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Flower Markets Around the World

Behind the Scenes at Philly

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Welcome Spring!


Extraordinary Craftsmanship, Graceful Design and Lasting Beauty

CHADWICK 6’ 877 866 3331 www.oxfordgarden.com


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In Every Issue

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Letter from the Editors Contributors

shop 16 18 22

Garden Benches Style Yourself‌ Style Your Garden Aha! Modern Living

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found 24 Seed Catalogs 28 Handmade Garden Projects 32 Decked Out 36 Trendspotting in Philadelphia 38 Rocky In Philadelphia 42 Our Favorite Blogger

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root

go

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James Rose

50 Austin 54 Flower Markets around the World

flavor

62 Indulgences 64 A Year of Growing My Christmas Dinner

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In Every Issue good

67

mood

Hudson Valley Seed Library

68 Bollywood

plant

70 Chaenomeles x speciosa

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flower

72 Bring Spring Inside

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Chain Reaction

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Night Sky

build fun

features

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90 Awakenings 98 Thinking Veddw 110 The Bark Garden 118 La Oriental 130 An Artist’s Garden in Los Angeles

pick

140 Landscape Architects Pick their Favorites On the cover Cover No. 1 A contemporary garden featured in Build in this issue Photograph by Garden World Images Cover No. 2 Inside the greenhouse at Veddw. Photograph by Charles Hawes.

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In good company. The original Smith & Hawken teak collection. Now exclusively at Target.com.


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Co-Founder & Editor

Co-Founder & Editor

Susan Cohan

Rochelle Greayer

scohan@leafmag.com

rgreayer@leafmag.com

Art Director

Marti Golon mgolon@me.com

Managing Editor

Lynn Felici-Gallant lfelici-gallant@leafmag.com

Advisory Board

Diane Turner Charles Sennott Jean Ann Van Krevelen Gina Ashe General Advertising Inquiries advertising@leafmag.com

Leafmag.com ŠCopyright 2012 Leaf Magazine LLC

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letters

From the Editors

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pring seems to hold our hopes and dreams for the future. Publishing a magazine is an evolutionary process, but unlike the gardens I create as a landscape designer, I get to revisit, refine, and rethink ideas with each new issue. The experience I have from years as a designer helps to make Leaf’s viewpoint more authoritative. I’m not an editor by trade; I don’t view things from that perspective. This spring issue has takeaways for everyone. We take design outside very seriously and understand that it doesn’t have to be out of reach for anyone. We know international ideas and regional identities are mixing with individual interpretations creating a renaissance of new ideas in every area of our lives outside. As for my hopes and dreams for the future? I have many more than these pages can contain, but for now, I hope that you like what you see in Leaf, share it with everyone you know, and let us know too!

Susan Cohan

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new project has an inevitable mystery about where it will ultimately lead. Nothing could be truer of this adventure called Leaf magazine. When we set out late last spring (I can’t believe that it has been just about a year already since this idea grew legs and started running), we worked hard to spread the word and find readers. We hoped that once you found us you would appreciate the vision that we put forward, but neither of us expected that (at the time of writing this) 80,000 of you would have read this magazine to date! We have been astounded by the rapid growth in readership and we are excited to share this latest edition as well look to continue to live out this journey. This spring we have travelled all around the world to bring you inspiration and ideas. As new things sprout and grow all around us, we appreciate the growth that you have encouraged in us and we hope you enjoy this issue.

Rochelle Greayer


alison abbott is a design consultant and lifestyle blogger for Green With Renvy. Her collection of home accessories is sourced from markets around the world, and includes antique textiles and trims, floral design, and all things artisan.

Jim Charlier is president of Garden Walk Buffalo (the largest garden tour in America), and co-founder of the National Garden Festival in western New York. He is considered one of the country’s leading garden tourism experts.

Gretchen Aubuchon is the founder and editor-inchief of Fashion + Décor which takes styles from the latest fashion runways and pairs them with a match in home decor. Together, fashion and home decor inspire readers to “Style your Home … Style Yourself.” Her site helps readers bring their personal style out of the closet and into every single room of the home.

Rachel De Thample is a London-based food writer and author of the recently acclaimed cookbook, Less Meat More Veg that Mark Bittman hails as “the cookbook for our time”. She is the resident cook for the organic fruit & box delivery company, Abel & Cole.

Warren Bobrow is the food and drink editor of the 501c3 non-profit Wild Table on Wild River Review. He was an Iron Mixology judge at the 2012 Charleston Wine and Food Festival, attended Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans in 2011, and will be covering the $1000-dollar mint julep contest for Vodka Magazine at the Kentucky Derby this year. 10

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Ken Druse is a celebrated lecturer and award-winning photographer and author. He is best known for his books (which The New York Times called “bibles for serious gardeners”). His newest book is Natural Companions: The Garden Lover’s Guide to Plant Combinations. Ken was awarded The Garden Club of America medal for lifetime literary achievement in 2004, and can be heard through his podcast and public radio show, Ken Druse REAL DIRT.

Photo by KC Kratt for Buffalo Spree magazine

contributors


While styles may change, our quality endures.

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Quality fence since 1933

For our 27 locations visit walpolewoodworkers.com or check us out at facebook/walpoleoutdoors


contributors Andrea Fox is rarely without her gardening boots, watering can, and camera. A designer, blogger, and maker of things for the home and garden, Andrea knows that putting down strong roots in the form of a garden is a sure way to find community. She blogs at grow where you’re planted. Delphine Gitterman is a France-based garden design enthusiast. An art director and graphic designer by day, her blog, Paradis Express, shares her love of travel, garden designers, and nature. Charles Hawes has been photographing gardens professionally since 1999. A member of the Garden Media Guild, he photographs gardens and nurseries for magazines and newspapers in the U.K. and mainland Europe. His book, Discovering Welsh Gardens, by Stephen Anderton, was published in 2009.

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Geneve Hoffman documents people during some of the happiest moments of their lives. She believes life is a work of art, and jumps through hoops to preserve those moments for her clients. She invites folks to swing by her Maine studio, where she may show you a photo of her four-year-old (she has a few, you know, lying around). Julie Jacobson bakes as Julie Bakes! for restaurants and private clients in New Jersey. A graduate of Juilliard, she found her bliss as a baker. Julie lives in New Jersey with her husband and three cats, and develops recipes in a kitchen that overlooks woods that were once Washington’s winter encampment. Katrina Kieffer-Wells heads the bespoke garden design company, Earth Designs, in London, England. They specialize in classic, funky, and urban contemporary garden design.


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contributors Sarah Kinbar is a floral designer, writer, and the former editor-in-chief of Garden Design magazine. She lives on Lake Hiawassee in Orlando with her partner Todd and their four children. Her new blog is called Inside the Flower Studio. Shelley Myers is an architect whose passion is helping people find the best solution for their home. She is the proud mom of two boys, enjoys good food and wine, and has an insatiable desire to travel. She is engaged to her soul mate and finds joys in all aspects of life. Clive Nichols has won many awards as a garden and flower photographer, including “Garden Photographer of the Year� by the Garden Writers Guild. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and books. He lectures and runs workshops for the Royal Horticultural Society, and has appeared on British and Japanese television.

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Roanne Robbins is garden and floral designer, mother of a precocious toddler, amateur baker, and moss collector. She loves running from one project to the next, racking up highway miles looking for new plants, but always has time to pick branches and flowers along the way. She is the co-author of Continuous Container Gardens. Anne Wareham is a garden writer and editor of thinkinGardens. She has been campaigning for the past ten years for a renaissance in British gardens. In January 2012, the Telegraph listed her as one of the most influential British gardeners. Her book, The Bad Tempered Gardener, was published in May 2011. Jane Kelly Yandell is an Australian artist and designer, home renovator, gardener, and mother to three lovely children. They, along with two small bunnies and seven chickens, live in Victoria, Australia.


design . innovation . durability marine grade shade equipment

shade experience : made in miami

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shop

Garden Benches

Provence Bench by Summer Classics

Log Bench Faux Bois by George Sacaris Studio

Love Seat by Garden House DĂŠcor

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Lucky Beam Bench by Katch Design Company

Ladderback Three Seater Bench by McKinnon and Harris

Benches are a must for any garden whether a small courtyard or an expansive country landscape‌they offer a place to sit, to read, to linger.

Applaro Bench by Ikea

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shop

Greige Design and Costume National, Spring 2012 “Pink roses are always good in my stylebook. Pink, beige, and white on the runway and outside create a calming, prettyin-pink style that I just adore.”

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Style Your Garden, Style Yourself

by Gretchen Aubuchon

Fashion-inspired design outside? Runways to outdoor décor? Can fashion from the runways offer inspiration for design outside? I believe it can. Just as runways offer inspiration for home décor, fashion runways inspire design outside. Style your home. Style yourself. Home styling belongs indoors and out! Fashion Images Courtesy of imaxtree spring 2012


Image from Mary McDonald, Interiors: The Allure of Style, Rizzoli Books.

Mary McDonald and Oscar de la Renta, Spring 2012 Every one of Oscar de la Renta’s runway creations are simply stunning—so stunning that they need to be in an outdoor living space as well, and Mary McDonald can do just that. Featuring blues and whites, and Asian accents, this Mary McDonald outside design is everything Oscar would dream of.

Runway fashions inspire design outside

Ruthie Sommers and Oscar de la Renta, Spring 2012 Look at the black top of Oscar de la Renta’s gown, and then at the windows of this house. See the green everywhere on the gown and on the house. Observe the sparkly bright shoes next to the sparkle from a single light on the house. This StylePair is fashion and outdoor design at its finest.  LEAF MAGAZINE

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What must-have trends will fill our closets this spring? My guess is florals. Lots and lots of florals—on our dresses, skirts, pants, and shirts. Florals are going to be everywhere this spring; I promise you that. From Giambattista Valli to Diane von Furstenburg and J. Crew, rose-inspired fashions were all over the Spring 2012 readyto-wear runways. Here are a few of my favorite looks with the beautiful rose that may have inspired them.

Mimi Plange Spring 2012 RTW with Rosa Easy Elegance ‘Little Mischief’

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Diane von Furstenberg Spring RTW with Rosa ‘MEIhelvet’ Sonia rose

Badgley Mishka Spring 2012 RTW with Rosa Easy Elegance ‘High Voltage’


Oscar de La Renta Spring 2012 RTW with Rosa bicolor ‘Austrian Copper’

Peter Som, Spring 2012 RTW and Rosa ‘Barbara Streisand’

Nanette Lepore Soring 2012 RTW with Rosa ‘Kiss Me’

Giambattista Valli, Spring 2012 RTW with Rosa Easy Elegance® Sunrise Sunset™

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shop Everyone loved these Modern Solar Lanterns

Aha! Modern Living

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ike Leaf, Jayme Jenkins, the proprietor of the online shop Aha! Modern Living, has a broad definition of outdoor style. The store’s number one mission? To help its patrons to discover their inner gardener even if only through a single potted plant. Specializing in garden and garden-related items, Aha! Modern Living offers contemporary, environmentally responsible, and affordable items with high style that are appealing well beyond the time we take off our muddy boots and sit down to relax inside or out.  SC

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Susan, cofounder/ editor, Hemingway Muddlers

Rochelle, cofounder/ editor, Bodega Birdhouses


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Seed Catalogs

More than a Lesson in Art History By Rochelle greayer

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hat do you do with your seed and trade catalogs after the season? Recycle them? Cut them up for the images? Pass them on to the kids for art projects? I have done all of the above, but I have never considered saving them as part of a historical record. Old trade and seed catalogs are increasingly being used for a variety of research—from the study of graphic design and art styles, to the emergence and decline of industry trends, crop production, seed strains, and gardening and agricultural methods. The Smithsonian Institution Libraries have a collection of approximately 10,000 seed and nursery catalogs dating from 1830 to the present. Other catalog collections are available at Vintage seed Harvard University’s Baker catalogs from the Library and the New York national collection Botanical Society, and at the Smithsonian

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there are many privately held collections as well. Ken Greene of the Hudson Valley Seed Library holds one such private collection, and he has used it to gather a greater understanding of our modern food production system. “Studying the catalogs, it is obvious that at one time [pre-1930], regional crop production varied widely, and the variation in our food supply was much wider than it is today,� says Ken. There was great diversity in crop production, and every state supported local seed suppliers who thrived by offering distinctive and regionally appropriate varieties. Early catalogs were beautifully illustrated documents that celebrated plants and produce for their unique qualities and tied artistic practices closely to the art of gardening. The involvement of government in our seed supply began during World War II, when food rationing and production were extremely important. It was at this time that hybrids where first introduced and, over time, industrial agriculture reduced the variation in our crop production dramatically. Where there were once dozens of seed suppliers in each growing region of the country, today we barely have a dozen in the entire country. Many now sell the same varieties from the same sources. With the proliferation of the Victory Garden movement and the need for food to support the war effort and the population at home, the catalogs of World War II morphed from beautiful and LEAF MAGAZINE

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scientifically detailed documents featuring cultivar descriptions, to the more production-focused photographic versions of the later 20th century. With the Internet and ease of online shopping, fewer seed catalogs are being printed today, and globalization is spreading faster than ever. The up side is that we are using less paper. And through the magic of search engines, we can find a wealth of growing information online, as well as connect with nearby gardeners through social media. The small and specialized seed companies that do exist are championing variety and heirloom seeds and are easier to find and support. Consumers will continue to drive the conversation about food sources, and individual choices will continue to expand the market for diversity and a safe and sustainable food supply. We may not be able to save the tradition of seed catalog documentation completely, but by supporting heirloom seed libraries, specialized seed companies, and local seed libraries, we can help to maintain diversity in the system.

● Resources Seed libraries (check out seeds, use

them to grow plants, and return harvested seeds at the end of the season for next year’s growing) are sprouting up all over the country. Heirloom and sustainable seed suppliers

The Hudson Valley Seed Library Seed Savers Exchange Sustainable Seed Company Ferry Morse Pepper Joe Tomato Fest

Note: If you have old seed catalogs, don’t throw them away! Call the Sustainable Seed Company, your local library, or any of the collectors mentioned in this article. 26

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Handmade Garden Projects

Small gabions topped with bluestone

Reuse a kettle grill base

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andmade Garden Projects by designer and author Lorene Edwards Forkner celebrates do-it-yourself projects in a way that surprisingly hasn’t been seen before. The selfproclaimed high priestess of Urban Hillbilly Chic, Lorene has a way of using materials and objects in a way that transcends mere repurposing. Leaf editors visited her garden last summer, just after she finished the book. We decided to ask her some questions to try and get to the bottom of her eclectic style.

Kettle drum terrarium

Leaf Your personal garden is full of so many divergent ideas, all centered on reinventing existing materials. Did you always have an affinity for found objects and reinventing them? Lorene Almost all of the projects in my book were created and shot here at home; the resulting “Projectland” was really a bit over the top. It’s a constant process and never “done”. But I assure you, found objects and resourceful reinvention will play a leading role.

Leaf You coined the term Urban Hillbilly Chic to describe your style, but it’s really more than that. You have a keen eye for well-edited and deceptively sophisticated design. What are your design influences beyond a love of vintage? Lorene I’m especially drawn to hardworking and durable agricultural materials: feed troughs, wire fencing, rusty bits of old machinery, and industrial scrap. I just can’t get enough of weathered galvanized metal; it just gets better with time, assuming a luminous, silvery patina. Maybe it’s because this LEAF MAGAZINE

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Projects pictured here are described step-by-step in Edwards’s new book

LED touch lights under mason jar lids!

material seems so at home under Seattle’s, uh, silver skies. I’m a real water/ shoreline person; to my thinking, the softly reflective surface of galvanized metal is very evocative of the sea, but at the same time has a very non-sentimental, gritty, urban vibe. Leaf For the past 100 years, there have been artists who take objects and use them to make art—Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, and even Julian Schnabel. Do you consider yourself an artist? Lorene That’s so funny you should mention art. My background is fine 30

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art. I love layered environments. Cornell’s assemblage work was/ is brilliant. It’s storytelling isn’t it? And I love stories. If being an artist means seeing the world beyond the obvious then yes, I would say I’m an artist. A storytelling, objectaccumulating, space-manipulating craftsperson might be more accurate, if somewhat wordy. Leaf What would you suggest to someone who wanted to make a trashto-treasure project of his or her own? Lorene Clean your basement, or your closet, or the junk drawer. Use what’s at hand. Most of us already have raw materials for clever garden structures or embellishments. And don’t forget to have fun. Build a garden for yourself. Photographs courtesy Timber Press


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Decked Out

What materials are right for you? by Shelley Myers

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hat deck material or finish is right for you? What is right for your project? How do you figure out what to do? This guide will help. There are four basic options for decking material—painted fir, hardwood, synthetic material, or treated wood. Within those four options is a second round of decision-influencing options—finish, texture, color, and cost. One might think the latter (cost) would drive the decision, but often costs can be deceiving. For example, some have a higher initial cost, but are much lower maintenance. As a result, we find our-

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selves dealing with several additional considerations—high cost/high maintenance, high cost/low maintenance, low cost/low maintenance, low cost/ high maintenance, and more! So where to begin? What are the options, and what are the factors to evaluate?

Painted Fir

Historically, this is the material of choice for millions of homes all over the United States. While this is often a great choice, there are several considerations. For one, painted fir is best used for covered porches; painted wood will deteriorate faster if not proPhotograph by David Yama; deck design by David Yama and Robert Shepherd


tected from the weather. In addition, the material available today is younger and less dense than the material available 60 to100 years ago. As a result, fir decking today does not have the longevity of decks installed decades ago. That being said, technology has come a long way in developing deck paints and stains that help keep a painted fir porch looking great for years. ● Pros Great option for historic homes or homeowners trying to create an “old time” feel; a great way to introduce color to your exterior structure; moderately expensive. ● Cons Will need to be repainted every 5 to 8 years depending on use; requires an experienced painter to achieve a successful finish.

Hardwoods

Some hardwoods are more readily accessible than others depending on your geographic region. Common options are IPE, teak, redwood, cedar, and walnut. IPE—a Brazilian hardwood—is the newest member of the group. IPE—like teak—will weather to a silvery grey if not maintained. When first installed and sealed, IPE is a rich,

beautiful deep brown. While many clients love its sophisticated look, they also need to know that IPE will need to be re-sealed once a year in order to sustain that look. If not maintained, it will start to change color, which can de-formalize the appearance of the space. IPE is incredibly weather resistant, and can be installed in large, uncovered areas. It rarely splinters, and there are many different installation methods available depending on the application. ● Pros Long-lasting; sophisticated appearance; elegant installation; rich mahogany color when first finished. ● Cons High cost; high maintenance responsibility and cost possible.

Synthetic Decking

Synthetic decking technology has come a long way. While UV-resistance and fading were an issue when synthetic decking first appeared on the market, this problem has largely disappeared. Still, it pays to do product research and make sure the options you are considering have addressed this original flaw. Of all the options, synthetic decking is by far the most debated in the design and construction industry. The biggest concern is the plastic feel and, quite frankly, the fact that it is “fake” wood. There is no doubt that there are applications where this is the best option—docks, decks adjacent to large bodies of water, or in coastal areas where humidity is a factor. So does synthetic decking make LEAF MAGAZINE

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playful teals, pinks, and purples. sense for your porch? It is Stained Pressure Each color is also available in a very personal decision. Treated Wood grades of saturation—from If the application is contranslucent to opaque. These temporary, this can be a stains have revitalized treated fantastic option; synthetlumber as an option that can be ics without a wood grain both weather-resistant and a can make a very streamIpe beautiful extension of one’s lined, high-style impact with Brazilian Hardwood home and personality. an array of thought-provoking colors. If you prefer a more ● Pros Low cost; dutraditional application, there rable long-lasting wood; are convincing wood grains fantastic color options with colors that mimic a hardwith low maintenance Composite wood deck with no maintewhen stain is used. nance requirements. ● Cons Not as long-lasting ● Pros True color; no as hardwoods or synthetmaintenance; the most ics; reputation for being weather-resistance option common. note: By treated on the market; recycled conwood, we are referring to tent available. ACQ-wood that features a Washington ● Cons Material does water-based preservative. Tiles not appeal to everyone.

What’s Right for You?

Treated Wood

Treated wood has long been the go-to choice for a standard deck. There are a lot of great ways to transform this common material into a fantastic design option that may quite possibly be the best option considering aesthetic, cost, and maintenance. New lines of exterior stains have transformed the standard 10 “wood colors” into an array of exciting hues— from sophisticated greys, to

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Garapa

Tigerwood

So where do you land in this decking dilemma? Weigh the options. First, determine what is the main factor driving your decision: is it cost, design aesthetic, or maintenance responsibilities? Prioritize these three key factors, and then rate each category. You will be able to find an installation that works for your home, the way you live, and your budget.


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Trendspotting in Philadelphia The oldest flower show is still inspiring

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ince 1829, the Philadelphia International Flower Show has been inspiring professional and amateur floral and garden designers. Each year trends emerge, and the 2012 show was no exception. This show is different from many others in that it is a flower show rather than a garden show. Largely tropical due to its Hawaiian theme, this year’s trend juxtaposed textures of both plants and materials in unusual ways. Many of these ideas can be interpreted in an outdoor garden. 36

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Gun metal grey Bird of Paradise, Baby Tears (Soleirolia soleirolii) and Protea blossoms make a striking textural display.

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found Rocky in Philadelphia

Landscape designer Michael Petrie built a rock garden for the 2012 Philadelphia International Flower Show

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andscape designer, Michael Petrie of Handmade Gardens, has been creating large scale show gardens for The Philadelphia International Flower Show since 1980. Its show garden are thematic and theatrical set pieces of dramatic lighting and other elements. Each March, legions of professionals and amateurs work to create a rich and varied weeklong event seen by more than 270,000 visitors. The show is just that, a show. It is about theater and entertainment--not about the recreation of reality. Naysayers don’t see the garden value of these indoor, temporary creations full of tricks and artifice. They dismiss them as unrealistic. When describing their entertainment aspect, Petrie says attitudes are changing and that the show itself has embraced its own theatricality. “It’s a show”, he says. Petrie’s flower show display gardens are experimental. He thrives on the challenge as well as the opportunity

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to explore his own creativity. He thoroughly embraces these installations and his goal is to create an emotional response that inspires people to action. The gardens allow him creative latitude that he doesn’t always have when designing gardens for clients. The 2012 theme was “Hawaii: Islands of Aloha” and Petrie created a


garden for the lavish central feature. His vast experience was challenged by the task. Asked by the show’s director to interpret the “Garden of the Gods” on the island of Lanai, Petrie had to dig deep to figure out how to make a garden inspired by Lanai. No lush tropical landscape, the actual Lanaian landscape looks more like Mars than Hawaii. “Garden of the Gods” in Petrie’s interpretation was a rockery that had its roots in the island’s strange landscape, as well as rock follies created by the Victorians. It challenged visitors to think about what a garden is and can be. Before the show, Petrie explained,

“Lanai is high dry desert. There’s no plant material to speak of so we’re going to make a rock garden of pumice stone. There are stacked stone columns, skewered really, and plants will be understated with succulents and conifers in jewel-like vignettes. We can’t really make it feel like Hawaii—we don’t have the sky, air, wind, and water that help give the islands their character, so the focus of the garden is going to be very close to the ground.” When asked about his own experience creating show gardens, Petrie was thoughtful. “Winter is almost over, spring is coming. I’m trying to please myself. If I don’t do something that makes me feel good, hen I’m not in the flower show. I want to be inspired by what I do and I want to inspire other people.”SC

Plan for next year! The 2013 Philadelphia International Flower Show will run from March 3 March 10, 2013. To avoid the crowds, attend early- or mid-week at dinnertime. Hungry? Eat at the Reading Terminal Market across from the convention center. Be sure to get your hand stamped before you leave if you want to return to the show.

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Highlights from Petrie’s Past Philly Shows


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Our Favorite Blogger Delphine @ Paradis Express

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’m French. I’m an art director and I live with a French garden designer and photographer named Lucien. I have an 18-year-old son, 2 cats, and a 35-yearold parrot named Raton. She is a female and she hates women. My German grandfather was mad about greenery but at home, plants were forbidden by his wife because of the dirt so he had a secret garden far away from his home. He often had germinated seeds in his pockets. My family had a huge house, full tropical plants which was like a jungle for me when I was a kid. In the living room, my father

planters

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had 12 parrots, flying free between the Alocasias. I live in a very old house, a ruin, but with a gorgeous garden. Our neighbours would like us to finish restoring the house before creating the garden. But we don’t. We prefer to invest our money in greenery. I collect garden designers! Some people want to be photographed with Johnny Depp or Brad Pitt. I don’t. I would do extravagant things for a photo with Topher Delaney or Piet Oudolf and I’m most proud of a picture with Patrick Blanc (with green hair), creator of the first vertical gardens. Garden design advice?

We must all continue to stay mobilized for the planet and its future. Promote the practices of environmentally friendly gardening in NYC, in Paris, in Mexico, or in Moscow, everywhere in the world. “Un jardin beau, oui, mais un jardin bio” is a French expression that could be compared to “organic is orgasmic.”

Mary Oros is a San Francisco Bay Area sculptor who makes contemporary concrete planters in addition to sculptures. Her “bump planter” is shown plumbed as a fountain, although it could just as easily be planted. All of Oros’s containers are signed and handmade from a proprietary eco-friendly concrete mix that is both lightweight and weather-resistant. They are finished with a colorfast treatment and sealed for outdoor enjoyment.


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root

James Rose (1913-1991)

By susan cohan

J

ames Rose was a mid-century landscape architect who, along with his contemporaries Garrett Eckbo and Dan Kiley, was a pioneer of modernism in landscape design. In 1937 he was expelled from Harvard for refusing to replicate what he considered to be antiquated Beaux Arts ideals in his design work. This rebellion—along with time spent in Japan—ultimately led to a series of dePhotographs courtesy James Rose Center for Landscape Architecture and Design

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“Its neither landscape nor architecture, but both; neither indoors, nor outdoors, but both.” sign experiments, articles, and books that formed the foundation of Rose’s design philosophy. Rose believed that a seamless transition from indoors to outdoors was contemporary and fundamental to the way people lived. He was not content to allow landscape design to be a pastoral element that framed architecture. Starting with a structural framework that was sometimes itself architectural, he created views and transitions that integrated useful living and garden spaces. In essence, he created what we now call outdoor rooms. Rose’s outdoor spaces—unlike some today—are as much a part of the architecture as they are the land they occupy; they are not separate. His experiences and observations while stationed in Japan during WWII greatly influenced his pareddown aesthetic. Rose’s desire to put his ideas into action led him to abandon a successful New York office to form a design/build practice that focused on private residential projects rather than corporate and public spaces. During his career, Rose built the majority of his landscapes near Photographs top and bottom left by Phillip Merrit; bottom center and right by S. Cohan

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The central courtyard at Rose’s Ridgewood, New Jersey home


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Trees in the upstairs hallway blur the lines between inside and out

Us vel exceaqui recae nam, que id ulloribus aut vere cus.Mendae nupta siminum ipic te plabora dolorer

his home in Ridgewood, New Jersey, although there are also examples of his work in California, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, and New York. He used his personal residence in Ridgewood as a design lab, and many of his ideas are evident in the way materials are explored there. He described it as “neither landscape nor architecture, but both; neither indoors, nor outdoors, but both.” One of the earliest landscape architects to embrace sustainable practices, James Rose abhorred waste. He championed the use of simple and 48

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indigenous materials, using them in unexpected ways. Rose’s process was often improvisational. He incorporated objects found on site along with natural elements such as rock outcroppings and boulders. An old door destined for the trash could find new life as a garden bench and a discarded barbeque could become a fountain. In Ridgewood, the synthesis of Rose’s design ideals are apparent—as is his spontaneity. Today, Rose’s home is open to the public as the James Rose Center for Landscape Architecture and Photographs by Phillip Merritt Design.


Map Illustration by Swiss Cottage Design

What to see in Austin By Andrea Fox 1 Sol’stice Gardens 1) Nursery and garden center for people looking to add an artistic flair to their outdoor space. A delightful collection of plants, sculpture, and furniture. Located in Dripping Springs, 30 minutes drive west of Austin.

3 Zilker 3)

Botanical Garden

Austin is a stop on the butterfly migration byway. Zilker is a perfect place to see the travelling butterflies as well as over 30 garden rooms and minigardens. 4 Umlauf 4)

Sculpture Garden

Art framed by nature. View the work of 20th century American sculptor Charles Umlauf and other contemporary sculptors. 2 Lady Bird Johnson 2)

Wildflower Center

The LBJWC is a premier educational resource, outdoor classroom, and research institution for native plants and sustainable landscape practices. A gem of a public garden consisting of 279 acres of gardens, meadows, woodlands, hiking trails, and research plots, all highlighting 650 species of native Texas plants. 50

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5 Sledd Nursery 5) Since 1978 Sledd has been serving its urban neighborhood with garden goods from a converted gas station. 6 Pitchforks & Tablespoons 6) A small garden, related shop next door to the East Side CafĂŠ, which serves excellent food straight from their own garden.


7 Old Empire Imports 7) Furniture—primarily from India—for indoors and covered outdoor spaces. Incorporating a piece or two from OEI will add an instant patina to your outdoor living space. LEAF MAGAZINE

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go

Austin

Not Shown on The Map but Worth a Visit: Barton Springs Nursery

Barton Springs Nursery specializes in native plants adapted to the extreme growing conditions of Central Texas. Shaded by sprawling oak trees, many of their plants are propagated on site. The Natural Gardener

A popular organicfocused garden center with several demonstration gardens, educational events, vegetables, herbs,

annuals, perennials, vines, shrubs, trees, houseplants, pottery, and gifts. Uncommon Objects

If you’re looking for a treasure, you’re bound to find several here. Antiques for indoor and out are arranged by color, subject, and theme into small rooms, filling the entire retail space with objects to covet. Music of the Spheres

Chimes in a variety of musical scales so you can choose the one that sings most sweetly to you.

EATS Tacodeli

In a town that is full of tacos and fantastic food trucks, these are widely regarded as the best.

Barton Springs

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Kolaches

Grown out of a strong Czech community in Austin, Kolaches are freshmade sausage rolls with a variety of local twists. Uchi

Japanese farmhouse dining & sushi restaurant.

Farmers Markets in Austin. Austin Farmers Markets Downtown, Sunset Valley, The Triangle, East Barton Creek Farmers Market Sunshine Community Gardens


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go

Flower Markets Amsterdam, Netherlands

Bloemenmarkt

T

he French phrase for window shopping, “faire du leche-vitrines”, which translates to “licking the windows”, suits walking around and peering into the flower stalls that make up the flower market. Plants, flowers, planters, and of course, the ubiquitous bulbs—as big as footballs or as small as your pinky fingernail—are available in singles, bags, boxes, baskets, cans, and wooden shoes. I was in tickled awe of the tulips, orange and lemon trees, Birds of Paradise, Sensitive plants, peppers, strawberries, cucumbers, daisies, fennel, and even Venus flytraps, all available in cans. It is a floating floral farmers market (the stalls are permanently-anchored barges) and across the way are bars, restaurants, gift shops and, most significantly, basement cheese shops (with delectable, luxurious, local cheeses), making a trip all the more worthwhile.

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Mumbai, India

Dadar Station Market

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he Flower Market has been a part of Sydney’s market tradition since the First Fleet in 1788. The market has moved a number of times to accommodate the growing metropolis. The new locale is a half-hour train trip out of the city, and although it offers an impressive range of flowers and greenery, it is sadly lacking the cosmopolitan vibe of its sister market, “Paddy’s.” If you are not after huge quantities of flowers, Paddy’s at The Haymarket near Central Station has more flair and energy. A wide variety of flowers are grown on local farms within a few hours of the Sydney Markets and fresh cut flowers are brought to the markets from these farms daily.

ndia tends to assault the senses—every one of them—with everything it has to offer. It is a country of contrasts and paradoxes, filled with the best and the worst of the world. Being greeted with a fragrant garland of jasmine—a form of welcome—was just the jolt I needed after the 24 hours of travel to Mumbai. This country commemorates occasions—especially temple celebrations and weddings—with over-the-top displays of flowers. The Dadar Station Market did not disappoint. The heady fragrance and brilliant colors were intoxicating, but the real fascination were the vendors who were busy constructing garlands worn by brides, grooms, temple gods, and politicians. These handcrafted beauties were meticulously strung together like beads onto thread in the most creative combinations.

Jane Kelly Yandell

Alison Abbott

Sydney, Australia

Sydney Flower Market

T

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go

Flower Markets

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Funchal, Madeira

Mercado dos Lavradores

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adeira is called “Island of Flowers” and the whole island is a large garden; the primary forest called Laurisylva is an ocean of greenery, dripping with moss, waterfalls, and tree ferns. The forest has all the shades of indigo, as Agapanthus has invaded and competes for space with huge and generous blue hydrangeas. Tracts of flamboyant and extravagant Crocosmias scatter the landscape. Balconies and terraces are filled

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with bamboo-orchids and huge pots of Cymbidiums. Funchal’s “Mercado dos Lavradores” (the market for workers) is colorful, with its mountains of fruit in the central courtyard. The flower sellers wear the traditional dress of Madeira—a red dress with a lot of colorful banners and a blue hat. They are located on the outskirts of the courtyard, under the arcades, and at the market entry. They sell huge bouquets of Proteas and exotic flowers—Heliconias, Anthuriums, gingembers, Passifloras, and Strelitzias. You can find potted plants too—ferns, Agapanthus, succulents . . . it goes on and on!

Delphine Gitterman


Denpasar, Bali

Pasar Bandung

B

ali means “offering” in Indonesian and this is very important on the island. Each family has its own temple where six to eight daily offerings are made. This takes about 40% of everyone’s time. The Balinese believe that their many ceremonies—with all the flowers offered—increase the sacred energy of their island. Offerings are usually a small basket made with banana or palm leaves that holds gifts of incense, holy water, and flowers, and sometimes other things depending on the season and the occupation and wealth of the giver. Offerings are everywhere—in the rice fields to ensure a good harvest, in the cars and motorcycles for protection from an accident on the road, under the trees near the temples, and in front of each door. The Pasar Bedung in Denpasar is not for tourists (like other markets). It is spread over three levels and straddles

the river and it is the place for Indonesians to buy their offerings. It is very exciting and the place smells of spices and gorgeous flowers. Indian carnations, jasmine, ylang ylang, and frangipani flowers spread their heady scents everywhere.

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Paris, France

Marché aux Fleurs

S

ometimes we live in places without paying them the attention they deserve. The flower market in Paris is one of them. I live within 25 minutes of it, but I had never gone. I assumed it would be denatured by mass tourism and was convinced that no Parisian was buying her flowers there. I was seriously mistaken because it is very authentically Parisian. Established in 1808 in the heart of

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Paris on the Ile de la Cité, this island of greenery is tucked into the Place Louis Lépine, between Notre Dame and the Seine. The market is sheltered by a beautiful metal pavilion and offers a bucolic setting for selling diverse flowers, plants, and shrubs at very reasonable prices (well below what I had expected). Many artists and designers like to dive into this urban Eden in search of inspiration. On Sunday, the picture is completed by a bird market that adds the sounds of happy chirping.

Delphine Gitterman


London, England

New Covent Garden Market

M

y husband and I arranged the flowers for our wedding. Our alarms beeped at 3.30 on the big day. After necking our coffees, we ventured to New Covent Garden Market to be there when it opened at 4 a.m. It was worth it. We had the top pick of a rainbow of flowers—a feast for the eyes and a perfumery for the nose. It’s a stunning place, with such a huge variety of flowers—from the exotic and oversized, to the earthy, homegrown English wild and meadow flowers. It’s the largest flower market in Britain, with so many friendly and surprisingly chipper faces, considering their unsociable working hours. We went for a spread of yellow roses (I’m from Texas) mixed with purple (my favourite colour) English wildflowers. We were there a half an hour, got a taxi to the church, arranged our flowers, and went back to bed for a while, happy that we saved a bundle of money and feeling proud we sourced and arranged them ourselves.

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flavor Do

Indulgences

Coffee and Chocolate!

T

hese two recipes are guaranteed to ward off any chill left in the spring air. Leaf asked cocktail whisperer, Warren Bobrow, to concoct a cocktail with a little caffeine kick. His Panamanian Monsoon is delicious, and includes links to two ingredients from small purveyors of simple syrups and exotic bitters. Since it is spring and burning off calories outside is a given, indulge in something decadent! Master baker Julie Jacobson shares her incredibly easy chocolate raspberry cheesecake recipe.

Photographs by Susan Cohan

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Chocolate Truffle Cheesecake with Raspberries Recipe by Julie Jacobson of Julie Bakes!

Ingredients Crust 1 package Nabisco chocolate wafers ¾ stick of melted unsalted butter Filling 1 12 oz bag of chocolate chips 1 14 oz can of condensed milk 4 8 oz packages of Philadelphia cream cheese at room temperature 4 large eggs 2 tsp good vanilla extract Topping Raspberry jam Fresh raspberries Preparation Preheat oven to 350F. Make the crust first. Spray a 9” springform pan with baking Pam. Line it with a wax paper circle. Spray again. Wrap the entire bottom and outside of the pan with aluminum foil to help prevent leaks later while baking. Grind the chocolate wafers in a food processor or blender. Melt butter and add to the wafers. Press the mix into the bottom of the springform pan. Put crust into the freezer while preparing the filling. In mixer bowl beat cream cheese and

condensed milk on low setting until smooth. Melt chocolate chips over a double boiler or in the microwave. Add melted chocolate and vanilla to the cream cheese mixture, mix on low setting until combined. Add eggs one at a time and mix well. Remove crust from freezer and pour chocolate cream cheese mixture into pan. Bake 60 minutes or until small cracks at the edge of the cake appear. Cool for 3-4 hours. Remove from springform pan and top with raspberry jam and fresh raspberries.

Panamanian Monsoon Recipe by Warren Bobrow

Ingredients (for one cocktail) Unflavored black coffee, filtered through a natural filter if available 2 shots light or dark rum 1 shot sweet vermouth 1 Tbl Royal Rose Cardamom Clove Syrup 1 dropper full of The Bitter End Mole Bitters (available through these specialty shops) Grated nutmeg to taste Preparation Warm mug with hot water. Pour out and fill about ¾ full with black coffee. Add rum, sweet vermouth, Royal Rose syrup, and bitters. Stir. Grate nutmeg to taste over the top if desired. LEAF MAGAZINE

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flavor A Year of Growing My Christmas Dinner by Rachel de Thample

M

y 2011 New Year’s resolution was to grow my own Christmas dinner. This probably wouldn’t be difficult if I lived in the country, but I live in London, in a small Victorian flat. And, oh, I have no garden. I dreamed of the goal shortly after writing my first book, Less Meat More Veg: The eco-friendly way to eat (Kyle Cathie, 2011). In addition to providing recipes with less meat and more vegetables, the book includes several es-

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says that examine the way we source our food. I advocate knowing exactly where our food comes from. Living through the entire life cycle of a meal seemed like a good way to follow through on the advice in my book. I was also curious to see how much food I could create in an urban environment. Most of us live in cities. In the United States, 84% of the population lives in urban areas, yet cities occupy only 10% of the country. In England, 80% of us are crammed into just 20% of the land. Can


Carrots and beets grown in an urban London community garden.

Photography by Adela Nistora

people packed into city spaces feed themselves without relying on supermarkets? Here’s how my Christmas dinner story unfolded. After I conjured up the idea, I announced my plan to a group of strangers in a pub. A lovely woman named Kalina immediately offered me her garden. I followed up, and in her garden I grew parsnips, carrots, leeks, potatoes, peppermint, thyme, and sunflowers for their seeds.

When I started the project, I really didn’t have a clue about gardening. So I signed up for a course at my local allotment. Even though I live outside of the area to get my own allotment plot, I was offered a patch of land on a training plot in exchange for a bit of volunteer time. My four-year-old son created a ketchup garden on the allotment’s training patch. Today, we’re still enjoying bottles of ketchup and jars of oven-dried tomatoes. With the vegetables covered, I started to think about spices. I spent a day with a professional forager and discovered so many new and exiting flavours that my head was dizzy with excitement. I also utilised my East-facing windows to grow saffron, chilies, garlic, and even lemons! My project had failures of sorts. I didn’t rear my own turkey; I couldn’t find anyone to host a bird. I considered hunting for wild partridge or other game but was not able to do so. Though I found a local source for crayfish, life’s responsibilities got in the way; I just couldn’t fit everything in. Yet, there were so many beautiful moments and meals along the way. To thank some of the people who shared in my adventure, I hosted a grown and gathered dinner. The meal included sourdough bread made with wheat I helped to harvest. My favourite dish was a salad of raw, crunchy winter vegetables—parsnips, foraged hazelnuts, a rainbow of winter leaves, and a LEAF MAGAZINE

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dressing made with wild mustard seeds and lemon thyme. I cracked open a bottle of sparkling apple wine that I had brewed. I thought it would taste of vinegar at best, but was it was stunning, and my guests guzzled it down with compliments. Though they were a nightmare to grow (I battled with wildlife and weather), the highlight of my Christmas dinner had to be the Brussels sprouts with chestnuts from my local park. We had crispy roasted potatoes with foraged fennel seeds, red cabbage braised in homemade vinegar, baby carrots, and leeks. We cheated on the meat, opting for a rib of native Aberdeen Angus from a farm my family and I toured during the summer. All in all, the project was a success. In the process, I have created a new community garden, giving me further space to grow ingredients for this year’s Christmas dinner that I hope to share with a few other city dwellers looking to get a little closer to the food they eat.

Rachel De Thample’s book, Less Meat More Veg is currently available internationally through Amazon.co.uk.

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good Hudson Valley Seed Library How one small farm supports both sustainable agriculture and the arts

B

efore he was running the farm full-time, Ken Greene was a librarian. He was also a collector of antique and vintage seed catalogs, so founding the Hudson Valley Seed Library seemed natural. Today, the Seed Library farm produces varieties that are rooted in the history and soils of the Hudson Valley region. Located in Ulster County, New York, the farm is one of few in the Northeastern United States that specializes in organic heirloom seed varieties that are processed entirely by hand. The

farm’s seed library provides its members with a resource for reasonably priced, regionally adapted seeds. To support the farm and to insure that their seed library is affordable to its members, Ken and his partner, Doug Miller, also sell their seeds in limited edition, curated collections of Art Packs. How great is it that two farmers raise heirloom and regionally appropriate seed, encourage their library membership to purchase as well as donate seed back to the library, and also support regional artists? That’s a win, win, win.  SC LEAF MAGAZINE

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mood

Bollywood

Along with rich and vibrant color, glamour, romance, and a lot of bling are common in Bollywood movies. Assembled in a mood board, these ideas are brought to life outside for high style on a patio, deck, or in the garden.

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plant

Chaenomeles x speciosa

Common Name Flowering quince Plant Family Rosaceae Native Habitat/Origin Native to China

Seasonal Interest Salmon, pink,

or white blooms in April prior to leafing out

Height and Width 6-10’ tall and wide

Soil and Moisture Moderately fertile, well-drained soil. Adaptable to most soil conditions except those high in pH. Aspect

Full sun for best bloom, but will tolerate partial shade

Maintenance Flowers are borne on old wood.

Cut back flowered shoots to strong buds or young lower or basal growth. Prune by 1/3 to 1/5 on established plants. Periodic rejuvenation can enhance performance. Can be wall-trained.

Problems and Diseases Susceptible to apple scab (can defoliate by mid-summer); scale, mites, and aphids can be problematic; chlorosis in high pH soils Hardiness USDA Zones 5-8 Notes Seldom bothered by deer; rabbits may

damage. Spiny branches. Notable cultivars include: ‘Apple Blossom’, ‘Red Chief’, and ‘Orange Storm’. More low-growing and spreading quince are Chaenomeles x superba.

Design Uses Vigorous and upright vase-shape

form makes this a perfect back of the border plant. Prolific flowering adds interest in early spring and glossy foliage adds texture to the summer border. Photograph by Susan Cohan

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flower

Bring Spring Inside

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by Roanne Robbins

E

ven though many plants are still asleep underground, now is the time where we long for spring to be in full effect. We garden as we can, marvel at the early, diminutive blooms of snowdrops and Witch hazels, and look for our plant friends to reemerge through last years’ carpet of decaying oak leaves. As a flower grower, I await the spring harvest—showy yellow Narcissus and candy-toned tulips that can be displayed en masse in a simple glass vessel on the table. But for now, I’m not quite ready for buckets of flowers; I just want to put spring itself on display. I want to capture how it looks and smells. I want to slice a chunk of the woodland garden floor and bring it indoors so that I can be surrounded by its alluring language of bright green, pillow-like moss, early blooming woodland hellebores, unfurling ferns, sprouting bulbs, and flowering branches.

Vessel

Antique galvanized trays and bins are great for planting. The vessel’s aged patina pairs beautifully with fresh green moss and a vibrant spring palette. Be sure that your planter is lined and has adequate drainage.

Photographs by Rochelle Greayer

Greenery

With long-lasting blooms, fabulous leathery leaves tinged with silver, and plum-stained stems, Helleborus x sternii ‘Boughton Beauty’ is a perennial favorite. Hellebores have gorgeous evergreen foliage and come in myriad colors—from stark white to speckled pink and deep black; they are a musthave for the spring woodland garden.

Branches

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Orchids

Quince branches

Moss and mushrooms collected from forest Photograph by Lisa Aciukewicz

and movement to the arrangement. In the garden, Cornus mas is a wonderful ambassador of spring. As a tree or multi-stemmed shrub, its showcase of early season yellow trumps Hamamelis and Forsythia for the best early yellow bloomer in the woodland garden category. Cut branches from the garden and force indoors. Place cut branches in water picks and insert into the soil of the arrangement.

Bulbs

Lots of new spring-blooming bulbs are being grown in the commercial marketplace. I used a combination of Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’ and sweet little 74

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Muscari. A 4” pot usually holds up to 5 bulbs. Break up the roots and plant individual bulbs, or break in half and plant in clumps.

Moss & Treasures

I have a section of my garden dedicated to moss that I harvest for garden projects. Moss is transferred in and out of the garden and terrariums, and is utilized in outdoor spring plantings. Whether you harvest your own, or purchase moss from a local florist or garden store, it is worthwhile to have it on hand. Add lichens, fungi, and other natural found objects to complete the composition.


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build

Chain Reaction

Do

Limited access is no bar to creativity in this urban London landscape by katrina Kieffer-Wells

W

hen a young london couple asked Katrina Kieffer-Wells of Earth Designs to create a garden for them, it was important that it be fun, vibrant, and eccentric. Both wanted a space in which to relax and entertain. The existing garden was surrounded

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on three sides by bare walls and few plants that gave it an uninspiring, schoolyard feel. The clients had eclectic tastes and were not afraid of creating bold design statements. The final design had to find a way to shape and change the existing layout to produce something different and interesting.


The property was situated on a busy main road into central London that prohibited stopping, making access a major issue. Material deliveries and waste removal were difficult and time consuming. The apartment was at the back of the building, in the basement and, had a narrow entrance, three

Before LEAF MAGAZINE

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Chain curtain from Chain Screens (above). The lighted elk head from Northern Lighting and metal wallpaper above water fountain from Susan Bradley (below).

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doors, a courtyard, and a number of steps following a dogleg turn. Since the existing Yorkstone paving was well-laid and in good condition, it stayed to satisfy budget and access constraints. A large green-oak pergola was built to create a simple and cost-effective way to give height, structure, and visual impact to the area. Paving slabs were removed around the boundary walls to create jagged, flush-level planting beds. The paving had been built upon several times on accumulated concrete. The soil below the concrete was solid clay and very hard to dig; and had to be completely excavated to approximately 60 – 70cm (24 to 28 inches), deep enough for the selected plants. The soil had to be amended to allow the new plants to thrive; it was refilled with a mixture of sharp sand, topsoil, and organic soil improver. The poor access proved problematic during construction. Timber for the pergola had to be brought into the garden through a neighboring car park and over the high wall at the back of the space. The heavy, long, solid oak beams required some serious manpower to negotiate them safely. This proved simple compared to the task of removing more than a dozen slabs from around the courtyard edge for beds and postholes. A unique water feature, based on a traditional fireplace, was constructed at the back of the garden from chunky


sections of green-oak, with a stainless steel weir mounted on the “mantle”. The water cascades into a cobbledressed reservoir below. The alcove above features a panel of powdercoated steel “outdoor wallpaper” on a colored acrylic backdrop. Above the mantle is an eye-catching, life-sized polyresin illuminated moose. Juxtaposed with the client’s existing daybed, the finished area feels like a living room. Judicious use of ornamentation comWith the new design, Kate-Alice and Dom’s existing table and chairs found a new vibrancy and purpose in the outdoor drawing room (above). The daybed with new cushions is a relaxing place to enjoy the water feature and a cocktail (left). LEAF MAGAZINE

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“We are thrilled with our extended living space, in particular the newest member of our family – the moose!”

Inexpensive trellises were constructed from wood blocks and square cut panels of wire mesh. The tall white containers are from Flora Select (facing).

pleted the courtyard’s transformation. The unsightly roof of an existing summerhouse was covered with artificial turf. Aluminum chain curtains were installed on the cross beams of the new pergola to create a fluid decorative wall and sense of privacy. Stainless steel mesh trellis panels were customfabricated and attached to oak blocks installed on the wall to help mask the unsightly brickwork. Tall fiberglass planters placed at intervals in the new perimeter planting beds added a large splash of color. The result is exactly what the homeowners hoped for—a bold and eclectic garden of which they and the designer are proud. Photographs by Garden World Images

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fun

Exploring the Night Sky (and the legend of the bears)

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By Rochelle greayer

O

ne of the best parts of spring is the ever-increasing opportunity to sit outside. Plannning a stargazing adventure—whether a romantic interlude with a loved one, or a more chaotic event with kids—can be a fun way to explore without leaving the comfort of your own garden. Using outdoor heaters and beautiful blankets for sitting

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fun

and snuggling, and having warm drinks in hand, helps keep the cozy vibe as the sun sets and the stars come out to play. Begin touring in the Northern Hemisphere by finding the Big and Little Dipper. In spring, these two constellations sit directly overhead and form a giant teacup and saucepan; the farther north, the brighter they will be. Ursa Major (Latin for Big Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little Bear) sit above and below each other. The stars that form these constellations are also part of the Big and Little Dipper. Finding them is easy. The stars of the Big Dipper also form the tail and back of the bears which helps to find the Find Ursa Major and Ursa Minor with one of the following stargazing mobile apps: Star Walk Google Sky Map SkySafari Go Sky Watch Star Map

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nose and front of Ursa Major. Similarly, Ursa Minor is formed from an extension of the stars of the Little Dipper. With kids in tow, share the story of how these bears came to grace our skies. Ancient Greeks explain that Zeus, the king of all gods, travelled between the heavens and the earth. One day, while walking in the woods, Zeus came across the beautiful nymph named Callisto. He fell in love with her. No one can say for sure if Zeus turned Callisto into a bear to protect her from his jealous wife Hera, or if Hera herself, using her goddess powers, banished Callisto to the animal kingdom out of spite. Either way, Callisto—now a bear—wandered the woods until one day her own son, Arcas, came upon her. Not realizing that the bear was his mother, he nearly killed her. At the last moment Zeus saved his beloved Callisto by turning Arcas into a bear, too. If you find the bears, you will notice that they have abnormally long tails. Legend says that after they were both bears, Zeus wanted to protect them, so he grabbed their tails (stretching them) and flung them up into the sky. Perhaps the most


Styling: Wendy Fredman of Lumina Photography: Geneve Hoffman and Kelli Wholy

“Though my soul may set in darkness, it will rise in perfect light. I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night. ” Excerpt From The Old Astronomer To His Pupil, A Poem By Sarah Williams

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Check Leaflets for a Cosmic-politan cocktail recipe

remarkable thing about this tale is not the love triangle of the gods, but the fact that Native American tribes such as the Micmac and the Iroquois (though in different parts of the world) looked at the same constellations and saw the same animal as did the Greeks—bears. There are many star stories worth exploring before searching for constellations. If you are destined for a sweet night with a lover, look up Leo Major (the great lion), whose early Egyptian and Babylonian stories may have inspired Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Dog lovers: Seek out the Indian legend of Yudistira and his dog Svana, whose journey resulted in Canis Minor (the Little Dog). 86

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If you don’t live in a place where stars are easily seen, there are alternatives for nighttime adventure. Find places where the ambient light is not too bright (e.g., head out of the city to low light areas in the country). If the moon is full, go for a moon hike. Moon hikes are a fun way to enjoy the woods or the landscape from a completely new perspective. It is quite normal to have a little bit of fear of the dark, but under lunar light you will notice entirely different things about the trails, and you may see animals that you would never encounter during the day. A healthy nervousness about where to step and what might be beyond the flashlight adds excitement to an otherwise normal trip.


The Young Naturalist Kit contains binoculars and a birding book (for later) from Eagle Optics

Setting the scene for an evening under the stars

Green laser pointer pen from Think Geek

Striped Wool Blankets from Coyuchi Adirondack Chair from Oxford Garden Wooden flashlight from Unica Home (wrap the lighted end with red plastic to help your eyes maintain good night vision) LEAF MAGAZINE

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Phlox subulata ‘London Grove Blue’

Do We Want a Line Here?

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s p r i n g

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Every year we look forward to spring.

We once again believe that everything is possible and our ideas are new and fresh. Spring brings bursts of color, activity, and longer days. This year we believe in pushing our gardens beyond what we think they can be through self-expression and thoughtful design. We are inspired by gardens and landscapes around the world. As we spend more time outside, our powers of observation are keener, and we find joy in often-overlooked details like the elegant graphics of bark or a simple field of yellow mustard. The sun warms our winter-weary souls and we linger

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outside rather than in. We share our outdoor spaces and experiences with each other. Welcome to spring at

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Awake by sarah kinbar

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enings Signs of the Times LEAF MAGAZINE

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Bloom Magnolia x soulangiana signals that warm weather is on its way. The saucer magnolia’s blooms are sometimes killed by a late-season frost so planting a laterblooming variety is often a wise choice.

Us vel exceaqui recae nam, que id ulloribus aut vere cus.Mendae num cupta siminum ipic te plabora dolorer ovidemp oressi in parum coribusda

Native Eastern redbuds (Cercis canadensis) are true harbingers of spring. The small understory tree’s diminutive pink or white buds push out from its branches before the tree leafs out with heart-shaped foliage which can be green, burgundy, or golden, depending on the cultivar.

Photographs previous spread and right: Clive Nichols; Above: Susan Cohan

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Grow Daffodils are the most certain of all the symbols of spring. In the fall of 2001, when I got my start as a garden editor, a story came across my desk about The Daffodil Project. Millions of bulbs are blooming in New York City’s parks, medians, and vacant plots of land—large and small. They were planted as part of The Daffodil Project in 2001 as a lasting tribute and 9/11 memorial.

Wine isn’t the only big draw in Napa Valley. The region’s early-blooming wild mustard plants are so spectacular that they have attracted a wave of tourists from January to March. Writer and photographer Alice Joyce, whose websites Alice’s Garden Travel Buzz and Bay Area Tendrils are mainstays for local gardeners, loves to explore the back roads of Napa and take in its seasonal shifts.

Photographs left: Clive Nichols Above: Alice Joyce

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Just as four decades of rain and muddy conditions have not stopped concertgoers from gathering at the Glastonbury Festival, gardeners do not give up due to weather. The solution for both? Waterproof Wellington boots. Wellies now come in many colors and patterns. Mine are white with a black line-drawing pattern of flowers. They’re cool, but I aspire to Candy Girl Wedge Wellies, which are totally “next level”.

Showers An unnamed Primula at Annie’s Annuals. At her previous home, (far right) garden designer Lisette Pleasance had the perfect opportunity to show off her favorite look of clipped foliage with a pop of floral color.

Photographs top: The Guardian; Above: Susan Cohan; Right: Clive Nichols

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Flowers

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A view through the woodland to the clipped parterre

Author and garden-maker Anne Wareham muses on creating her ambitious welsh garden and its future care

Thinking 28

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g Veddw LEAF outsidee s 28 photography b y CMAGAZINE h a r l e sdesign Haw


I

By anne wareham

could start by telling the usual garden story— about how we left London for the Welsh borders to make a garden on two acres of field with a two-hundred-year-old, rather ugly house in the middle. About how I had discovered mulching

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after deciding that digging two acres was a little too demanding (good old Ruth Stout). I could go into the endless trials and tribulations of doing all of that with practically no money or help, and with a husband who wanted me to finish the first bit before moving on to the next (not recommended—you’ll be fiddling about with a tiny garden forever and never realise the grand vision. You have to bite off more than you can chew and then tolerate the mess and complaints for some considerable time, until the plants begin to fill out and the hedge cutting begins … and then never ends). I could talk about opening the garden to the public and waiting for nobody to come. Well, I could (or just did) produce the usual British garden story that inevitably finishes with


An early morning frost defines the geometry of Veddw’s hedging

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“Bit-by-bit I began to know something about familiar, well-worn tips about how to keep slugs down or kill the neighbours (no, not that last one really—just seeing if you are still awake). But I think the garden-making at Veddw actually became interesting when I read about Little Sparta and realised that a garden can be more than decorative and more than somewhere to garden in, which seems to be many people’s ambition. I knew what I wanted and what the garden needed. I began to add words and to try to put people in touch with the history of the site. From the time I had arrived in this rather curious place—neither English, nor Welsh, and not a village but 102

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the last two-hundred-years in the Veddw” a settlement—I had been working at discovering all that I could about its history, in an attempt to make sense of it. I was embarrassed and humiliated repeatedly by discovering how little I knew, but bit-by-bit I began to know something about the last two-hundred-years in the Veddw. I’m still working on several previous millennia. The land—the same that is now ours—was taken over from the Lord of the Manor’s Waste by squatters who managed to live off it and some local casual work in the woods, farms, and wireworks. They graduated from a turf and mud cabin into the stone cottage and cow shed where we now live, and they obtained a huge parchment lease from

The bench at Veddw chronicles its name and spelling over 200 years

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Clipped witch hazels in early spring amid masses of Narcissus in the meadow

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the Duke of Beaufort, granting them tenure. I discovered such leases and a document saying that they were living “chiefly on potatoes and the coarsest kind of bread” and, “exposed to peculiar temptations, they have been accused of dishonest practices, and of those acts of petty fraud, which often prevail amidst such a population.” It was clear that I should acknowledge and honour these people and their hard lives on the land where they had struggled and no doubt suffered. And so I have added words to the garden—on a gate, on seat backs, and on memorial stones. Words that remind us of our predecessors. We have come to realise, too, that we must confront ourselves; we are as temporary as they were. However much this feels like “ours”, we are not here forever. We plan to acknowledge our transience, too. Given that, it has still always seemed essential to me that we make the beauty of the garden our first priority—we live in it, after all. We have attempted to make that beauty by shaping and delineating the garden with hedges, which contain small gardens and a reflecting pool, where both

Left: The reflecting pool in early spring Above: A memorial stone by Catriona Cartright stands in the meadow

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The black conservatory wall sets off simple seasonal plantings in galvanized pails

“We make the beauty of the garden our first priority.” meanings of the word are relevant. We have also—true to the spirit of honouring the history of the land—kept large areas of the original meadow, gardened to keep it as close as possible to the meadow on which our predecessors would have kept their cow (we know there was a cow, as the census somewhat idiosyncratically mentions it in 1890: “An agricultural labourer’s widow lives here. She keeps a cow). These areas of grassland now grow fine grasses, wild orchids, and native wildflowers while also offering a peaceful, open break from what would otherwise be a rather too-busy, flowery garden. I have read a great many stories about making gardens, often with similar challenges and obstacles as our own. I have read much less about people tackling the next, frightening stage. How will we maintain it in our retirement and old age? The hedge cutting is already a remorseless taskmaster, though one that provides enormous yearround delight. Making and maintaining a garden like this demands endless creativity and adaptability; as I hate to leave the place even for a short holiday, I am not likely to leave it to make our lives easier. Sometimes the thought terrifies me, and sometimes—just sometimes—I think we have created a dreadful, devouring monster out there. 108

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Prunus rufa

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Heptacodium miconiodes

Betula jacquemontii

Stewartia sinensis

Bark Garden By Ken Druse Photography by clive nichols

The

Platunus x acerfolia

Pinus nigra ssp pallasiana

Acer griseum

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Bark may be the last thing one thinks about when choosing a tree. However, bark may be one of the best things to consider when designing, especially for winter and early spring interest. While most of us have seen white birch with contrasting black dashes, other trees often go unnoticed. Many trees grown for There are many birch bark effects do not show species and varieties their features until they with colorful bark, horireach a certain stage of zontal dashes, or exfomaturity. Kousa dogliating strips. A mediwoods (Cornus kousa), um-sized, fast tree that for example, develop displays its bark traits at exquisite patchy bark, an early age is the Jacbut only after decades. quemonti Himalayan Patience is often in Acer ‘White Tigress’ birch (Betula utilis var. short supply for gardenjaquemontii). The black ers, so get started by inor river birch has peelcluding at least one tree ing grey, doeskin tan, for its bark effects in and beige bark. your planting plans this If you don’t have space spring. for a big tree (or the paCamouflage-like tience for the payoff), patches of colorful grey, there are small trees green, brown, and ochre that will exhibit bark characterize the laceinterest while they are bark pine (Pinus bun- Acer conspicuum ‘Phoenix’ still young. Betula nigra geana). Lacebark elm ‘Little King’ (also sold (Ulmus parvifolia ‘Elmer II’) is a wide- as ‘Fox Valley’) forms a perfect hemispreading tree with a mosaic of color- sphere of green foliage in summer. ful bark. The mottled colors of the bark When the leaves drop, a ball of twigs on the London plane tree and the large and typical River birch bark appears. American sycamore (Platanus x aceri- The pale, shaggy, Seven-son flower tree folia and P. occidentalis) feel flocked and (Heptacodium miconioides), Threebegin to appear on young trees. flowered maple (Acer triflorum), Cor112

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Eucalyptus spp.

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Smaller trees with mottled color include varieties of Crapemyrtle 114

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Photograph by Susan Cohan

Lagerstroemia spp.


al-bark maple (Acer palmatum ‘Sango Kaku’), and the moose and snake bark maples have vertical pencil lines running up their trunks, especially evident in youth. Some species and varieties of these maples include A. pensylvanicum, A. davidii, A. tegmentosum, and A. conspicuum ‘Phoenix.’ Smaller trees with mottled color include varieties of Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) with smooth, cool-to-thetouch skin, and spectacular bark color. Other small trees with mottled bark include Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica), Chinese quince (Pseudocydonia sinensis), and various Stewartia species. The California Manzanita (Arctostaphylos varieties) might have the smoothest bark of all—a thin, oxblood surface that appears to have been burnished by years of waxing and buffing. The Japanese cherry (Prunus serrulata)—best known for its spring flowers— bears smooth, lacquer-like, chestnut red bark, and it is scored by horizontal dashes called lenticels. Similar marks appear on a wide range of birch trees, and on the cherry look-alike Peking tree lilac (Syringa pekinensis). There are also shrubs with colorful bark that attract attention before leafing out. Planting a medium-sized, fourseason shrub like Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’ with double-white flowers, fall foliage color, and cinnamon-stick ornamental bark is a no-brainer. Enliven the landscape with the colorful bare twigs of some varieties of willows,

About Bark... ● ARMOR Bark is a tree’s first line of defense—its armor. And like our skin, bark is mostly made of dead cells. Some trees—like the common juniper—slough off strips of outer tissue every year. Others keep adding to their bark, building into a thick, hard shell over time. ● Waterproof Bark is fairly waterproof, and the protective layer should not be breached. A deep scrape will allow disease organisms to enter the live tissue or interrupt the flow of sugars and moisture from the roots to the top of the tree and back again. Damage from rutting deer, or a crack from frost or lightening may take years to disappear as new tissue grows to heal the gaps. ● SCARRING The smooth grey bark of beech trees seem to be irresistible to young men eager to swear their undying love by carving a heart pierced by an arrow on the trees. The declaration will be carried throughout the life of the tree and very likely outlast the relationship. ● PROTECTION Young trees may benefit from having their trunks wrapped with paper to shade them from sunlight that can scald immature bark tissue. I’ve used plastic foam pipe insulation (a tube that is split on one side) to slip over the lower stem of fall-planted saplings to protect the trunks. But do not build mulch up the trunk for winter (mulch should never touch any plant). A pile of wood chips provides a nice cozy place for rodents to hide as they eat rings around the base of the trunk. LEAF MAGAZINE

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shrub dogwoods, and a few brambles. The willows, mostly varieties of Salix alba, are cut back nearly to the ground every year to produce tall slender stems in brilliant, fiery shades, depending on variety. An anomaly is Salix irrorata with black stems. One-year-old twig colors on shrub dogwoods range from acid yellow to flame to ruby-red by species and variety. Some of these deciduous plants— such as the yellow-twig Cornus sericea Ulmus parvifolia

Acer conspicuum ‘Phoenix’

‘Silver and Gold’ with variegated green leaves edged in white—have foliage interest throughout the growing season. Cut the oldest stems down to two inches in late winter. Ghost bramble (Rubus cockburnianus ‘Aureus’) has just about the best and longest-lasting golden leaves that drop in the fall to reveal pinkish-red stems coated in a white, waxy powder. The best Ghost bramble is R. thibetanus with pure silver canes. As if the thorns on the canes were not enough, the coating, called “bloom”, offers additional protection from winter sun and dry116

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ing winds. I planted these brambles on the southwest side of a path where they can be safely seen, but grow away from passers-by. I planted a Paperbark maple (Acer griseum) with exfoliating, translucent amber curls where it is illuminated by the low afternoon rays of winter sunlight. It is a small and slow-growing tree, but it exhibits its fantastic glowing bark at a very early age. I can see the tree from the windows of the sun-

spring 2012

Prunus pandora

room without going outside. In late winter it is joined by several flowering Witch hazels. Now is the time to consider places to site shrubs and trees that will contribute interest during the winter and early spring before foliage and bloom steal the show. This year, choose at least one to start a bark garden. Remember, trees and shrubs with wonderful bark make beautiful year-round plants. Some have ornamental flowers, all have fresh leaves in spring, and many have spectacular autumn leaf color before the bark takes center stage.


Betula utilis var. jacquemontii ‘Grayswood Ghost’ LEAF MAGAZINE

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La

The swimming pool is also a reflection of the Neo-Moorish architecture designed by Fernando Malenchini and Diego Pondal of La Oriental

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Oriental South American landscape architect creates a natural balance for a traditional estancia in Uruguay By Susan Cohan P h o t o g r a p h y b y A m a l i a Rob r e d o

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Gardens on different levels anchor the buildings and complement the natural landscape

F

A series of terraces significantly

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or the past four years, Argentinean landscape architect, Amalia Robredo, has been creating a masterful garden in the hills just west of Uruguay’s Atlantic coast. The smaller garden is part of a large working ranch, or “estancia,” that produces olives and wine. It is being restored by a young couple who want a relevant, environmentally conscious, and low maintenance landscape. The ranch’s name, La Oriental, is a nod to both the official name of Uruguay (Oriental Republic of Uruguay) as well as one of the homeowner’s Japanese ancestry. The main house is situated on a slope and looks


increases the outdoor living space

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Three of Salvia were include “thevarieties plants were chosen to remind Masterful use of materials gives the estancia its international and eclectic flavor

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out to a mountain vista to the west. When they first bought the more than 1200-acre property, there was no flat usable terrain. The extent of the livable outside space was a tiny deck adjacent to the old house. Robredo’s first order of business was to design a series of terraces that created garden areas and significantly increased the outdoor living space. Since beginning the renovations to the property, the driveway has been relocated, the house has been enlarged, the garden areas have been defined, and much more usable space has been built to provide


ed toof attract hummingbirds you the native plants of uruguay.” opportunities for outdoor activities and entertaining. To accommodate the need for water in an otherwise dry landscape, the homeowners built four small lakes that irrigate the property. La Oriental’s design has always been anchored in the homeowner’s desire to conserve the surrounding native environment as well as its glorious mountain view. The estancia’s mountain views are an integral part of the landscape’s visual experience, and Robredo wanted to capitalize on those and honor the native landscape in her design. She LEAF MAGAZINE

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explains that, much like their North American neighbors, people in Argentina and Uruguay are just beginning to want gardens with local identities. There is a growing concern for the conservation of natural resources and an interest in the restoration of native landscapes. They are developing a design aesthetic that is uniquely South American, rather than looking back through the generations to European traditions for inspiration. “At the time I designed La Oriental,” she said, “these plants where not yet available, but the plants were chosen to remind you of the native plants around. I have nature and ecology present at the moment I design and I choose plants that will add to the environment I am changing.” According to Robredo, she has only recently been able to source plants native to the region; a mere 20 varieties are now commercially available in local nurseries. Built into a slope, the home is surrounded by structured and geometric terraces and courtyards that include a rill and fountain, a swimming pool, and large rectangular planting beds that are lush in bloom and that add an air of informality to the otherwise rigid geometry. The white and blue groupings of plants incorporate three varieties of Salvia that were included to attract hummingbirds, and large masses of Chrysanthemum frutescens ‘Chelsea,’ Gaura lindeimerii, and a white Lantana ssp. that is native to the region. These controlled spaces morph slowly into the more naturalistic and less tame areas farther away. Structural boundaries disappear and the plants become the most important feature in the gardens. The living and working areas of the estancia are close to the residence, but almost 500 acres of outlying woodlands and rockeries were kept intact and provide nesting spaces, food sources, 124

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The Santolina “meadow” and local stone create a sense of place

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the result is a uniquely south america Geometric structures are softened with exuberant plantings

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and shelter for wildlife. The woodland is unusual for an estancia of this size. Ranch properties are generally comprised of open prairie used for grazing livestock rather than woodland. In the larger, non-working part of the landscape design, native stone and traditionally built walls combine with a sophisticated yet restrained planting scheme that mirrors the colors found in the ever-present view at La Oriental. Sunparched browns, neutral grays, and warm yellows punctuated with purples, dominate. The planting spring 2012


an garden style with european roots

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the design is anchored in the desire

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The working vineyard in the larger landscape adds additional visual interest

combinations create visual stories that are found as single plant masses or multiple, exuberant mixed borders. Even when not in bloom, Santolina chamaecyparissus and create a frame for wide-open vistas of the western hills. The edge of the terraces close to the house is punctuated with evenly spaced terra cotta planters that signal a change. The project is ongoing, and there is more work to be completed at La Oriental. With landscape architects and designers like Amalia Robredo working closely to strike a balance between beautiful and usable outdoor living space and the conservation and restoration of natural habitats, it is now possible to achieve a uniquely southern South American garden style that embraces its European heritage as well as its native landscape.

to conserve the native environment

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Large scale photographs with motivational messages have personal meaning for the artist.

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Ketti Kupper has created a personal haven of inspiration, expression, and experimentation in her own garden

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P h oto g r a p h y

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Clean lined geometric structure is softened with natural materials and plants

A By Susan Cohan

a designer’s personal garden often reveals more about their aesthetic than the gardens they design for their clients. A multi-disciplinary artist and designer, Ketti Kupper’s Los Angeles garden reflects her passion for life, her strong sense of spatial relationships, and her need to experiment with traditional and nontraditional materials. Kupper’s idiosyncratic sense of personal style is uniquely her own. Kupper moved to Los Angeles from Connecticut. The stylish and elegant fusion of the landscape vocabulary of both coasts adds personality to her garden. There is a traditional formalism to the overall design but the details of its execution are pure Californian. With a commitment to eco-conscious landscape design, Kupper is interested in the power of gardens and landscapes to impact and add to our daily lives. In her own space, she has created an uplifting and surprising experience that begins at the street entry. The traditional Spanish-style gate with a wrought iron latch has a message . . . literally. A small plaque invites all who enter to Take all the risks you want. Make no mistake about it, this garden takes risks. Corten steel, wood, concrete, and largescale photographic prints combine with

A small plaque invites all who enter to

“Take all the risks you want.”

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Wisteria is trained on a steel as a canopy over the twin track driveway (above). Each element has a purpose and contributes to the whole (right).

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natural stone and carefully considered plants in the front courtyard. Another small plaque, this time on the back of a concrete bench, says Patterns, reoccurrences, and similarities reveal the story. The twin ideas of risk and repetition are carried out throughout the courtyard. Each time a design element is repeated it seems new, as if a risk has been taken. Divided by a central path, one side of the garden is almost entirely gravel. It creates sound so subtle that the focus is on it rather than the surrounding street sounds. A small pond anchors the far end. On the opposite side, large-scale black and


The bold use of color is controlled and purposeful via

white photographs are a surprising feature not typically found outside. They are joyous and uplifting, and each has a message with a personal meaning to Kupper. Large areas of negative space and seating allow a visual respite from the garden’s details. Plants are sculptural. There is a predominantly neutral color palette of grey, brown, and tan. Each element has a purpose and contributes to the whole. The house anchors the courtyard and becomes its fourth wall. Kupper’s design makes the arrival at the front porch secondary; it is the journey to the

paint, planters and plants.

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front door that is important. A transitional experience occurs when travelling through the courtyard to the back yard. Geometry gives way to a more traditional garden space with a Wisteria-covered-pergola and a twin track drive whose center is planted with Alyssum. Shades of Kupper’s East Coast roots are more obvious here than anywhere else. A potting bench and a console table display collected artifacts. A tomato plant is tucked into a sunny spot. The small details that make a garden personal are everywhere. Integrated work areas are adjacent the house; this is a gardener’s garden. The focal point is a lime green door at the end of the drive that hints of another, different experience at the end of the drive. Neutral colors become punctuated with bright citrus green. The bold use of color is controlled and purposeful via paint, planters, and plants. This area is more playful, and the space is less strictly defined than in the front. A series of low, wood platforms create a transition between the driveway and the back garden. Seating, a chimenea, and another photograph are integrated into the small space. The backyard has an intimacy to it that the front does not; it is clearly a private space. There are a multitude of ideas within this small urban lot, yet the hand of a thoughtful and skilled designer is evident in its unity. Ketti Kupper’s garden proves that intensely personal and experimental ideas can contribute to a fully realized design when there is thought behind the process.

The hand of a thoughtful and skilled designer is evident in the garden’s unity.

Another plaque says “Patterns, reoccurrences, and similaritites reveal the story.” LEAF MAGAZINE

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pick

Two landscape architects’ favorite new products from the ASLA expo

“Despite the look, it’s extremely comfortable.” Jason Castillo on the Santorini Chair by Babmar

“Take any image and apply it to this bench.” Naomi Sachs on bench by Equiparc

“I love the curvaceous form and bold color.” Jason Castillo on the Maui Chair by Kannoa

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COMING SUMMER 2012 Chelsea Confidential Summer in Santa Barbara Outdoor Style’s Young Designers Gin…the Botanical Spirit


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Flower Markets Around the World

Behind the Scenes at Philly

Welcome Spring!

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A Closer Look at Seeds, Decks and Benches


Leaf Magazine - Spring 2012