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Life

Sounds for

the soul South Bend woman uses music therapy to heal

CHEER HIGH on

Notre Dame’s iconic leprechauns instill spirit in South Bend

The Black Friday blues WNDU reporter reflects on viral broadcast one year later

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018


A SECOND CHANCE “When you use, you have fallen so far that you can’t see the light of day. You give up all hope. I think the only way that people really make it out of that deep pit, is somebody sticks a ladder in there and climbs down there with them. That’s what I really admired most about the Goodwill Program. It amazes me that it works. And I’m amazed with the happiness and joy that I feel in my heart every day.” David

See David’s Story at: https://Goodwill-NI.org/Donate/David

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contents

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LIVING

BUSINESS

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GETTING SOCIAL Engage with #southbendlife on social media

14 MOVERS & SHAKERS Organization committed to growing South Bend

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DIFFERENCE MAKER South Bend woman uses music to heal

18 SHOPPING Ali on the Boulevard is ready for autumn

12 FIT & FUN Disc golf team builds friendships, community

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

58 WHAT’S HAPPENING Plan ahead for upcoming local events

44 ARTIST FEATURE Local artisan makes handcrafted furniture

FEATURES

60 AROUND THE BEND South Bend events caught on camera

49 MUSIC SCENE South Bend Music celebrating five years

20 CHEER ON HIGH Leprechauns instill spirit in South Bend

52 FOOD FOCUS New restaurant serves up northwest flavor

28 BEYOND THE FIELD See the highlights of ND vs. Michigan

66 ASK THE BARTENDER Meet the man behind the bar at The Hideaway

36 BLACK FRIDAY BLUES WNDU reporter reflects on viral broadcast

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Life

ON THE COVER

Nothing says Notre Dame like the university’s iconic mascots. Meet the leprechauns cheering on the Irish on page 20.

Sounds for

the soul

South Bend woman uses music therapy to heal

CHEERonHIGH Notre Dame’s iconic leprechauns instill spirit in South Bend

The Black Friday blues WNDU reporter reflects on viral broadcast one year later

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

Editor’s letter

“C

heer, cheer for old Notre Dame. Wake up the echoes cheering her name.” These lyrics are as much a part of my childhood as the “Itsy Bitsy Spider.” When most kids were learning their ABCs, my mom was also teaching my siblings and me the Notre Dame fight song. Growing up just north of the state line in Niles, nothing said fall like the Fighting Irish taking the field. Tailgate treats like bean dip and chicken wings are as synonymous with autumn to me as apple pies and pumpkin spice lattes. I grew up spending a lot of time both on Notre Dame’s iconic campus and in the greater South Bend area. I love the community that comes with cheering for a common team, with practicing traditions and fighting for the same goal. Beyond campus, these principles can be found all over South Bend — most notably in the city’s tremendous growth. Anyone who has spent time in the city in the last decade has witnessed this change. The downtown district, once desolate after dark, has been revived to such a degree that the downtown South Bend of decades past is almost unrecognizable. The neighborhoods surrounding the downtown have embraced their own identities, celebrating the diverse culture and opportunities available in every corner of this constantly growing city. A sculpture at the center of town sums up

the city’s secret to success. Thousands of folks have put their feet on the markers, smiled and pronounced, “I Love South Bend” on this sculpture, a message that is truly reflective in the community: South Bend loves South Bend. Just like the Fighting Irish and their diehard fans, these individuals have committed to a common goal. They celebrate the same traditions, and bond over their shared love — a love for their city. While publishing Michiana Life the last four years, we found it was nearly impossible to keep up with all the positive change happening in South Bend while sharing space with the rest of the Michiana region. There are so many people with powerful stories to tell in the South Bend area, that we decided the city deserved its own magazine, and so South Bend Life was born. During this uphill climb the city is experiencing, this bi-monthly publication serves to showcase the artists, entrepreneurs, civil servants, businesses and everyday citizens contributing to that growth. Put another way, South Bend Life will, quite simply, portray life in South Bend. We’re so excited to continue witnessing and documenting this forward momentum in South Bend, and we hope you’ll join us for the journey. 

AMBROSIA NELDON is the General Manager of Leader Publications LLC. A native of Niles, Michigan, she pursues her passion for publishing in her hometown, where she leads the efforts to produce several newspapers and magazines.

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Life

GENERAL MANAGER Ambrosia Neldon CONTRIBUTORS Mark Bugnaski Sarah Culton

Matt Cunningham Kelsey Hammon Wes Jerdon Joe Kuharic

Angie Marciniak

Andrew Mentock Scott Novak

Timothy Ritter Emily Sobecki Ashley Wentz

MARKETING

Donna Knight Phil Langer

Lisa Oxender Jordan York

CONTACT INFORMATION Leader Publications 217 N. 4th Street Niles, MI 49120

www.SouthBendLifeMag.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES (269) 683-2100

EDITORIAL INQUIRIES (269) 687-7700

TO SUBSCRIBE (269) 687-7727

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getting social • south bend life

#southbendlife Join the conversation! Tag us in your photos throughout South Bend, and we’ll pick our favorites to feature each issue.

nicole.reidenbach We’re ready for some Irish football! #southbendlife

marj_juar It’s true. #southbendlife

southbendcharm Starting the season off the right way #goirish #beatmichigan #bffs

robwallace621 Biking around @notredame #southbendlife

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living • difference maker

Sounds for the soul Local woman changing the lives of patients with a guitar and her voice STORY ANDREW MENTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY MARK BUGNASKI

S

itting on a chair in the corner of WXYZ Bar, Cambrae Fox strums the guitar on her knee and covers “Thrift Shop” by Macklemore. She is surrounded by her keyboard, amp, banjo and a small group of dedicated fans. When it comes time to rap the first verse, Cambrae sings the lyrics instead. She does the same thing when she plays the Black Eyed Peas song, “Where is the Love.” “I like to adapt songs on my own and make my own version,” Cambrae says. “Whitney Houston’s ‘I Want to Dance with Somebody’ is obviously a really fast pop song, but it’s actually super sad, so for that one I play a slow version. Or I’ll mash songs together. ‘Too Close’ by Alex Clare and ‘Say My Name’ by Destiny’s Child have the same chord progression.” On most weekend nights, Cambrae can be found playing at a bar in the South Bend area. On Fridays, she is typically at the WXYZ Bar in the Aloft Hotel or LaSalle Kitchen Tavern, and on Saturdays, she plays at Villa Macri in Toscana Park.

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At each performance, she monitors the crowd’s mood to confirm they like what she is playing — a tapping of a foot or the swaying of shoulders, but for the most part, it is her time to play the songs she loves — the songs she wants to sing — because at her day job Monday through Thursday, it’s not up to her what she plays. On the other hand, the songs she sings carry more weight than an acoustic rendition of a rap song. At work, her music helps to save lives. Cambrae is a music therapist at Memorial Hospital and spends her days singing songs and teaching music lessons to children from various hospital units. For most lessons, she places colorful stickers beneath different frets on ukeleles to help her patients remember which chords to use. Before Cambrae started at Memorial, music therapy was not a service the hospital offered. “I sought them out,” Cambrae says. “I put together a lengthy proposal. I met with them quite a few times and was able to start and build the program.”


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living • difference maker While at the hospital, Cambrae spends the majority of her time with children. She works in the newborn intensive care unit, pediatrics, pediatric intensive care, pediatric hematology-oncology and, on occasion, meets with women with complicated pregnancies. She says music therapy can benefit patients in a variety of ways, and Cambrae has different goals for each person she meets. For some children, it is providing them with a source of independence or control in their lives, as most children in the hospital, especially those with cancer, have a limited amount of say in what they eat or do. These patients’ doctors, parents and nurses make those decisions almost 24 hours a day, so having some time where they are given even a little power or authority can significantly boost their mood. When they are with Cambrae, the children get to pick the songs they learn on a ukulele or what song she sings. In the NICU, Cambrae begins to work with infants who are as young as 28 weeks after gestation. “I add live music when parents are doing skin-toskin holding,” Cambrae says. “That helps increase the babies’ oxygen saturation — so how much oxygen is in their blood. It can help stabilize their heart rate. It helps increase moms’ breast milk production. I make recordings of the parents’ voices for the babies. A lot of parents cannot take two, three, four months off of work to be at the hospital every day.” Cambrae says she tracks health-related results from her patients rigorously, and every method she uses is backed by research. For instance, music can also decrease a premature infant’s stress, according to “A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Music Therapy for Premature Infants” by Jayne Standley, Ph.D. This meta-analysis also states that music appears to be more effective compared to unintentional ambient noises, which can actually increase an infant’s overall stress. Another way she has demonstrated that her work can improve the health and wellbeing of a child is through lyric analysis. “Most adolescents who have attempted suicide don’t know why,” Cambrae says. “They know they’re upset, but they can’t really communicate all that.” 10

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difference maker • living The CDC recently reported that adolescent suicide rates are at an all-time high. Helping children to better communicate their emotions is one way to improve their ability to cope with and understand what they are feeling, according to an article published by Jennifer D. Jones in the Journal of Music Therapy. When Cambrae analyzes lyrics with an adolescent, they tell her their favorite song and go over the lyrics. She says in the past, a popular song adolescents chose was “Cool Kids” by Echosmith. “As we listen to it, I’ll go, ‘so the artist says this. What do they mean by that?’” she says. “Then the [adolescent] is able to explain it, and everyone reflects themselves in the music they like. ... Then I can ask them if that’s something they feel sometimes. Then they are able to use that as a gateway without necessarily feeling vulnerable.” Since January of this year, Cambrae has been piloting on the adult floors of the hospital. She hopes to use this as an opportunity to expand the music therapy department at Memorial by adding another therapist. Currently, she makes up the entire department, which is completely supported by donors. “It’s funded philanthropically through donations and fundraisers,” Cambrae says. “The Sunburst has gone to the Music Therapy department before. It’s a very difficult thing to bill because insurance will only sometimes cover it. ... On top of that, I really made it a priority not to make it a billed service because I didn’t want people who could benefit from it to have to turn it down.” The hospital agrees that music therapy should be available to all of its patients — not just those who can afford it. Still, Cambrae says that she lacks the time to serve all the patients that could benefit from music therapy, and that other hospitals the size of Memorial often have five or more music therapists. Cambrae says that oddly enough, her work as a music therapist helps to make her a better performer and vice versa. “When I’m on stage I can tell you what the feel is. I can tell you what’s going on — if they like a song or are paying attention,” she says. “They both play off each other. My performances improve my abilities as a music therapist because musically, some of my skills are continuing to improve.” 

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south bend life • fit & fun

HITTING THE CHAINS

South Bend disc golf team builds friendships, community STORY ANDREW MENTOCK

PHOTOGRAPHY ASHLEY WENTZ

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o a disc golfer, there is no greater sound than the harsh metal clank of chains clashing against one another after a disc ricochets off them and lands in a basket. For beginners, this can take more effort than one might expect. Most people who try disc golf for the first time spend an afternoon climbing trees to retrieve errant disc throws. Like most activities, anyone can improve through practice, repetition and dedication. Take Phil Sanchez, the chief bartender at Woochi in downtown South Bend, who developed a passion for disc golf over the past few years. The first time one of his friends asked him to play, he almost stayed home. “My buddy was like, ‘let’s go play disc golf,’” Phil says. “I was like, ‘throwing frisbees? That’s ridiculous. That’s what people play instead of real golf.’” Despite his reservations, he went and enjoyed it. Flashforward to today and his game has significantly improved. He participated in the PDGA Amateur Disc Golf World Championships in Charlotte, North Carolina this summer and is one of the founding members of 574 Chain Gang, a disc golfing team in South Bend with more than 130 members. He and his buddies created the group in order to grow the sport locally and to support one another. “When we first started playing. People were like, ‘this isn’t a team sport,’” Phil says. “We said, ‘well, you might feel that way, but the camaraderie is important to us.’” 574 Chain Gang members do not pay dues, but rather represent the brand and support one another. The team’s logo is based on the South Bend flag, 12

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and the colors are black and orange. There are hats, shirts, wristbands and discs. Members support each other by carpooling to tournaments and sometimes even sponsor one another if a fellow member is strapped for cash. Their encouragement extends beyond the disc golf course as well. Recently, a member and childhood cancer survivor was in the hospital, so the team hosted a disc golf putting contest to raise money to help alleviate the financial burden of his medical bills. In April, 574 Chain Gang hosted its first event called the Spring Fling for Bling at Rum Village Park in South Bend. “I took chains and metals and made trophies that were actually like necklaces that the winners got: gold, silver and black for first, second and third place,” Phil says. “The event sold out. There was a waitlist, and I had to turn about 10 people away.” The team also works closely with another local club, Southside Disc Golf Club, which organizes events throughout the South Bend area.

Besides Rum Village, there are disc golf courses at Madeline Bertrand Park in Niles, George Wilson Park in Mishawaka and Ferrettie/Baugo Creek County Park in Osceola, to name a few. While Phil is ambitious, at the age of 36 he does not see himself going pro — yes, there are professional disc golfers — but he continues to disc golf because he loves the game and it keeps his body active. “I just have fun, and it is healthy,” he says. “I’m always moving. I walk all over the course and talk with friends. It’s not like ball golf. I am not sitting in a cart [all afternoon].” He said it is also easier on his body than “ball” golf. Due to a previous shoulder injury, swinging a club can put a lot of strain on him, but that’s not a problem in disc golf — another one of the reasons why he thinks everyone should give the sport a try. “You don’t have to do what we’re doing,” he says. “You don’t have to go out every week and play. … Our team is more like an extended family than anything else.” 


fit & fun • south bend life

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business • movers & shakers

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movers & shakers • business

Young leaders YPN members committed to growing South Bend STORY MATT CUNNINGHAM PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY SOBECKI

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t the core of any place are relationships. It is the people who collaborate, create and take risks that shape the soul of a city. Engagement creates movement and in South Bend a tremendous source of energy beats with a group called the Young Professionals Network. “YPN is a group of young professionals who are and will be the next leaders of the city of South Bend,” regular attendee Coy Brown explains. “We need people to be the next wave, to inspire those around them and help bring people together and support the richness of the community.” Initiated by the South Bend Regional Chamber in 2005, the Young

Professionals Network is comprised of a chamber liaison and a volunteer advisory board. YPN seeks to develop, connect and empower individuals ages 21 to 39 from the South Bend area through regular events, many of which can be attended by simply showing up and buying lunch. “We truly aim to develop, connect and empower all young professionals,” says Briana Stiner, South Bend Regional Chamber Manager of Programming and Communications and YPN liaison. “We give them tools to develop into the professional they aim to be, connect them to other professionals and empower them to do more than they thought they could.”

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business • movers & shakers

ERIN BONIN, YPN chair, is the marketing director at Kruggel Lawton CPAs. She has been involved with the organization since 2006.

GET INVOLVED

Find out more about South Bend Young Professionals Network at ypnsouthbend.com, or find the organization on social media for regular updates. YPN South Bend is hosting a YP Summit from 1 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9 at the Century Center. The event features a number of keynote speakers, including Notre Dame women’s basketball coach Muffet McGraw and associate head coach Niele Ivey.

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AMANDA GADACZ, immediate past chair of YPN, is a financial advisor at Edward Jones. She has been in YPN since 2009.

CARA GRABOWSKI is the director of marketing for the City of South Bend Department of Public Works. She has been involved with YPN since 2011.

Opportunities are a natural byproduct of participating with YPN, Coy says. “It’s significant because you have like-minded individuals who are coming together, not just for networking events, but who want to create a culture of friendship, effectiveness and progression.” YPN’s current chair, Erin Bonin, originally from Wisconsin, says when she got involved with the group a few years after she moved to the area, it was small, but already offering great ways to learn about the area, things to do and ways to meet other young people. “The rest is history!” Erin says. “My favorite thing to do now as a more veteran participant is to talk to people at events

that are new transplants to the area. I love to be able to share what I’ve learned and help them connect with resources that are of interest to them.” Erin voiced a lot of excitement for the YP Summit — the first event of its kind — that is expecting to draw around 300 young professionals from across the region. The Oct. 9 event will be a halfday conference featuring two keynote presentations by Notre Dame women’s basketball coach Muffet McGraw and associate head coach Niele Ivey and breakout sessions and a networking reception to follow. “It really is the biggest thing we’ve ever done,” she says. “We’ve had a


movers & shakers • business

BRANDON NETTROUER is an associate risk advisor at Gibson. He joined the organization this year.

BRIANA STINER is the manager of programming and communications for the South Bend Regional Chamber. She serves as the liaison between the chamber and YPN.

tremendous response from regional chambers of commerce and other YP groups throughout northern Indiana and southwest Michigan,” Erin says. YPN events in the past have drawn anywhere between 30 and 150 professionals. About 1,700 people are receiving communications from the group. Amanda Gadacz joined the group nearly 11 years ago because a friend of hers was involved and they needed help planning events. She says the non-membership style is a really attractive feature. “You don’t have to have a specific job title, pay membership fees and you aren’t forced to attend,” she says. “You literally

get out of it what you put in. … Some of my deepest relationships have derived from YPN.” Amanda says people from all over the country have made friendships and been exposed to unique opportunities, including jobs, and that there truly is value for all involved. “There is something in it for everyone,” she says. “I think often people put too much emphasis on the ‘professional’ part and assume that means it is not for them. If you work in manufacturing, education, lawn care, medical, etc., you are a professional of some sort and I can guarantee you would get something out of becoming a part of our group.” 

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FALL INTO business • shopping

fashion PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY SOBECKI

Trendy boutique Ali on the Boulevard is ready for cooler weather. Check out these items and many more in the shop, located at 722 E. Jefferson Blvd. in South Bend from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

LOOK #1

Latico tan cross body purse ($206) Lydella light khaki vest ($41) Hem & Thread Coral & black top ($44) Flying Monkey jean midrise ($68)

LOOK #2

She & Sky black square neck dress with flutter sleeve ($48)

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shopping • business

LOOK #3

Hem & Thread floral baby doll top ($38) Cello tuxedo strip jeans ($52) Qupid textered bootie in tan ($44) Ali handmade gem necklace ($28)

LOOK #4

Hem & Thread black and white striped top with ruffle sleeves ($38) Hem & Thread black trouser pants ($42) Madeline black textured open toe bootie ($68) OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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south bend life • feature

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feature • south bend life

CHEER onHIGH Notre Dame’s iconic leprechauns instill spirit in South Bend STORY KELSEY HAMMON PHOTOGRAPHY WES JERDON/WESTLEY LEON STUDIOS & TIMOTHY RITTER

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south bend life • feature

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feature • south bend life JACK SHEEHAN

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t is a crisp fall morning in South Bend and football fans from across the country are pouring into the University of Notre Dame parking lots to tailgate in the shadow of the towering stadium. In the smoke of grilling meat and clink of cold beverages, they pull out yard games like cornhole and frisbee, building their energy in anticipation for the game. Inside the stadium just before game time, restless fans dressed in blue and gold fill the seats of the more than 80,000 capacity facility. At the brink of the field, the university’s leprechaun mascot waits, poised in a dapper green suit and Bowler hat. With a burst of energy, he storms the field, raising a flag bearing the school’s iconic emblem, supercharging the fans into a deafening roar, as football players flanking just behind him enter the field from the tunnel. Soon, the game begins. A folklore synonymous with mischief, the leprechaun mascot at the University of Notre

Dame has also come to stand for the grit and determination that the Irish take onto the field each Saturday during football season. The leprechaun was first used as an icon for the school in the early 1960s and was intended to represent the “tenacious spirit and determination of the Fighting Irish,” according to the university’s website. As an icon, the leprechaun with his crooked hat and raised fists is a symbol for Notre Dame and the greater South Bend community.

Carrying that legacy onto the fields, courts and ice rinks this year are three men whose passion for the Fighting Irish might be as fiery as the stereotypical leprechaun’s red beard: 19-year-old Conal Fagan, a political science major; 21-year-old Andrew Bub, who goes by “Bub” and is studying computer science; and 21-year-old Jack Sheehan, an economics major. Bearing the duties of the leprechaun is not all glamour and cheering fans. Leprechauns attend between two to three games a week on average — and this does not include the time they spend practicing with the cheer team, learning stunts and choreography. Historically, those selected to represent the university as mascots are not fair weather fans in any sense of the term. They lead fans in cheer in even the coolest of temperatures and the most abysmal of scores. This year’s leprechauns are no exception: they like finding new ways to engage their crowd. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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south bend life • feature

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ANDREW BUB


feature • south bend life

For Jack, a seasoned leprechaun, who earned a second-year term among dozens of others vying for the title, being a mascot involves the art of reading the fans that fill the bleachers. “Even if it is a small crowd with a few parents and kids watching, make a good experience of it,” Jack says. “Go over and talk to the little kids. Ask them who their favorite player is. [That’s] something that is going to make memories for the parents and the little kids, too.” There’s also a community outreach component to the mascot. Leprechauns visit South Bend area schools and hospitals to interact with residents outside of the MYTH BUSTING stadium. • Mascots do not actually have to have a Social media posts beard announcing the Garth Brooks • They do not have to be under 6 feet tall concerts this fall include • Women can try out for photos of Leprechaun Jack the role with the famous country star — a unique way of promoting the first concert ever hosted in Notre Dame stadium. “That’s one of the most important things, being an ambassador for the school on and off of the field,” Fagan says. “And just enjoying it as well, because when people see us enjoying ourselves, it makes the crowd excited, especially when it’s the cold nights.” The @ndcheerteam Instagram page is littered with photos of young students at South Bend schools like Holy Cross School, a grade school on the west side. Children put up their fists in true leprechaun style. This effort to get outside of the campus and share a little Fighting Irish spirit is perhaps why the leprechaun is also a symbol that residents of South Bend can identify with, too. “We do a lot of work in our community, whether it’s visiting schools or elderly homes” Bub said. “It’s more than just sporting events.” The Notre Dame leprechauns and cheerleaders also serve their community by volunteering with organizations like the Food Bank of Northwest Indiana.

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south bend life • feature

While there is no doubt that being a mascot takes a certain kind of spunk, this year’s leprechauns say they see the mascot as an opportunity to be part of the university and South Bend community in a bigger way. Each leprechaun who tries out for the role has their own motivations for wanting to be the icon, but their goal as the mascot remains largely the same: to cheer on the Fighting Irish and represent their school. Bub, of St. Louis, first began growing his red chinstrap beard as a senior in high school and his friends jested that he had all the makings of a leprechaun. When he started studying at Notre Dame, he wore the classic leprechaun suit during tailgates. His likeness was so stark to that of the mascot that a 97-year-old woman once asked for her picture with Bub because she thought he was the mascot. She was so delighted by the photo opportunity that Bub says he did not have the heart to tell her he was not an official leprechaun at that time. However, it gave him a taste of just how much the feisty green icon means to Notre Dame and its fans. “It’s a really neat experience to get to touch people’s lives like that,” Bub says. For Jack, also of St. Louis, the draw to be a leprechaun was in his blood. Jack’s parents are “double domers” — both attended Notre Dame to earn their undergraduate and graduate degrees. As a child, every Halloween Jack says he would dress up as either a leprechaun or a football player. Now that he is a leprechaun at Notre Dame, he says his parents are ecstatic that he has fulfilled his childhood dream. “My parents tell everyone that they meet that I am a leprechaun,” Sheehan says. Like his fellow leprechauns, Conol, who is from Derry, Northern Ireland, says he was drawn to be the mascot because it allows him to be part of the university in a bigger way by being an ambassador. The leprechauns have had similar experiences connecting with fans and they described this as one of the most rewarding parts of the gig. “It’s something people are attached to,” Conol says. “Other schools have great school spirit, but I don’t think there is anywhere like Notre Dame that sort of has that same attachment. It’s part of [something] bigger. We are part of the community.” 

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CONAL FAGEN

feature • south bend life

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feature • south bend life

Irish

LUCK OF THE

Experience the tradition of Notre Dame football PHOTOGRAPHY TIMOTHY RITTER

Anyone who has ever attended a Notre Dame football game — or even tailgated before a game — knows that the experience is unlike any other. The pageantry and theatrics that come with each home game are as well timed as a rock concert, with traditions and performances taking place like clockwork leading up to the game. As diehard Notre Dame fans know, these theatrics are bumped up a notch whenever the Fighting Irish take on the Michigan Wolverines, as they did in their home opener this season. Here are some recaps from that exciting game.

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south bend life • feature

$16 million is spent in South Bend and the surrounding region for every Notre Dame home game weekend, according to an ESPN article from November 2017. On non-college football home game weekends, that number is $1.5 million. The average cost of a hotel room in South Bend balloons from $104.63 per night on non-home game weekends to $339.84 per night on home game weekends.

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feature • south bend life Notre Dame’s 24-17 win over Michigan marks the 11th time the two teams have meet for a season opener. Notre Dame is now 7-4 all time in those contests. This was the fourth time that game was played a night, dating back to 1982. In those contests, Notre Dame is 4-0.

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According to the most recent Notre Dame economic impact report published in July of 2017, more than 52,000 people flocked to Notre Dame and South Bend from outside of St. Joseph County per home game during the 2015-16 season and Blue Gold Game. The estimated total number of non-local visitors during that time frame is 314,363.

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feature • south bend life

Hesburgh Library (or “Touchdown Jesus” as it is known to football fans) was a dream made into a reality by Father Theodore Martin Hesburgh when the university set out to build the largest college libary in the country. The mural portraying “Christ and the Saints of Learning” became known as Touchdown Jesus in 1964, when Heisman winner John Huarte began throwing touchdown passes to John Snow. The landmark can be seen from the top rows in the south portion of the stadium.

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south bend life • feature

Notre Dame Football’s defensive lineman Khalid Kareem (right) and wide receiver Chase Claypool hop in the stands after Notre Dame’s 24-17 victory over Michigan. According to ESPN, Kareem finished the game with a total of eight tackles and one sack, while Claypool had three receptions for a total of 47 yards.

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south bend life • feature

A holiday

sensation Reporter reflects on famous Black Friday broadcast one year later STORY ANDREW MENTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY WES JERDON/WESTLEY LEON STUDIOS

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n a shivering November morning in northern Indiana, WNDU’s Joshua Short, a reporter at the time, stood outside of University Park Mall at 5:13 a.m. Even in 2017, he still expected there to be crowded lines of people bundled up as they anxiously anticipated the opening of the mall doors at 6 a.m. for Black Friday sales. However, all he could see were Christmas lights, red brick walls and a scarcity of vehicles in the parking lot. No one was there — or at least no one was outside. That’s when his producer told him that he had three minutes — not six — to prepare to be live on-air. “Jason, there’s nobody around me right now,” Josh replied. “It’s only a minute,” replied his producer, Jason. “Just ad lib, and do what you do best.” For one minute and eight seconds, that’s what he did.

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“You know what, Alex,” he told the news anchor during the live shot, “I thought I was going to be inside and apparently I’m stuck outside. … I got up at three o’clock this morning expecting to do my first ever Black Friday, and ain’t nobody here. I am literally upset right now…” He ended the segment by walking off camera, while Alex fought back laughter. When Josh got back to the station, the anchors, producers and other reporters were giggling and cracking jokes. He was surprised his co-workers were making it out to be a much bigger deal than he thought it was. A little worried, he went to speak to the station’s general manager, just to be safe. “I said, ‘look, I’m sorry, I was just goofing off,’” Josh says.


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“He said, ‘I thought it was great. In fact, I think it’s going to go viral,” Josh says. “[I said,] Well, I don’t think that, but thank you. I appreciate that.” Josh was wrong, and he knew it as soon as Twitter sent him a notification alerting him that he received an ‘abnormal’ number of messages. His off-the-cuff antics resulted in a clip with more than 1.2 million views on Twitter and another 700,000 on Facebook, earning recognition from several celebrities and TV personalities with blue check marks next to their names. “Josh was fresh out of you know whats,” wrote Jemele Hill, then with ESPN, when she retweeted the clip. “Candidate for live report of the year.” “That’s when it went crazy,” Josh says. “Then you had D.L. Hughley retweet it. You 38

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had all these people retweet it and put it on Instagram. Then you had World Star HipHop, the Shade Room and B.E.T. share it. The Today Show ended up airing it on Monday.” The next day, Josh went on air to assure viewers he wasn’t fired. In reality, he says that most people in South Bend and the greater Michiana area appreciated seeing someone be so “authentic.” In part due to that live shot, the next news director at WNDU promoted Josh to morning news anchor a few months later, working alongside Tricia Sloma, who has been with the news station since 1993 — before now 23-year-old Josh was born. Today, he is no longer a stranger to working at 5 a.m. As an anchor, his work days begins, ideally, at 2:30 a.m. As he opens his eyes, head still on the pillow, he checks his phone for texts and monitors Twitter to

figure out what happened while he slept. “I usually get a text from sources saying, ‘you need to look into this, this and this,’” he says. “They’ll tell me there was a fire or there was a crash or whatever went on.” Living on the northwest side of South Bend, it only takes Josh about 10 minutes to drive to the WNDU studio on US-31, just off the University of Notre Dame’s campus. As a Chicago native, the first time Josh came to South Bend was after he was already employed by WNDU. It was his first job out of college. To connect with the South Bend community, he explored his new city by driving around on his off days without a specific plan for where he was heading. “Sometimes, I’ll see a restaurant and pull over and call a friend and ask them to meet me there,” Josh says.


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That’s how he discovered Frankie’s BBQ at 1132 S. Bend Ave. on South Bend’s west side. Since then, he says he’s eaten at Frankie’s at least seven times. Even though he’s not a coffee drinker, he still enjoys cafes such as South Blend, and on a night out, he can occasionally be seen at downtown’s Whiskey Exchange. “I want people to know not necessarily who I am, but why I do what I do,” Josh says. “I am not on TV just to be on TV. I am doing a job. I am a storyteller, and in order to tell stories you have to know about the community. … If someone recognizes me, that’s great because they know I’m not just a face on TV. I want to know the community and to be heavily involved with the stories I tell.” For as much as Josh has been able to acclimate himself to South Bend, it’s a much larger television market than he expected to be in — at least not this early in his career. “You never want to start off in Chicago because it’s market number three,” Josh says. “You’ve got over one million people watching a news cast every day. You don’t want to mess up or say something wrong because that will ruin your credibility forever. … You’d rather make a mistake in a smaller market. I thought this market, number 96, was still too high.” But after getting a job here, Josh has run with the opportunity, which, in a way, he has been preparing for ever since he was a teenager. Growing up on the southside of Chicago, he did everything with his twin brother, Julian, an avid athlete who stands at 6’ 6”, which is at least half-a-foot taller than Josh. His mother knew it wasn’t safe for them to travel home alone, so Josh attended all of his bother’s high school football and basketball practices and games as a team manager and videographer. Then one day his brother suggested that he become their high school’s sideline reporter. “Reporting? I never thought about reporting,” Josh says. “But then it came true.” After high school, Josh attended Columbia College, where he learned from a number of professors with industry experience and interned as often as he could at places like CBS Chicago, Windy City Live, ABC7 and Comcast SportsNet, which is now called NBC Sports Chicago. Another experience in college that prepared him to be on air was working as a tour guide on a double-decker bus in Chicago.

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Josh knew the historical Chicago sites and could convey that to his audiences, but he wanted to make his tours exciting, so he added a personal touch, often by improvising. “I would say, ‘you see Grant Park?’” he says. “‘Those stairs are historic,’ and I’d tell them why, but then I’d say, ‘they’re also historic because that’s where I scraped my knee as a kid when I tried to skateboard.’” As an anchor with WNDU, his challenges are much more pressing and important than remembering the name of a Chicago monument. He has to cover the news fast and convey often heart-wrenching information to his audience. He is also trying to engage a younger generations of viewers — ones that often don’t watch a traditional newscast. He frequently goes live on Facebook or engages with his followers on Twitter, sometimes just to thank them for a compliment. “It’s a unique demographic, but I can still connect with them,” Josh says. “I think that’s the most important thing. I’m only 23. I’m a part of that demographic, and I am apart of that generation.” He immerses himself into the community as much as he can, whether that means going to a high school for a football pep rally and crowd surfing, engaging with tailgaters at home Notre Dame football games or hopping on the set of ESPN’s College Gameday to take pictures of the crowd with his phone. Josh isn’t sure where his career is headed or where he sees himself in 5, 10 or 20 years, but he can confidently say that he wouldn’t be where he is today if it weren’t for Black Friday. “It was the greatest thing to happen to my career [in South Bend]” he says. “No matter what happens here on out, whether it means I can’t get a job in Chicago, New York or Los Angeles, it’s the best thing that happened to my career here in Michiana because I’ve developed so many sources and met so many great people. “I could have met them in different ways, but now they understand who I really am, and it makes that interaction easier than it would have been otherwise.” 


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Natural

talent

South Bend artisan makes handcrafted furniture STORY JOE KUHARIC PHOTOGRAPHY MARK BUGNASKI

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fter 20 years as a woodcrafter, Larry Piser still uses the first stepstool he ever crafted. “That stepstool is something that I’ve kept coming back to,” he says. “That’s been the consistent [piece I make]. That stool has been steady.” Larry is a South Bend native with a passion for wood. His shop, located on the east side of the St. Joseph River on Colfax, is overfilled with wood planks and scraps. Sawdust hangs from every available surface, the sign of a well-used shop. His career as an artisan began during his college years when he decided to stop pursuing an English degree at IU Bloomington and head west to Taos, New Mexico. He was working as a manager for an outfitter in Taos and realized he needed

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some furniture. “I moved out there with very few possessions, two of those being a Swiss army knife and a hammer,” he says. “There happened to be scrap wood that we were burning in the wood-burner for heat. I started cobbling things together and made a few little artistic pieces.” He started telling some of his co-workers about the pieces he was creating and they were impressed. The seed had been planted. “I didn’t have an artistic background,” he says. “I’d taken photography and maybe a drawing class in middle school, but I’d never worked in construction or never taken a shop class. But I met people who were doing things. [Taos] was a very handson, tire meets the road kind of place.”


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arts & entertainment • artist spotlight After about four years of sporadic travel between South Bend and Taos, Larry decided to return to his hometown, make a go of his art as a business and finish his degree. Since then, he has perfected his craft, and he takes his job seriously. In a given year, he works on three to five large projects — think pieces for Notre Dame and St. Mary’s — and countless medium and small pieces for other clients. He always tries to add a bit of his own style to each piece. “If somebody looks at something [I’ve made] and doesn’t know that I made it, then what’s the point?” he says. “It has to have my fingerprints on it, literally and figuratively.” EVERYTHING IS THERE FOR A REASON Larry begins each project with a sit-down meeting with his client in his shop. They discuss the expectations for the piece he will create, and they peruse a portfolio of his work. Sometimes he even asks to visit the client’s home in order to understand exactly how his work will fit into the space. “We’ll go to their home, or wherever the piece will eventually live. The best thing to do is get as many brains and as many eyeballs in the same place at the same time and just talk it through,” he says. “It’s a conversation: ‘What woods are we using? Where’s the light coming in, how are you going to enter the room? How are you going to interact with the piece?’ I don’t want my pieces to be an afterthought.” After visualizing a plan for the piece, Larry gets to work designing how he will tackle the project. It’s not uncommon for the design process to take a week or more so that Larry is convinced that he knows every challenge he will face. He splays out blueprints across his wood bench, begins selecting the correct pieces of wood, finds out what defects he may need to correct and begins marking up each 46

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piece. Larry says he views the woodworking process like telling a good story. “Being selective about the wood helps me keep the story in order,” he says. “Each little piece is like a character or has a chapter and has a beginning and an end and an arc for its story. Sometimes there’s like a spell when I’m really into the work. All of a sudden it’s done and ‘POOF!’ the movie’s over and the story ends.” That attention to detail and process is what makes the artisan. Larry becomes the director. Client rooms become his set, each piece of furniture an actor, and he becomes mindful of the overall story — how his pieces fit into the room as well as the story of the client. “Everything in their home is telling their story, and I’m continuing that process,” he said. “I agonize sometimes over what pieces

of wood to put where, and what piece [to use], so that it shows that someone was mindful and that someone paid attention to building this.” A LEARNING PROCESS Having never received a formal education in woodworking, Larry had to make a lot of mistakes to get to where he is. He says the most difficult challenge was learning the “proper” way that wood needs to be worked with. “You don’t get to do whatever you want with wood,” he says. “It’s a natural, living, breathing thing. You can only do so much. That’s why it’s called ‘working with wood.’ You’re not always in control. Not having a background in that, I sometimes design myself into corners. Then I’ve got to problem solve.”


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But that’s what he sees as the challenge of woodworking, and he enjoys finding a way he can design his way out of the puzzle. Looking back, he wishes that he would have been encouraged to try woodworking more when he was in high school, but it had a stigma SEE FOR attached to it at the YOURSELF In addition to Larry’s time. shop, interested “Back when I was shoppers can see some of the artist’s in school, the shop work in his show room, classes were for the which doubles as an AirBNB. Guests can kids that weren’t rent this space, which is going to college,” conveniently located in downtown South Bend, Larry says. “And and see plenty of Larry’s pieces at work. Visit that was seen as a piserdesigns.com for bad thing; they were more info. looked down upon. Now that I’ve done this, or that I’m doing this, [I see that] it’s just a different way your brain works. It needs to be taught in a different way. It can’t be at the end of the hall in a dank, stinky room.” Still, he is able to view this process of woodworking with wonderment and is amazed on a daily basis that he gets paid to do what he loves. “No one is more surprised by this whole thing 48

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than me, that this is where my life has taken me,” he says. “But, equally, I’m everyday surprised by a piece of wood. Like, ‘wow, that’s so beautiful. That’s so cool. Let’s make something cool out of this. It took this tree 80 years to do this. Let’s not waste it.’” Larry’s mantra has always been, “It’s got to look nice and it’s got to do a job.” That’s where his original step stool fits in. Though he has modified his stool over the years, he models all of his current stools after the original. “[Being an artisan] means being more artist

than crafter,” he says. “Not just to be the builder, but to be inspired by what I’m making now to make bigger and better things next time.” Back in 1996, Larry took a risk that he could walk the line of artist and crafter and quit his job to open his own business selling his pieces to the community. Though it has not always been easy, he continues to evolve his process to meet the demands of a changing society. Now, his pieces can sell for thousands of dollars. “I’ve been a working artisan in South Bend for 20 years,” he says. “That’s somethin’.” 


blues PLAYING THE

Organization has provided a music community to the city for five years STORY SARAH CULTON PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY SOBECKI

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or the people who work and visit there, walking into South Bend Music and Drum Company is like coming home. A comfy couch sits in its center, flanked on all sides by walls covered with custom guitars and ukuleles. This is where staff and customers alike sometimes spend hours, just hanging out to learn about music and soak up the lounge-like atmosphere. Sitting on that very couch on a Friday afternoon, some of the company’s staff struggled to come up with a single reason that made their little shop so special, each joking and talking over each other, sharing stories in the comfortable way only people who know each other well can do. “I guess what it comes down to is that we are like a family here,” says vocal instructor Linsay Kelly, sharing a laugh with her coworkers as she pulls a shawl over her shoulders. “We treat everyone that comes through here that way. … We respect the music and each other.” OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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South Bend Music and Drum Company, formerly South Bend Music Exchange, has served the city for five years as a professional music shop, selling, buying and trading handcrafted guitars, instruments and musical necessities, and offering repairs and services. The store also allows instructors like Linsay to use the space for music lessons. The store’s owners say South Bend Music is a local alternative to large national chain music stores, such as Guitar Center. “There was nothing like this is in South Bend, and it needed to be done,” says owner Mike Janovic, 48, of why he opened South Bend Music. “You get exactly what you need here at a fair price. A lot of local artists are struggling, so we help out a lot and do what we can. The people that come in here, we kind of become friends.” Located at 626 S. Portage Ave., the shop sits on a corner in one of South Bend’s most diverse neighborhoods, which the store’s staff says helped make the business what it is today: a community for musicians and artists. Mike says the culture of South Bend is in everything the music store does, down to the building itself, built in 1880s as one of South Bend’s first grocery stores, which Mike renovated and revived. 50

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“There is a pretty big music community in the area,” he says. “There are a lot of working musicians and there is a high demand for live music. You gotta support the musicians. They need to have a place to support them and give them what they need. Even since we have been here, the arts have grown.” South Bend Music does a number of things throughout the year to support South Bend’s music community, including giving away guitars and drum sets to city youth each year. Mike believes that supporting the arts is important to keeping South Bend’s culture vibrant and forward-thinking. “The arts are the heart of the city — always will be,” he says. “Dull things don’t define the city, and arts are huge. If it’s painting or music or whatever, it’s all part of the same flavor of the community.” The instructors that work for South Bend Music say they have seen the impact the store has had on the city’s music community even in their own lives. For Linsay, a 42-year-old former nurse, the

business allowed her to teach vocals full-time, something she had always wanted to do. “I’ve known for a long time that there really wasn’t anything else for me [other than music],” she says. “I think it’s important to have [South Bend Music] here to let others explore music and maybe realize what I realized, that music was it for me.” Drum instructor Dani Graf, 26, has been working at South Bend Music since she moved to South Bend a year ago. She says that working at the shop has allowed her to meet people and get connected to the community in a way she would not have otherwise. “It’s harder and harder to find a little shop like this that is totally run by local people, who are really chill,” she says. “I love seeing all my students, who are of all ages, grow. It’s just really cool to see and get to be a part of.” Neil Carmichael, 37, who teaches guitar, bass, piano, music theory and composition, has been with South Bend Music since near the beginning. He says he has seen the community embrace the shop and how it

offers a place for musicians in South Bend that did not exist before. “This place is important because there is a cross section of people who are musicians and people who support local everything, from food to music,” Neil says. “When musicians come here, they are supporting their own tribe, and that’s really cool.” Staring down a line of shining, polished electric guitars, Mike jokes that even though he does not have a crystal ball to predict the future, he does have hopes for where he wants the store to go moving forward. Primarily he has two goals: to see South Bend Music continue to be successful and embraced by the city, and to see the local music community thrive. “Like I said, music and the arts are so important to a community. I never want to see that die,” he says. “We don’t do this to get rich. We do this because we love music. … We treat people like family and a community, and we are always hoping to add new members to the family.”  OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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Northwest flavor, Midwest charm

Portland natives bring restaurant experience to downtown South Bend STORY ANDREW MENTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY WES JERDON/WESTLEY LEON STUDIOS

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ust through the front entrance of the Emporium Building is a two-story room outlined with worn red brick. The ceiling consists of stained wooden boards that run parallel across the ceiling, just below a glass skylight. Ironically, this rustic space is the perfect backdrop for one of South Bend’s newest restaurants. Perhaps the only thing more aesthetically pleasing than the room is the food its owners serve. Kevin and Colleen Lawler are the sibling duo who officially opened Baker & Rose in May, a breakfast, lunch and occasional weekend brunch café just off of the St. Joseph River at 121 S. Niles Ave. Both originate from the Pacific Northwest and decided to bring a touch of the Portland area food scene to the Midwest. “It seems like people like everything,” Colleen says. “They keep coming back and want to try something new because they trust that we’re going to give them something that is awesome, and because they’ve had that experience already, they’re willing to get away from their normal order and try something new.” A few of Baker & Rose’s popular dishes include the ricotta toast and the soft scrambled eggs. The ricotta toast is eye-popping. It’s a slice of rosemary bread and ricotta smeared with a thick layer of blueberry-lavender jam. Sprinkled on top are pistachios and a drizzle of Unity Gardens’ Honey. This purple treat was the first menu item posted on Baker & Rose’s Instagram account. “OMG it could not look any better than that,” commented one long-time South Bend-area resident after seeing it on the Baker & Rose Instagram feed. The soft scrambled eggs, on the other hand, are a savory dish. Freshly scrambled eggs are placed on top of bright-pink pieces of smoked salmon, with chive oil drizzled all over.

When the dish was posted on Instagram in July, the first comment was “Yum! So good.” It was through posts like these that Baker & Rose attracted most of its customers when it first opened. “Within our first few days of opening, we asked people how they heard about us,” Colleen says. “More often than not, it was Instagram. Sometimes Facebook, but mostly Instagram. People are following along and they’re seeing stuff pop up and they’re seeing friends post after coming here.” OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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arts & entertainment • food focus Other common breakfast items on their menu include granola, pancakes and an egg sandwich. Common lunch items include grilled cheese sandwiches, meat sandwiches and a seasonal side salad. While most customers seem to enjoy their menu, Colleen and Kevin refuse to become complacent. They never seem to share the same items on social media more than once, and they are always changing their menu in order to incorporate seasonal vegetables and the freshest ingredients. The duo reprints their menus daily, which allows them to tweak an item as they see fit and add or replace it. That doesn’t mean they have a brand new selection every day or every week, but it does allow Baker & Rose to perpetually improve and adapt. “If an ingredient cycles CHECK IT OUT out of season, it’s a really easy Visit Baker & Rose from adjustment for us,” Kevin says. 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday In the fall, they say customers through Friday at 121 S. Niles Ave., South Bend, can expect a menu item or two IN 46617. Check out to incorporate Brussels sprouts the menu beforehand at the restaurant’s website, and butternut squash, but, for bakerandrose.com. the most part, Colleen and For more information or to make a reservation Kevin aren’t sure what’s next. for brunch, call (574) 404-7214 “We just don’t know yet,” Colleen says. “That’s kind of the fun part. We get to collaborate and enjoy our own experiences experimenting. … It’s more like workshopping with [various ingredients] for days or weeks at a time, and then once when we get it right, we put it on the menu.” Even though neither grew up here, they both hold South Bend dear to their hearts — Kevin in particular. He is 35 and first experienced South Bend in 2011 when he visited to help Pete Buttigieg with the last few months of his first mayoral campaign. “My title was GOTV director — Get Out the Vote — so you’ve got in the last four or five days of the campaign, you’re going to knock on thousands of doors with hundreds of volunteers,” Kevin says. “I helped organize that effort. He and I have mutual friends, and I thought it would be fun to work with someone roughly my age.” After the campaign, Kevin left South Bend only to return a few years later. He noticed how much the city had grown and was looking for an opportunity to start something like Baker & Rose in an up-and-coming community like South Bend, especially if he could do it with his sister.

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“It’s something we had talked about for a while,” Kevin says. “Colleen has experience in food service and managing coffee shops and restaurants. I used to have a bagel business, but I wanted to do something with a more diverse menu. We were looking for the right time and the right space. When it came along, we decided to go for it.” “Going for it” includes roughly 10 tables and a 120-square foot kitchen, but the duo has already figured out how to wisely use this picturesque, yet quaint space. Open from 7 a.m to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday and occassionally on weekends, the restaurant serves breakfast and lunch every day. For now, brunch is only offered on certain, prescheduled Saturdays which they announce on their website and social media accounts. Customers can then go online to reserve a certain time slot with a $10 deposit, starting at 9:30 until 11:30 a.m.

“We pick a date that works for us, announce that we have brunch and sort of cycle through, so once people come in, place their orders and get settled, that fills the room,” Kevin says. “Then the second seating comes in right behind them, and we are able to get both groups started. After that the second seating was full. As they start clearing out, we’ll do another two waves of reservations.” The restaurant is constantly garnering extra exposure due to the traffic from visiting Baker & Rose’s neighbors, such as the Emporium restaurant, Luxe Wagon and A.R. Drew Art. Colleen, 33, has only lived in South Bend for a few months, but says that she has enjoyed her time here. “There’s a lot of cool, young people here that have been really kind and welcoming to me,” she says. Colleen she wants to provide South Bend with

more food-related experiences. Recently, Baker & Rose started hosting picnics, where customers can purchase a basket filled with food and then take it across Jefferson Boulevard to Howard Park. This is the type of event experience the sibling duo could see becoming a big draw, especially once South Bend’s Venues, Parks & Arts department finishes renovating Howard Park next year. “It still feels like South Bend is still just at the beginning of its growing process,” Colleen says. “If it’s not raining in Portland, then the parks are full anywhere you go. Here you just don’t see that, but I think it’s coming, like a lot of other things. “What we’re doing with the menu is something a lot of people don’t see, not just in South Bend but in the Midwest. It seems like South Bend is headed in a really positive direction.”  OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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THINGS TO DO OCTOBER 10 Wednesday Beer Walk — Eat Drink DTSB will host a Wednesday Beer Walk from 5 to 9 p.m. in downtown South Bend. Choose your starting point and stroll through downtown tasting beer and food from local restaurants. Visit eatdrinkdtsb.com for more information. OCTOBER 12-13 South Bend Jazz Festival — World class jazz and music from all over the globe will serve as the soundtrack to a weekend of craft brew, great eats and culture in downtown South Bend. The festivities take place at Island Park at the Century Center, 120 S. St. Joseph St. Visit southbendjazzfestival.com for a complete lineup and more information about the event. OCTOBER 12-28 The Secret Garden — The Pulitzer Prize-winning musical adaptation of “The Secret Garden” comes to life on stage all through October. In the show, Mary is sent to live with her Uncle Archibald, where she discovers her late Aunt Lily’s garden, and sets out to make it the beauty it once was. Shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sundays. Visit sbct.org to purchase tickets. OCTOBER 13 Notre Dame vs. Pittsburg — The Fighting Irish take on the Panthers for the 71st time at Notre Dame Stadium. Kickoff is 2:30 p.m. Visit gameday.nd.edu for more information. OCTOBER 20-21 St. Pat’s 24-Hour Race — Instead of being the first across the finish line, the point 58

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OCTOBER 12-13 South Bend Jazz Festival — World class jazz and music from all over the globe will serve as the soundtrack to a weekend of craft brews, great eats and culture in downtown South Bend. The festivities take place at Island Park at the Century Center, 120 S. St. Joseph St. Visit southbendjazzfestival.com for a complete lineup and more information about the event.

of this race is to run as many miles as one can in a 24-hour period. Runners can participate in one of three divisions: six hours, 12 hours and 24 hours. Runners will run a threemile route along the St. Joseph River in St. Patrick’s County Park. Registrations ends at midnight Oct. 15. OCTOBER 26 Downtown Trick-or-Treating — All are invited to show off their Halloween costumes and collect some sugary loot from downtown businesses. Trick-or-treating lasts from 5 to

7 p.m. Afterward, a costume contest will run from 7 to 7:30 p.m. at Chicory Café for children and adults alike. Participation will be limited to 25 participants per category (7 and under, 8 to 15, and 16 and over). Register at Chicory Café. OCTOBER 28 Castillo Quartet — The award-winning Castillo Quartet will perform at the Debartolo Performing Arts Center, 100 Performing Arts Center, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, from 2 to 4 p.m. October


calendar • arts & entertainment

28. Visit performingarts.nd.edu for more information. NOVEMBER 2 Flannel Formal — Mishawaka Parks and Recreation will host the inaugural Flannel Formal from 7 to 9 p.m. Nov. 2 at Central Park, 295 E. Mishawaka Ave., Mishawaka. This event is designed for adults 21 and older, who will enjoy live music, a bonfire, s’mores, games, contests and more. Tickets are $5 per person, which includes a commemorative mug. Visit Mishawaka.in.gov/parks for more information. NOVEMBER 10 Notre Dame vs. Florida State — The Fighting Irish take on the Seminoles at 7:30 p.m. at Notre Dame Stadium. Visit gameday. nd.edu for more information. NOVEMBER 23 The Gift of Lights — Potawatomi Zoo will light up for Christmas thanks to Indiana Michigan Power. The event kicks off from 5 to 9 p.m. November 23 at the zoo, where guests

can see more than a million lights wrapped around trees and free-standing displays for this first-time event. The zoo will be open weekends through December 23 for the display. Visit potawatomizoo.org for more information. NOVEMBER 24 Small Business Saturday — Downtown South Bend and towns across the country will celebrate locally owned businesses the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Shoppers are encouraged to frequent local merchants for special deals, promotions and fun throughout downtown South Bend. Visit downtownsouthbend.com for more information. NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 2 The Sound of Music — This Tony, Grammy and Academy Award Winning musical classic takes the stage at the Morris Performing Arts Center just in time for the holidays, from Nov. 30 to December 2. Visit morriscenter.org for tickets and more information about the show.

NOVEMBER 24 Small Business Saturday — Downtown South Bend and towns across the country will celebrate locally owned businesses the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Shoppers are encouraged to frequent local merchants for special deals, promotions and fun throughout downtown South Bend. Visit downtownsouthbend.com for more information.

BRE WERY • PIZZERIA • MUSIC VENUE

OCTOBER 01 – NTAA OPEN STAGE 6:30PM sign up // 7PM performances // FREE 05 – THE NORTH 41 9PM // $7adv // $10 door 06 – FLATLAND HARMONY EXPERIMENT 9PM // Pay what you want 12 – DESMOND JONES 9PM // Pay what you want 13 – DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE 9PM // $12 adv // $15 door 19 – HENHOUSE PROWLERS 9PM // $10 adv // $12 door 20 – TOXIC TRIVIA 8PM // You can win prizes! 26 – ELEPHANT RESCUE 9PM // Pay what you want 27 – DEEP FRIED PICKLE PROJECT 9PM // Pay what you want

NOVEMBER 02 – MARK LAVENGOOD BAND 8:30PM doors // 9PM show // $10 adv // $12 door 05 – NTAA OPEN STAGE 6:30PM sign ups // 7PM performances // FREE 09 – TOXIC TRIVIA 8PM // You can win prizes! 10 – ANDREW FISHER QUARTET & FRIENDS 9PM // $7adv // $10 door 16 – STARHEART 9PM // Pay what you want 17 – SANKOFA 9PM // Pay what you want 21 – SLIM SYPIAN BAGGAGE 7PM doors // 8PM show // $10 adv // $15 door 24 – CHIRP 9PM // Pay what you want 30 – JAKE ALLEN 9PM // Pay what you want

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W W W . L I V E R Y B R E W . C O M BENTON HARBOR, MI • LOCATED IN THE ARTS DISTRICT

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bend Around the

Art Beat • August 18, 2018 • Photos by KELSEY HAMMON

LEFT: Elizabeth and Morgan Vandemark, of New Carlisle. ABOVE: Flynn, of South Bend. RIGHT: Aubrey Johnson and Monique Brewer, of South Bend. 60

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LEFT: Ashley Hatfield, of South Bend. ABOVE: Tim and Jan Micinski, of Mishawaka. BELOW: Renee Feathers, of New Carlisle, and Amelia Hodgson, of South Bend.


LEFT: Veda DeVille, of South Bend. ABOVE: Kaitlin Dickman, of Mishawaka and Ryan Snodgrass, of South Bend. RIGHT: Asheila Muhammad and June Newsome, of South Bend.

ABOVE: Andy Swisher, of Mishawaka. RIGHT: Brandon Young, of Muncie and Shane Henderson, of Elkhart. BELOW: Christina Casperson, of Niles.

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Dog Days of Summer September 7, 2018 Photos by Sarah Culton

ABOVE: Gayle Dantzler and Kathy Borlik. LEFT: Olivia and Chip Rotolo with Remy. BELOW: Sara Kaszas and Jamie Ealy.

LEFT: Carla Carmon with Kipp. ABOVE: Jeff Morauski and Adam Bejdek. RIGHT: Jacqueline and Joaquin Echartea with Capone. 62

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DAILY FOOD AND DRINK SPECIALS!!Â

ABOVE: Haylie Boyd with Ginger. RIGHT: A-beona Scott. BELOW: Amy Klingler and Danielle Gilbert.

ABOVE: Ken and Sherri Wenrich with Maverick and Goose. LEFT: Justin Hay with Skipper. OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2018

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South Bend Business Expo September 13, 2018 Photos by Emily Sobecki

ABOVE: Jennifer Handlen, Ken Wolford, Milton Lovett, and Georgia Furto with Fourwinds Casino. RIGHT: Josh Sisk with Pippa the Possum, Marcy Dead with Catchi the armadillo and Margie Anella with Potawatomi Zoo. BELOW: Mark Walker with Kuert Concrete.

LEFT: Hilary Genova, Cookie Monster, and Stacey Evans with Double Tree. ABOVE: Mark Bagwell, Stacey Zurate, Joanna Limberopoulos and Tom Cassady with Horton. ABOVE-RIGHT: Travis Fehr and Ivan Rumachik with Purdue. RIGHT: Jake Wood and Scott Massom with Smith Ready Mix Concrete. 64

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ABOVE: Connor Dalton, Peg Dalton, Tara Mullin and Andrew Teall with Peggs. BELOW: 5. Lisa Horvath, Debbie James, Pauletta Washington, Caryn Fisher with TCU.

ABOVE-LEFT: Amy Charboneau, Shelby Nelson, Katie Pierce with Saint Mary and Hilton Garden Inn. LEFT: Corey Barnes and Jim Schuster with Shambaugh Fire Protection. ABOVE: Grant Vanparys, Kevin Brunton, Jim Schleis, Christina O’Conner, Time Killiea, and Terry Miller with Advance Imaging, Pinnacle, and Water Solutions.

ABOVE: Jackie Briggs and Erika Emery with The Villas of Fir. RIGHT: Michelle Crone, Steve Troike, Denes Veres, and Kathryn Gentz with Wells Fargo. BELOW: Mary Jan Hedman with Zing.

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BAR Behind the

with Michael Bleile

STORY ANDREW MENTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY SOBECKI

MICHAEL BLIELE is the bartender at The

Hideaway at the LaSalle. The bar describes itself as “Cheers, but in a speakeasy.” In addition to a constantly changing cocktail menu, The Hideaway serves light bar food, including paninis, soup and a gourmet cheese plate. FAVORITE DRINK TO MAKE...I love to make an old fashioned, and I like making Manhattans. I prefer a perfect Manhattan, which is a half sweet vermouth and half dry vermouth. Those are my favorite drinks, so I prefer making them. MY FAVORITE BAR BESIDES MINE...If I’m just trying to have a chill night, it’s probably Oyster Bar, and then if I’m going to have some fun, LaSalle Kitchen Tavern. Those are pretty fun bars and my favorites, for sure. IF I WEREN’T A BARTENDER I WOULD...I’m in school right now [at IUSB] for education, and I’m minoring in planetary science, so I want to be a science teacher. I have about a year and a half left of school. After that, I’ll probably still bartend on the weekends because $40,000 a year isn’t much money. That’s my goal right now: pursue teaching. MY BEST TWIST ON A CLASSIC COCKTAIL IS... I really like either an elder fashioned, which is like an old fashioned except you substitute the simple syrup with Elderflower, which is kind of like a floral liquor. MY FAVORITE FOOD ON OUR MENU IS...I love the black forest ham paninis. I add extra cheese. I put hot sauce and chips on top and then panini press it. It’s a good mid-shift snack. OUR VIBE IS...The vibe here is very mellow — very laid back. We have a lot of 66

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different demographics here. We have young professionals, we’ve got doctors and all the above. It’s very chill — usually a very intimate environment and quiet. You can hear yourself and others speak. It’s just chill, laid back and relaxed. IF I COULD GO ANYWHERE, I WOULD... love to explore New Orleans. For one, it’s one of America’s oldest cities, and I just always heard amazing things about the cocktail culture. On our menu we have a large variety of drinks from that area. Besides that, Seattle. I hear Seattle has a lot of good cocktails in the area, so I would like to try that out and see what they are all about. They are big on whiskeys and bourbons out there also. Also, the Bourbon Trail. I’ve been to the bourbon trail before in Kentucky, and I would do

that every year for the rest of my life if I could. It’s fun. SOUTH BEND IS GREAT TO BARTEND IN BECAUSE... it’s super up and coming. I remember 10 years ago — 15 years — ago it was hard to even walk around downtown. It wasn’t a very safe environment. Mainly because of the new mayor, it’s awesome. Now, everyone is outside, enjoying the weather and enjoying the streets, and enjoying all the shops and bars. It just fun. It’s nice to see the change and see the growth, and see who will contribute. OUR TARGET DEMOGRAPHIC IS... We don’t [have one]. I get asked that a lot actually. It’s whoever wants to come and enjoy a new bar that’s unconventional and still kind of low key. We don’t focus on anyone. We’re very open. 


Help mom live safely at home with Saint Joseph PACE Mom loves baking treats for us. With the help of Saint Joseph PACE she still can, all while getting the care she needs and keeping the independence she deserves to live at home. To learn more about Saint Joseph PACE, call 574.247.8700 and speak with an Intake Coordinator or visit saintjosephpace.com. 250 E. Day Rd. Mishawaka, IN 46545 saintjosephpace@trinity-health.org SA I N T JO S E P H PA C E

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South Bend Life October 2018  

Launch issue of South Bend's premiere lifestyle magazine

South Bend Life October 2018  

Launch issue of South Bend's premiere lifestyle magazine

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