and let stand for 1 minute. Step 3. Fill the syringe with the liquid. Step 4. Push the liquid from the syringe into the tubing. Step 5. Place the tubing in a cold bath of water for 3 minutes. Step 6. Push the spaghetti from the tubing using the syringe filled with air.

Reverse Spherfication Spherified Yogurt Step 1. Blend 1/2 tsp of sodium alginate with 1-1/3 cups of water. Let stand for 30 minutes. Step 2. Mix 8 oz of plain yogurt, 4 oz of heavy cream, 2 Tbsp of sugar, and 1/2 tsp of calcium lactate.Make sure to use regular yogurt as low-fat or fat-free lacks the needed calcium. Step 3. Slowly spoon tablespoonfuls of the yogurt mixture into the sodium alginate bath. This is done by placing the spoon over the bath and slowly turning your wrist. Step 4. Leave the yogurt spheres in the sodium alginate bath for 2 minutes. Mix them around gently to ensure they do not stick together. Step 5. Remove the spheres from the bath, and place them in a water bath. Stir gently to rinse them. Step 6. Remove from the water bath and serve.

Twisted

Unwinding

Relaxed

Reformed


Step 1

Step 2

Step 4

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 1

Step 4

Step 4

Step 2

Step 4

Step 5

Step 6

Step 5

Step 6

Facing page Left: Recipes of “At Home Molecular Gastronomy”. Center: Diagram inspired by Molecular gastronomy, imagining how it is translated to architectural design. Right: Results from experiments of “At Home Molecular Gastronomy” tool kit ordered from Amazon.com. This page Above: Processes of each methods (spherification, gelification, reverse spherification).


Step 1. Roughly try different shapes (that are possible without breaking it) in different directions. Step 2. Set the iron as 400 degree (cotton) and use aluminum goil or cloth to protect your iron from adhesive on the back of wood. Step 3. As you make wrinkles with iron, use other sheet of aluminum foil to cover the surface of wood preventing from burning from over-heat. Step 4. Try to take advantage of the adhesive on the back as you form the wrinkles for holding the shape.

Step 1. Soak Red Oak Veneer into water for 1-2 hours. Step 2. When the veneer is soaked, it gets much more flexible than before and you can create wrinkles in various directions. (However, you lose advantage of adhesive meaning it is harder to hold the shape than before.) Step 3. Take more time to iron the piece and if it does not work well, use masking tape together.

Step 1. From previous experiments, take the models and find where the failure points are. Then sketch lines according to the form. Step 2. Draw lines with permanent marker. Step 3. Soak the models into water in order to unfold. Step 3. Take the re-flattened pieces from the water and make sure to it dries flat too. Step 4. Scan the pieces and take them to Auto CAD for laser cut file. Step 5. Laser cut (heavy score). Step 6. Try re-fold the pieces without soaking water first and if it doesn’t work, try after soaking into water.

Hybrid – Pattern & behavior study (previous and current pages) Reading points

back

-

Failure


Step 1

Step #1 Fold along the lines from the pattern (all directions).

Step #2 Build up while following the order from pre-drawn plan (left). Shape is decided by how the each veneer acts from the scored patterns (different amount) and perforations.

Step #3 By ironing, laminate 2-3 layers of veneer sheets while building up vertically also.

Left: Unfolded pattern/plan of final model which shows combination of surface with solid and scored pattern. 3 Layers of this layout are laminated for structural integrity. Right: Process (scoring, folding, ironing/laminating/ building)

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4


PROFESSIONAL WORKS FROM SUMMER INTERNSHIPS June 2011–August 2011, June 2012–August 2012

Nemaworkshop New York, NY This page: W Mexico City bar and guest room - in construction (2011) Concept models, lighting studies, 3D renered images, conceptual collages, photos, 1:10” scale section model. Facing page Left: W French Quarter built (2011) Rendered images of hallway and photos of lightings, bathroom, minibar of guest room#409. Right: Melt Shop in NYC - in construction (2012) 3D rendered images of the grilled cheese shop.


IMMANENT ARCHITECTURE Sites of the Klamath Basin, South Central Oregon Vertical Design Studio Cornell University AAP, Spring 2012 Brad Cloepfil with Brent Linden : Allied Works Studio


From the existing geographical condition/topography, the design integrates the language of existing landscape and transform it into open/ semi-open public space. The geometry of the site is generated by reflecting surrounding 3 other buttes’ and itself’s topography on the surface. By adding and subtracting the forms of ground from the site, the butte, the quality of the language of the site gets amplified which allows people to experience the nature to the greatest. The programs (performance stage, music institute, residential) are brought together through the method of the ground formation. The system of penetrating transversal corridors for pedestrians and roads operates on different levels throughout the exterior and interior of the site and the building. The pathways become the links between the natural landscape and the built environment. The gradual experience of ramps from the ground level to below ground and back on the ground level offers diversity in the experience of the nature. From one strip of pathway, people can feel both extreme openness and containment. The language of slots of strips continues to the design of the building, used as private practice rooms, circulation paths, windows, voids on the ceiling for natural lights, and more. The top view of the design which is covered with earth and grass blends into the nature while the elevations and the sections of the design highly contrasts with the surroundings by using transparent and light materials like glass and thin columns for structure. The juxtaposition of two qualities diversifies the experience of the site.

Concept sketch


Top: Different approaches to the site in relationship to the site’s geographical conditions. Center: Concept model study of layering and voids/ pathways on the ground. Bottom: Existing surrounding buttes’ topo lines as generator of site/building design.

Rotation & Centralization

Different experiences of music/ Common view sheds

Creation of new boundary

Existing topography

Reflection & Rotation

Addition & Subtraction


arts

exploration

concentration performance expressions engagement knowledge memory community inspirations talent passion opportunity friendships

dream

ambition

nature freedom

wild

experience identity escape

growth

music

creativity

Site plan: Ground as building. Word diagram: According to intended hierarchy and emphasis of design.


Music Institute

Practice rooms

Class rooms

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Dormitory, Dinning hall Interior/exterior All school meeting hall

SECTION

SECTION

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Left: Plans of music institute and amphitheater/concert hall. Center: 3D renderings showing transversal voids acting as pathways for the site. They also act as design force for corridors, skylights, rooms of the building. Right: A collage expressing the atmosphere of the overall site and the building.

A

B

SECTIONS 1/8” = 1’0” SCALE

Amphitheater/Concert hall: open underground space for music festival and other events – capacity of 1,000 people Parking lot entrance connected to the concert hall – capacity of 1,000 people


COMBINATORY FORM : X-Y-Z LINES, SURFACES, OBJECTS – 10X10X3 Core Design V: Integrative Design Practices Cornell University AAP, Fall 2011 Thom Mayne with Ung-Joo Scott Lee : Morphosis Studio


“The production of organizational systems, capable of maximizing differentiation, commensurate with the complexity of 21st century programmatic demands and situational contingencies. “Morphogenetic strategies for design are not truly evolutionary unless they incorporate iterations of physical modeling, nor can we develop systems that utilize emergence without the inclusion of the self-organizing material effects of form finding and the industrial logic of production. Emergence requires that the recognition of buildings not as singular and fixed bodes, but as complex energy and material systems that have a life span, and exist as a part of the environment of other buildings, and as an iteration of a long series that proceeds by evolutionary development towards an intelligent ecosystem.” – Emergence and Design Group Architectural Design, Vol 74, no. 3.P.7


Phase #1 Concept / definition of line, surface, and object

Phase #2

Phase #3


Phase #4

Phase #5

Phase #6


+, –

+


Facing page: Left: Photographs of 3D printed physical model (left row: perspective views from the top, right row: upside down–views from the bottom). Center: Final images of 3 components– line (+ & –), surface (–), object (+)) laid out within the context of 10x10x3 box. Right: Elevations from front to left (counterclockwise). This page: Top view and elevations of final design (counter-clockwise).


Conceptual collages expressing the atmosphere of the building, site or object would be imagined (continued through next two spreads).


RIGID PORO-CITY HOUSING FOR THE FLOOD SCENARIO IN NEW ORLEANS, LA Core Design Studio II Cornell University AAP, Spring 2011 Shayne O’Neil Studio


The whole urban plan and the unit itself are designed to survive from extreme situations resulted from natural disasters, located in Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans. By analyzing the flooding situations, the causes and effects, each housing units are designed to be adaptive to different stages and degrees of situations for flooding/draught/windstorm. The form is created according to the energy systems and also the proportions and basic geometries are driven from study of shotgun houses which are traditional houses in New Orleans. Using the facade and space in between and below structures as pathway for vertical circulation of rainwater system, water pillow, and roof garden, water is stored and used freely according to the situations. The porosity of units continues to the ground and the surrounding landscape, with living water system throughout the site and the water park on west side which is right next to dam. From ground to the top, houses to the water park, all the water systems are connected to one to the other, almost creating an urban scale organism.

Facing page: 3D rendered image of the housings – Urban aggregation. This page: An elevation of housing aggregation seen from South to North.


Modified PV system on rooftop (slanted and placed right next to water surfaces (water garden) in order to increase the amount of solar energy absorption.

Envelope materials– Differences in material: differences in weight Perforated waterproof stainless steel sheet

Bendable piping system Waterproof membrane Underground water system: 3 Stages (Black, Grey, Portable water)

Waterproof membrane (insulation)

Septic tank - stage 1 Black water Septic tank - stage 2 Grey water Septic tank - stage 3 Portable water

Thin pre-cast concrete


Water pillow Blast resistant glazing Balcony used for future access level in case of severe flood Stair cases as separate sliding elements Grid mat foundation Seismic bearing system for level 1 and 2 for sliding building effect Concrete columns designed to resonate the structural logic of building

Facing page Left: An unit seen from North, East, South and West (top to bottom). Top: Wall & floor section details with various systems. Top right: Different materials for the porous but protective building envelope for weather situations. Bottom: Detailed floor plans from ground to the roof. This page Left: Sliced axonometric drawing of the unit showing systems inside and detailed explanation of the structure. Right: 3D rendered image of unit simulating residents’ interaction with living machine on the ground.


Possible scenarios (flood 0-10ft & wind/earthquake response diagram) with Isolation bearings

Structure: Mitigating forces from wind and water flow

This page Bottom: An elevation of housing aggregation seen from East to West. Right: Site plan of entire housing aggregation with water park along west side next to the industrial canal. Facing page: 3D rendered image of housing aggregation seen from above showing rooftop topography.


RED HOOK JUSTICE CENTER THE COURTHOUSE AS COMMUNITY INTERFACE : PROCEDURES & PROTOCOLS Core Design Studio I Cornell University AAP, Fall 2010 Gisela Baurmann Studio


This youth center is about the reintegration of minors who have either been released from a juvenile detention center, released early under the provisions of our program, or have been given the option of our program over prison. The main objective of our program is to allow individuals to realize their full potential and to facilitate positive attitudes and behaviors that will in turn not only benefit the individual but the community as a whole. Programs include auditorium, classrooms, computer lab, counseling rooms, detention area, library, meeting rooms, recreational area (sports, meditation area). Case study of panopticons throughout history indicates that the prison interface was considerably driven from the distinct physical environment or architecture which controls the prisoners’ behavioral acts. Inspired from the psychological effect via the tension among the spaces, the idea of varied forces of ‘pushing and pulling’ and the interfaces between the programs are used as design source.

Facing page: Final physical model (paper folded) of the youth center which is abstracted in terms of pulling/ pushing action and interface between those two forces.


Top and Bottom: Concept model and sketch inspired by magnetic force between two different sources of energy and Serpentine dance representing interface of two different forces and intensity within one continuous form. Center (two lines): Paper models created by folding one paper for each, experimenting pushing and pulling forces within one that eventually result in limitations in certain forms. The Academics • Art • Recreation models were made at the same time as the 3D models, but the material constraints resulted in a bit different forms compared to computer generated models. Expressing the moments that we chose from the section cuts (facing page) were the generator of this model making.


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT ED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRO PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

From top to bottom - Academic class, Art (crative) class, Recreations From cutting each of the 3D models vertically and horizontally, interesting moments of pulling/pushing or containing/releasing were selected for each programs for further exploration.


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PROD PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED PRODUCED BYBY ANAN AUTODESK AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODU

ODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BYBY ANAN AUTODESK AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT ODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTPRODUCED

Each of chosen moments were combined and developed as one whole building, the youth center. After combining all three programs according to hierarchy, more specific moments within the combined form were studied. Also, relationships with surrouding buildings made changes in the scale of the building.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


Abstracted section drawings by choosing one moment from section cut study. (left: cross section, right: longitudinal section)


Above: 3D rendered rooftop view. Bottom: The rooftop is the ultimate point where the concept of relief and constraint is maximized by providing the experience of two contrasting feelings gradually, from one end to the other.


THE EXPOSURE Jean- Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre by Renzo Piano Structural Systems Cornell University AAP, Fall 2010 Brett Schneider


100% zone: Architectural Skin Lateral Bracing Cross Bracing Diagonal Bracing

Vertical Load Zone: Diagonal Bracing

Later Load Zone: Lateral Bracing Cross Bracing

Modeling Concept • The Lamination of the Structure : Divided the building into three part system in order the show the varying structural assemblies. Starting in the Center we slowly peal off the layers and expose each components. • The Building : The Project is consists of 10 buildings with shell like appearances. There are three different sizes of buildings. We modeled the largest building type to a 1:75 Scale. By using varying drawings from researching we were able to construct plans and sections of the building we needed. • The Wooden Structure and Symmetry : The largest shell that we modeled after is consisted of total 29 members. In order to create a perfectly symmetrical shell the members mirror each other starting from the most centered columns.


PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY THE WHITE PAGES Advanced Design Studio Rhode Island School of Design, Spring 2009 Wolfgang Rudorf Studio


Library itself becomes white blank pages of a book which opens up opportunities up for public to involve and interact better than it is now. The library has 5 floors with monumental central stairs leading from floor to floor, providing not only gradual experience of preface to intro, body, climax (top floor) but also reading back experience while walking down. The book/architecture/library finally becomes a whole set of book with users who are the contents, texts, and so on.

Facing page: Section drawing showing a gradual development of the central staircase throughout the floors and the profile of the staircase/lounge on the top floor – the climax.


Circulation/Info desk/ Reference desk

Lounge/Public area

Offices

Programs

Trustee’s room/Meeting room

Staff

Stacks

Auditorium

Loading dock

Collections

Children’s library

Study Area

Cafe/Lounge-reading area


Above: Color coded floor plans showing different programs and representing the central staircase with lighting and materials. Bottom: Floor plans from Basement to Roof top emphasizing the experience of traveling through grandiose staircase.


Facing page Above (first 2 rows): Physical model of staircase/lounge on level 4 that provides library users a virtual outdoor experience by bringing nature, white birch trees, into the indoor space. It can be used as reading space and also seating for cafe users. The slit on the staircase wall is located on the eye level height; It provides different feelings according to the position of the users, depending on the person’s height, standing or sitting. (3rd row):Physical model of central staircase and reception area on the first floor. (Right): 3D rendered images of staircase. Bottom: Elevations (from left to right: South, East, North). This page: A section drawing showing frontal elevation of the central staircase seen from the main entrance (East).


HIGH SEAS CRUISING : RE-IMAGINING DESIGN ON THE HIGH SEAS Interior Architecture Design Studio Rhode Island School of Design, Spring 2008 Janet Stegman Studio


The central idea of this cruise ship is to create spaces that merge the interior and the exterior, the interior of the cruise ship and the sea, so that the purpose of cruise ships which is to have sea experience could be emphasized through the architectural elements. This emphasis results in maximization of the sensation from the nature. Throughout the spaces, large windows and stairs would be used as devices to represent the connection or dialogue between the interior and exterior. Although openness would be the key point to represent the previous idea, essential privacy would be still kept by control and flexibility of devices. The reason for bringing interior and exterior together is to provide spaciousness and airy atmosphere, avoiding staleness that can be easily caused in ships. This ship would provide users sensation of both calmness and wilderness of the nature. Furthermore, both vertical and horizontal ways of walking experience are crucial moments that users would experience. By using diagonal wall structure and flooring that create optical illusion and lead users to the main stair cases, users reach the ultimate point of the ship, deck 9.

This page: Initial idea/concept sketches for exterior and interior design. Facing page: Section drawing showing a gradual development of the central staircase throughout the floors and the profile of the staircase/lounge on the top floor – the climax.


Deck 9

Deck 8

Deck 7

Deck 6

Deck 5

Deck 4 (Arrival deck)

Public Stateroom Theater Pool/Jacuzzi

Restaurant/Bar Crew (Staff )

Library


Facing page Left: Deck floor plans of the whole ship representing significance of vertical access which deliberately lead guests to the destination or ultimate reach point, deck 9. Lighting and different materials are used for special stairs & public area. Materials get mixed as deck goes up, and the sculptural stairs at deck 9 (above and bottom) is made of steel and wood for the stairs and glass for roof structure. Section diagram of whole ship representing different programs for each decks. Right: Floor plan and longitudinal section of typical staterooms indicating free–standing furniture (closet+bed) and walls with lighting fixture behind slots of wood panels. This page Physical model of typical stateroom which becomes remnant of the whole ship’s schematic concept of controlling the view by using diagonals. The differences of diagonals/angles between the layout of furniture and the wooden floor pattern creates optical illusion in addition to playfulness and movement within. Material usage was represented (glass, Teak and black stained wood, leather for furniture) and the model was photographed in a sequence of anticipated entering experience.


Top left and right: Floor plan of deck 9 (left) and detailed plan of Public the sculpture/installation/public Stateroom area with pool, cafe, and bar. Restaurant/Bar Theater BottomPool/Jacuzzi left and right: Floor Crew (Staff ) plans of library (deck 4 & 5) and detailed plans.

Library


Top: A section of sculpture/installation/public area on deck 9 representing the mixture and transitions of several programs within one structure (staricase/ seating, pool, cafe/bar). Center and bottom: Area of Focus – Library Library is located on the front part of the whole ship on deck 4 (arrival deck) and deck 5 which allows a better view of the sea (double height). A section of the reception and the reading area (center) and a section of cafe (day)/bar (night) (bottom) on the other side of library, with angled seatings that are also used as standing tables.


Ramen Restaurant | Sake Bar TEMPORARY SEASONAL RESTAURANT FOR RESIDENTS IN PROVIDENCE, RI Interior Architecture Design Studio Rhode Island School of Design, Fall 2007 Janet Stegman Studio


The task of this project was to build a restaurant which would just used for one season for a time, for a temporary usage. I was interested in building a ramen restaurant with sake bar for summer period about five months, from May to August. The reason why I chose ramen as a cuisine is because of its internationality even though it is one of the traditional Japanese cuisine. Though the exact cuisine that I want is not a traditional ramen but a fusion ramen which has a flavor of western foods while it still keeps the originality. Through this restaurant, more people would be able to experience various kinds of ramen which could become a connection between the East and the West. My inspiration of the schematic design came from the traditional Japanese lighting and the ramen itself: the colors and lines. From the inspirations, my design concept started from the form of strings like noodles. Since, the restaurant is just for temporary usage, the string envelop with a light–weight steel structure as frame seemed proper for the deconstruction at the end. In plan, the restaurant is divided into two different kinds of space, one for groups of people and the other for individuals. For groups of people, there are separate domes with string structure which not only have a certain level of privacy but also an openness through the irregular holes that strings create. There is a separation because of the envelop but also there is a connection with others in the restaurant because of it.

Detail drawing of one of sake bar pods (facing page) and dining area (this page) representing lighting system and the atmosphere affected by it (string ball lights from floor to the ceiling, covering and also going through the inside of the table).


Vignette drawings of entering experience at night - light emitted from porous skins of the structures. Background image: Inspirational image of traditional Japanese lighting.


A section drawing showing string domes in interior and exterior space of sake bar area, and facade and entrance to the another part of restaurant area which is for foods only.


AEL NUYHIJ EEL


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