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Excel INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS MAGAZINE 2010

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Being inclusive not so elusive Get the message on tech talk

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Want to borrow some words?

DATE: JUN10

Finding balance

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The right extra-curricular activity can make the dance of life a little easier


ACCLAIMED HAILEYBURY Aim to have the best for your boy or girl. Award winning teachers. Small Classes. National best-practice literacy and numeracy outcomes.

K e y s b o r o u g h B e r w i c k B r i g h t o n www.haileybury.vic.edu.au telephone 9213 2222


ACCLAIMED HAILEYBURY Aim to have the best for your boy or girl. Award winning teachers. Small Classes. National best-practice literacy and numeracy outcomes.

K e y s b o r o u g h B e r w i c k B r i g h t o n www.haileybury.vic.edu.au telephone 9213 2222


4 CONTENTS advertisers’ index Haileybury ........................................ p1,2,3 St Leonard's College ............................. p4 Tintern Schools ...................................... p5 Mentone Girls' Grammar ........................ p6 Caulfield Grammar................................. p7 Strathcona ............................................. p8 The Knox School..................................... p9 Korowa Anglican Girls' School ............. p11 St. Anthony's Coptic Orthodox College .... p13 Presentation College Windsor .............. p14 Christian Brothers' College.................. p14 Kingswood College ............................... p15 Melbourne Grammar School ................ p16

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Geelong Grammar ................................ p17 Ruyton Girls' School ............................. p18 Acacia College...................................... p19 Preshil ................................................. p20 Luther College ................................ p20,24 Genazzano FCJ College ........................ p21 Education Access ................................. p22 Huntingtower ....................................... p23 Camberwell Girls Grammar ................. p24 Toorak College ..................................... p24 Santa Maria College ............................. p24 Wesley College..................................... p25 St. Peter's College ............................... p26 Yarra Valley Grammar.......................... p27 Mentone Grammar ............................... p28

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To advertise, contact Karen Chandler 9875 8346 or email chandlerk@leadernewspapers.com.au

editor's note Welcome to the 2010 edition of Excel: Melbourne’s essential guide to independent schools. Enrolments in independent schools in Victoria continue to grow, Independent Schools Victoria’s latest annual report shows. The sector has grown almost 3 per cent from 2007 to 2008. This takes the growth to 44 per cent between 1996 and 2008. Independent school students make up more than 14 per cent of students in Victoria, which is 120,000 out of about 840,000. Whether you are the parent of a child enrolled at an independent school, considering independent education for your child or are simply keen to keep abreast of education issues, I hope you find the content of this Leader publication lively reading. Some of the stories in this edition relate to research projects being undertaken by ISV, an association of independent schools which provides professional services to inform its member schools and raise standards. ISV worked with an academic and Melbourne consultant to examine a program gaining notoriety, Learning to Read: Reading

to Learn. Ten schools participated in the project and the results indicated improved literacy gains for middle-school students. Journalist and education specialist Shaunagh O’Connor explains further on p19. Also, many schools operate values education programs so ISV is working with Prof Joe Camilleri and Dr George Myconos at La Trobe University to examine the programs that are most effective. Journalist Fay Burstin spoke with Prof Camilleri for Excel. Go to p10 to learn more. Meanwhile, cyber safety is never far from the minds of parents, teachers or schools. ISV and 40 member schools researched about 2000 students’ online activities and online threats – and we reveal the results. It makes for fascinating reading. And if you think you are not going to be surprised, test yourself: What percentage of year 11 students do you think send messages via their mobile phone during class? Turn to p22-23 to find out. Enjoy,

Kristin Owen Education editor owenk@leadernewspapers.com.au

DATE: JUN10

Small school, big school, great school!

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St Leonard’s College is a coeducational, Uniting Church College, with almost equal numbers of boys and girls. The school has two campuses in Melbourne, one in Brighton and one at Patterson River. The Brighton Campus, which caters for students from ELC to year 12 has over 1400 students, and the Cornish Campus at Patterson River has approximately 320 students from ELC to year 10.

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St Leonard’s College

The College enjoys an enviable academic record, offering both VCE and the International Baccalaureate Diploma at years 11 and 12. The Reggio Emilia philosophy of early years education underpins the Junior School curriculum and the College is accredited to offer the IB Primary Years Programme at both campuses.

include academic, artistic, community and sporting opportunities. The College has been recognised for many of its programs, particularly its sustainable education program and recently the Cornish Campus was named the Sustainable School of the Year by the University of NSW. The College offers a series of out of hours information sessions and tours during school hours at both campuses. Check the website for dates and times. RSVP essential. For enrolment enquiries contact the Community Relations Office on 9909 9300 or email enrolment@stleonards.vic.edu.au

Cocurricular activities are viewed as an essential part of College life, rather than an option, and

Cornish Campus Patterson River

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Brighton Campus Brighton East

stleonards.vic.edu.au leadernews.com.au


CONTENTS

inside

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COVER STORY The evidence is in. Extra-curricular activities can help children with their social skills and even raise the IQ a point or two.

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VALUES EDUCATION

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BOOK TIME

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CREATIVE INSPIRATION

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LIFE’S SENTENCES

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DOWNLOAD THIS

Actions speak louder than words when it comes to teaching good manners and inclusive behaviour. The power is in the classroom.

You can have the advice of experts at your fingertips – from brain power to realising potential.

our cover PAGE: 5 COLOUR: CMYK

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Your chance to enjoy some of the best art from our independent schools.

This new and effective way to teach reading is all about borrowing, patterns and bridge building.

Young people see the onine world a whole lot differently to adults. It’s all about staying connected.

Photographer: Eugene Hyland Model: Lauren Centofanti, of Victorian Ballet School Mt Waverley, Balwyn, Rowville, Box Hill

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Excel editor: Kristin Owen Contributors: Fay Burstin, Shaunagh O’Connor Designer: Josie Kilgour Sub-editor: Louise Browne Photographer: Eugene Hyland Advertising: Karen Chandler Publisher: Sylvia Bradshaw Published by Leader Associated Newspapers PTY LTD, ABN 34 004 337 446.

DATE: JUN10

Leader Community Newspapers cannot be held liable for any errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission.

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Better Results. Better Students.

Tintern’s girls and boys have performed outstandingly in the VCE, the International Baccalaureate and the NAPLAN tests. Great teachers, small classes and a unique environment. Find out why Tintern is setting the pace in the outer east. Main Campus – Tintern, 90 Alexandra Road, Ringwood East Southwood Campus, Maidstone Street, Ringwood www.tinternschools.vic.edu.au | tel: 9845 7878 leadernews.com.au

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6 THE BALANCING ACT

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nt in the Involveme evelop d arts helps erson. p the whole ral manager NIYPAA gene Grey e tin is Chr

Whether it’s ballet, basketball or Bach, after-school activities have benefits

G MPR: QUV001 ED: PUB: QUV DATE: JUN10 Lauren Centofanti (above) says dancing has made her more organised and confident.

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Every girl. Every day. From Kinder to Year 12.

eraldine Kinsella’s three daughters are all highly academic – and all have a long-time love of singing and music. Julia, 18, has sung with the National Institute of Youth Performing Arts Australia for about 10 years, as does her sister, Niamh, 12. In addition, Niamh and the girls’ other sister, Siobhan, 14, also dance with the NIYPAA. All three play musical instruments. “It’s all one great big musical tapestry,” says Ms Kinsella. So does music make you smarter? Researchers are still trying to find out. The Kinsella family’s experience is that it helps. “It teaches them to be focused and organised and has helped instil discipline for school,” Ms Kinsella said. “Dancing has taught them poise and balance, and helps with their athleticism. (They are sprinters, too). “It’s been wonderful for them socially; it’s been fantastic for them to get together with like-minded children – and you don’t always get that at school.” Certainly the vigorous physical nature of dancing could have played some role in boosting the Kinsella girls’ academic abilities, at least according to some. Writing in The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (2007), Beth Sigman Somerset reported that various studies had shown positive relationships between

academic achievement and physical activity, including sport. But she highlighted one study which hypothesised that increased physical activity, including the activity from physical education classes, could lead to better classroom performance because of the positive effects it has on arousal level, concentration, and self-esteem. The Michigan study involved 214 grade 6 students. Researchers measured the students’ height, weight, body mass index, amount of physical activity outside of school, academic grades, and fitness instruction time in physical education. “The main finding was that enrolment in physical education classes was not related to academic achievement scores, but involvement in vigorous physical activity was,” Ms Sigman Somerset reported. Students who engaged in vigorous activity outside of school at least 20 minutes a day three days a week were found to have higher academic scores. An average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute physical education class was found to be at the level of “moderate-tovigorous physical activity”. “Given that this amount and intensity of activity had no correlation to students’ academic achievement, whereas there was a significant association between academic achievement and vigorous activity outside of school, the researchers propose that there may be a ‘threshold level of activity’ necessary ‘to produce these potentially desirable effects’,” Ms Sigman Somerset wrote. “Many of the subjects who frequently engaged in vigorous activity did so through

We love to make a difference in the community.

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Mentone girls of all ages are encouraged to be leaders and life-long learners who defy their own limitations, aspire to excellence, and make a real difference to the people and environment around them. ENROL NOW

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Mentone Girls’ Grammar School 11 Mentone Parade, Mentone VIC 3194 leadernews.com.au


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So apart from the sweaty side of the the extra-curricular activities, might immersion in music help students switch on their brains in the classroom? Academics argue a qualified yes. In his Current Directions in Psychological Science (2005) article “Music and Cognitive Abilities”, E. Glenn Schellenberg, concludes music listening and music lessons can lead to shortterm and long-term cognitive effects, respectively. “This positive answer is qualified because the short-term benefits of music listening do not appear to differ from those associated with other stimuli that optimise arousal level or elicit mild positive effect,” Mr Schellenberg said. “The mechanisms driving the intellectual benefits could be derived from other out-of-school activities that are similarly school-like. “Nonetheless, music lessons may be special in this regard because (a) they are a school-like activity that many children enjoy; (b) multiple skills are trained in music lessons; (c) music is a domain that improves abstract reasoning; or (d) acquiring musical knowledge is similar to acquiring a second language.” Finally, though, he notes that different extra-curricular activities, such as drama lessons, have beneficial effects in other domains (eg social skills) that could be as valuable as the modest increase in IQ attributable to music lessons. The simplest take-home message is that extra-curricular activities benefit child development.

WHAT STUDIES SAY: High fitness levels in children are positively related to improved attention, working memory, and response speed Exercise boosts the number of brain cells in the hippocampus, the part of the brain known to be centrally important in learning and memory

Adults who received music training before the age of 12 have a better memory for spoken words than those who did not Musicians’ brains can differ from those of non-musicians. People who play music before age seven have larger brain areas connecting the two hemispheres

Sources: Journal of Sport Behavior, 2008; Teaching Elementary Physical Education, 2001; Nature 1998; The Brain that Changes Itself by Norman Doidge (Scribe) 2010 edition.

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There’s more out there where Year 9 students are immersed in a remarkable t is truly unique. The program encourages respect for g people for an international future. The chance to live ther reason why Caulfield Grammar is more than a school. To find out more about how we inspire the journey from Kindergarten to University, please call 03 9524 6300 or visit www.caulfieldgs.vic.edu.au

more than a school ool leadernews.com.au

Wheelers Hill Malvern Caulfield

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participation in sports outside of school. This suggests that participation in sports may meet the threshold intensity level for physical activity.” NIYPAA general manager Christine Grey said both the choral program and the dance program were designed to develop self-confidence, memory, teamwork, co-ordination, communication and presentation skills. “We believe involvement in the arts helps develop the whole person,” Ms Grey said. “The experience and skills our students gain benefit them in many areas of their life, helping to develop a positive sense of themselves while balancing their academic work with their artistic and social experiences.” Melbourne student Lauren Centofanti, 14, has been dancing since she was five years old. “I do ballet, tap, contemporary and jazz – altogether that’s five classes a week. And I do swimming classes,” Lauren said. “You don’t just dance – you also learn about the human body, ballet history and French words. It’s great for fitness and flexibility.” Her passion for dancing spurs her on to achieve at school, she said – and it clearly works because she scores 90 per cent or above in all her subjects. She agreed dancing helped her be more confident, organised and disciplined. “It’s great to have an extra-curricular activity that you are so passionate about because when you get school work, you get it done straight away so that you have time to go to dancing classes. “Fun as dancing is, school is still the No. 1 priority.”

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something

Yarra Junction Nanjing-China

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become big futures

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Every achievement starts with a dream. At Strathcona, we encourage our girls to explore their talents and embark on their own unique journeys.We support them in their pursuits, in setting goals and achieving them. A Strathcona education is based on a sense of trust and community, where every girl feels supported in reaching her potential.We believe it’s the perfect environment to start a lifetime of achievements.

Main Campus: Senior/Middle School & ELC 34 Scott Street, Canterbury

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Year 9 Campus: Tay Creggan 30 Yarra Street, Hawthorn Junior Campus: Mellor House – Prep to Yr 6 173 Prospect Hill Road, Canterbury

bring out her best.

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Tel: 8779 7500 Fax: 9888 5440 E: registrar@strathcona.vic.edu.au www.strathcona.vic.edu.au

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COLOUR: CMYK PAGE: 9 DATE: JUN10 At The Knox School, learning is a wonderful journey that lasts a lifetime – and you really will love coming to school!

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Our excellent NAPLAN results, VCE results and tertiary placements reflect a caring place rich in personal attention where a positive and happy atmosphere allows and encourages students to think and reason for themselves.

The Knox School

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Choosing the school that’s right for you is a huge decision. Schools, just like people are unique. Each has its own strengths and special features. The Knox School students excel in many ways but we challenge them to do much more. Our curriculum goes beyond academics to promote strong character and values.

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You’ll love coming to school!

CO-EDUCATIONAL | PRE PREP TO VCE

220 Burwood Highway Wantirna South VIC 3152 Tel: 03 8805 3800 www.knox.vic.edu.au

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ducation is as much about building character as it is about equipping students with literacy, numeracy and other skills for a successful life. And in an increasingly complex world, just how schools go about teaching the sort of values that strengthen students’ self-esteem and resilience, promote wellbeing and healthy relationships, and tackle violence and anti-social behaviour has been the subject of recent debate and research. But now, two new and as-yet unpublished Victorian reports could help shed light on what works in values education – and what doesn’t. The first report, by researchers at La Trobe University’s Centre for Dialogue, examined the effectiveness of programs that prompt students to consider their ethical rights and responsibilities in relation to people of different ideologies, cultures, faiths, genders and appearance. The study, commissioned by Independent Schools Victoria, collected the experiences and observations of about 30 teachers and identified difficulties. Problems included: ● how to manage the learning process when dealing with attitudes and emotions; ● how to ensure values permeate the whole school, not just some classrooms; ● how to impart values that are understandable to people of different backgrounds and ages; and ● how to ensure a role exists for secular values in religious schools, which can sometimes claim ownership over values education. INCLUSION THE KEY Study co-author Prof Joe Camilleri said the centre’s key interest lay in one major value – inclusiveness – mutual respect and social harmony in culturally diverse schools. “We’re finding that when it comes to teaching, actions speak louder than words,” Prof Camilleri said. “How can you speak about integrity, respect, compassion, fairness and cultural sensitivity when students don’t see that reflected in the behaviour of the teacher? “Teaching is not just about

Values added

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communicating knowledge and ideas but about communicating by example, and this should inform the ethos of the whole school, from the principal to the cleaner.” To quote the Federal Government’s Values-Centred Schools website: “Without this implicit values modelling, the task of implementing values education is doomed. If the seen-behaviours of teachers and felt-experiences of students do not correspond to the explicit values fostered in the school community, the explicit values education becomes compromised, incongruent and less effective.” The second major report is actually the third in a series by the Curriculum Corporation for the Federal Government. Its first report set out nine values for Australian schooling: care and

compassion, doing your best, fair go, freedom, honesty and trustworthiness, integrity, respect and responsibility, understanding and tolerance, and inclusion. POSITIVE EQUALS PEACEFUL The second report recommended 10 principles of good practice in values education. Among them were: ● using a common values language across a school, explicitly teaching values so students know what they mean; ● implicit “teaching” by the modelling of the values; and ● using values to foster intercultural understanding and social cohesion. But the third report, due to be released this month, actually tested these good practices – and they work.

Fifteen clusters of schools across Australia took part in the Values In Action Schools Project. It included a youth magazine, a radio show and emotional intelligence workshops for students in culturally diverse Melbourne high schools. There was also a project by a group of NSW primary schools that examined poverty and how to maintain a sense of respect and “fair go”. “The results were really positive,” said project director David Brown. “We identified five major impacts on students, teachers and parents, including schools becoming more peaceful places, less bullying behaviour, higher attendance rates, and improved relationships between teachers and students, and teachers and parents,” Mr Brown said.

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learn from the experts

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THE GENIUS IN ALL OF US

THE BRAIN THAT CHANGES ITSELF

INSTRUCTIONS

David Shenk. Icon Books, RRP $39

(revised edition) Norman Doidge. Scribe, RRP $29.95 In this New York Times bestseller, Norman

Neil Gaiman, illustrations by Charles Vess. Bloomsbury, RRP $24.99 In his famous Desiderata, Max Ehrmann

Doidge gathers stories from brain scientists and their subjects around the world - stories that challenge the centuries-old notion that the adult brain is fixed and unchanging. In this book, we learn that the brain is “like a living creature with an appetite that can grow and change itself with proper nourishment and exercise”. This has implications for people with learning disabilities, the book offering stories about brain exercises that have been found to be useful in stemming such problems. The stories of personal triumph are striking.

urges children of the universe to, “Go placidly amid the noise and haste” and “be on good terms with all persons”. Horror and fantasy author Neil Gaiman puts his unique spin on this in Instructions and it works brilliantly. Supported by superb illustrations from Charles Vess, Gaiman uses a fairytale world of witches, goblins and predators waiting to feast on the unwary, to urge respect and goodwill for all places and people. Gaiman’s message is to “trust your heart”, tread carefully and fear not adventure. Parents would do well to arm all their children with these instructions for life.

Believe. That’s the first piece of advice author David Shenk gives parents who want to inspire their charges towards excellence. “Rather than wonder if their child is among the ‘gifted’ chosen few, parents should believe deeply in the extraordinary potential of their children,” he writes in his revolutionary new book. “Without that parental faith, it is highly unlikely that significant achievement will occur.” Integrating cutting-edge research from many disciplines, Shenk brings a highly optimistic new view of human potential: The problem isn’t our inadequate genetic assets, but our inability, so far, to tap into what we already have.

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mazing is just one way to describe some of the creative work emanating from the art rooms of independent schools across Victoria. And now you have the chance to see some of these pieces up close. The fifth Independent Schools Victoria Annual Art Exhibition opens next Tuesday at Shell House, at 1 Spring St, Melbourne. ISV’s Anne Smith said the exhibition aimed to showcase the artistic excellence of the students in

the independent sector, with works chosen by her organisation in collaboration with teachers. While the choice of media the students use has changed a little over the life of the shows, often incorporating technology, the themes are not so different. “Sometimes students comment on their own personal relationships but other times on broader social issues; the issues of the environment and sustainability are often in students’ minds,” Ms Smith said.

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The Artist: Reka Bujdoso, grade 6, ICA Casey College Media: buff raku clay and acrylic paint. Artist’s statement: “With my terrace house I tried to make some nice and interesting textures that bring out the house and the nice gold, brown and silver colours.”

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HOMAGE TO ART DECO

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The Artist: Bronwyn Northcott, year 11, Mentone Grammar Media: digital media photography Artist’s statement: “This image is that of an Art Deco ceiling tile I captured on my camera in Camberwell. I morphed the image on Photoshop by zooming in and using the filter tool and the ink brush effect. The four images work best in a vortex style as if the viewer is being pulled into the repetitive pattern.”

DINOSAUR WORLD

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The Artist: Anfal Husayni, grade 6, Mt Hira College Media: collage, pastel, pencil Artist’s statement: “I created a dinosaur using pencil and pastels. Using magazines, I cut out various palm trees. Later I assembled both the collage and smudged a pastel dinosaur to create a composition.”

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The Artist: Alice Gascoyne, year 12, Woodleigh School Media: oil on canvas Artist’s statement: “I wanted to portray the differences in perspectives we all have towards a place; how one person can feel wonder and excitement yet the next can feel fear and apprehension.”

EDUCATING FOR LIFE … in the footsteps of our Lord Jesus • 76% of our graduate students go on to university • Small classes achieve maximum student potential • Special needs teachers increase literacy/numeracy • Eastern suburbs school bus service • Scholarships available for Prep,Years 3 and 6

OPEN DAY is everyday at St Anthony’s. Contact Principal, Mr Gary Underwood, to make an appointment to see our education in action, or to obtain a prospectus.

51QUVQ480495F/LH/10

The building of our new primary school has made new places available at all levels for 2010.

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ST ANTHONY’S A P-12 CHRISTIAN COLLEGE FOR CHILDREN FROM CHRISTIAN FAMILIES

St Anthony’s Coptic Orthodox College • 15 Alpina St, Frankston Nth • Ph: 9786 3145 • www.stanthonys.vic.edu.au leadernews.com.au

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The Artist: Natalie Cefala, year 9, Penleigh and Essendon Grammar School Media: mixed media on paper Artist’s statement: “A still life of a few decorative objects. The background is all black ink and the foreground is a collage of paper.”

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YOUR EYES ARE THE PRETTIEST I’VE EVER SEEN

STILL LIFE WITH BUDDHA

DATE: JUN10

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At CBC each boy can

Come see how

experience the thrill that

by calling 9529 6611

comes from learning in a

to arrange a tour or for

dynamic environment.

a prospectus.

and each student is

CBC St Kilda

encouraged to approach

11 Westbury Street

his learning with a sense

St Kilda East

of openness by using his

www.cbcstkilda.com

E cr ativity own unique genius.

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Innovation

Creativity is highly valued

CBC C H R I S T I A N B R O T H E R S ' C O L L E G E S T. K I L D A

cultivating boys’ character SINCE 1878

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How do you give a child confidence? MPR: QUV001 ED: PUB: QUV DATE: JUN10 PAGE: 16

Choosing the right school for your child is of vital importance. It’s a decision that will shape your child’s life well beyond their school years.

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For 150 years, Melbourne Grammar has recognised that education isn’t just an intellectual journey, but a physical, emotional, psychological, social and spiritual one, too. Because one of the most important things a school needs to teach is self-belief to enable students to look beyond what they think is possible to achieve the unimaginable. To join one of our regular Melbourne Grammar School tours, contact the admissions secretary on 61 3 9865 7570 or via email enrol@mgs.vic.edu.au Bookings are essential. www.mgs.vic.edu.au

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Ruyton Girls’ School Ruyton aspires to give each girl an opportunity to learn and grow so that she achieves educational excellence and personal fulfilment. Ruyton seeks to provide a supportive environment enabling girls to demonstrate that:

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• as individuals they are confident, resourceful and resilient; • as learners they are intellectually curious, versatile and can work both independently and collaboratively; • as members of the community they practise tolerance and compassion;

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• as leaders they act with integrity, self-assurance, initiative and an awareness of the value of service;

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• and as citizens they are enterprising, creative and have a commitment to community service, sustainability and a global society.

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The size of Ruyton makes it possible for each girl to be acknowledged and valued and for her individual needs to be supported. At Ruyton there is a sense of community belonging, where teachers, girls and their families work together and value each other. Self-esteem and confidence are fundamental to each girl’s personal, social and academic success. Many specialist programmes are offered across our Junior and Senior Schools; including Personalised Learning, Leadership, the Co-ordinate Programme with nearby Trinity Grammar School, and Specialist Maths, Science and IT. For the full range of our programmes, please contact our Enrolment Coordinator, Mrs Nadine Hibbert, at nhibbert@ruyton.vic.edu.au.

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Academic, General Excellence and Music Scholarships are offered for entry into our Gifted and Talented Programme, commencing in Year 5.

Ruyton’s co-curricular and sporting activities offer many choices: a wide range of musical instrument tuition is available; there are choirs, orchestras and chamber groups; lively musicals and drama; joint performances with Scotch College and Trinity Grammar School at senior level; specialist art and craft, ceramics, dance, photography, and a full range of House and School competitions and activities. Sports include: athletics, basketball, cricket, cross-country, equestrian, diving, hockey, netball, rhythmic gymnastics, rowing, skiing, soccer, softball, surf lifesaving, volleyball, water polo, swimming and tennis. The National Trust-listed Henty House, set in landscaped gardens, provides a beautiful and gracious backdrop to our vibrant and active campus, alongside state-of-the-art facilities. Our ELC, Junior and Senior Schools are linked together on the same site, creating a strong sense of collective and community spirit across every year level. Academic Performance Ruyton’s results are exceptional and consistent. The top independent girls’ school in 2008 and 2009, our 2009 VCE results are outstanding. 68% of girls received ENTER scores of 90 and above; 6 girls attained ENTERs over 99, and 6 perfect study scores of 50 were achieved. Annual Fees 2010: From $8,056 pa (ELC) to $21,109 pa (Year 12) Student Population: Approximately 780, from ELC to Year 12. Co-educational ELC; girls only Prep – Year 12. A non-denominational school.

The Best of Both Worlds Ruyton & Trinity Recognising the changing needs of their students as they mature, Ruyton Girls’ School & nearby Trinity Grammar (all boys) collaborate to offer the Co-ordinate Programme in the crucial VCE years. Students can share a number of subjects across the Schools, increasing the curriculum choice at VCE and providing an introduction to the co-educational environment.

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Ruyton Girls’ School 12 Selbourne Road Kew 3101 Victoria Australia Tel 61 3 9819 2422 www.ruyton.vic.edu.au CRICOS 00336J

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NEW CHAPTER 19

Turning the page Text patterning is making words more friendly

CAPTURE OUR SPIRIT! CARING CONFIDENCE CURIOSITY CREATIVITY

COLOUR: CMYK PAGE: 19 DATE: JUN10 “Remedial programs do not close the gap between the weakest and the top kids. Our program consistently demonstrates that you can close the gap while teaching the curriculum.

Acacia College opened in February this year and already a unique ‘spirit of Acacia’ has emerged. Our school is underpinned by Christian values, yet we welcome students from all faiths and cultural backgrounds. Our buildings are fresh and new, our classrooms are warm and welcoming, and our staff and students are filled with energy and enthusiasm. Together we are building a school community founded on respect – for oneself, for others and for the environment. Join us for an Information Session and tour of the College with the Principal and senior staff. For details, phone the Registrar, Jane Austin, on 9717 7305 or visit our website: www.acacia.vic.edu.au

ACACIA COLLEGE WELCOMES ENROLMENTS FOR 2010 AND SUBSEQUENT YEARS Co-educational, Prep-Year 7 in 2010, Prep-Year 12 by 2015.

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“That’s because we train teachers to teach their students to read texts at the level that they should be for their grade and subject area. It’s the absolute opposite to the remedial programs.

9717 7300. 370 Bridge Inn Road Mernda 3754 (Melway 390 B9)

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“It has been repeatedly demonstrated that all students from all backgrounds accelerate at double to more than four times the expected learning rate when using the program.

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DR DAVID ROSE ON THE READING TO LEARN PROGRAM:

into Reading to Learn commissioned by Independent Schools Victoria which confirmed previous findings that student growth in reading and writing skills over a year using the program is double to four times what has been traditionally expected. Another group of teachers from independent Victorian schools were trained in Reading to Learn in 2009, and have begun using the program in classrooms. “The number of schools using the program is expected to increase as more teachers train and them implement the program,” Dr Culican says. Reading to Learn “looks closely at written texts and first works on students developing fluency and deep understanding of all the layers of meaning in the texts, not just literal meanings, but inferential meanings”, she says. Teachers then highlight for students the clever language structures and encourage students to borrow those structures and use them in their writing. “That’s called text patterning, where kids deliberately borrow. In a science text it might just be a factual way to say things, like, ‘this consists of’, or ‘cells contain’,” Dr Culican says. “So it teaches not just the science terms, but the bit of grammar that relates to those texts.” She says a 2001 trial of the program in Melbourne focusing on years 5 to 8 found it “was a fabulous bridge” between the topic, theme-based learning of primary school and “an explosion of factual reading and writing” students must cope with in early secondary school.

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A

literacy program that produces outstanding success rates is slowly gaining popularity in Victorian schools. The Reading to Learn program, first developed in the 1980s by Australian academics Dr David Rose and Dr Brian Gray, improves student literacy rates by up to four times the expected rate of growth in skills. Dr Rose, director of Reading to Learn and a specialist in teacher education with the University of Sydney, says the effectiveness of the program was first tested on indigenous primary and secondary students in SA. “Indigenous children’s literacy levels are many years behind their non-indigenous peers, so with the schools we worked with no children were reading independently before the end of year 3, and all the high school students were reading at junior primary levels,’’ Dr Rose says. “In our project we had all of them reading at ageappropriate levels within one year.” The secret to the success of Reading to Learn, Dr Rose says, is the way it integrates the teaching of reading and writing skills with the skills and content taught in all curriculum areas, and the fact that the program can be used with all students, from prep to those at tertiary level, from weak readers to the gifted. “While the weaker students are accelerating at over four times the expected learning rate on this program, the top students are accelerating at double the expected rates,” he says. The reason for this is that we are making explicit the language choices that authors use and showing all students how to use those language choices themselves.” Melbourne consultant in language and literacy Dr Sarah Jane Culican, who completed her PhD in the Reading to Learn program, says it “scaffolds students and gives them support structures so they can tackle difficult texts, rather than dumbing down the curriculum”. Dr Culican also worked on a 2008 report

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Zahava Elenberg’s journey started at Preshil. Zahava’s love of architecture and entrepreneurial spirit were nurtured at Preshil. Our students take a pro-active role in their education. They gain the confidence to believe anything is possible. That’s what makes Preshil unique. A child’s potential is theirs to discover: we help them find it.

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Visit www.preshil.vic.edu.au or call 9817 6135 for details about open days, information nights and monthly tours.

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Anne Lewitzka Pianist VCA Secondary School Class of 1965

Enrolling now for 2011 and 2012 Genazzano FCJ College 301 Cotham Road Kew VIC 3101 Phone 03 8862 1000

www.genazzano.vic.edu.au leadernews.com.au

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22 GETTING THE MESSAGE

Words: Fay Burstin

u r wot u want 2 b

Being exposed to the downsides is all part of learn ing how to exist

Teens find it easier to connect with their peers on all fronts

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lmost a third of Victorian teenagers spend more than two hours a night on the internet, according to a new survey about their online behaviour. And those with internet access in their bedrooms are more likely to surf the net for longer on school nights. CyberCulture, the Independent Schools Victoria study of 5000 students in years 511, found almost half those surveyed have no rules about the amount of time they spend on the computer at home. Two thirds of students say they discuss their internet activities with their parents, and claim their parents know about everyone they chat to online. But more than a third report having online “friends” they’ve never met. The survey of 39 single-sex and co-ed schools found children’s unsupervised internet use in their bedrooms rose sharply with age, from 15 per cent of year 5 students to 47 per cent of year 10s. Similarly, the older the student, the more time they spend online, with 32 per cent of

year 10s surfing the net for more than two hours on school nights compared to 20 per cent of year 8s. Most of that time is spent socialising, using social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace, Bebo and others, said Dr Debora Brown, senior research fellow in social marketing and cyber bullying from the Child Health Promotion Research Centre at Edith Cowan University in Perth. “They’re also downloading music and spending time gaming, much of which is socially interactive and involves communicating with others and playing in teams,” Dr Brown said. “And they do spend some time doing homework and searching online for educational purposes.” But Dr Brown said parents need not worry: “Young people live in this (online) world and use it

differently to how adults use it,” she said. “For them it’s a social tool and they use it like adults might use the telephone.” The survey found fewer than 10 per cent of students had had a negative online experience, such as being the subject of a rumour spread online or receiving a nasty or threatening message. “Parents should understand there are risks (online) and the need for filters and educating young people about protective behaviours,” Dr Brown said. “But being exposed to the downsides is all part of learning how to exist in this world where there are no boundaries or rules.” Almost all students said they would turn to friends, parents or teachers for support if they were bullied online or by phone, but most said they would talk to their school friends first. Dr Brown said teens fear their parents will over-react to a bad experience and ban them from using the technology. “But research suggests young

Academic, Debora Brown

people are much more inclined to talk to their peers if there’s a problem because they’re likely to know about it, too,” she said. “If something nasty has been posted on a social networking site, other people have probably seen it, too.” More than 95 per cent of students say they know about their school’s anti-bullying policy and most said cyber bullying had been discussed at school. In the words of one year 10 girl who took part in the survey: “I think cyber bullying is a lot scarier than normal bullying, as people can disguise their identities and be more confident behind masks, but I don’t think adults necessarily understand the problem very well. “I think young people need some basic guidelines to go by on how to keep safe, not just lectures about how dangerous it is, because we don’t connect with that.”

The affordability of Private School Education is a major financial consideration and decision for parents every year.

PAGE: 22 COLOUR: CMYK

Education Access is a new solution that uses borrowed funds to pre-pay multiple years of education (discounts and other benefits may apply) and spread repayments over an extended period thereby reducing financial stress on family finances during the high cost education years. Visit our website for more details

www.buyerschoice.com.au/edacc To be eligible for Education Access, borrowers will ideally have 30% minimum equity in their home or other residential property. Other criteria also apply.

Education Access A specialist Free service of

Free Call 1800 888 876 22

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Technically speaking ● More than 60 per cent of year 11 students send text messages during class, stunning survey results show.

with phones say they take a few photos or videos a month and about half send them to friends’ phones.

● Texting is more common than calling; about 40 per cent of all teens check ● Ken Rigby, psychology professor from messages during class and about 30 per the University of South Australia and cent send them. And almost all students author of Bullying Interventions In

Schools: Six Basic Approaches (ACER Press, 2010), said it was possible, but unlikely, that students were texting in class for educational purposes. “It’s probably a game to dispel boredom and it’s a worry if teachers and parents are unaware of it,’’ Prof Rigby said.

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● Almost 70 per cent of the 5000 students surveyed by Independent Schools Victoria often take a mobile

phone to school, with girls slightly more likely to have phones than boys.

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GETTING THE MESSAGE 23

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Santa Maria College is a secondary school for girls embedded in the Catholic tradition. It cultivates a spirit of compassion and a heart for social justice. The College offers the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program. As winner of the NAB Schools First $100,000 state award for science, the College acknowledges its responsibility to educate young women for a future that is dynamic and unknown. Enrol now for Year 7-12. Tours available on June 23 and August 2 or by appointment. For more information phone 9489 7644. The College is located at 50 Separation St, Northcote. www.santamaria.vic.edu.au

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| EXCEL INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS MAGAZINE 2010

Open Day is on October 27. Tours: 2-7pm Information Session: 7pm

49QUV485263F/N/WS/10

A World of Opportunity for Young Women

SANTA MARIA COLLEGE leadernews.com.au


PAGE: 25 COLOUR: CMYK DATE: JUN10 PUB: QUV

A true education realises the full potential of every child

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At Wesley, we believe in a true education - one that realises the full potential of every girl and boy. Our rich and comprehensive coeducational program promotes not only excellent academic results but has a concentrated focus on the Arts, Sport, Outdoor Education and Community.

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A True Education

WES032

Elsternwick • Glen Waverley • St Kilda Road

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Visit www.wesleycollege.net or call + 61 3 8102 6888 for more information.

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26 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS DIRECTORY Acacia College

Education Access

Luther College

St Leonard's College

370 Bridge Inn Rd, Mernda 9717 7300 www.acacia.vic.edu.au

Free Call 1800 888 876

Plymouth Rd, Croydon Hills 9724 2000 www.luther.vic.edu.au

163 South Rd, East Brighton 65 Riverend Rd, Bangholme 9909 9300 www.stleonards.vic.edu.au

Camberwell Girls Grammar 2 Torrington St, Canterbury 4 Mont Albert Rd, Canterbury 9813 1166 www.camberwellgirls.net

Caulfield Grammar Wheelers Hill. Malvern. Caulfield. Yarra Junction. Nanjing-China 9524 6300 www.caulfield.vic.edu.au

MPR: QUV001

Christian Brothers' College 11 Westbury St, St. Kilda 295 Carlisle St, Balaclava 9529 6611 www.cbcstkilda.com

Geelong Grammar 14 Douglas St, Toorak 50 Biddlecomb Ave, Corio 5273 9307 www.ggs.vic.edu.au

Melbourne Grammar School

Genazzano FCJ College 301 Cotham Rd, Kew 8862 1000 www.genazzano.vic.edu.au

Haileybury Berwick. Brighton. Keysborough 9213 2222 www.haileybury.vic.edu.au

Huntingtower 77 Waimarie Drive, Mount Waverley 9807 8888 www.huntingtower.vic.edu.au

Kingswood College

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355 Station St, Box Hill 9890 0677 www.kingswoodcollege.vic.edu.au

Korowa Anglican Girls' School

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Ranfurlie Crescent, Glen Iris 9885 0336 www.korowa.vic.edu.au

67 Balaclava Rd, Caulfield 1 Domain Rd, Melbourne 9865 7570 www.mgs.vic.edu.au

St Peter's College

Mentone Girls' Grammar

Strathcona

11 Mentone Pde, Mentone 9581 1200 www.mentonegirls.vic.edu.au

34 Scott St, Canterbury 30 Yarra St, Hawthorn 173 Prospect Hill Rd, Canterbury 8779 7500 www.strathcona.vic.edu.au

Mentone Grammar 63 Venice St, Mentone 9584 4211 www.mentonegrammar.net

Presentation College Windsor 187 Dandenong Rd, Windsor 8517 2777 www.pcw.vic.edu.au

Preshil 395 Barkers Rd, Kew 9817 6135 www.preshil.vic.edu.au

Ruyton Girls' School 12 Selbourne Rd, Kew 9819 2422 www.ruyton.vic.edu.au

Santa Maria College 50 Separation St, Northcote 9489 7644 www.santamaria.vic.edu.au

Cranbourne-Frankston Rd, Cranbourne 5996 6733 www2.stpeters.vic.edu.au

The Knox School 220 Burwood Hwy, Wantirna South 8805 3800 www.knox.vic.edu.au

Tintern Schools 90 Alexandra Rd, Ringwood East Maidstone St, Ringwood 9845 7777 www.tinternschools.vic.edu.au

Toorak College Old Mornington Rd, Mt Eliza 9788 7200 www.toorakcollege.vic.edu.au

Wesley College Elsternwick. Glen Waverley. St. Kilda Road 8102 6888 www.wesleycollege.net

Yarra Valley Grammar St Anthony's Coptic Orthodox College 15 Alpina St, Frankston North 9786 3145 www.stanthonys.vic.edu.au

Kalinda Rd, Ringwood 9262 7700 www.yvg.vic.edu.au

PAGE: 26 COLOUR: CMYK

St Peter’s College - Cranbourne East Campus Providing the Environment where Excellence Can Flourish

St Peter’s College Cranbourne-Frankston Road Cranbourne Ph: 5996 6733 www.stpeters.vic.edu.au Email: office@stpeters.vic.edu.au 26

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The new Cranbourne East campus of St Peter’s College will be located on Berwick-Cranbourne Road, and we are currently taking enrolments for Year 7, 2011. Please call our Registrar, Kelley Cooper, on 5996 6733 for an Enrolment Information pack today.

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COLOUR: CMYK PAGE: 27 DATE: JUN10

Our expert and creative staff encourage students to be their best in an environment of openness, friendship and compassion for others. The relationship between our staff and students is fundamental to everything we do, whether it’s fostering the development of young personalities or providing meaningful one on one support. Our dynamic curriculum provides each student the best opportunities to study and grow in a culture of confidence.

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DR MARK MERRY – PRINCIPAL

Located in the heart of Melbourne’s east, Yarra Valley Grammar understands the value of boys and girls working together to develop teamwork, sociability and self confidence.

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“THERE ARE GREAT OPPORTUNITIES AT YARRA VALLEY GRAMMAR; ACADEMIC, SPORTING, CULTURAL AND THE ARTS. STUDENTS HERE CONTINUE TO BE CHALLENGED AND SUPPORTED TO REACH THEIR ACADEMIC POTENTIAL”.

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To book a private tour, please contact our Registrar, Mrs Alison Klitzing on 9262 7700.

7563 05/10

A CO-EDUCATIONAL SCHOOL IN THE ANGLICAN TRADITION – EARLY LEARNING TO YEAR 12

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Yarra Valley Grammar Kalinda Road Ringwood Victoria 3134 Telephone 03 9262 7700 Email registrar@yvg.vic.edu.au www.yvg.vic.edu.au CRICOS NO. 00356E

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BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

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Mentone Grammar is acknowledged as a dynamic coeducational learning environment. Middle School is where our unique education model truly shines and sets our school apart. Students in Years 5-9 learn in separate gender classes, with all other year levels coeducational, reflecting modern thinking that boys and girls develop differently during various stages of adolescence. It’s the best of both worlds!

OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITIES

FOR GIRLS AND BOYS FROM

ELC

TO

YEAR

12

Come and see what everyone’s talking about. School Tours - see our website or by appointment with our Registrar. 63 Venice Street, Mentone | Phone 9584 4211 | www.mentonegrammar.net

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