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Overview Program Thank you for making the commitment to take part in The Journey, created by the Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values. Your involvement is critical to the overall experience and to the impact this experience has on the participants. The Journey is designed for participants to experience the following: • Cultural Immersion • Service to a Community • Emotional Introspection and Understanding of Personal Strengths • Personal Commitment to an idea for Social Good • Using fraternal values and purpose as the catalyst to make that idea a reality Think of these intentions as focus areas for your work as a Guide for this immersion experience. It is suggested that you use these intentions as the framework from which you speak, act, and instruct during the trip. Assessment of the experience will be centered on the connection of the individual participant to the program intentions. This binder of information will assist in preparing you fully for this immersion experience. As with any experience though, especially those involving travel with large groups, we cannot be 100% prepared for everything that may come your way. These materials and prior program orientation discussions should get you close. In a perfect world, things would always go smoothly. Flights would not arrive late, and they certainly would never be cancelled. Participants and leaders wouldn’t forget anything on the suggested packing list, and volunteer coordinators would never change plans on the fly. However, this is not the world that The Journey lives in. And that’s okay. We invite you to embrace it. As you go through the experience, recognize that although you should do your best to keep things on schedule, some overlap and surprises are bound to occur. If you are unable to be flexible and hopeful in the face of these challenges, it will be hard to expect flexibility from your participants. If one service group is going to be late to dinner, empower other students to fill missing roles until they arrive. If a leader needs to leave to make an airport run for a late-arriving student, collaborate with other leaders to make sure they are prepared. Flexibility, collaboration, and critical-thinking are essential to a successful experience at The Journey. We also need your help in evolving this program to ensure future success. Please take notes and jot down your questions and thoughts as you move through the experience. You will participate in a debriefing call following The Journey and your ability to reflect on these notes will be integral that discussion. All that being said, we again thank you! We know you are making a large investment of time to help guide this experience, and we are incredibly grateful! Enjoy The Journey!

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Your Role Your

Role

An effective Guide during The Journey is able to play multiple roles at once and distinguish when each role is appropriate. Keep in mind that you, again, are here based on your ability to adapt to change and respond to challenges. With that in mind, we recommend you discuss the roles in which you feel most comfortable with your fellow Guide(s) while preparing for participants’ arrivals. The following is a list of the types of roles Guides may fulfill during the trip:

Advocate

Guides can often make a tremendous impact on a student’s life by helping them understand the sociological and cultural implications of the work they are doing.

Challenger

As articulated later, participants are intended to struggle with cultural and sociological conflict during the trip. Embrace this conflict and challenge students to process its meaning.

Collaborator

Successful Guides are often team players as they are required to work with other leaders, participants, community leaders, volunteer coordinators, and other interested parties.

Delegator

Remember that service provides an excellent opportunity to empower others to act. Why attempt to move that fallen log yourself when you can work as a team with students to do so?

Educator

Don’t be afraid to read up on the area in which you’re working before leaving and share that knowledge with participants as you go. While you are there to serve, you are also there to teach.

Facilitator

According to Webster, to facilitate means (1) to make easier or less difficult; help forward (an action, a process, etc.) and (2) to assist the progress of (a person). Your role is to guide and empower rather than to force or manipulate. An effective Guide is unafraid of allowing students to challenge one another rather than doing so directly, sets the expectations of collaborative learning and then creates an environment that supports teamwork, brainstorming, and discussion.

Listener

Be an active listener, rather than an active speaker. Silence can be a powerful motivator; remember that what you voice isn’t what is important; it’s about the participants’ voices. The experience is about creating a collaborative learning environment where participants are allowed to discuss, debate, and share with one another in a safe space.

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Your Your R oleRole Logistician

Part of your job as a leader is to make sure participants get where they need to be on time, ensure travel goes smoothly, and that the time of those with whom we work is respected.

Mentor

Don’t be afraid to challenge students to think differently and outside of the designated curriculum times. Helping provide direction to a participant when appropriate can be extremely rewarding.

Negotiator

Some volunteer coordinators may ask participants to do tasks that violate time, logistical, or wellness parameters. It may fall into your duties to negotiate what is and is not reasonable.

Preparer

Be prepared. Look ahead in the program to know what’s next. Be ready to provide examples, situations, and thoughtful commentary to enhance each piece of curriculum. In particular, consider your own thoughts and experiences as they relate to the experience.

Role Model

The attitude and approach of the participants will be dictated by your attitude and approach. Set a great example by believing in the power of this experience and by being all-in to make it great.

Supporter

There are going to be moments when the participants are tired, disengaged, and uncomfortable (physically and emotionally). Providing support to participants in these moments will directly impact their ability to reengage.

Travel Guide

For some participants, this is one of the first times they’ve ever travelled alone. Although we want them to learn travel responsibility, keep in mind you may have to guide or aid some students when going from point A to point B.

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Schedule At a

DAY 1 / Friday, January 10

Glance

10am – 1pm Flights arrive into New Orleans 2:00pm Arrive at Camp Restore 9301 Chef Menteur Highway

New Orleans, LA 70127

AFLV provided / group prepared

4:00pm 6:00pm 8:00pm

Lunch / Unpack Property Overview and Tour / Orientation Dinner at Camp Restore The Journey Program

DAY 2 / Saturday, January 11

8:00am Breakfast (AFLV provided / group prepared) 9:00am New Orleans Tour 12:30pm Lunch back at Camp Restore AFLV provided / group prepared 1:30pm Depart for Community Volunteer Program 5:30pm Depart for Camp Restore 6:30pm Dinner at Camp Restore AFLV provided / group prepared 7:30pm The Journey Program

DAY 3 / Sunday, January 12

7:00am Breakfast AFLV provided / group prepared 8:00am Depart for work site 8:30am Community Project 12:00pm On-Site Lunch CR provided / group prepared in the a.m. 1:00pm Community Project 4:30pm Depart for Camp Restore 6:00pm Dinner at Camp Restore CR provided / group assists in clean-up 7:30pm The Journey Program

DAY 4 / Monday, January 13

7:00am Breakfast CR provided / group assists in clean-up 8:00am Depart for work site 8:30am Community Project 12:00pm On-Site Lunch CR provided / group prepared in the a.m. 1:00pm Community Project 4:30pm Depart for Camp Restore 6:00pm Dinner at Camp Restore CR provided / group assists in clean-up 7:30pm The Journey Program

DAY 5 / Tuesday, January 14

7:00am Breakfast CR provided / group assists in clean-up 8:00am Depart for work site 8:30am Community Project 12:00pm On-Site Lunch CR provided / group prepared in the a.m. 1:00pm Community Project 4:30pm Depart for Camp Restore 6:00pm Dinner at Camp Restore CR provided / group assists in clean-up 7:30pm The Journey Program

DAY 6 / Wednesday, January 15 8:30am

Beignets at Cafe du Monde

AFLV provided

10:00am Cemetery Voodoo Tour 12:00pm On-Site Lunch CR provided / group prepared in the a.m. 1:00pm Community Project 4:30pm Depart for Camp Restore 6:00pm Dinner at Camp Restore CR provided / group assists in clean-up 7:30pm The Journey Program

DAY 7 / Thursday, January 16

:00am Breakfast 8:00am Depart for Airport Departures between 10:30am and 1pm

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Supplies Supplies As part of your trip kit, Guides will be provided with the following supplies: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 first aid kits 2 sets of emergency contact information for each participant 2 sets of contact information for key local contacts 1 set of privilege inventories for all participants Pens for all participants Paperclips Thank you notes to write at the end of the week for all of the individuals who assisted the group T-shirts for all participants (with size list) Participant Journal for all participants 1 DVD “If God Willing and the Creek Don’t Rise” 1 Boomtube 1 LCD Projector 1 laptop (provided by the AFLV facilitator)

We recommended checking your kits upon arrival to ensure you have all necessary materials.

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OurOPrganization artner

We have partnered with Camp Restore on The Journey to New Orleans. In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita ravaged the Gulf Coast from Texas to Alabama. Over one million households were displaced and over 250,000 homes destroyed. People from all over gave millions of dollars, and millions of volunteers traveled to the Gulf Coast to help those in need. Volunteer camps and tent cities sprang up along the coast to house and equip volunteer crews for “mucking” and “gutting” houses. The gargantuan task of rebuilding followed. Camp Restore was born in 2006 to address this task. Camp Restore is a volunteer camp mission site in New Orleans, LA with a mission to restore faith, home, and community. An organization committed to house, feed and equip volunteer groups of all ages who physically rebuild family dwe llings, churches, and schools, work on a wide range of community projects with partner nonprofits, and provide emotional and spiritual care to those in need. Combined with the mission opportunities available, the unique culture, people and history of New Orleans will make for meaningful experience, to say the least. While Camp Restore is a faith based and driven organization, faith is not an area of intentional focus in the curriculum provided by AFLV. Faith based experiences may be included as optional opportunities throughout the experience. Students are not required to participate, and have other options during those times. AFLV values the partnership with Camp Restore to make each experience of The Journey as success. We would not be able to provide The Journey without this amazing partnership. Camp Restore has also provided us with a Handbook for our experience in New Orleans. It is included in this binder and you are expected to be familiar all that it entails.

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The Curriculum Understanding The Journey’s educational experience is unique in the fact that reflection and discussion is based on the experience taking place. Activities, discussion talking points, and reflective prompts will be provided to you throughout the experience, but you will need to use your judgment in content decisions that reflect the activities of the day and the experience. Major components of the curriculum lend itself to several models and themes, including the Bennett Model of Cultural Competence and Blake Mycoskie’s book, Start Something That Matters. Do you need to master these concepts in order to facilitate? No. But familiarity with them will only be helpful to you. This is why there will be snapshots provided throughout the curriculum for your perspective and reference. You will notice that we are light on activities and heavy on discussion and reflection during The Journey; this is completely intentional given the nature of the experience. We want participants to connect with one another and the culture and to reflect on how this experience has impacted them and will impact their future. All discussion questions are provided for contextual facilitation. Put another way…this isn’t a script. You will need to use your judgment to determine which of the questions (and it could be all of them) are best suited for the discussion. You may also notice certain types of exercises such as the privilege inventory and suitcase activity may seem repetitive. This is also done intentionally to give participants familiarity with perspectives and self-sacrifice. Although the framing of each activity may stay the same, it’s also important to notice the subtle differences of each activity description based on the general progression of the curriculum. This guide is to be used as a supplemental aide in implementing the program. It is not a script, but rather an outline of the purpose, details, and required preparation for each component of the program. At the beginning of every session, you will see the following: • Time: The total amount of time for each session. • Outcomes/Intentions: The purpose and intent of the session (i.e. what we are striving to accomplish). We believe this to be the most important component of each session description. • Environment: Any room set needed for each session. • Tools: Any supplementary materials and/or tools needed to properly implement the session. The following keys are throughout the document to give you the necessary prompts: Statements and Questions to ask - when prompted - appear in bold. Good rule of thumb is to read the session more than once prior to facilitating it. Everything you need to be successful will be listed. Overall, there are no forced outcomes here… whatever is supposed to happen, ultimately will and we appreciate and embrace that fact. Additionally, this curriculum is the property of the Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values and cannot be used or replicated without written permission. These programs are intentionally designed for our members and are created by dedicated staff members of our organization who are passionate about curriculum development. We appreciate your willingness to only use this curriculum for its intended purpose… The Journey that you are currently on…as way to ensure that the integrity of our programs are kept intact.

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Final Thoughts Thoughts Now we know that a lot of information has covered in this guide, but we want to provide you with a few final thoughts as you prepare for your experience on The Journey.

Pace Yourself While Serving

In some cases, you may be required to work for several hours at a time. Don’t be afraid to take breaks and work at your own pace.

Model the Way for Participants

Keep in mind the commitments and expectations agreed upon by the participants the leaders before and during the session apply to everyone.

Challenge Participants to...

...work outside of their comfort zone. In some cases, participants may ask repeatedly to buy additional tools or secure extra resources for a task. Help students explore their conceptions and habits regarding privilege by providing respectful challenge.

Be Encouraging

High fives, cheers, group songs, and general positivity can all make service more fun. Attitude is contagious.

Get Enough Rest Although it may be tempting to stay up late talking to participants, encourage everyone to get an appropriate

amount of sleep. These are long days, often in high temperatures, and sleep is crucial to restoring the mind and body.

Trust...

...your fellow Guides and work together to deal with any and all concerns.

Have Fun Get to know participants and understand why they decided to participate in this experience. It can help inform how you can best serve them during the trip.

Challenge Yourself...

...to be outside of your comfort zone. Even though you’re the Guide, you will still learn a lot from the experience.

Remain Respectful...

...of community members encountered at each jobsite. In the moment, it may seem okay to allow students to take a ton of posed pictures, but remember; we are often working in and around people’s homes or in areas of deep impact in their communities. Challenge students to consider cultural differences in a positive light.

Use Discretion

...and maintain mutual respect at all times.

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C ontacts & Notes Important Contact Name

Notes:

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Organization

Phone Number

Email Address


P::rogram O rientation C E Day ultural

xploration

Time: 50 minutes

One

Outcomes/Intentions: • Welcome participants to the experience • Share and discuss the schedule, guidelines/rules, and any additional relevant program information Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals (distribute to participants at this point) • Copies of any agency information (if applicable)

Property Overview/Tour (20)

Invite a representative to cover house rules, important information, and to the tour the property. Thank any agency representative for providing everyone with information and details, and share that we look forward to working with them throughout the week. They are free to leave the room, at that point. If a representative is not available, be prepared to cover all of this on your own. Following the tour, then bring the group back together for orientation.

Orientation & Expectations (10)

Transition the conversation into a welcome from the Fuller Center (if available). Ask them to cover the big items from the Handbook (that all participants should now have) and any additional rules that weren’t covered during the house tour. Recommended rules, if not covered: • • • • •

Access to internet is not available for participant use. No one leaves the property, unless under the supervision of someone from the agency. Explain dinner clean-up process…a.k.a. we clean up after ourselves. General safety precautions. Photography: Ask permission first.

Additional item to consider: have all waivers been signed? If not, now would be a good time to finalize that. GUIDE NOTE: Some items may have been covered in the house tour, so be prepared to make adjustments as needed.

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ProgramC Orientation E :: Day One ultural

xploration

Next, share a few statements with participants about what this trip is and what it isn’t: Examples (feel free to add your own): • This is a cultural immersion experience, NOT a vacation. • This is a social good program, NOT a chapter training program

Recap aloud the agreements, made by participants during the application process: • By registering to participate in this experience, I agree to represent my institution and the Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values in a positive light through my words and actions as I prepare for the trip, participate in the trip, and share my experiences with others upon returning home. • By registering to participate in this experience, I agree to uphold the substance free policy of the experience, by refraining from drinking, using tobacco products, or other illegal drugs during my travel to New Orleans, my time in New Orleans, and my travel home from New Orleans. • By registering to participate in this experience, I agree to participate fully in all pre-trip preparation work, group activities during the experience, cultural experiences, reflection times, and house chores. If I am feeling ill, or have other needs, I agree to share these with a trip leader in a timely manner. Encourage participants to ask questions or points of clarification about what was just covered. Next, walk through the entire schedule at a glance with participants. Ask again for any questions or points of clarification from the group to you.

Welcome/ Group Introductions (20)

Now that we’ve covered all of the logistics, guides will: • Welcome everyone to The Journey. • Introduce themselves and their experience. • Thank participants for making the commitment to be here and initiate a group (re)introduction. Now that we’re all together in the same space, and semi-settled, I’d like to do another round of more formal introductions to make sure that we are all familiar with our team. Please share your name, age, institution, and what you “do” back in your community. NOTE: you might need to do an abbreviated version of this again if you have late arrivals! Introduce the journals and how they will be used: • Participants will be asked to journal specific things throughout the week • Participants are encouraged to journal whenever they feel compelled • Journals should not leave the vans during service opportunities • Final thought: These journals will be their one tangible take-away from this experience, so they should use them as much as possible.

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S::tarting the Journey C C Day ommunity

ontext

Time: 75 minutes

One

Outcomes/Intentions: • To provide community context to participants through guest speakers (or relevant videos) Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals • Contextual resource (guest speaker(s), video, documentary, etc.)

Culture Context (75)

The purpose of this time in the schedule is to provide participants with perspective and context on the community in which they are engaging in. The session should begin with the Guide introducing this purpose and a brief introduction of who/ what is involved. It should also be shared as expectation to participants that questions be asked, based on based on the information they are receiving. Documentary Overview (If God Willing And The Creek Don’t Rise) Do your best to present the room with a laptop, speakers, and projector (speakers and projector provided by AFLV). Try to project on a blank wall. If God Is Willing and Da Creek Don’t Rise is 2010 documentary film directed by Spike Lee, as a follow-up to his 2006 HBO documentary film, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts. The film looks into the proceeding years since Hurricane Katrina struck the New Orleans and Gulf Coast region. Some portions of this documentary are graphic, but we shot it to provide you with context about what has happened to this community over the last decade. GUIDE NOTE: Stop the video at 54:08 as this is the best natural break without showing the entire 4-hour documentary. Make sure that you stay within the 75 minutes for both the screening and subsequent conversation. At the conclusion, the guide should end the session by discussing the following: • What surprised you most about what you saw tonight? • Were your assumptions way off or right on? • How do you feel about this community right now? • What else do you want to know about the community that you don’t yet know? • How do you plan to be fully engaged and be open to this culture? Dismiss the group to a break and for dinner and share that they will need their journals immediately following dinner to begin our evening programming.

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StartingCthe JE ourney :: Day One ultural

xploration

Time: 70 minutes

Outcomes/Intentions: • To create interaction and community amongst participants • To acknowledge the cultural diversity in the room, bring it in as a resource, and connect to the concept of cultured womanhood • To have participants identifying their own cultural perspective and share it with others • To explore individual strengths Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals • Contextual resource (guest speaker(s), video, documentary, etc.)

Who Am I (25)

As we begin our Journey this week, I think it’s only fair that we ask ourselves “why are we here?” Are we here to do service? Yes. Are we here to have fun? Absolutely. Are we here to talk about Fraternity/ Sorority? Sure, there might be times where we make that connection but it’s not the focus. But most of all, we’re here for you. This whole experience is about an experience that you are going to have and the impact that the experience has on you in the future. This experience will help you understand how you can have an impact on the world in a meaningful way. How you can do things that matter in your own community. Invite participants to open their journals to the first page and title that page “Who Am I” and then provide them with the following prompts: With that being said…for the next 5 minutes, you are going to write in your journal about who you are. There are no specific prompts; we want you to simply write about you; who you are and what you’re about. We want you to spend the entire 5 minutes writing and we’ll give you further instruction once the time has passed. Once 5 minutes have passed, ask participants to partner up with someone to re-introduce themselves one on one, using the information in their journals as the foundation of the conversation. Each pairing (or triad) will have a total of 10 minutes for this conversation so encourage them to plan accordingly. Once the time has expired, transition the group to the next activity.

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S::tarting the Journey C E Day ultural

xploration

Cultural Exploration Activity (15)

One

By now you have probably realized that this is more than a service trip; this is a cultural immersion experience. But before we can truly immerse ourselves in another culture, it’s crucial for us to be able to explore our own and our perspectives about others. What is culture? Show of hands, how many of you feel educated on and/or connected to your own culture/where you come from? GUIDE NOTE: Culture sharing is a simple tool for acknowledging cultural diversity and allowing people to share about their culture and learn about others. For mainstream people (white people in the US, for example), it may be a challenge to identify “my culture” -- stay with people and give them support -- this tool is not about right or wrong, it’s about exploration. Whether you raised your hand or not is fine, this conversation is not about right or wrong…it’s about exploration. We are now going to do a quick activity to delve deeper into this conversation and you will be using your journals again to get started. In your journals, I want you to write Cultural Exploration in the next available space in your journal and then to write “My Culture” underneath that. Once you do that, I want you to take time to write down 3 things that you are proud about from you culture and 1 thing that concerns you. You can write proud and concern near each statement, as well. You will have 5 minutes to complete this work in your journal. You may begin. Following the 5 or so minutes, invite participants to pair up with someone new and ask them to spend the next 10 minutes sharing their journal work with their partner. The prompts are: • Why did you put these items on your list? • Where these items included on your “Who Am I” entry? Why? Why Not? Each participant will have equal time to share and the full 10 minutes needs to be used. Once the 10 minutes is over, transition into a group discussion.

Discussion Questions (15) • • • • • • •

What did we just do over the last two activities? What did you learn about you each other during your conversation? What did you learn about culture (as a concept) during your conversation? How do we usually describe a culture? What are things that make up culture? What do we think know about the culture of the community we’re in right now (New Orleans)? What do you think will be the extent of cultural shock you experience while you’re here? What is the difference between cultural service immersion and a vacation?

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StartingCthe JE ourney :: Day One ultural

xploration

Cultural Assumptions (15)

So we may not know about a lot of the culture here in New Orleans or we may even come into this conversation with some assumptions, but that’s okay. That is why we are here…to explore and better understand this culture. Through understanding you are best able to serve. Servant leadership is understanding the needs, culture, and context of those you are working with and acting in a way that serves their interests best, not your own, and this can only come through cultural understanding. Ask participants to again find the next available space in their journal, under Cultural Exploration then to write “New Orleans” in that space and give the following instructions: We are going to have a discussion about culture. Please use the journal to make notes of things that resonate with you and that you identify with. You are going to create two parallel columns. In the first column, write “I assume”. In the second column write “Personal Relevance”. You can take notes within these columns. What are some things that we assume the culture of New Orleans to be like? Invite participants to come up with ideas as a group and make notes in their journals. Come up with at least 10 descriptions total. This should help to create community in sharing similar assumptions, but also gives an opportunity to point out how we view things differently as well. How are these things different from the culture you identify with? Invite participants to share aloud in context of their personal culture. Encourage participants to make notes in journal. Take 3-5 additional minutes to write in journals privately about how culture differences exist individually. Once 10 minutes have passed, invite students to have a 10 minute break and share with them that we’ll be spending the next portion of the evening learning about New Orleans, it’s culture, and exploring our assumptions we just identified.

DISMISS FOR 10-MINUTE BREAK

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S::tarting the Journey C Day onclusion

Time: 40 minutes

One

Outcomes/Intentions: • To create community commitments • To discuss why we are here • To introduce the evening reflection experience Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals

Community Commitments (10)

As we close out our experience, we want you to turn to the next free page in your journal. We are going to spend the next 10 minutes developing our community commitments for the week. These commitments we are making to each other and to the community here in New Orleans. I am going to start us off with the first one and then ask us to collectively come up with at least 10. You are expected to write each down in your journal in your Community Commitments area: Guide should start with: “I will respect my fellow participants at all times” and briefly, in one sentence, share why. This should set the tone for the additional commitments. Suggested commitments are: • I will respect the staff and volunteers who we are partnering with our partner agencies. • I will respect the citizens and culture of New Orleans and strive to learn more about the community and the people here. • I will be open to change, new ideas, and perspectives. • I will stretch myself out of my comfort zone. • I will be open and honest with my fellow participants. • I will be on time throughout the entire experience. • I will ask questions of and expect questions from my participants. Are there any additional Community Commitments we need to add to this list? Allow time for answers, and reframe if necessary. Thank participants for their additions, and remind them to hold each other accountable to these commitments throughout the week.

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Starting the JCourney :: Day One onclusion

Group Discussion: Why Are We Here (10 minutes)

Earlier in the evening, we asked the question “why are we here?” but we never really spent time talking about it as a group and we want to end our evening doing just that. Ask participants to stay all-in for the discussion and share that this long day will be coming to a close very soon. Discussion Questions • As a group, why are we collectively here? • As individuals, why do you think you are here? • What does it mean that you are here as members of fraternities/sororities? • Is this experience something that matters? How can you tell when something matters or doesn’t? • What are your predictions for the week? Where will be at the end of this Journey? What will we have accomplished? Closing Thoughts • For us to be the most successful during this experience, we must be all-in. • We also must be here to support and challenge each other during the inevitable ups and downs of our time together. • Finally, we need to remember why were are here and use that as the foundation of everything we do. Thank participants for the discussion and transition to the closing of the day and evening reflection.

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S::tarting the Journey C Day onclusion

Group Discussion: Closing the Day (20)

One

Today has been a long day and you’re going to need rest, so we suggest that going to sleep be a priority tonight. Breakfast will be opening starting at ____________. We will need to ready to depart at _____________ tomorrow. Please make sure you have you need for tomorrow – we are doing outdoor tours and community work, so you’ll want appropriate clothes for that. Water bottles and sunscreen are also suggested. We also need to prepare our lunches for the day tonight, so once we are done with our activities please return to the space to take care of that. Share any additional reminders, relevant to the experience. To close out of day today, we are going to introduce the process that we’ll use to close every day of the Journey. First, I need your help to recap the entire day…what did we do today? What did we talk about it? • Make sure that all aspects of the day are covered in this recap. If the participants miss something, you have to be able to make sure to catch it and share. Now that we’ve re-capped the day today, I want you each to individually reflect on the day in your journals. Find your next blank page and write Day 1 Reflection on the top of it. I want each of you to spread out around the house and spend at least 10 minutes quietly reflecting on your day. Things to consider as you write: • What happened to me today? • What happened to our group today? • What did I learn today? About myself? About Others? About the Community? • What predictions do I have for tomorrow? For this experience? Remind participants that their journals will be the only tangible items they take away from this trip, so the value you of it and the reflection being done are critical to the experience. There will be no more group activities following you logistics needs so people are free to disperse, to reflect, and to end the evening at their preference.

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The Journey Continues P :: Day Two rivilege

Time: 80 minutes

Outcomes/Intentions: • Provide the opportunity to identify their own personal privilege • Provide the opportunity to consider the inequalities that others may face • Discuss the topic of privilege, its personal impact, and its relation to the culture in which they’re immersed • Reflection on the day’s experience Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Copies of Privilege Inventory (pages 22 &23) • Participant Journals • Markers

Community Build Recap (10)

Following dinner, bring the group back together to start the evening discussion and reflection. Ask participants to reflect on their day in this group discussion. • For each of you, what was the highlight of the day? • What did you learn about the culture in New Orleans? Thank participants for being all-in today and transition into the next activity.

Privilege Inventory and Sacrifice Discussion (15)

This discussion is designed to explore privileges enjoyed by those whose social identity resides with being a college student in the United States or Canada. This exercise is not meant to make anyone feel bad, but do not shy away from conversations about guilt and shame, in fact, welcome them…as they will lead to increased developmental opportunities. Distribute an inventory to each participant and ask them to complete the inventory in silence. Instructions • Allow a total of 10 minutes for participants to complete this. • Participants should provide their “gut reaction” to the prompts provided and not spend too much time debating the answer. • Once they complete the inventory, either read aloud or personally completed on paper, have participants reflect on their answers in silence and ask them to consider how their lives have been impacted by the opportunities they had/ not had. • Once all participants have finished, share that we will engage in a group discussion on what was just done.

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T::he J ourney Continues P Day Two rivilege

Group Discussion Questions (20) • • • • • • •

What was going through your mind as you completed this activity? Were you uncomfortable at any point? Why? Why Not? Did anything surprise you, as you did this? Do you feel like you are a privileged person? Why? Why Not? Is there a difference between material privilege and cultural privilege? Why do you think we would do something like this during The Journey? How has our experience thus far impacted your thoughts about the activity?

Invite participants to share any final thoughts on the impact of this activity. Facilitator should work to help participants process the notions of shame and guilt that may emerge and encourage them to embrace the discomfort that may arise from this exercise as a positive sign of growth and movement toward understanding and applying culture in an ethnorelative world as opposed to an ethno-centric world. Affirm their work. Invite participants to share any final thoughts on the impact of this activity. Thank them for their contribution and share with them that we’ll revisit this conversation again in a few days. Transition into the Suitcase Activity; the final group activity of the evening.

Suitcase Activity (5 minutes)

The Guide should retrieve his/her empty suitcase and pull into the center of the group. Ask participants to close their eyes and imagine that they are now members of this community/this culture. Ask the participants to return to their sleeping areas and select an item that they, as members of this community, can live without for the rest of the week and bring that item back to the general room. As they return with their items, share that they will be kept in this suitcase for the rest of the week. Students will likely have questions about this exercise, especially as we do it for the first time tonight. Keep instructions brief on the front end, and then allow for processing/questions when the students return to the common space with their item.

Suitcase Group Discussion Questions (15) • • • • •

What is the item you decided to give up and how did you reach your decision? How is this sacrifice for you? In considering yourself a member of this community/culture, how did this impact your decision? What will living without this item look like for you? Could you live without this item beyond this week? Why? Why Not?

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The Journey Continues P :: Day Two rivilege

Closing Thoughts • For us to fully immerse in this culture, we need put ourselves in the shoes of those in this culture would…for us, this will require sacrifice. • Part of the giving-process is people understanding what we have and what we are able to give up as part of that process. Share any other final thoughts, invite participants to share any final thoughts, and/or ask any final question. Thank them for making this initial sacrifice. Transition into final instructions for the evening.

Closing the Day (15)

The final activity of the evening will be to spend timing doing personal reflection in their journals. Reinforce the importance of this reflection, related to the overall long-term impact of the experience. Prior to offering the reflection prompts, share final logistics information for the following day: Breakfast will start at _________________. We will depart for the work site at _______________. Please be prepared with whatever you need – appropriate clothing/shoes, water bottles, sunscreen, etc. Also, we will have to prepare our lunches for tomorrow tonight. So please plan to reconvene following your reflection. Any final safety/health instructions. Find your next blank page and write Day 2 Reflection on the top of it. I want each of you to spread out around the house and spend at least 10 minutes quietly reflecting on your day. If you don’t use the full 10 minutes, you need to remain silent as others continue their reflection. GUIDE NOTE: Feel free to conduct a quick day-recap conversation, as needed. Things to consider as you write: • In what ways were you taken out of your comfort zone? • What did you learn about the culture today? • What did you learn from the culture today? • What did you learn about yourself today? • What impact has the entire experience (day and night) had on you personally? • What strengths did you use today and how/why? How could you have used your other strengths today and how/why? Organically allow the group to come back together at the end of the 10 minutes. Allow for social time or encourage sleep (depending on time).

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Privilege Inventory

Privilege Inventory

YES

NO [STATEMENT] Is your primary ethnic identity American? Did your ancestors come to America by choice? Did one or more parents attend college? Do you describe your family as middle to upper class? Did your family own the house you grew up in? Did you attend summer camp as a youth? Did you have your own room growing up? Did you attend museums, professional sporting events, etc. as you grew up? Did you have a cell phone before you turned 18? Did you attend a private high school? Did you need to have a job in high school? Do you need to have a job while in college? Do your parents (or a trust) pay for your college tuition? Are you in a social fraternity? Do you parents (or a trust) pay for your auxiliary college activities (ex. fraternity dues)? Are you able to buy personal items based on designer/label? Do you have a car? Was this car purchased for you? Do you believe people similar to you are portrayed positively in society? Do people assume you are privileged because of your nationality? Were you told growing up that you could be anything you wanted to be?

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YES

NO [STATEMENT] Have you done community service for people/communities in need? Have you always had the ability to buy what you need? Are you able to put money into savings? Have you left the city/town in which you were born prior to this trip? Do you have access to transportation? Do you have running water in your home? Do you have central air/heating in your home? Do you have access to basic medical treatment? Do you have access to legal advice? Have you always had access to formal education? Do you have professional goals? Do you know when your next meal will be? Have you always known where you would sleep at night? Do you change your clothes every day? Do you wear shoes every day? When there is inclement weather, are your home and possessions protected? Are you generally been to avoid dangerous places? Are you able to avoid direct violence against you or your family? Have you met everyone in your immediate family? Do you expect to live beyond 40 years old? Do you expect to live beyond 60 years old? Have you ever experienced guilt associated with what you have?

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T::he J ourney Continues D P Day Three ifferences of

eople

Time: 60 minutes Outcomes/Intentions: • Discussion on the people of the community • Discussion on the acceptance of difference • Reflection on the day’s experience Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals

Community Build Recap (10)

Following dinner, bring the group back together to start the evening discussion and reflection. Ask participants to reflect on their day in this group discussion. • For each of you, what was the highlight of the day? • What did you learn about the culture in New Orleans? • Are we on a service trip or an immersion trip? Why? Thank participants for their hard work serving the community and share with them that tonight will be a lighter night; one where we will just be chatting as a group.

Group Discussion Questions (30)

Tonight we are going to spend time talking about the people; those in this community and people in a more global sense. • What have you learned about the people in this community thus far? • What have you learned from the people in this community? • How would you describe the perspective of people in this community? • What are the differences between the people in this culture and the people in our home culture? • What do you think the differences are between we may view the world and how this culture may view it? • How hard do you think it is for the people in this culture? • How do you think the people in this community perceive us being here this week? • What implications might that have on our experience? • Let’s close the discussion on difference. Is it okay that there are differences between our two cultures? Why? Why Not? • Why is the acceptance of difference so important? Put another way, why is important for us not to impose our culture on another and vice versa?

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The Journey C ontinues P :: Day Three D ifferences of

eople

GUIDE NOTE: If you hear responses throughout the conversation related to how “WE” could make this culture better and/ or how hard it must be for people in this culture, you are on the right track. Closing Thoughts • Appreciating difference is what allows us to connect with others outside of our own culture. • Understanding this fact, also allows us to be introspective and think about our place in the experience and what we can bring to this community. • Understanding difference, and allowing it to connect us with others outside of our own culture also opens us up to learning about and from others. This understanding empowers true service – taking steps to understand and work to make things better in the interest of and from the perspective of those people you are serving, not from your own cultural understanding and perspective. Share any other final thoughts, invite participants to share any final thoughts, and/or ask any final question. Thank them for having such an honest conversation. Transition into final instructions for the evening.

Closing the Day (20)

The final activity of the evening will be to spend timing doing personal reflection in their journals. Reinforce the importance of this reflection, related to the overall long-term impact of the experience. Prior to offering the reflection prompts, share final logistics information for the following day: Breakfast will start at 6:30am. We will depart for the work site at 7:15am. Please be prepared with whatever you need – appropriate clothing/ shoes, water bottles, sunscreen, etc. Also, we will have to prepare our lunches for tomorrow tonight. So please plan to reconvene following your reflection. Any final safety/health instructions.

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T::he J ourney Continues D P Day Three ifferences of

eople

Find your next blank page and write Day 3 Reflection on the top of it. I want each of you to spread out around the house and spend at least 15 minutes quietly reflecting on your day. If you don’t use the full 15 minutes, you need to remain silent as others continue their reflection. GUIDE NOTE: Feel free to conduct a quick day-recap conversation, as needed. Things to consider as you write: • What did you learn about the culture today? • What did you learn from the culture today? • What did you learn about yourself today? • What did you learn about people today? • What did you learn about difference today? • What impact has the entire experience (day and night) had on you personally? • What is your goal for tomorrow? Organically allow the group to come back together at the end of the 15 minutes. Allow for social time or encourage sleep (depending on time).

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The Journey Continues P :: Day Four rivilege

Time: 70 minutes

Outcomes/Intentions: • Provide the opportunity to identify personal privilege • Provide the opportunity to consider the inequalities others may face • Discuss the topic of privilege, its personal impact, and how one might start to live differently • Reflection on the day’s experience Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals

Community Build Recap (10)

Following dinner, bring the group together to start the evening discussion and reflection. Ask participants to reflect on their day in this group discussion. • What was the highlight of the day? • What did you learn from the people today? • Do you feel good about the work you did today? • How will you turn those good feelings outward toward others rather than making it about us? Thank participants for their hard work in the community and transition into the next activity.

Privilege Discussion (20)

We are going to revisit the conversation on privilege. It is important to know that this is not meant to make anyone feel bad, but it is important to share how you are feeling – including any feelings of guilt or shame – as that is where the growth toward ethno-relational perspective occurs. A few nights ago, we talked about privilege and after spending more time in the community today, I want to take an opportunity process that further. • What kind of privilege are you more aware of today than you were the first time we discussed this? • Were you uncomfortable at any point of your service so far? Why? Why Not? • Do you feel more like you are a privileged person than you did before? Why? Why Not? • Does privilege equal a happier life? Why? Why Not? • Being underprivileged is a matter of perspective. Have you noticed that the members of this community have a negative disposition? Why don’t they? • Why is the general impression that the more you have, the happier you are? • Do the people in this community need our charity? Truly need it? • What are you thinking, about yourself, in this moment?

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T::he J ourney Continues P Day Four rivilege

GUIDE NOTE: If participants do share feelings of guilt; if they become challenged or frustrated; if they understand that happiness has nothing to do with privilege; …you’re on the right track. Invite participants to share any final thoughts about how they might now be different, as a result of this activity.

Thank them for their contribution in this tough conversation. Reiterate this is not meant to make anyone feel bad, but that if they feel challenged and introspective right now, that is a good thing.

Suitcase Activity (5)

The Guide should retrieve his/her empty suitcase and pull into the center of the group. Share with participants that are, even more-so now, considered members of this community/this culture (New Orleans) Ask the participants to return to their sleeping areas and select an additional item that they, as members of this community, can live without for the rest of the week and bring that item back to the general room. As they return with their items, share that they will be kept in this suitcase for the rest of the week. Keep instructions brief on the front end, and then allow for processing/questions when the students return to the common space with their item.

Suitcase Group Discussion Questions (15) • • • •

What is the item you decided to give up and how did you reach your decision? How is this sacrifice for you? Could you live without this item beyond this week? Why? Why Not? What else could you live without in your life?

Closing Thoughts: • The point of this experience is not to make you feel bad about what you have; rather it is a challenge for you to think about what is important and what makes happiness. • We also need to stop feeling sorry for people/communities who have different experiences than us. This holds us back from fully understanding and appreciating the culture we are in. Share any other final thoughts, invite participants to share any final thoughts, and/or ask any final question. Thank them again for making this sacrifice. Transition into final instructions for the evening.

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The Journey Continues P :: Day Four rivilege

Closing the Day (20)

The final activity of the evening will be to spend timing doing personal reflection in their journals. Reinforce the importance of this reflection, related to the overall long-term impact of the experience. Prior to offering the reflection prompts, share final logistics information for the following day: Breakfast will start at ________________. We will depart for the work site at ____________. Please be prepared with whatever you need – appropriate clothing/shoes, water bottles, sunscreen, etc. Also, we will have to prepare our lunches for tomorrow tonight. So please plan to reconvene following your reflection. Any final safety/health instructions. . As we close out the evening, find your next blank page and write Day 4 Reflection on the top of it. I want each of you to spread out around the house and spend at least 15 minutes quietly reflecting on your day. If you don’t use the full 15 minutes, you need to remain silent as others continue their reflection. GUIDE NOTE: Feel free to conduct a quick day-recap conversation, as needed. Things to consider as you write: • What did you learn from the culture today? • What have you learned about yourself? • How are you already different, as a result of this experience? • What impact has the entire experience (day and night) had on you personally? • What strengths did you use today and how/why? What strengths did you notice in others? Organically allow the group to come back together at the end of the 15 minutes. Allow for social time or encourage sleep (depending on time).

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T::he J ourney Continues W M ? Day Five hat

atters

Time: 95 minutes

Outcomes/Intentions: • Discussion on the impact of our work thus far • Discussion on “things that matter” • Reflection on the day’s experience Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals

Community Build Recap (10)

Following dinner, bring the group together to start the evening discussion and reflection. Ask participants to reflect on their day in this group discussion. • For each of you, what was the highlight of the day? • How did today differ from our work days in terms of understanding the culture? • How have we done so far? Thank participants for another successful immersion into the community and share that tonight will be a lighter night; one where we will just have a group discussion for the next hour or so.

Group Discussion Questions (60)

Tonight we are going to spend time talking about the impact we’re making this week. • What type of impact have we made on the community this week? • How does this make you feel, personally? Put another way, what type of impact has this experience had on you thus far? • What is the value of making a positive impact in the world? • Is making a positive impact on someone/something a priority for you/your peers? Why? Why Not? • Social Entrepreneurship (identifying and solving social problems) is an emerging trend amongst college students, why do you think that is?

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The Journey CW ontinues M ? :: Day Five hat

atters

GUIDE NOTE: Social entrepreneurship is about identifying and solving social problems (ex. education, the environment, poverty, etc.). Unlike traditional business entrepreneurs, social entrepreneurs primarily seek to generate “social value” rather than profits. And, unlike the majority of non-profit organizations, their work is targeted not only toward immediate, small-scale effects, but sweeping, long-term change. The job of a social entrepreneur is to recognize when a part of society is stuck and to provide new ways to get it unstuck. He or she finds what is not working and solves the problem by changing the system, spreading the solution, and persuading entire societies to take new leaps. “Social entrepreneurs identify resources where people only see problems. They view the villagers as the solution, not the passive beneficiary. They begin with the assumption of competence and unleash resources in the communities they’re serving.” -David Bornstein, author of How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas

• Who are some of today’s most important social entrepreneurs? GUIDE NOTE: Look for someone to mention Blake from TOMS. If no one does, please mention it and give a brief overview of the TOMS story. • I’m glad TOMS came up, their Founder, Blake, wrote a book entitled “Start Something that Matters”. Has anyone read it? If not, the concept is simple….he encourages people to go out into the world, have a positive impact, and do/start something that matters. • Has our experience “mattered” this week? How so? • What are the things that in your lives back home that matter to you? • How does “doing what matters” connect to the fraternity experience? • How can you sustain the feelings of this trip throughout your day-to-day life…without taking trips to New Orleans each month, as an example? GUIDE NOTE: The conversation should not be a debate about whether or not success in social entrepreneurship is a realistic; rather it should be centered on its intrinsic value…the society AND to the individual. Closing Thoughts: • Think about how this week has made you feel thus far. Wouldn’t it be nice to sustain those feelings beyond this week? • People in your shoes can ultimately be the ones who change the world, if we can expand our lens to think about how we can make an impact. • We are in a much better position to start/do something that matters, when we start focusing on things that matter…and stop focusing on things that don’t. • How can your strengths be best utilized to start/do something that matters? Invite participants to share any final thoughts or ask any final questions and thank them for having such an honest conversation.

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T::he J ourney Continues W M ? Day Five hat

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Passion Projects (40)

We are going to spend the remaining time tonight a little differently than in previous nights. Our work continues in our travel journals, as a continuation of the conversation we just had. Almost everyone has a passion for something, but sometimes we have trouble saying what it is. It’s surprisingly easy to lose touch with these passions – sometimes because we get distracted and sometimes because no one ever asks about our passions. That’s why it’s so important that you first find a way to articulate your passion. By connecting to your passion and executing it in a meaningful way, you truly committing to something that matters. For the next 15 minutes, we want you to journal about the following four questions. Go ahead and write these down before you find another place to write: • If you did not have to worry about money, what would you do with your time? Why? • What kind of work would you want to do? Why? • What cause would you serve? Why? • How can your fraternal values help you make this a reality? Once you answer these questions, you’ll have a good idea of what your passion is. Take your time – you might want to let the questions sit with you for a moment before you can answer them truly. Once the 15 minutes is complete, I want you to come back to the space for further instruction. Following the 15 minutes, as the group reconvenes, ask each participant to identify (to themselves) one emerging idea from the responses they just created. Once everyone has identified this emerging idea/concept, share with participants that this is now their “passion project”. On the next available page, the participants should re-word their passion project on the top of the page as they see fit. This will serve as the title of their passion project, which they will spend the rest of their time this evening working on. Now that you have figured out what your passion is, you have the core of your story and the beginning of your project. For the next 20 minutes, we want you to start developing that story; the story behind you and your passion project. Imagine that you are starting your passion project as an organization, business, or movement… how would you describe it? How would you describe why you’re doing? How would you describe your personal connection to it? How are your strengths a part of it? The final thing that you should know is that tomorrow night, as part of our last night together, you are going to share your story with the group and the group will be asked to offer questions and support to you, your story, and your passion project. Any questions before you begin your work? After 20 minutes, invite the group back together to process this experience.

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The Journey CW ontinues M ? :: Day Five hat

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Group Discussion Questions (15)

• How are you feeling about the story you’ve just created? • How does all of this connect to the experience we’re having here in New Orleans? • Why do you think me made this project a focus of our experience?

Closing Thoughts • Humans rely on stories for understanding, making sense of, remembering, and connecting to ideas. • When you have a memorable story about who you are and what your passion is, your success no longer depends on how experienced you are or who you know. • Your story becomes who you are and what you’re about; it clarifies for people your identity. • Your story is how you connect to other people. If you genuinely love your story, you will love sharing it with others, as well. • What if we started using fraternal values as a catalyst to change the/our world?

Closing the Day (15)

The final activity of the evening will be to spend timing doing personal reflection in their journals. Reinforce the importance of this reflection, related to the overall long-term impact of the experience. Prior to offering the reflection prompts, share final logistics information for the following day: Breakfast will start at _______________ am. We will depart for a special cultural immersion experience at _____________ am. Please be prepared with whatever you need – appropriate clothing/shoes, water bottles, sunscreen, a bit of spending money, etc. Any final safety/health instructions. Find your next blank page and write Day 5 Reflection on the top of it. I want each of you to spread out around the house and spend at least 10 minutes quietly reflecting on your day. If you don’t use the full 10 minutes, you need to remain silent as others continue their reflection. GUIDE NOTE: Feel free to conduct a quick day-recap conversation, as needed. Things to consider as you write: • Reflections from all the experiences of the day. • What were our community interactions today? • What are the things in your world that matter? • Identify five societal needs that are not being met in your world, however you define it. • What could you do to spend more time on these things? • What impact has today’s experience (day and night) had on you personally? • How did you use your strengths today? How could you have used them better? Organically allow the group to come back together at the end of the 15 minutes. Allow for social time or encourage sleep (depending on time).

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T::he J ourney Continues S T M Day omething

hat

atters

Time: 135 minutes

Six

Outcomes/Intentions: • Presentation of participant “purpose projects” • Discussion of next steps • Bringing closure to the experience Environment: • Group Discussion Tools: • Participant Journals

Passion Project Presentations (30 min)

Following dinner, bring the group back together and allow them a final opportunity to refine their passion projects. We will spend the first part of the evening sharing our individual passion projects in groups of 4, but we want to give you a quick 5 minute block to do any final work on it. If you need the time, take it. If you feel set, then feel free to relax. Following the 5 minutes, invite participants back to the group to start the program. Here are the instructions for this component: • Each participant has 5 minutes to share their story. • GUIDE: You must track time throughout the program. • Groups can be randomly selected or participants can self-select. • Following each participant sharing in-group, there should be the opportunity to ask a question or give affirmation. Let’s go ahead and get in groups to begin. Following the presentations, begin a group discussion on fraternal values…

Group Discussion Questions (30 minutes)

• Reactions to what you heard tonight… • What does it mean that we’re here together, having this experience as members of fraternal organizations? • How can the fraternity experience help us in achieving our passion projects and in positively impacting the world? • Let’s also reflect on the values of our organization. How have these values prepared you to achieve great things? How can they be the foundation of things you want to achieve? • How does the concept of doing/starting something that matters intersect with the fraternity experience? How can they be one in the same?

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The Journey C ontinues Day Six S T M :: omething

hat

atters

Closing Thoughts • We intentionally tried to limit our conversations about day-to-day fraternity during this experience, because that isn’t what this is about. • This journey was not about trying to create the best chapter president or the best chapter, it was about something much more. • What we want most is for fraternity members to use an experience like this to positively impact their world, however they define it. • Fraternity/Sorority members should be the ones who make our world better and that, is that this is about. Invite participants to share any final thoughts or ask any final question and thank them for having such an honest conversation. Transition now into the next activity…

Pass the Journal (45)

As we begin to bring our time together to a close, we wanted to give you an opportunity to share your thoughts with your fellow participants. The instructions are as follows: • On the back 5 pages of your journal, your fellow participants will share a brief note of support or inspiration with you related to our experience and/or your passion project. • We will start by everyone passing their journal one person to the left and create a rotating process of providing feedback. • At the end of this activity, you should receive your journal back with a note from every participant. • Participants should wait until their return travels to read the notes from their peers. GUIDE NOTE: This is a casual activity, so conversation is encouraged but make sure people are focusing on the notes in the interest of time. You have to make sure this is done within 60 min though. If not everyone gets a chance, tell them that there will be time at the conclusion of tonight’s discussion. Invite participants to the final discussion of the experience…

Recapping the Journey (25)

Following the activity, bring the group back together to start the evening discussion and reflection. Ask participants to reflect on the entire experience in this group discussion. • For each of you, what was the highlight of the experience? • How has this experience changed you, for the better? • What will you do to sustain this change, when you return home? Facilitator should share a closing message of inspiration or support to the group. Thank participants for the conversation and for their efforts throughout the entire experience.

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T::he J ourney Continues S T M Day omething

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Closing the Day (15)

Six

The final activity of the evening will be to spend timing doing personal reflection in their journals. Reinforce the importance of this reflection, related to the overall long-term impact of the experience. Prior to offering the reflection prompts, share final logistics information for the following day: Breakfast will start at ______________ am. We will depart the airport at ___________ am. You need to back tonight and be ready to go immediately after breakfast. Some of you may even want to shower tonight to avoid the rush in the morning. Find your next blank page and write Final Reflection on the top of it. I want each of you to spread out around the house and spend at least 10 minutes quietly reflecting on your day. If you don’t use the full 10 minutes, you need to remain silent as others continue their reflection. GUIDE NOTE: Feel free to conduct a quick day-recap conversation, as needed. Things to consider as you write: • What happened during this journey? • Who Am I, as a result of attending this experience? • What is my first, next step? Invite the group to come back together at the end of the 10 minutes for final logistics needs and congratulate participants for finishing this journey and wish them luck as they start their next one.

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Acknowledgements The Journey The following sources were utilized in creating this curriculum:

Bennett, M. J. (1986). Towards ethnorelativism: A development model of intercultural sensitivity. In. R. M. Paige (Ed.), Education for the intercultural experience. Yarmouth, ME: Intercultural Press. Mycoskie, B. (2011). Start something that matters. New York: Random House, Inc. Stultz, W. S. (2002). An explanation of the Bennett model of intercultural sensitivity. The Journal of Student Affairs. 11, 8292.

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Service Immersion Facilitator Guide