Page 1

   

   

DESIGNING THE CIRCULAR METABOLIC BUILDING  The case of Biotope   in the Sunrise Campus  Master Thesis                         

 


Wageningen University  Environmental Technology Group  Urban Environmental Management     

MASTER THESIS           

DESIGNING THE CIRCULAR METABOLIC BUILDING  The case of Biotope in the Sunrise Campus                Author: Léa Gejer Struchiner  Supervisor: Ingo Leusbrock  Examiner: Huub Rijnaarts                  August 08 2011 


Contents    SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................. 1  1.  INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................. 3  1.1. 

RESEARCH PURPOSE ................................................................................................................... 4 

1.2. 

RESEARCH QUESTIONS ............................................................................................................... 5 

1.3. 

OUTLINE OF THE THESIS ............................................................................................................. 5 

2.  THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: THE EFFECTIVE DESIGN ............................................................................. 6  2.1. 

CRITERIA 1: WASTE EQUALS FOOD, CIRCULAR METABOLISM ........................................................ 7 

2.2. 

CRITERIA 2: CELEBRATE DIVERSITY, BIODIVERSITY ....................................................................... 8 

2.3. 

CRITERIA 3: USE CURRENT SOLAR INCOME, USE ONLY RENEWABLE SOURCES ............................... 9 

3.  EVALUATION CRITERIA ...................................................................................................................... 10  3.1. 

URBAN HARVEST APPROACH (UHA): CIRCULAR METABOLISM AND USE OF RENEWABLE SOURCES . 10 

3.2. 

BIODIVERSITY CRITERIA ............................................................................................................ 12 

4.  CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE ........................................................................ 15  4.1. 

STAKEHOLDERS ........................................................................................................................ 16 

4.2. 

THE MASTER PLAN AND THE BUSINESS AS USUAL (BAU) SCENARIO ........................................... 19 

5.  SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY ...................................................................................................... 21  5.1. 

ENERGY FLOW  ......................................................................................................................... 22 

5.2. 

HYDROLOGICAL FLOW .............................................................................................................. 23 

5.3. 

BIODIVERSITY .......................................................................................................................... 25 

6.  SCENARIOS ...................................................................................................................................... 26  6.1. 

SCENARIO 1 – BUSINESS AS USUAL (BAU) ................................................................................ 29 

6.1.1. 

ENERGY FLOW  ................................................................................................................. 31 

6.1.2. 

WATER FLOW  .................................................................................................................. 32 

6.1.3. 

BIODIVERSITY .................................................................................................................. 33 

6.1.4. 

BUSINESS AS USUAL: ASSESSMENT ................................................................................... 34 

6.2. 

SCENARIO 2 – EFFICIENT .......................................................................................................... 35 

6.2.1. 

ENERGY FLOW  ................................................................................................................. 37 

6.2.2. 

ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION ...................................................................................... 37 

6.2.3. 

ENERGY PRODUCTION  ...................................................................................................... 44 

6.2.4. 

WATER FLOW  .................................................................................................................. 45 

6.2.5. 

WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION ....................................................................................... 46 


6.2.6. 

MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT....................................................................... 46 

6.2.7. 

BIODIVERSITY .................................................................................................................. 48 

6.2.8. 

‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT ................................................................................. 48 

6.3. 

SCENARIO 3 – BIO‐DIVERSE ...................................................................................................... 50 

6.3.1. 

ENERGY FLOW  ................................................................................................................. 51 

6.3.2. 

ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION ...................................................................................... 52 

6.3.3. 

ENERGY PRODUCTION  ...................................................................................................... 57 

6.3.4. 

WATER FLOW  .................................................................................................................. 59 

6.3.5. 

WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION ....................................................................................... 60 

6.3.6. 

MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT....................................................................... 61 

6.3.7. 

BIODIVERSITY .................................................................................................................. 63 

6.3.8. 

‘BIO‐DIVERSE SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT ............................................................................ 64 

6.4. 

SCENARIO 4 – PRODUCER ......................................................................................................... 66 

6.4.1. 

ENERGY FLOW  ................................................................................................................. 68 

6.4.2. 

ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION ...................................................................................... 69 

6.4.3. 

ENERGY PRODUCTION  ...................................................................................................... 72 

6.4.4. 

WATER FLOW  .................................................................................................................. 77 

6.4.5. 

WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION ....................................................................................... 79 

6.4.6. 

MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT....................................................................... 79 

6.4.7. 

BIODIVERSITY .................................................................................................................. 80 

6.4.8. 

‘PRODUCER SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT ............................................................................... 81 

6.5. 

SCENARIO 5 – HYBRID.............................................................................................................. 83 

6.5.1. 

ENERGY FLOW  ................................................................................................................. 85 

6.5.2. 

ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION ...................................................................................... 86 

6.5.3. 

ENERGY PRODUCTION  ...................................................................................................... 88 

6.5.4. 

WATER FLOW  .................................................................................................................. 92 

6.5.5. 

WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION ....................................................................................... 93 

6.5.6. 

MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT....................................................................... 93 

6.5.7. 

BIODIVERSITY .................................................................................................................. 93 

6.5.8. 

‘HYBRID SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT .................................................................................... 94 

7.  DISCUSSION  ..................................................................................................................................... 96  8.  CONCLUSION .................................................................................................................................. 102  References .......................................................................................................................................... 103  Annex 1 – Technology index ............................................................................................................... 108 


SUMMARY    Annex 2 – Potential Water Applications (Asano, 2006) ...................................................................... 109  Annex 3 – Water application qualities and volumes in Sunrise Campus Buildings ............................ 110  Annex 4 – Water Consumption in Working Environments in the Netherlands. ................................. 111   


SUMMARY   

SUMMARY  The  present  thesis  deals  with  the  role  of  the  built  up  environment  in  relation  to  the  resources  it  relies on. It reflects and designs urban systems towards closed cycles of energy and water, through  the use of renewable resources. Moreover, it takes into account the buildings integration to its local  biodiversity.  All  these  issues,  when  planned  for  an  urban  area,  will  bring  up  an  effective  design  through a strategic management of resources.  To  create  such  effective  design,  the  ‘Cradle  to  Cradle’  (C2C)  (McDonough  et  al.,  2002)  theory  is  embraced  as  the  theoretical  background  for  the  design  criteria.  The  three  tenets  of  the  book  are  used to generate and evaluate scenarios for the study area. The first tenet, ‘waste equals food’, is  represented by the search of a circular metabolism of energy and water in the building’s design. The  second, ‘celebrate diversity’, is represented by the biodiversity that can be enhanced depending on  each scenario’s design features. Finally, the third tenet, ‘use current solar income’, is represented by  the effort of using renewable and local energy and water. For the first and third criteria, the Urban  Harvest Approach (UHA) (Agudelo et al., 2009) is applied, whereas for the second, indices of quantity  and quality of green areas are assessed.  The  study  area  is  the  Sunrise  Campus,  an  industrial  site  located  in  Venlo,  the  Netherlands.  This  campus serves as an open innovation place for companies and institutes that have their main focus  on glass and energy. There, a building called Biotope is to be built, and this building will serve as a  meeting place for all workers of the companies. The Biotope is to create an identity in the campus  while  it  stimulates  the  working  environment.  A  Master  Plan  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  is  being  developed, where the C2C theory is strongly emphasized.  According to the theoretical background, five different scenarios for the Biotope and Sunrise Campus  were  developed  and  assessed  according  to  the  three  criteria  mentioned  above.  The  first  is  the  ‘Business  as  Usual’  (BAU)  Scenario,  which  is  designed  according  to  information  of  the  energy  and  water  flows,  and  biodiversity  of  the  buildings  that  are  currently  placed  in  the  study  area.  It  is  the  basis for comparison with other scenarios. The second is the ‘Efficient Scenario’, where the building  efficiency is seen as a tool that intends overall positive effects towards a more sustainable design.  The third scenario is the ‘Bio‐diverse’, which prioritizes the biodiversity through the implementation  of green areas rather than other technologies that make possible the production of clean water and  energy. The fourth scenario is the ‘Producer’, which in turn, prioritizes the production of renewable 

1   


SUMMARY    energy and water rather than biodiversity. The last is the ‘Hybrid Scenario’, which intends to give the  same priority level to the production of renewable water and energy, and the biodiversity.  These  scenarios  are  designed  managing  different  technologies  that  are  seen  as  a  connection  between  the  human  functions  of  the  Biotope  and  the  renewable  sources  such  as  the  Sun  and  the  rain  water.  Different  technologies  that  reduce  the  water  and  energy  demand,  and  others  that  enhance  their  multisource  are  implemented.  At  the  same  time,  green  areas  are  also  added  to  the  program  with  the  intension  of  increasing  the  biodiversity  in  the  Biotope  and  in  the  campus.  According to each building design and chosen technologies, their demand, their self‐sufficiency and  output of energy and water vary. Furthermore, the amount of green area in each design, as well as  the local species that would live there, will differ.  Finally,  these  scenarios  were  assessed  and  evaluated  according  to  the  above  mentioned  criteria.  They are analyzed and compared in order to achieve the most effective solution for the case study.       

 

2   


INTRODUCTION    1. INTRODUCTION   The  Industrial  Revolution  has  given  humans  unprecedented  power  over  nature  through  new  technologies and the use of non‐renewable sources of energy (McDonough et al., 2002). The mass  industry has allowed and incentivized high consummation standards and consequently massive use  of  resources.  In  search  of  comfort,  convenience,  and  material  wealth,  the  modern  society  has  scarified  not  only  human  health,  but  also  the  health  of  all  species.  We  are  starting  to  exhaust  the  capacity of the very systems that sustain us, and now we must deal with the consequences (Ryn et  al., 2007).    Thus, modern industrial life is based on an unsustainable level of use of natural systems. The root  cause  of  human  imbalance  with  the  natural  ecosystem  and  biochemical  cycles,  on  which  all  life  depends,  is  the  decision  to  expand  the  use  of  resources  without  reflecting  on  the  consequences.  Many  of  the  current  environmental  problems  derive  from  the  fact  that  the  sinks,  on  which  the  human  society  depends,  cannot  make  use  of  their  wastes1.  The  excess  waste  then  disrupts  the  functioning  of  its  sinks.  The  cities  are  forced  to  concentrate  the  wastes,  producing  huge  landfills,  polluted air and water bodies (White, 2006).    According  to  Keen  et  al.,  the  urbanization  processes  within  the  modern  industrial  society  are  characterized first of all by the use of fossil fuels consumption associated to greenhouse gases and  pollutant emissions (Keen, 2002). Second, it is characterized by the increased production of synthetic  chemicals  used  to  create  products.  Those  products  such  as  pesticides  and  plastic  are  not  easily  broken  down  by  natural  ecological  processes.  Third,  new  forms  of  human  organization,  which  are  not  directly  engaged  with  food  production  and  associated  ecosystem  functions,  have  developed.  Finally, it is characterized by exponential growth of human population.    Within the nowadays consummation patterns, the human society rarely thought about the impacts  of  their  wastes.  Yet,  as  the  use  of  resources  has  increased,  so  has  the  production  of  wastes  of  all  kinds  (White,  2006).    Therefore,  the  idea  of  unlimited  economic  growth  with  unlimited  use  of  resources  is  becoming  outdated  and  it  is  necessary  to  review  the  old  values  initiated  during  the  Industrial Revolution.    Hence, it is crucial to discuss the role of the built environment in such analysis, since the cities’ areas  are  increasing  and  represent  most  of  the  populations’  settlements.  Already  in  1996,  according  to  Girardet, although the urban areas occupied only 2% of the world’s land surface, they used 75% of  the world’s resources and released a similar percentage of global wastes (Girardet, 1996). Moreover,  half of the world’s population has been living in urban areas since 2008; whereas in Europe, North  and  Latin  America  more  than  70%  of  the  population  is  by  now  living  in  urban  environments  (UN‐ HABITAT , 2008).       

                                                             1

 Wastes are defined as all the materials left over from production or consumption. They can be solid, liquid or  gaseous (White, 2006). 

3   


INTRODUCTION    1.1. RESEARCH PURPOSE  In  the  present  thesis,  the  built  environment  is  conceived  as  a  dynamic  and  complex  ecosystem,  where the social, economic and cultural systems cannot escape the rules of abiotic and biotic nature.  Therefore, like any ecosystem the built environment has inputs and outputs of energy and materials.  According to Newman, the main environmental problems are related to the growth of these inputs  and managing the increasing outputs (Newman, 1999). Consequently, while contemporary urban life  covers our biological origins, people still depend on ecological systems to meet basic needs such as  food,  oxygen  and  water  (Keen,  2002).  This  thesis  will  study  urban  ecology  as  complex  systems  of  relationships and interactions between people and resource use within the urban environment. The  challenge is to create fewer wastes and at the same time, develop market for those wastes that are  still produced.    The main objective of this research is to identify a viable model for urban building in relation to all  resources upon which urban regions depend, but currently tend to deplete or destroy. Most of the  time,  the  technologies  in  use  in  the  business  as  usual  situation  need  inordinate  amounts  of  chemicals,  materials  and  energy,  often  with  harmful  environmental  consequences.  In  contrast,  according to Todd, it is possible to design living technologies that have the same capability as natural  systems do, such as self‐design, self‐repair, reproduction and self‐organization in relation to changes  (Todd, 1996).    Therefore,  this  thesis  seeks  to  evaluate  different  designs  of  building  settlements  when  concerned  with metabolic cycles of energy and water of a built environment.  It takes the case of study of the  Sunrise Campus, an industrial region located in Venlo, the Netherlands, which is in its design phase.  The municipality of Venlo, which is the client of the Sunrise Campus Master Plan, aims at reducing  CO2  emissions and at increasing the use of renewable resources. The campus is an open innovation  site  for  companies  and  institutes  which  have  their  main  focus  on  glass  and  energy  (Studio  Marco  Vermeulen, 2009). Hence,  the  idea  is  to  compare  different  solutions  for  the  case  study  assessing  the  flows  of  energy  and water in and out of the site in study. These flows should stretch renewable resources close to  their ability to replenish supplies. At the same time, the waste generated is to be reused within the  campus  ecosystem.  In  addition,  this  thesis  aims  to  explore  the  relationships  between  energy/materials  and  site  use  activities  that  will  set  the  boundaries  and  conditions  for  the  design  proposal.   Furthermore, the Biotope, a building that will be set as the heart for the campus will be studied. The  Biotope  will  be  understood  as  an  example  that  could  irradiate  to  the  campus  and  to  the  city  of  Venlo.  It  will  mimic  the  consumer‐producer  ecosystem,  in  order  to  mix  urban  activities  with  the  natural  world.  The  residues  will  be  reduced  to  their  minimum  and  the  circularity  of  physical  processes will be set. This process will make use of renewable resources that will bring up a diverse,  clean, safe and healthy environment. Consequently, the site will be addressed as a potential place to  provide habitat for plants and animal species.       4   


INTRODUCTION    1.2. RESEARCH QUESTIONS  Hence,  this  thesis  aims  to  create  a  discussion  of  the  different  ways  to  design  a  building,  with  a  strategic  resource  management  and  spatial  planning,  towards  the  human  integration  with  the  surrounding environment. Therefore, it aims to connect the existent knowledge gaps, by answering  the following questions:    Main Research Questions  RQ.1. How can a new building be designed in the most effective way to avoid the damage  caused to the surrounding environment, without depleting the ecosystems and bio‐chemical  cycles on which it depends, and being a part of a sustainable urban environment?  RQ.2.  Why  is  the  introduction  of  such  buildings  crucial  for  the  continuous  development  of  the current society?  Sub‐Research Questions  RQ.3. What will the social and technological functions of the Biotope building be?   RQ.4.  What  are  the  current  technologies  available  and  how  can  they  be  combined  in  this  case?   RQ.5. What will the quantities of inflows of energy and water of the Sunrise Campus and the  Biotope be according to its new functions?   RQ.6. What are the design options for the Biotope – which are dependent on the buildings’  architectural design, spatial orientation, construction materials and used technologies – such  that  they will prevent the  destruction and depletion of the surrounding environment even  though  the  building  will  depend  on  resources  such  as  energy,  water  and  materials  for  its  functioning?    1.3. OUTLINE OF THE THESIS  The  thesis  starts  by  grounding  a  theoretical  framework  that  is  supported  by  three  main  principles  established according to the understanding of an effective design. After that, an evaluation criterion  is set, with the purpose of assessing different possibilities for the case study. The case study, which is  a building called Biotope that is located in an industrial campus, the Sunrise Campus, is described in  its current situation and its Master Plan is studied. As a baseline for the comparison of scenarios, the  first  scenario,  which  is  the  Business  as  Usual  (BAU)  situation  is  designed,  according  to  the  main  characteristics  of  the  existing  buildings  in  the  campus.  After  that,  four  other  scenarios  are  developed. They are assessed according to the theoretical framework criteria and compared.     

5   


THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: THE EFFECTIVE DESIGN    2. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: THE EFFECTIVE DESIGN  The  task  of  righting  the  balance  between  society  and  nature  requires  the  application  of  the  knowledge  of  the  functioning  of  ecosystems  to  a  fundamental  redesign  of  human  support  technologies. Todd argues that such redesign according to applied ecology can reduce the negative  footprint on  the  Earth by  up to 90%  (Tood et al., 2003).  Therefore, designs produced with regard  for,  and  taking  advantage  of,  the  characteristic  behavior  of  natural  systems  will  be  the  most  successful (Bergen et al., 2001).     The Biotope project aims to better integrate society with its supporting environment. Therefore, in  this  thesis,  it  is  recognized  that  human  society  is  inseparable  from  and  dependent  on  natural  systems.  Bergen  et  al.  argue  that  sustaining  human  society  requires  engineering  design  practices  that  protect  and  enhance  the  ability  of  ecosystems  to  perpetuate  themselves  while  continuing  to  support  humanity  (Bergen  et  al.,  2001).  Mitsch  defines  ecological  engineering  as  the  design  of  sustainable ecosystems that integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of  both  (Mitsch,  1996).  Therefore,  following  ecological  principles,  the  Biotope  design  recognizes  the  relationship of organisms (including humans) with their environment. It works on the difficulties of  design imposed by the complexity, variability and uncertainty inherent to natural systems; while it  aims at the integration of society and ecosystems in built environments.    In the book ‘‘Cradle to Cradle’’, McDonough and Braungart argue that the conflict between industry  and  the  environment  is  not  an  indictment  of  commerce  but  an  outgrowth  of  purely  opportunistic  design. The design of products and manufacturing systems growing out of the Industrial Revolution  reflected the spirit of the day and yielded a host of unintended yet tragic consequences (McDonough  et al., 2003).    Today, with our growing knowledge of the living earth, design can reflect a new spirit. In fact, it is  argued  by  the  authors  that,  when  designers  employ  the  intelligence  of  natural  systems—the  effectiveness  of  nutrient  cycling,  the  abundance  of  the  sun's  energy—they  can  create  products,  industrial  systems,  buildings,  even  regional  plans  that  allow  nature  and  commerce  to  fruitfully  co‐ exist (McDonough et al., 2002).     In  this  thesis,  the  ‘Cradle  to  Cradle’  (C2C)  theory  will  be  used  as  the  base  for  the  theoretical  framework for the analysis of the Biotope / Sunrise Campus design options. C2C is underpinned by  three tenets: waste equals food; use current solar income; and celebrate diversity (McDonough et  al., 2002). These principles are taken into consideration when exploring design options for the study  area  and  they  are  explained  in  the  following  Section.  Furthermore,  they  are  taken  as  the  three  different criteria to evaluate the design proposals, and are described further in Section 3.          

6   


THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: THE EFFECTIVE DESIGN    2.1. CRITERIA 1: WASTE EQUALS FOOD, CIRCULAR METABOLISM  The  design  will  be  mostly  concerned  with  the  idea  of  circular  urban  metabolism.  This  means,  following Keen, that the area will be developed by mimicking a natural system, while ensuring that  waste products are re‐integrated into wider ecosystems. In this model, it is possible to specify the  physical  and  biological  processes  of  converting  resources  into  useful  products  and  wastes  like  the  metabolic processes of human bodies or ecosystems. The amount of waste depends on the amount  of resources required (Keen, 2002).     In this project, the human society is seen as a part of the biosphere that we are transforming. We  are seen as just another ‘producer‐consumer ecosystem’, as described by Howard Odum (Figure 1).  In  this  model,  waste  is  not  a  natural  concept,  because,  in  natural  systems,  the  outputs  from  one  activity are the inputs for other activities. Although the objective is to produce less waste and reuse  them  within  the  site,  these  wastes  continue  to  exist  elsewhere.  They  take  up  spaces  that  are  referred to as ‘sinks’. Some of the materials lying on sinks are inert and may be ignored. However,  other materials continue to play an important role in the environment, such as contaminants in the  food chain or greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Only humans have managed to create unusable  wastes, and these are the ones that are disturbing the natural cycles on which we depend (White,  2006).    

  Figure 1. Howard Odum’s model of typical producer‐consumer ecosystem. Source: White, 2006. 

According  to  Nederlof  et  al.,  the  urban  metabolism  concept  facilitates  the  integration  of  different  cycles  (water,  energy  and  nutrients)  in  the  built  environment.  Therefore,  planners  must  consider  water,  energy,  and  nutrient  flows  together  rather  than  separately,  and  will  have  to  design  with  flexibility for future changes (Nederlof et al., 2010). However, the present thesis will mainly focus on  7   


THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: THE EFFECTIVE DESIGN    the assessment of energy and water flows. Even though the nutrient flow will also be seen as a part  of the system, the only data of this flow that will be assessed are those that are related to the other  two flows.     2.2. CRITERIA 2: CELEBRATE DIVERSITY, BIODIVERSITY   Tzoulkas et al. state that the concept of biological diversity was initially defined as the total number  of species within a given area. It was further complemented with the concepts of genetic diversity,  habitat diversity and cultural diversity. Therefore, biodiversity comprehends genes, species, habitats,  associated  interactions  and  socio‐economic,  aesthetic  and  ethical  values  (Tzoulas  et  al.,  2010).  However, the multi‐scale aspects of the concept of biodiversity have led the present thesis to focus  on  the  concept  of  biodiversity  defined  by  Bergen  et  al.  This  definition  states  that  biodiversity  can  manifest  itself  in  terms  of  the  number  of  species,  genetic  variation  within  species  and  functional  diversity (when different species can perform similar functions) (Bergen et al., 2001).    When natural structures and processes are included and mimicked, nature is treated as a partner of  design,  and  not  an  obstacle  to  overcome  and  dominate.  Life  causes  local  decrease  in  entropy  by  producing order out of chaos (even though the energy expended to produce order results in more  entropy  overall).  The  practical  implication  is  that  although  ecosystems  are  complex,  they  have  the  capacity  to  self‐organize.  The  design  serves  only  as  the  choice  generator  and  as  a  facilitator  for  matching environments with ecosystems, but nature does the rest (Bergen et al., 2001).    According  to  Bergen  et  al.,  ecosystems  are  heterogeneous,  displaying  patchy  and  discontinuous  textures  at  all  scales.  Moreover,  they  are  complex  because  they  do  not  function  around  a  single  stable equilibrium. Therefore, the structure and diversity produced by the functional space occupied  by ecosystems is what allows them to remain healthy or to persist (Bergen et al., 2001).    Furthermore, diversity systems are more ecologically resilient and able to persist and evolve (Bergen  et al., 2001). Moreover, the complexity and diversity of natural systems cause high degree of spatial  variability.  Every  system  and  location  is  different  and  solutions  should  be  site‐specific  and  small‐ scaled.  Therefore,  the  vegetation  chosen  for  the  building  and  its  surrounding  should  be  local  and  appropriate for the climate and soil. This will minimize disruption to existent ecosystems and at the  same time avoid irrigation and active maintenance (Snep et al., 2009).     Traditional and mono‐functional business sites are usually seen as colossal urban developments that  destroy  historical  landscapes  and  biodiversity  values.  Biotic  aspects  of  this  land  use  environment,  that  is,  fauna  and  flora  and  the  landscape  they  inhabit,  are  not  fully  addressed  in  the  business  as  usual site concepts. Therefore, sustainable development of business sites is increasingly being called  for  (Snep  et  al.,  2009).  For  that  reason,  the  Sunrise  Campus  and  the  Biotope  are  assumed  to  be  potential sites to provide habitat for plants and animal species (please refer to Section 4 for more  details of the case study).      

8   


THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK: THE EFFECTIVE DESIGN    2.3. CRITERIA 3: USE CURRENT SOLAR INCOME, USE ONLY RENEWABLE SOURCES  Bergen et al. claim that to let nature self‐organize, it is necessary to make maximum use of the free  flow of energy into the system from natural sources, primarily the Sun (Bergen et al., 2001). Hence,  the  building  should  be  positioned  and  built  in  the  most  effective  way  of  using  solar  energy  and  natural ventilation. The use of natural energy brings up complexity and diversity of fauna and flora,  at the same time, it allows self‐organization of the ecosystem.     Trees and plants use sunlight to produce food (McDonough et al., 2003). Mimicking this system, the  Biotope  will  directly  collect  solar  energy  or  tap  into  passive  solar  processes,  such  as  day  lighting,  where  natural  light  can  be  “piped”  into  indoor  spaces.  Other  technologies  such  as  combined  heat  and power, bio‐digester, or photovoltaic cells, where energy flows are fueled by sunlight, will be also  explored as options.      Moreover,  like  in  the  Figure  2,  the  Biotope  will  nourish  its  surrounding,  by  making  more  than  is  necessary  for  its  own  metabolism.  It  should  produce  more  energy  than  it  consumes  and  purify  materials  such  as  water  and  air.  Finally,  the  Biotope  will  create  in  the  Sunrise  Campus  a  dynamic  interdependence, where it will support different buildings inside the campus in multiple ways.     

  Figure 2. Biotope  and its relationships with the surrounding  buildings in the Sunrise Campus.

     

 

 

9   


EVALUATION CRITERIA    3. EVALUATION CRITERIA  Two different methodologies are used to evaluate the scenarios, according to the above theoretical  framework. The first copes with the first and third design criteria, (waste equals food and use solar  income). This evaluation criterion is the urban harvest approach (UHA), developed by Agudelo‐Vera  et  al.  (Agudelo‐Vera  et  al.,  2011).  This  method  assesses  energy  and  water  balance  flows  through  three  different  indices:  demand  minimization,  self‐sufficiency  and  waste  output.  The  second  methodology copes with the design criteria of celebrate diversity. It is focused on biodiversity in the  built  environment.  Its  assessment  comprehends  two  different  calculations:  green  area  and  local  species indexes.     3.1. URBAN HARVEST APPROACH (UHA): CIRCULAR METABOLISM AND USE OF RENEWABLE SOURCES  Urban  metabolism  quantifies  the  overall  fluxes  of  resources  of  an  urban  area.  To  evaluate  the  circular  metabolism,  the  Urban  Harvest  Approach  method  developed  by  Agudelo  et  al.  has  been  used.  The  UHA  aims  for  improved  resources  management  by  closing  cycles,  through  the  use  of  innovative technologies and harvesting natural resources (Agudelo‐Vera et al., 2011).    The  UHA  always  starts  with  a  baseline  assessment,  followed  by  the  evaluation  of  strategies  to  harvest resources. According to Agudelo et al., it consists of three bases for calculations. First, the  demand  is  minimized.  Second,  it  is  necessary  to  reduce  waste  outputs  by  cascading  and  recycling.  Last, renewable and local sources are used for the remaining demand (Agudelo‐Vera et al., 2011). In  what follows, these strategies are explained.    Baseline Assessment  The baseline assessment, the starting point of the UHA, is a mass flow analysis for the Business as  Usual (BAU) Scenario.  The aim is to identify all the external inputs and outputs of a defined urban  system and to understand the situation of the development of the area in the case of absence of any  concern to urban harvest and biodiversity issues. A demand and an output inventory are covered in  this analysis. The demand inventory quantifies the activities that consume resources and studies the  qualities  required  for  their  uses.  The  output  inventory  describes  the  outgoing  resources  of  flows,  their quantity and quality.    Demand (input) Minimization  After the baseline assessment, minimization of demand is achieved by modifying human behavior or  by  harvesting  resources  through  the  implementation  of  technologies  and  through  designing  an  optimum  spatial  distribution  of  the  scenario.  The  UHA  focuses  on  technology  implementation  to  reduce  resource  demand.  After  the  baseline  assessment,  the  activities  of  the  buildings  are  to  be  identified  and  technologies  are  to  be  selected  in  order  to  contribute  in  the  reduction  to  those  resource demands.    Output Minimization  The output minimization is achieved through recovery, cascading and recycling. Recovery refers to  direct reuse of outputs that have kept the same quality during the use of resource. In this case, the  quality  of  a  resource  has  remained  the  same.  Cascading  also  refers  to  direct  reuse  of  outputs,  however with a deteriorated quality. Finally, recycling refers to reuse of a particular resource flow  after quality upgrading.   10   


EVALUATION CRITERIA    Multisource  After  demand  and  output  minimization,  there  can  still  be  a  remaining  demand.  According  to  the  UHA, this is supplied by using local and renewable resources, such as solar energy and rain water.    Urban Metabolic Profile  According to the UHA, urban systems have two different impacts on the environment. The first is the  extraction  of  resources,  and  the  second  is  due  to  release  of  wastes.  The  Urban  Metabolic  Profile  provides  information  regarding  the  demand  of  resources  and  production  of  wastes  or  secondary  resources.  They  are  used  to  evaluate  the  possible  UHA  combined  strategies.  Therefore,  a  building  unit is assessed according to the following variables:     Conventional Demand (Do) that represents the demand when conventional technologies are  implemented, which is the case of the Business as Usual Scenario demand.   Minimized Demand (D) is the new demand after different technologies are applied.   Cascade (C) refers to resources that are directly reused within the building.   Recycle (R) is the flow of resources that is treated and reintroduced in the building unit   Consumption (Co) is the part of demand that is being consumed, converted to one or more  different components, or diminished, e.g. by decay.   Multisource (M) refers to local sources used in the building.     To relate these variables it is possible to achieve the following definitions:   Waste Exported (We) refers to the wastes produced by the building unit and exported. It can  be described as the following formula: .   Resources  harvested  (Rh)  are  the  sum  of  resources  cascaded  (C),  recycled  (R),  and  multisource (M); i.e.     For  water  and  energy  assessment,  the  urban  metabolic  profile  can  be  described  by  the  Demand  Minimization  Index  (DMI),  the  Self‐Sufficient  Index  (SSI)  and  the  Waste  Output  Index  (WOI).  Together, the three indices evaluate the criterion 1 and 3 of the theoretical framework explained in  Section 2: waste equals food and use of current solar income. These indices are given by:    Demand Minimization Index  DMI     The DMI represents the percentage of change in the demand taking as reference the conventional  demand, according to the chosen technologies in each scenario.     

11   


EVALUATION CRITERIA    Self‐Sufficient Index    SSI

 

The SSI shows the relation of the resources harvested and the new demand. If the SSI=1, the area is  self‐sufficient, by harvesting, recycling and cascading local and renewable sources. If SSI=0, there is  no  multisource,  cascading,  or  recycling.  In  this  case,  waste  is  produced  and  all  the  resources  are  imported to the system. If SSI > 1, the production of renewable sources is more than the demand,  and the extra production is to be exported.  Waste Output Index  WOI

 

The  waste  output  index  represents  the  relation  between  the  waste  that  is  exported  (We)  and  the  demand. Therefore, WOI=‐1 represents the conventional linear metabolism, where there is no reuse  of  resources  within  the  system.  However,  WOI=0  means  that  there  is  no  waste  being  exported,  which characterizes a circular metabolic system.   For the energy assessment, the Consumption (Co) has to be defined for each appliance used within  the building. It is only possible to obtain the exact appliances after a more detailed building project,  where the function needs of the Biotope are further defined. Therefore, the Co is considered zero  for all the scenarios, and it does not interfere in the energy assessment. For the water assessment,  the Co is also neglected, because the water losses are considered to be a minimum fraction of the  total demand.  3.2. BIODIVERSITY CRITERIA  According  to  Snep  et  al.,  the  Dutch  guidelines  for  biodiversity  conservation  are:  to  improve  the  quality of existing habitats, to enlarge the size of existing habitat patches, and to connect different  habitat patches to create a sustainable habitat network (Snep et al., 2009).    Detailed  biodiversity  studies  would  be  necessary  for  the  evaluation  of  the  development  of  biodiversity  in  the  comparison  of  the  present  situation  and  future  scenarios.  Although  detailed  studies  are  crucial  for  a  precise  description  of  urban  habitats,  they  can  be  time  and  resource  intensive and are not possible in the present thesis.    According to Snep et al., there are five principles that are capable to enhance biodiversity in business  sites (Snep et al., 2009). These principles are:  a. Make use of the potential of flat roofs for habitat  b. Enhance the green areas  c. Enhance the ecological quality of existing green, making use of local species  d. Make better use of vacant lots  e. Implement habitat corridors in the design    

12   


EVALUATION CRITERIA    For the evaluation of the biodiversity criteria, the three first principles are going to be measured and  compared  among  the  design  options.  The  use  of  the  potential  of  flat  roofs  for  habitat  and  the  enhancement of green areas will be evaluated according to the total area of green roofs and green  areas  within  the  buildings.  The  third  principle  will  be  evaluated  according  to  whether  these  green  areas have potential to become habitat of local species or do not.    The  biodiversity  criterion  is  based  on  two  variables:  the  amount  of  green  areas,  the  total  implantation area in the Sunrise Campus and in the Biotope, and the amount of each type of green  area.     The  types  of  green  areas  assessed  in  this  study  are  green  roofs,  green  walls,  gardens  ponds,  constructed  wetlands  and  greenhouses.  They  are  classified  as  controlled  (CG)  and  not  controlled  (NCG),  as  it  is  shown  in  Table  1.  The  total  green  area  (TG)  is  the  sum  of  the  controlled  and  not  controlled  areas .  Not  controlled  areas  are  green  roofs  and  walls,  gardens  and  ponds,  where  local  species  will  take  place.  Controlled  green  areas  are  constructed  wetlands  and  greenhouses, where human beings control the species that are going to be planted. In the case of  greenhouses, the temperature and humidity will be also modified, and local species will have fewer  chances to develop. The implantation areas (A) are the Biotope and Sunrise Campus project areas.  They are further explained in Section 6.    Table 1. Controlled and not controlled areas. 

green roof   Not controlled green areas (NCG)  garden pond Total Green Area (TG)  constructed wetland   Controlled green areas (CG)  greenhouse  

    For the evaluation of biodiversity in each scenario, two indices are to be assessed, the Green Area  Index and the Local Species Index. These indices are given by:    Green Area Index (GAI)    GAI

 

The  Green  Area  Index  (GAI)  represents  the  relation  of  the  total  green  area  and  the  implantation  area. If GAI=1, the total amount of green areas is equal to the implantation area. If GAI=0, there is no  green  area  at  all.  Note  that  GAI  can  be  greater  than  1,  which  means  that  the  total  green  area  is  larger than the implantation area. This can occur if there is more than one level of green in the study  area (Figure 3).     

13   


EVALUATION CRITERIA     

    

Figure 3. Green area index (GAI) shows the relation of total green and implantation area. 

Local Species Index (LSI)    LSI

 

The  LSI  is  the  percentage  of  the  total green  areas, which  are  not  controlled.  LSI=0  means  that  the  green areas are totally controlled and there is no space for the development of local species in the  green areas. On the other hand, LSI=1 means that there is no greenhouses or constructed wetlands  and that the total amount of green areas have potential to become habitat of local species.   

 

14   


CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE    4. CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE   This thesis discusses the metabolic cycles in the built environment, its importance and possibilities. It  takes the  case study of the Sunrise Campus located in Venlo (the Netherlands), a city that aims  at  reducing CO2 emissions and the use of non‐renewable resources. In this campus, the industrial area  in  the  direct  vicinity  of  the  company  Scheuten  Solar  Glass  will  be  developed,  and  different  stakeholders are taking part in the project (please refer to Section 4.1). In this area, other industries  focusing on glass and energy production will be located (Studio Marco Vermeulen, 2009). Therefore,  the land use of the Sunrise Campus is classified as a business site, that is, according to Snep et al.,  “areas  designated  by  local,  regional  and  in  some  cases  national  governments  to  accommodate  multiple companies that produce, transfer or store goods or provide services” (Snep et al., 2009).  The Sunrise Campus will be set as an example of urban enterprise that will be designed to provide its  own energy, wastewater treatment, and water supply. This campus will be developed in an area of  approximately 30ha, located in the Southern part of Trade Port West between the A67 highway and  Eindhovensesweg  (Figure  4).  The  operational  area  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  consists  of  two  thirds  of  the  total  area  (approximately  19,8ha).  Within  this  area,  an  industrial  site  of  130.000m²  is  planned  and is designated  to consist of 37% of production, 30% of research and development (R&D), 27% of  offices and 6% of facilities (Municipality of Venlo, 2010).    

A67  Sunrise  Campus  Eindhovensesweg 

  Figure 4. Sunrise Campus location. Source: Municipality of Venlo, 2010. 

The draft Master Plan is already projected. According to the Municipality of Venlo, it is the structural  basis for the construction of the Sunrise Campus. The area will serve as an open innovation campus  for  companies  and  institutes  that  have  their  main  focus  on  glass  and  energy.  The  Master  Plan  strongly  emphasizes  the  ‘Cradle  to  Cradle’  (C2C)  philosophy  in  the  whole  area  of  the  campus.  Moreover, it aims to create an identity in the campus while it stimulates the working environment  (Gemeente Venlo, 2010). Thus, through the main values such as “innovation, openness, encounter,  knowledge,  comfort  and  sustainability”  (Studio  Marco  Vermeulen,  2009),  the  Sunrise  Campus  intends to be an attractive working environment. 

15   


CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE    In  the  center  of  the  area  and  in  the  green  heart  of  the  campus,  a  multifunctional  building called Biotope will be located (Figure  5). It is designated to serve as a meeting place  for all employees of the campus. Moreover, it  will  bring  the  companies  together  and  it  will  set for a place of exchange of knowledge and  cooperation (Studio Marco Vermeulen, 2009).  The  Biotope  will  hold  facilities  such  as  restaurants,  day‐care,  fitness,  meeting  room,  conference  center,  laboratories,  glass  museum,  and  C2C  information  center,  within  a  building  area  of  12.500m².  Therefore,  the  Figure  5.  Schematic  drawing  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  program and  zoning.  In  the  center  is  represented  the  Biotope,  which Biotope  will  become  an  icon  for  the  campus,  will  be  the  connection between  all  the  other buildings  in  the like the campus itself will become an icon for  Sunrise Campus. Source: Master Plan Sunrise Campus, 2009.  the city of Venlo (Vermeulen, 2010).    Hence, the main proposal of this thesis is to develop and evaluate different design options for the  Biotope building in order for it to  be a  prototype installation for the whole campus.  As such, each  design option for the Biotope will result in a different scenario for the whole Sunrise Campus. The  design  will  be  concerned  with  the  Biotope’s  function  as  a  human  and  technical  link  between  the  offices, industries and people.     4.1. STAKEHOLDERS  Three  different  groups  of  stakeholders  were  identified  in  the  Sunrise  Campus  project:  local  government/Municipality of Venlo, Scheuten Company, and employees of the Sunrise Campus.     Firstly, the local government of the province of Limburg aims to reduce drastically CO2 emissions in  the region. Moreover, the Municipality owns the land in study; thus, it has asked for the Master Plan  studies and is responsible for the development of the industrial region where the Sunrise Campus is  located. Therefore, the Municipality aims to develop a sustainable region based on C2C principles.  (Gemeente Venlo, 2010).     Secondly, although according  to the  Master Plan  different companies focused on glass and energy  production will be located in the campus, Scheuten is the only one that is already placed in the area.   This  company  presented  itself  very  closed  when  asked  for  contacts  and  interviews  for  the  present  thesis.  In  email  exchange,  the  person  responsible  doubted  that  the  Sunrise  Campus  is  really  interesting  for  the  thesis  case  study.  Moreover,  although  the  fact  that  this  company  produces  photovoltaic  cells,  it  does  not  show  itself  willing  to  close  energy  or  materials  cycles  or  even  to  become  self‐sufficient  in  energy  production.  When  asked  if  they  aim  to  cover  the  energy  demand  from the industries with photovoltaic cells, the answer was: “I don’t think so, in time a few percent  of  the  total  demand”2.  Scheuten  does  not  have  the  assessment  of  the  quantity  of  rain  water                                                              

2

 A few emails were exchanged directly with Scheuten. The technical data was sent by Tim Verstegen the  Engineer Coordinator of Quality, Arbo and Environment in Scheuten Glas Nederland.  

16   


CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE    collected, used and discharged; the real quality of the discharged water (the contact person stated  the  water  was  “clean  to  lightly  polluted”  with  “dust  and  non‐toxic  paint”).  Moreover,  the  temperature of the waste‐heat, i.e. the heat that is produced during glass production and processing  and is released to the environments without being reused, was not available either.     Finally, the third group of stakeholders is the workers of the Sunrise Campus. Although they do not  have power for decision making, they are those who will experience the actual business site and the  Biotope after their development. As it was already mentioned, it is not yet known which companies  will  be  placed  in  the  area  (except  for  Scheuten),  but  they  will  be  focused  on  knowledge  intensive  companies according to the Master Plan.    Nowadays,  the  Sunrise  Campus  consists  of  five  buildings  that  belong  to  the  Scheuten  company.  Three  of  them  (M16,  M6,  M10)  are  used  for  production  and  processing  of  glass.  The  other  two  buildings are used for office activities (H30) and research and development (R&D) (H9). In between  the  buildings,  there  are  ponds  and  vegetation.  Through  the  existing  fishing  activities,  it  can  be  deduced that the level of pollution of the water in the pond is low (Figure 6).     The current inputs of water, energy (electricity and heat) and workers in the current situation of the  Sunrise  Campus  are  described  in  Tables  2  and  3.  The  data  from  production  halls  and  offices  was  provided  by  the  municipality  of  Venlo  (total  area,  volume,  electricity  demand,  gas  demand  water  demand  and  number  of  workers),  as  well  as  the  number  of  workers  in  the  R&D.  The  averages  of  energy, water, gas were calculated by dividing the total demand by the area (in the case of gas, by  the volume).  In addition, the data from R&D were accessed considering that these places are used  half as production halls and half as offices.   Table 2. Current situation: energy demand in the Sunrise Campus. Source: Bas van de Westerlo, 2010. 

TOTAL  AREA  (m²) 

TOTAL  VOLUME  (m³) 

TOTAL  ELECTRICITY  DEMAND  (MWh/year) 

AVERAGE  ELECTRICITY  DEMAND/m²  (MWh/year/ m²) 

TOTAL GAS  DEMAND  (Nm³/year) 

AVERAGE GAS  DEMAND/m³  (Nm³/year/m³) 

PRODUCTION   34.350  R&D   4.600  OFFICES   3.060  TOTAL  42.010 

258.000  34.500  14.076  306.576 

13.051 1.288 552 14.339

0,38 0,28 0,18

573.989  80.040  34.000  688.029 

2,22 2,32 2,42

  

   Table 3. Current situation: water demand and number of workers in the Sunrise Campus. Source:  Bas van de Westerlo, 2010. 

  

TOTAL AREA  (m²) 

PRODUCTION   R&D   OFFICES  

34.350  4.600  3.060 

TOTAL  WATER  DEMAND  37.199 5.120 1.401

TOTAL 

42.010 

43.720

AVERAGE WATER  DEMAND /m²  (m³/year/m²)  1,08 0,77 0,46

TOTAL  NUMBER OF  WORKERS  207 48 235

AVERAGE  NUMBER OF  WORKERS/m²  0,006  ‐  0,077 

490

 

 

17   


18 

 

Figure  6.  Current  situation  of  Sunrise  Campus.  Map  adapted  from  Google Earth. 

  CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE   


CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE    4.2.

THE MASTER PLAN AND THE BUSINESS AS USUAL (BAU) SCENARIO 

The  Master  Plan  for  the  area  was  designed  in  2010,  by  the  Studio  Marco  Vermeulen  and  GroupA,  that were hired by  the Municipality of Venlo (Studio Marco Vermeulen, 2009). This Master Plan is  still  in  debate  with  the  main  stakeholders  and  financial  issues  are  also  being  discussed.  Therefore,  there is no timeline for its construction yet.     According  to  the  Master  Plan,  in  the  existing  open  area  in  the  two  blocks  adjacent  to  the  James  Cookweg  street,  new  buildings  that  will  work  as  production  hall,  research  and  development,  and  office will be constructed (Gemeente Venlo, 2010)(Figure 7).  This new area of 209.000m² represents  the study area of this thesis.    

M6 M10 James Cookweg

H30

  Figure 7. Future situation of Sunrise Campus and study area. Source: Master Plan 2010 and Google Earth.  

Table 4 shows the results of the calculation of the inputs of this new development, if the buildings  are to be conceived in the business as usual (BAU) scenario. For the energy, water and number of  workers in the area, the average numbers of the current situation were used and multiplied by the  new  area  according  to  its  function  (production,  research  and  development  (R&D),  and  offices).  According to the Master Plan, the Biotope area is 12.500m² (Studio Marco Vermeulen, 2009). For the  assessment of energy, water and number of workers, the Biotope was considered an office building.     The  total  built  up  area  to  be  developed  in  the  Sunrise  Campus  is  133.000m²,  and  the  Biotope’s  expected built up area is 12.500m². In the Biotope, 960 people are expected to work and consume  annually  5.723m³  of  water,  2.255MWh  of  electricity  and  138.889m³  of  gas  in  a  business  as  usual  situation.   

19   


CASE STUDY: THE SUNRISE CAMPUS AND THE BIOTOPE    Table 4. Sunrise Campus new energy and gas demand for each activity sector in the BAU situation. 

  

NEW TOTAL  AREA (m²) 

NEW  TOTAL  VOLUME  (m³) 

NEW TOTAL  AVERAGE  NEW TOTAL  AVERAGE GAS  ELECTRICITY  ELECTRICITY  GAS  DEMAND /m³  DEMAND  DEMAND /m²  DEMAND  (Nm³/year/m³)  (MWh/year)  (MWh/year/m²)  (Nm³/year) 

PRODUCTION  R&D   OFFICES  

50.000 39.300 31.500

375.546  294.750  144.900 

18.997 11.011 5.682

0,38 0,28 0,18

835.501  683.853  350.000 

2,22 2,32 2,42

BIOTOPE  

12.500

57.500 

2.255

0,18

138.889 

2,42

TOTAL 

133.300

872.696 

37.945

2.008.242 

    Table 5. Sunrise Campus water demand and number of workers for each activity sector in the BAU situation. 

  

NEW TOTAL  WATER  DEMAND   (m³/year) 

AVERAGE  WATER  DEMAND /m²  (m³/year/m²) 

TOTALNUMBER  OF WORKERS 

AVERAGE  NUMBER OF   WORKERS/m² 

PRODUCTION  R&D   OFFICES  

54.146  30.276  14.422 

1,08 0,77 0,46

301 1.627 2.419

0,006  0,041  0,077 

BIOTOPE  

5.723 

0,46

960

 

5.308

 

TOTAL 

   

104.567

 

20   


SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY    5. SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY  Aiming  at  discussing  different  solutions  for  buildings  designs,  five  scenarios  were  projected  and  afterwards  evaluated  according  to  the  criteria  explained  in  Section  3.  The  scenarios  vary  in  the  building’s  shape,  spatial  distribution,  technologies  used,  and  resources  harvested  in  relation  to  energy, water, and biodiversity in the area. They were worked out to reduce the energy and water  demand together with producing energy and water by the use of multisource. Green areas are also  added  to  the  program  with  the  intension  of  increasing  the  biodiversity  in  the  Biotope  and  in  the  campus. The demand, self‐sufficiency and output of energy and water will differ according to each  building  design  and  chosen  technologies.  Moreover,  the  amount  of  green  area  in  each  design  will  vary, and the local species index will alter according to each use of green spaces. All the areas were  calculated  according  to  the  referent  drawings  of  each  scenario.  They  were  made  and  calculated  using the AutoCad software.  The  first  scenario  is  the  ‘Business  as  Usual’  (BAU),  which  does  not  have  any  concern  to  minimize  energy  and  water  demand,  to  make  use  of  renewable  resources,  or  to  enhance  the  quantity  and  quality  of  green  areas.  The  second  scenario  is  the  ‘Efficient’,  which  looks  towards  a  better  energy  and  water  performance,  and  starts  to  incorporate  green  areas,  although  still  in  a  small  scale.  The  third scenario is the ‘Bio‐diverse’, which has the priority of increasing the green areas as well as their  quality.  Minimizing  demand  and  using  renewable  sources  are  also  important  features  of  this  scenario,  but  they  are  combined  with  the  implementation  of  biodiversity  in  the  study  area.  The  fourth  scenario  is  the  ‘Producer’,  which  focuses  on  reducing  and  producing  the  maximum  of  renewable  energy  and  water  that  is  possible  in  the  limited  area,  with  the  combination  of  a  great  amount  of  different  technologies.  It  aims  at  not  only  being  self‐sufficient,  but  also  at  being  an  exporter of renewable energy and water. Finally, the last scenario, the ‘Hybrid’, mixes the different  characteristics  of  the  above  scenarios,  in  the  search  of  a  balance  between  the  three  criteria  explained in Section 2 that are needed to achieve an ‘effective design’.    The  scenarios  were  developed  according  to  different  technologies  of  water  and  energy  reduction  demand and multisource, and the implementation of green areas. The technologies used and their  assessments are explained in each scenario when they are applied. Annex 1 – contains a list of the  technologies  applied  along  with  the  pages  in  which  their  explanations  are  given.  These  methods  were studied and different combinations of them were developed resulting in the design options. In  what  follows,  the  methodology  of  the  choices  of  the  energy,  water  technologies  and  biodiversity  design is explained.       

21   


SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY    5.1.

ENERGY FLOW  

According  to  the  main  features  of  each  scenario  explained  in  the  Section  below,  a  range  of  technologies were first selected from the ones that have commercial accessibility, available technical  knowledge  and  that  have  been  already  tested.  After  that,  they  were  categorized  according  to  different  energy  demand  minimization  and  multisource  technology.  These  strategies  are  listed  in  Table 6. The demand minimization technologies are: passive lighting and diming control, use of LED  lamps, solar tubes, CPU management, building insulation materials and green roofs. The multisource  technologies  are:  photovoltaic  (PV)  cells  on  roofs  and  windows,  aquifer  thermal  energy  storage  systems (ATES), waste bio‐digestion, wind turbines and ‘greenhouse village’ system.  The functioning  of  each  technology  is  explained  in  the  Section  6,  at  the  same  time  that  the  energy  flow  of  each  scenario is described. Please refer to the Technology Index (Annex 1 –     Table 6. Energy variants for the scenarios design. The technologies are classified as those that minimize the energy  demand and multisource technologies. 

‘greenhouse village’ 

wind turbines 

Anaerobic digester 

ATES 

PV windows 

PV cells 

no multisource 

MULTISOURCE TECHNOLOGY 

green roofs 

insulation materials 

CPU management 

solar tubes 

 

DEMAND MINIMIZATION  use of LED lamps 

SCENARIO 

no demand  minimization  passive lighting and  diming control 

 

1. BAU 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

2. EFFICIENT 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

3. BIO‐DIVERSE 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

4. PRODUCER 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

5. HYBRID 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

    Except for the ‘BAU Scenario’, all the other scenarios implement energy demand minimization in its  design  with  passive  lighting  and  diming  control,  use  of  LED  lamps,  solar  tubes,  CPU  management,  building insulation materials. Besides all these measures, in the ‘Bio‐diverse’ and ‘Hybrid’ scenarios,  green roofs are added.    Furthermore,  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’,  there  is  no  harvesting  and  production  of  renewable  energy,  whereas in all the other scenarios, multi‐sourcing guarantees the production of a portion, or in some  cases the total amount, of the Biotope’s demand. In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, PV cells are combined  with PV windows and ATES systems. In the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’, PV cells are not to be placed on  the Biotope’s roof, because it is to be covered by green roofs. On the other hand, the increase in the  amount  of  green  areas  in  this  scenario  generates  a  growth  in  the  production  of  green  waste.  Therefore,  an  anaerobic  digester  is  implemented,  generating  energy  from  the  green  waste.  In  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’,  PV  cells  are  to  be  placed  on  the  roofs  of  the  human  function  areas  of  the  building.  In  addition,  PV  windows  are  to  be  installed  in  the  South  façade  and  on  the  roof  of  the  greenhouse  areas.  Moreover,  greenhouses  are  to  be  applied  in  this  scenario.  They  produce  heat,  food and clean water for the human functions of the Biotope. Besides that, an anaeric digester and  22   


SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY    ATES  systems  are  to  be  implemented  in  this  scenario.  The  implementation  of  small  scale  wind  turbines  on  the  roof  is  studied.  Lastly,  the  multisource  in  the  Biotope  building  of  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’ is equal to the ‘Producer Scenario’, with the difference of not implementing wind turbines.    5.2. HYDROLOGICAL FLOW  In the Sunrise Campus, the industries can re‐circulate their water using on‐site technologies in order  to recycle it. However, the metabolism of the water used for industrial purposes is not going to be  studied in this report. This report will focus on the human water use of the Biotope.    According  to  Asano,  before  choosing  the  technology  that  can  be  used  for  water  reclamation  and  reuse, it is necessary to consider the range of potential reuse application, and a general discussion of  water quality and quality for each application. Seven general categories of water reuse application  can be seen in the Annex 2. Also, it is important to take into account the use of multiple technologies  for producing multiple qualities of water (Asano, 2006).    Therefore, in water reclamation and reuse, the treatment needed and the degree of water quality  will depend on the reuse application. Three different categories according to the quality needed in  each function are considered for the case study. Quality 1 (Q1) is referred as drinking water quality,  that  can  be  used  for  food  preparation  and  wash  basin.  Quality  2  (Q2)  is  related  to  uses  such  as  irrigation and industrial water (industrial water is not assessed in this study). Quality 3 (Q3) refers to  toilet  flush  water  quality  (Annex  3  –  Water  application  qualities  and  volumes  in  Sunrise  Campus  Buildings).    In this sense, multi‐sourcing is the key to guarantee a stable offer for the existing demand (Agudelo,  et al., 2009 and Han, et al., 2008). It refers to the use of different water sources to obtain water with  different  qualities  that  could  match  directly  with  the  demand.  The  multi‐sourcing  makes  use  of  hidden flows and secondary resources that comes from cascading and recycling activities (Agudelo,  et al., 2009). In the Sunrise Campus, not only reservoirs are water sources, but one building can be  the  main  source  for  other  buildings.  Moreover,  within  each  building,  the  outflow  of  a  determined  use can be the inflow for another use.    Furthermore, the liquid wastes of the Biotope consists of urine, toilet flush water (included water to  clean  toilets),  faeces,  kitchen  wastewater,  water  used  for  personal  hygiene  (washing  basin).  The  waste streams in the Biotope can be categorized into three different types of water: rain water (RW),  grey water (GW), and black water (BW). The grey water is the mixed water from kitchen and washing  basin. The black water is the wastewater from the toilets, which conveys urine, faeces and flushing  water. Each quality of water has different needs of treatments. There are a number of variations of  technologies that can be used for each type of water quality.     In  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’,  the  wastewater  streams  are  combined  and  transported  to  the  public  wastewater treatment plant. However, in order to keep different wastewater streams separate, to  use  different  treatment  techniques,  and  to  close  water  and  nutrients  cycles,  the  decentralized  sanitation methods is to be considered in other scenarios. To make it possible, a community‐based  method  of  sanitation  is  to  be  used.  According  to  Kujawa‐Roeleveld,  this  method  provides  off‐site 

23   


SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY    wastewater treatment at level of community in contrast to central treatment that covers an entire  city or catchment area (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).     Hence, these scenarios are to explore separated collection in one, two (rain water and black water)  or  three  streams  (rain  water,  black  water  and  grey  water).  These  separated  streams  can  be  then  treated  with  the  most  suitable  technology  for  each  stream.  A  selection  of  these  treatments  was  chosen, and  their technical needs were specified. They were selected from technologies that have  commercial accessibility, available technical knowledge and that have been already tested. In Table  7,  the  choices  of  water  discharge  demand  minimization,  multisource  and  water  reuse  for  each  scenario is shown. The functioning of each technology is explained in the Section 6, at the same time  that the water flow of each scenario is described (please refer to Annex 1).    Therefore, the ‘Efficient’ and ‘Bio‐diverse’ scenarios work with the separation of the water collection  into  two  water  streams,  the  rain  water  (RW)  and  wastewater  (WW).  The  wastewater  is  the  combination  of  grey  and  black  water.  In  both  scenarios,  the  rain  water  is  harvested  and  used  for  flushing  toilets.  In  addition,  in  both  scenarios,  the  demand  is  minimized  by  using  efficient  faucets  and low flush toilets. However, in the first mentioned scenario, the rain water is used directly from  the  ponds  and  the  wastewater  is  discharged  into  the  public  sewage  system  without  being  treated  locally. In the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’, there is the implementation of constructed wetlands and ‘Living  Machine’ system. According to White, this system uses only natural biological processes, mostly con‐ sisting  of  plants,  through  which  the  influent  flows  (White,  2006).    The  wastewater  is  treated  and  reused for flushing toilets. Moreover, if there is more treated water than it is used, it is re‐directed  to a local watercourse.   Table 7. Water variants for the scenarios design. 

 Anaerobic digestion 

‘greenhouse village’ 

‘Living Machine’ 

constructed wetlands 

water retention ponds 

rain water harvest and  use 

MULTISOURCE AND REUSE  no rain water harvest 

vacuum toilets 

low flush toilets 

efficient faucets 

no demand  minimization 

3 streams: RW, GW,  BW 

 

WATER DISCHARGE  DEMAND MINIMIZATION  2 streams: WW and  RW 

SCENARIO 

1 stream: public  sewage system 

 

1. BAU  2. EFFICIENT  3. BIO‐DIVERSE  4. PRODUCER  5. HYBRID 

  The  ‘Producer’  and  ‘Hybrid’  scenarios  have  the  same  water  treatment  system.  In  these  cases,  the  wastewater collection is separated into three different streams, the rain, grey and black water. The  demand is minimized by the use of vacuum toilets and efficient faucets. Black water is collected by  means of vacuum toilets and stored and treated in an anaerobic digester, where energy is produced.  The system yields a clean grey water effluent, which is directed to the constructed wetland. There  the water receives a secondary treatment and is stored in ponds until its next use. In these scenarios  24   


SCENARIOS: METHODOLOGY    drinking water is also produced from rain water, by implementing a greenhouse. In this system, rain  water and the water pre‐treated by wetlands are used for irrigating the greenhouses. The irrigation  water  evaporates  and  is  collected.  After  an  activated  carbon  filtration,  re‐hardening  and  quality  monitoring, it is used as drinking water.    5.3. BIODIVERSITY  The  types  of  green  areas  are  described  in  Section  3.2  and  are  classified  as  controlled  and  not  controlled.  For  more  details  in  the  biodiversity  design,  please  refer  to  Section  6.  The  green  areas  types were  chosen according to energy and water technologies  applied and/or the scenarios main  characteristics  (please  refer  to  Section  5).  They  are  shown  in  Table  8.  In  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’,  the  ponds only retain the water that naturally runs to its surface. In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, the ponds  work as a retention and settlement structure which enables the use of rain water in the Biotope. In  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’,  the  rain  water  is  to  be  treated  in  constructed  wetlands  and  the  wastewater is to be treated in a ‘Living Machine’. Besides that, in this scenario, the green areas are  to be enhanced and green roofs and walls are also to be implemented, as well as gardens within the  building. In the ‘Producer Scenario’, all the green area is implemented aiming at the local production  of  energy  and  cleansed  water,  resulting  in  only  controlled  green  areas.  Greenhouses  are  there  to  produce  food,  heat  and  clean  water,  whereas  the  constructed  wetlands  are  to  treat  the  rain  and  grey water. The ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is very similar to the Producer in its biodiversity design; however  green roofs are also partially added to the top of the Biotope.    Table 8. Green areas variants for the scenarios design. 

greenhouse 

garden 

  

CONTROLLED  constructed wetland  and retention pond 

NOT CONTROLLED 

pond 

SCENARIO 

green roof/ wall 

 

1. BAU 

  

  

  

  

  

2. EFFICIENT 

  

  

  

  

  

3. BIO‐DIVERSE 

  

  

  

  

  

4. PRODUCER 

  

  

  

  

  

5. HYBRID 

  

  

  

  

  

25   


SCENARIOS   

6. SCENARIOS  The  following  scenarios  represent  the  search  for  solutions  that  create  a  connection  between  the  Biotope  and  external  sources  of  energy  and  water,  and  biodiversity  according  to  the  criteria  established in Section 3. For that, a variety of technologies (please refer to Section 5) and different  spatial  organization  of  the  study  area  are  considered.  Each  scenario  represents  the  use  of  a  collection of these technologies in a different spatial situation.    The human functions of the Biotope remains as suggested in the Master Plan, i.e., the building will  function  as  a  meeting  place  for  the  campus,  and  its  program  covers  functions  such  as  conference  center, study center, restaurants, fitness center, glass and energy museum, and C2C museum. Other  auxiliary functions are annexed to the main program of the building such as kitchen and restrooms.  The total area reserved for the human function is the same for all scenarios, namely 12.500m² which  will hold a total of 960 workers.  The Biotope implantation area is 60.500m² (Figure 8). This area is the total area where the Biotope is  emplaced, counting the ground floor area of the Biotope together with its vicinity area, which can be  used  as  green  or  paved  areas,  parking  lots  or  greenhouses.  This  area  can  be  open  or  closed,  depending on technological or biodiversity needs of each scenario. The Sunrise Campus implantation  area covers 202.900m² and 5.308 workers (including the Biotope’s implantation area and workers). 

Figure 8. Biotope  and Sunrise Campus Implantation Areas. Biotope  Implantation area is 60.500m², whereas the Sunrise  Campus implantation area is 202.900m². 

In some scenarios, besides the technological and human functions, food production is added to the  main program. The food is produced in greenhouses in the Biotope implantation area. The amount  of food produced is not assessed, but the heat, green waste and clean water are assessed as outputs  that are to be used for the human function.  In  the  Sunrise  Campus  implantation  area,  not  only  the  Biotope  is  implemented,  but  other  fifteen  buildings are to be located, and their function will vary among offices, industrial hall and R&D (Figure  8). However, because the Master Plan is still in the development phase, there is no data about the  26   


SCENARIOS    exact  function  of  each  building,  such  as  the  kind  of  industry  that  will  be  set  in  each  plot.  Consequently, the information of different demands in relation to water, energy and materials, and  the external outputs of these buildings are missing. 

  Figure 9. Building roofs in the Sunrise Campus that is  managed in the scenarios development. This is done to  intensify the main characteristics of each scenario. 

For  this  reason,  the  present  thesis  focuses  only  on  the  assessment  and  design  of  the  Biotope  implantation  area  described  in  Figure  8.  However,  there  are  two  exceptions  in  relation  to  the  boundaries in the assessment exercise:    (1) Other buildings roofs  The Biotope assessment represents a scenario; i.e. an outline or model of an expected sequence of  similar  characteristics.  The  other  buildings  roofs  in  its  surrounding  are  added  as  a  part  of  the  scenarios to intensify their main characteristics.     Table 9 describes the roof management in the other buildings of the Sunrise Campus. The roofs are  either  not  to  be  used,  or  they  are  to  be  covered  with  PV  cells  and/or  green  roofs.  In  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’  they  are  not  to be  used,  whereas  in  the  ‘Efficient’,  ‘Producer’  and  ‘Hybrid’  Scenarios, PV  cells are suggested to be placed on the roofs.     On the one hand, when PV cells are to be placed on the roofs, they are not assessed in the Biotope’s  scenario  evaluation.  In  these  cases,  the  energy  produced  in  each  roof  is  to  be  used  within  the  respective building and does not interfere in the Biotope’s energy flow.    On the other hand, when green roofs are placed on these building, as in the ‘Bio‐diverse’ and ‘Hybrid  Scenario’s, they are to be  taken into account  in the  scenario evaluation. The green area (GAI) and  local species indices (LSI) are assessed for both, the Biotope and the Sunrise Campus (please refer to  Section  3.2).  This  happens  because  the  biodiversity  cannot  be  assessed  only  as  a  local  issue.  The  surrounding area of the Biotope is important to enhance the resilience of the biodiversity within the  building. According to Snep et al., the larger the urban green area, the greater the species richness  that may be expected (Snep et al., 2009).Therefore, enhancing the green area in the surroundings of  27   


SCENARIOS    the Biotope, creates an increase in the amount of the not controlled green area of the campus, and  consequently, the green area of the Biotope itself becomes more diverse, more resilient, and able to  persist and evolve.   Table 9. Other buildings roofs variants for the scenarios design. 

no roof  management 

1. BAU 

  

2. EFFICIENT  3. BIO‐DIVERSE 

PV cells 

  

green roofs 

ROOF  MANAGEMENT 

SCENARIO 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

4. PRODUCER 

  

  

  

5. HYBRID 

  

  

  

  (2) Other buildings wastes  In  the  ‘Bio‐diverse’,  ‘Producer’  and  ‘Hybrid’  scenarios,  the  wastes  of  other  buildings  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  are  to  be  used  in  the  Biotope  (Table  10).  These  wastes  are  black  water,  grey  water  and  organic  waste,  which  are  used  to  produce  either  energy  or  clean  water.  In  this  case,  these  wastes  and the outputs of the production generated from them are assessed.     This happens because of the first and third theoretical criteria explained in Section 2.1 and 2.3. This  waste  is  not  assessed  as  external  input,  because  the  clean  water  and  energy  produced  from  the  waste output of the other buildings becomes food for the Biotope and for the Sunrise Campus. At  the same time, the Biotope is nourishing its surrounding area by producing clean water and energy  back to those buildings. Finally, these wastes are not considered as imported because they are part  of the study area and they are to be returned to these buildings, although it is in another form.     Table 10. Other buildings variants for the scenarios design. 

black water 

  

organic waste 

WASTE USE  grey water 

SCENARIO  no waste use 

 

1. BAU 

  

  

  

  

2. EFFICIENT 

  

  

  

  

3. BIO‐DIVERSE 

  

  

  

  

4. PRODUCER 

  

  

  

  

5. HYBRID 

  

  

  

  

   

 

28   


SCENARIOS    6.1.

SCENARIO 1 – BUSINESS AS USUAL (BAU) 

The  first  scenario  is  the  Business  as  Usual  Scenario,  which  is  the  basis  for  comparison  with  other  scenarios  according  to  the  different  application  of  technologies  and  designs.  It  is  also  the  baseline  assessment for the indicators of the urban harvest approach and biodiversity (please refer to Section  3).  This scenario shows the energy and water flows of the Biotope and the Sunrise Campus in the BAU  situation. The building orientation will be in a North‐South axis, following the streets design (Figure  10).  Figure  11  shows  the  main  Section  of  this  scenario  schematically.  The  electricity  and  heat  are  exclusively  supplied  by  the  conventional  public  companies.  Also  from  a  public  utility,  water  enters  the building as drinking water and after use, it is directly discharged as wastewater. The rain is not  harvested  and  is  also  discharged  in  the  public  sewage.  In  this  case,  there  are  no  efforts  in  the  building design to reduce the consumption of energy and water, whereas the energy production is  null.   N 

  Figure 10. Scenario 1: Business as Usual plan view. 

29   


SCENARIOS   

 

 

Figure 11. Business as Usual Scenario schematic Section. Water, heat (H) and electricity (E) flows.  Legend:  1 and 2. Electricity and gas for heating are supplied by the conventional public companies.  3.  Also from a public utility, water enters the building as drinking water quality (Q1).  4. The wastewater is directly discharged into the public sewage system.  5. The rain is not harvested and is also discharged together with the wastewater.  6. The sun energy is lost. 

The main design characteristics of the ‘BAU Scenario’ are:          

Biotope  area: 12.500m² (three story building)  Biotope  roof area: 4.000m²  Biotope  implantation site: 60.500m²  Sunrise Campus implantation site: 202.900m²  Number of workers: 960  Sunrise Campus: no flows exchange  Building orientation: North‐South axis      

30   


SCENARIOS    6.1.1.  ENERGY FLOW   The main design characteristics of energy consumption and production of the ‘BAU Scenario’ are:      

Conventional heat and electricity from public supply   Cooling system: conventional air‐conditioning system  Heating system: central heating fueled with natural gas   No reduction in demand  No production of energy 

  In  Table  11.  Energy  demand  in  Biotope    and  Sunrise  Campus  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’  per  year.,  the  outline  of  the  total  energy  demand  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’  is  expressed.  The  energy  consumption  covers  the  electricity  and  heat  that  are  assessed  separately  proportional  to  the  current  situation  demand (please refer to Section 4.3 or more details in this calculation). The total electricity demand  is  2.255MWh/yr,  and  the  heat  is  138.889Nm³/yr  or  1.335MWh/yr  (using  a  conversion  factor  of  0,00961  from  1m³  of  natural  gas  to  MWh  (Graaff  et  al.,  2010)).  This  results  that  the  total  amount  energy consumed is 3.590MWh/yr.   Table 11. Energy demand in Biotope  and Sunrise Campus in the ‘BAU Scenario’ per year. 

 

Biotope 

Electricty  Heat (natural gas)  Energy 

2.255 1.335 3.590

Sunrise Campus

MWh MWh MWh

37.945 19.299

MWh  MWh 

  In  Figure  12,  the  different  uses  of  the  electricity  are  shown according to their percentages. These percentages  26,5% in  Biotope  are  assumed  to  be  the  same  as  in  office  26,0% buildings.  According to the United Nations Environment  25,5% 25,0% Programme,  in  the  average  of  the  European  office  24,5% building  energy  demand,  25,6%  of  the  electricity  is  24,0% consumed for lighting demand; 26% for cooling demand;  23,5% and  24,2%  for  office  equipment  such  as  appliances  like  23,0% computers,  printers,  etc.,  and  the  same  amount  (24,2%)  for  other  buildings  uses  such  as  elevators,  automatic  doors  and  building  maintenance  (United  Nations  Environment  Programme,  2007).  Therefore,  the  lighting  demand in the ‘BAU Scenario’ is 577MWh/yr, the cooling  Figure 12. Biotope ’s electricity demand in the  demand  is  586MWh/yr,  the  office  equipment  is  ‘BAU Scenario’.  546MWh/yr,  and  the  other  uses  demand  is  546MWh/yr  (Table 12 and Figure 12).  Table 12. Electricity use in Biotope  in the ‘BAU Scenario’ per year. 

lighting  cooling  office equipment others 

25,60% 26,00% 24,20% 24,20%

577 586 546 546

MWh MWh MWh MWh

31   


SCENARIOS    6.1.2. WATER FLOW   The main design characteristics of water consumption and production of the ‘BAU Scenario’ are:    

No reduction measures in relation to water demand  Rain water management: traditional storm drainage system  Wastewater management: combined sewer system: 1 stream outflow public discharge (grey  water, black water and rain water)    The total water demand in this scenario is 5.723m³/yr (see detailed calculation in Section 4.3). Like  the  energy,  the  water  is  imported  from  the  public  utilities  as  drinking  water  (Q1)  (please  refer  to  Section  5.2),  while  the  rain  water  is  not  harvested.  The  traditional  storm  drainage  system  is  used.  According to Burkhard et al., it consists of inlet structures and drainage pipes that transport water to  the  nearest  outfall  (Burkhard  et  al.,  2000)  (Lazarus,  2009),  which  removes  water  from  its  natural  course (Lazarus, 2009). The ponds only retain the water that naturally runs to its surface.   Moreover, there is not any technique to reuse the water. The different uses of water in the building  are assessed in Table 13 and shown in Figure 13. It was considered that the water used for human  purposes during working hours in the Sunrise Campus was proportional to the domestic Dutch water  use  behavior  per  person  per  day  (see  detailed  data  in  Annex  4  –  Water  Consumption  in  Working  Environments  in  the  Netherlands.).  The  total  water  demand  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’  is  101.459m³/year  (see  Section  4.2),  of  which  26.574m³  represents  the  human  use  (according  to  proportion  of  human  water  demand  in  the  Netherlands),  while  the  difference  represents industrial use (please refer to Annex 3). It results that, in the Biotope the water demand is  4.992m³/year  for  this  scenario.  The  activities  assessed  are  food  preparation,  drinking  water,  wash  basin, dishwasher, and toilet flush.     Table 13. Water demand in the Biotope  in the ‘BAU Scenario’ per year. 

WATER DEMAND BIOTOPE  USE PERCENTAGE drinking water faucets  toilet flush  dishwasher  food processing

184 541 3.788 306 174

m³ m³ m³ m³ m³

4% 11% 76% 6% 3%

TOTAL 

4.992

100%

    The  drainage  system  consists  of  the  combined  sewer  system  (CSS),  transporting  both  wastewater  (domestic  use)  and  storm  water  to  the  centralized  conventional  sewage  treatment  from  the  local  public  utility.  To  assess  the  outputs,  the  input  water  demand  was  multiplied  by  the  discharge  coefficient 0,8 (according to Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., a typical value of the discharge factor is 80% of  the drinking water used) (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  Toilet flush represents the biggest amount of water use (76%), whereas the second most used water  is represented by the use washing basins for hygiene use (11%)(Figure 13). 

32   


SCENARIOS    80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

  Figure 13. Biotope ’s water demand in the ‘BAU Scenario’. 

  6.1.3.  BIODIVERSITY  The  biodiversity  area  in  this  scenario  is  considered  to  be  only  the  pond  area,  which  can  serve  as  habitat for different ecosystems. The other open areas in the vicinity of the Biotope are considered  to  be  paved,  and  they  are  not  assessed  in  this  scenario.  The  total  pond  area  is  12.682m².  It  was  calculated through Autocad software according to the design shown in Figure 10. Table 14 shows the  green  area  amounts  and  its  total  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’.  Moreover,  it  displays  the  assessment  of  controlled and not controlled green areas in the Biotope and Sunrise Campus.  Table 14. Biodiversity assessment in the ‘BAU Scenario’. 

 

 

green roof  Not controlled  garden pond  constructed wetland  Controlled  greenhouse    Total 

SUNRISE CAMPUS 0 0 12.682 0 0 12.682

m² m² m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE   0  0  12.682  0  0  12.682 

m²  m²  m²  m²  m²  m² 

   

 

33   


SCENARIOS    6.1.4. BUSINESS AS USUAL: ASSESSMENT  This Section gives an overview of the assessment of the ‘BAU Scenario’. For more details about the  following indices calculation and methods, please refer to Section 3.  The results of the energy and  water demand are expressed in Table 15, whereas the biodiversity assessment is shown in Table 16.  There is no use of technologies for reducing the energy demand. The demand is not minimized and  the DMI is zero. The SSI is also zero for this scenario. This means that the Biotope relies totally on  external input demand, and consequently, it is dependent on non‐local and non‐renewable energy.   Moreover,  there  are  no  strategies  to  minimize  the  outputs  such  as  cascading  and  recycling  in  this  scenario. As a result the WOI for energy and for water is ‐1. The ‘BAU Scenario’ is an example of a  building linear metabolism.  Table 15. Energy and water assessment for the ‘BAU Scenario’. 

 

BAU ENERGY

Conventional Demand (Do)  New Demand (D)  Cascade (C)  Recycle(R)  Consumption (Co)  Waste exported (D‐C‐R‐Co)  Multisource (M)  DMI= (Do‐D)/Do  WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D=‐We/D  SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

3.590 3.590 0 0 0 0 0 Indices

BAU WATER 

MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr

4.992  4.992  0  0  0  4992  0 

  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr 

0

0    

‐1

‐1    

0

0    

  The  biodiversity  area  in  this  scenario  is  considered  to  be  only  the  pond  area,  which  is  a  not  controlled  area  and  different  ecosystems  can  inhabit.  The  others  open  areas  in  the  vicinity  of  the  Biotope are considered to be paved and they are not assessed in this scenario. The total ponds area  and consequently, the total green area is 12.682m², according to Figure 10 and calculated by using  Autocad software.  Table 16. Biodiversity assessment for the ‘BAU Scenario’. 

  Implantation area (A) Not controlled green (NCG) Controlled green (CG) Total green (T)  GAI = T/A  LSI = T‐CG/T 

SUNRISE CAMPUS 202.900 12.682 0 12.682 0,06 1

m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE  60.500 12682 0 12.682 0,21 1

m²  m²  m²  m² 

As a result, the GAI in the Sunrise Campus is 0,21 and in the Biotope is 0,06 , i.e. the total green area  corresponds to 6% of the Biotope ’s implantation area (Table 16), whereas it also indicates 21% of  the Sunrise Campus area. Without the existence of greenhouses and constructed wetlands, the LSI is  1. This means that local species can make use of the total amount of the green areas. Note however  that even though LSI=1, the total amount of green area (GAI) is very low.  34   

 


SCENARIOS    6.2.

SCENARIO 2 – EFFICIENT 

In this scenario, the efficiency is seen as a tool that intends to have overall positive effects on a wide  range  of  issues.  According  to  McDonough  et  al.,  it  is  valuable  when  conceived  as  a  transitional  strategy to help current systems slow down and turn around (McDonoug et al., 2002). It brings up a  Biotope that is able to reduce its energy and water consumption, and at the same time, to produce  renewable energy and water. The energy production is focused on photovoltaic systems, which are  produced by the industries located in the Sunrise Campus (Figure 14).  However, the renewable energy production based on photovoltaic systems is not enough to make  the building autarkic in relation to energy and water cycles. Consequently, the Biotope cannot make  more  than  it  is  necessary  for  the  building  consumption,  but  it  will  achieve  reduced  quantities  of  energy and water that are imported to the building.  N 

  Figure 14. ‘Efficient Scenario’ plan view. 

 

 

35   


SCENARIOS    The main design characteristics of the ‘Efficient Scenario’ are:     

Biotope  area: 12.500m²  Biotope  roof area: 4.335m²  Number of workers: 960  Building orientation: 3 blocks in the east‐west axis. The distance between the blocks  (34,5m)  is  3  times  their  height  (11,5m),  for  the  optimum  use  of  direct  sunlight  and  heat (Figure 15).  Sunrise Campus buildings: use of PV cells on all roofs (this is not going to be assessed  because each building uses its own energy production)   

m

100m 

 

Figure 15. ‘Efficient Scenario’: Transversal Schematic Section AA (h=11,5m and d=34,5m). These blocks are connected  through passages. PV windows are to be installed on the South façade, whereas PV cells are to be installed on the roofs. 

 

 

36   


SCENARIOS    6.2.1. ENERGY FLOW   The management of the energy flow in this scenario consists of two steps. First, the energy demand  is minimized through the implementation of passive lighting and heating, insulation materials, use of  LED lamps, solar tubes and CPU management. After that, the building will produce energy through  the implementation of PV cells on the roof and in the southern façades. Moreover, ATES system will  be used for harvesting the heat and cold within the building throughout the year (Figure 16). These  techniques are to be explained in details in what follows. 

W

  Figure 16. ‘Efficient Scenario’ Energy management. Block Schematic Section BB.  Legend:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Passive lighting and heating  Insulation materials; use of led lamps, CPU management  ATES system  PV cells on roof and windows  Solar Tubes  Extra energy from ‘green companies’ 

  6.2.2. ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION  In  this  Section,  the  technologies  that  were  taken  into  consideration  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  and  their  implementation  are  explained.  They  are  listed  in  Table  17  and  in  what  follows,  they  are  explained.  For  the  assessment,  it  was  first  taken  into  account  lighting  reductions  with  passive  lighting  and  dimming  control.  Second,  the  use  of  LED  lamps  instead  of  regular  incandescent  bulbs  was considered. Third, the cooling and heating demand were minimized, by the implementation of  passive  ventilation  and  insulation  materials  in  the  buildings  envelope.  Lastly,  the  ATES  system  was  assessed, reducing the remaining heating and cooling demand.  Table 17. Implemented technologies to energy demand minimization in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

TECHNOLOGY 

(1) LIGHTING 

(2) OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  (3) COOLING 

REDUCTION  Literature Source 

passive lighting and diming  control  use of LED lamps instead of  regular incandescent bulb 

40,00%

(Bodart et al., 2002) 

90,00%

(MacKay, 2008) 

CPU management and standby  and active mode power  reductions for computers  passive ventilation 

40,00%

(Waide et al., 2007) 

10,00%

(Kolokotroni et al., 2006) 

37   


SCENARIOS   

(4) HEATING 

(1)

ATES

70,00%

insulation materials: floors,  walls, windows and roofs 

40,00%

ATES

46,00%

(Bridger et al., 2005); (Nieuwenhuize,  2011)  (MacKay, 2008)  (Bridger et al., 2005); (Nieuwenhuize,  2011) 

  Lighting demand minimization 

In what follows the lighting demand minimization is described according to two technologies used:  passive lighting and dimming control, and use of LED bulbs instead of incandescent bulbs (Table 17).  

Passive lighting and diming control 

The  passive  lighting  method  is  understood  as  glazing  luminous  transmission  coefficient,  façade  configuration, opening orientation and rooms width (Bodart et al., 2002). Therefore, the Biotope has  been oriented on an east‐west axis to maximize the Southern solar potential for day lighting, passive  solar and photovoltaic applications (Figure 14). The other features described above are expected to  be detailed in a further architectural design and are out of the scope of this thesis.  For the increase of the windows area and the optimum  passive lighting effect, the Biotope  can be  divided  in  three  connected  blocks.  These  blocks  should  be  separated  by  a  distance  such  that  one  block  will  not  shade  the  others  during  business  hours.  This  distance  is  set  to  be  three  times  the  buildings height, in the case of this building orientation in the Netherlands (Scheuten Solar, 2011). 

  Figure 17. Solar tube. Source: Solartube International, 2011. 

Moreover, solar tubes (Figure 17) are to be implemented on the roof of the building, to complement  the passive lighting effect. A solar tube is a way of using passive sunlight as lighting for a building. It  is a tubular skylight  that  captures sunlight on the top roof. Sunlight is redirected down to  a highly  reflective  shaft  and  diffused  throughout  the  interior  space  (Solartube  International,  2011).  Other  forms  of  indirect  lighting  such  as  light  shelves  and  zenithal  illumination  are  to  be  used  in  this  38   


SCENARIOS    scenario  for  the  optimization  of  the  passive  lighting,  but  they  are  to  be  detailed  in  a  future  architectural design.  Together with the passive lighting, diming control devices are to be used in this scenario. With the  implementation of this system, one light is automatically turned  off when there is already  enough  light in the room. It works also through occupancy sensors, and the lights are automatically turned  off when there is no one in the room.  These measures regulate lighting within the rooms, reducing  considerable amount of internal energy loads.  

Use of LED bulbs instead of incandescent bulbs    The  regular  incandescent  bulbs  that  are  used  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’  deliver  10lumens/W.  In  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’,  these  lamps  are  to  be  replaced  for  LED  (light‐emitting  diode)  bulbs,  which deliver 100 lumens/W (MacKay, 2008). Thus, with the use  of these lamps, the lighting demand is reduced by 90% (Table 18  and Figure 18). 

Figure 18. Energy Saving LED bulb.  Source: Direct, 2011. 

Therefore,  through  passive  lighting,  diming  control  and  use  of  LED  lamps,  the  annual  lighting  demand of 577MWh in the ‘BAU Scenario’ is reduced to 23MWh. This represents a reduction of 96%  in the lighting consumption (Table 18).  Table 18. Yearly lighting Demand Minimization in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

LIGHTING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ TECHNOLOGY 

577 REDUCTION

passive lighting  and diming control 

40,00%

use of led lamps instead of regular  incandescent bulb  LIGHTING ‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’ DEMAND

90,00%

MWh

NEW DEMAND    346 MWh 35

MWh

35

MWh

LITERATURE SOURCE (Bodart et al., 2002) (MacKay, 2008) 

  (2) Office Equipment energy demand minimization  On  average,  desktop  computers  require  125  to  150  kWh  per  unit  per  year,  depending  on  the  capacity of the system, the efficiency of the power supply and the number of hours the machine is  left in active, sleep, or standby  mode. In most offices, 64% of desktop computers are left  on after  work‐hours. Moreover, desktop‐derived servers are now commonplace in office spaces for network  management. Because these units have large capacities and are often left on 24 hours a day, they  can consume 3 to 5 times the energy of desktop computers (Waide et al., 2007).  Since many electronic appliances spend a majority of their time idle, until recently, efforts to control  the  energy  consumption  of  office  equipment  have  focused  on  standby  power  usage.  But  as  use  increases  and  most  office  appliances  now  easily  comply  with  current  energy  use  specifications,  active  mode  power  specifications  are  also  important  for  a  decrease  in  energy  demand.  Qualified 

39   


SCENARIOS    products  such  as  Energy  Star  specify  minimum  power  supply  efficiency  for  desktop  computers,  servers, and monitors (Waide et al., 2007).  Moreover, computer networks in commercial office buildings usually use considerably more energy  than necessary, because the network software being used may not support low‐power modes, even  when computers are on standby (Waide et al., 2007). While many tools are available to control the  power  used  by  networked  computer  monitors,  software  that  helps  manage  central  processor  unit  (CPU) energy use is to be adopted in the ‘Efficient Scenario’.  According  to  Waide  et  al.,  standby  and  active  mode  power  reductions  for  computers  and  CPU  management  generate  energy  savings  in  the  range  of  40%  to  60%  (Waide  et  al.,  2007).  In  the  ‘Efficient Scenario’, this yields a reduction of 327MWh in the total energy demand (Table 19).  Table 19. Yearly office Equipment Demand Minimizatiuon in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND TECHNOLOGY  REDUCTION CPU management and standby and  40,00% active mode power reductions for  computers  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT ‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’ DEMAND

546

MWh

 

NEW DEMAND 327

MWh

LITERATURE SOURCE   (Waide et al., 2007) 

327

MWh

 

  (3)

Heat and cold demand minimization  

In what follows the heat and cold demand minimization is described according to two technologies  that were used. For the assessment, it was first applied passive ventilation and insulation materials.  After that, the ATES system was implemented (Table 17).  

Passive Ventilation 

In the Biotope, natural ventilation strategy is a combination of cross ventilation, warm air rising and  wind passing over the terminals causing suction (Figure 19). Use of passive high capacity measures  provide  effective  night  cooling  as  internal  and  external  temperatures  have  a  higher  variance,  and  consequently  convection  is  increased  at  night.  These  strategies  are  to  be  detailed  in  further  architectural design of the Biotope.  Natural  or  passive  ventilation  is  intended  to  maintain  the  purity,  temperature,  humidity  and  movement of the indoor air within a certain comfort range. It has a hygienic and energetic function.  Through passive cooling  with night ventilation,  the  required  indoor  temperature  can  almost  always  be maintained when coupled with a consequent reduction of the solar load and of internal thermal  loads  as  well  as  usage  of  the  building’s  storage  capacity.  According  to  Kolokotroni  et  al.,  night  ventilation  strategies  in  office  buildings  reduce  the  cooling  demand  by  10%  (Kolokotroni  et  al.,  2006). 

40   


SCENARIOS   

Figure 19. Combination of cross ventilation, warm air rising and the wind passing over the  terminals causing suction. Source: Twinn, 2003. 

Insulation materials 

Aiming at the optimization of the heating and cooling systems, the ‘Efficient Scenario’ is concerned  with the thermal proprieties of the Biotope’s outer shell.  According to Waide et al., improvements  applied to windows, walls, ceilings and roofs of a commercial building reduce energy cost, and at the  same  time  reduce  mold  and  other  moisture  problems,  equipment  breakdown,  and  discomfort  (Waide et al., 2007).  The  thermal  conductivity  and  air  filtration  through  walls  account  for  21%  for  the  total  heat  losses  from commercial buildings during heating months. Windows are responsible for 22% of a building’s  total heat losses in winter and 32% of cooling loads in the summer. Finally, the roofs account for only  1%  of  the  total  heat  gains  during  the  summer  months  and  for  12%  of  the  total  heating  load.  Cool  roofs can reduce peak cooling demand in 10% to 15% (Waide et al., 2007). This is the case of green  roofs that will be implemented in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (please refer to Section 6.3.2)  In order to minimize these conductivity rates, insulation materials such as fiberglass, mineral wool  and  cellulose  are  to  be  used  on  the  floors,  walls  and  ceilings  of  the  Biotope.  Double  glass  and  spectrally selective glass are to be used in windows. Sandwich walls are to be used for the increase  in  thermal  insulation.  According  to  Lindström,  they  consist  of  two  concrete  panels  separated  by  a  layer  of  thermal  insulation  of  a  thickness  selected  as  required  due  to  location  and  climate.  The  internal  panel  is  normally  load‐bearing  with  a  thickness  in  the  range  of  120mm  to  150mm  (Lindström, 2011).    With the implementation of all the above measures, the use of insulation materials in the building  envelope will avoid significant thermal losses. It is assessed that the use of insulation materials can  achieve a 40% reduction in the heating and cooling demand of a building (MacKay, 2008).   

 

41   


SCENARIOS    

ATES system 

In this scenario, a system using aquifers for energy storage, referred to as Aquifer Thermal Energy  Storage (ATES), is used. The ATES is an open loop system in which groundwater is used to carry the  thermal  energy  in  and  out  of  the  aquifer  (Figure  20).  The  system  consists  of  two  water  wells,  one  with  cold  and  the  other  with  warm  water.  When  a  building  needs  to  be  cooled,  cold  water  is  pumped into the system. Groundwater of approximately 7°C can be directly used for cooling. During  its circulation through the building, this water is heated up and will be stored in the warm well with a  temperature of about 15 to 25°C. When heating is needed, warm water is pumped into the system  after  passing  the  heat  exchanger.  This  water  is  cooled  down  after  circulating  through  the  building  and will be stored in the cold well. Pipes are needed in a range of 20 to 250 meters below ground  level. The minimal scale of operation is about 50 houses or a building with a minimum floor area of  2,000 square meters (Nieuwenhuize, 2011; Andersson, 2007).  According to Bridger et al., ATES systems can reach 70% to 100% of efficiency. Moreover, the author  also states that the ATES system can deliver the entire heat load for an office building (Dickinson et  al.,  2009).  According  to  Nieuwenhuize,  it  generates  energy  savings  of  about  50  to  80%  for  cooling  and up to 50% for heating. The heat and cold efficiency is assessed to create a balance between the  energy  exchanged  in  the  two  wells.  For  the  scenarios  energy  assessments,  the  same  amount  of  energy  that  is  saved  for  the  cooling  reduction  is  also  reduced  from  the  heating  demand.  The  coefficient  of  performance  (COP)  of  the  ATES’  system  considered  is  40  for  heat  pumps  and  4  for  other pumps (one for the hot and another for the cold wells) (Nieuwenhuize, 2011).  The groundwater retains a temperature higher or lower than the undisturbed ground temperature.  Therefore, during periods of high heating or cooling demand, water is pumped from the aquifers and  used as an energy source or sink (Bridger et al., 2005).  The main components of an ATES system are a suitable storage aquifer, a production well or wells  (which may act as pumping or injection wells), a low cost or free source or sink of thermal energy  (such as waste industrial process heat or solar heat for heating or cold outside air temperatures for  cooling), a heat exchanger, and a demand for the energy transfer (Bridger et al., 2005). 

      Figure 20. ATES system. Source: Dickinson et. al., 2009.

42   


SCENARIOS    Table  20  expresses  the  results  of  the  implementation  of  the  technologies  explained  above  for  heating and cooling demand minimization. The remaining demand of cooling is to be fulfilled with  conventional air conditioned systems, fueled by electricity. The heating demand will be completed  through central heating systems powered by natural gas, which has to be imported to the system.   For  the  cooling  demand  assessment,  first  the  demand  was  reduced  by  the  use  of  passive  night  ventilation,  whereas,  for  the  heating  demand,  insulation  materials  were  first  considered.  The  remaining demand was minimized by the using the ATES system.  For  that,  it  was  first  considered  that  ATES  system  minimizes  70%  of  the  cooling  total  demand  (Nieuwenhuize,  2011),  which  corresponds  to  a  reduction  of  351MWh.  The  same  load  of  energy  (351MWh)  was  reduced  from  the  heating  demand,  which  represents  46%  out  of  the  total  heating  demand.   After that, the energy spent by the pumps needed for the system was added to the calculation. The  heating pump has a COP of 40, whereas the other pumps (including the cold pumps) have a COP of 4  (Nieuwenhuize, 2011). The demand of each pump is the ratio between the energy minimized by the  ATES system and the COP:  heat pump demand

ATES demand minimization

 

The pumps have a total demand of 110MWh/yr, in the form of electricity. Therefore, this amount of  energy is added to the ‘others demand’. In the ‘BAU Scenario’, the ‘others demand’ is 546MWh/yr  (Table 12), and in the Efficient Scenario is 656MWh/yr.  Table 20. Yearly heat and cold minimization assessment for the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

COOLING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND  TECHNOLOGY  passive night ventilation  ATES   COOLING ‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’ DEMAND     HEATING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND  TECHNOLOGY  insulation materials  ATES  HEATING ‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’ DEMAND    PUMP DEMAND (ELECTRICITY)  ATES cooling pumps (COP 4)  ATES heat pump (COP 40) ATES other pumps (COP 4) PUMP DEMAND (ELECTRICITY) 

REDUCTION 10% 70%

REDUCTION 40% 46%

‐ 5% ‐21% ‐2%

586 MWh   NEW DEMAND  LITERATURE SOURCE 528 MWh (Kolokotroni et al.,  2006)  176 MWh (Bridger et al., 2005) (Nieuwenhuize, 2011)  176 MWh     1.335 MWh   NEW DEMAND LITERATURE SOURCE 801 MWh (MacKay, 2008) 431 MWh (Bridger et al., 2005) (Nieuwenhuize, 2011)  431 MWh       9 MWh (Nieuwenhuize, 2011) 92 MWh (Nieuwenhuize, 2011) 9 MWh (Nieuwenhuize, 2011) 110 MWh  

  As a result of bringing together all the above mentioned strategies for electricity and heat demand  minimizations,  the  total  energy  demand  dropped  from  3.590MWh  (please  refer  to  Section  6.1)  to  43   


SCENARIOS    1.625MWh in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. The electricity used for lighting, office equipment, and others  is  responsible  for  908MWh  whereas  the  heat  and  cold  are  responsible  for  718MWh  of  the  energy  demand (Table 21).   Table 21. Energy demand in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ for each use and the total demand per year. 

‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’ ENERGY DEMAND Lighting  Office  Equipment  Cooling  Heating  Others  TOTAL ELECTRICITY DEMAND TOTAL HEAT/COLD DEMAND TOTAL ENERGY DEMAND

35 328 176 431 656 908 718

MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh 

1.625

MWh 

  6.2.3. ENERGY PRODUCTION   Photovoltaic  (PV)  panels are able  to directly convert light into electricity. Some materials exhibit a  property  known  as  the  photoelectric  effect  that  causes  them  to  absorb  photons  and  release  electrons.  These  free  electrons  are  captured,  resulting  in  an  electric  current  that  can  be  used  as  electricity (Gil, 2002).  In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, PV cells are used both on the roof of the building (with a 20o inclination)  and in the South, east and west façades.  According to MacKay, the average raw power of sunshine  per  square  meter  of  South‐facing  roof  in  Britain  is  roughly  110W/m2.  Moreover,  mass  produced  solar  panels  are  available  and  with  cheap  prices  at  an  efficiency  rate  of  10%  (MacKay,  2008).  In  adittion, there is currently available in the market, a semi‐transparent vertical window that produces  35 to 40kWh/m2/yr (Schueco, 2011). This represents an average power delivered of 4,6W/m².  The main issues described in the table below were taken into considerations in this scenario design  for  the  energy  production.  All  the  areas  were  calculated  according  to  the  plan  view  and  Section  figures (Figures 14 to 16) through the Autocad software.  Table 22. Implemented technologies and yearly energy production in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

TECHNOLOGY  PV cells  PV window 

TOTAL 

AVERAGE  POWER  DELIVERED  11W/m2 

4.335  m2

417

MWh

Figure 12 (Autocad) 

(MacKay, 2008)

4,6W/m2 

1.242  m2

50

MWh

Figure 12 and 13 (Autocad) 

(Schueco, 2011)

467

MWh

   

AREA 

ENERGY  PRODUCTION 

LITERATURE  SOURCE 

SOURCE 

 

  In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, the total area of the roof of the Biotope is 4.335m². The PV cells are to be  installed on it, producing 417MWh per year. The PV windows are to be installed in the South façades  44   


SCENARIOS    and together they have a total area of 1.242m², which are able to produce 50MWh per year (Table  22).  As  a  result,  on  the  one  hand,  through  the  implementation  of  the  photovoltaic  systems  explained  above,  the  Biotope  is  able  to  produce  467MWh  per  year.  On  the  other  hand,  its  new  demand  for  electricity  is  1625MWh  per  year  (Table  18).  The  Biotope  becomes  a  significant  producer  of  its  own  energy,  being  responsible  of  59%  of  the  new  energy  demand.  The  extra  energy  is  to  be  imported  from companies that produce energy from renewable sources.  6.2.4. WATER FLOW   In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, there are three main objectives related to the water management. First, it  aims  to  reduce  human  water  consumption  in  the  Biotope,  by  installing  water  efficient  appliances.  Second, in this scenario, the surface water runoff is managed minimizing local hydrological impact.  Third, it incorporates high ecological value ponds landscaping into the site. This issue is incorporated  in Section 6.2.7.    Figure  21  represents  the  water  flow  in  the  Biotope  for  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’.  The  rain  water  is  collected from roofs and permeable pavements and stored in the ponds. It is used for flushing toilets  and irrigation. The rain water that is not used within the building is returned to the groundwater via  soakways, preventing flooding. For other activities that require a better water quality, drinking water  is  supplied  to  the  building  by  the  local  public  water  company.  The  Biotope’s  wastewater  is  discharged into the sewage system and treated by the local public utility. 

  Figure 21. ‘Efficient Scenario’ water management.  Legend:  1. The rain water is collected from roofs and permeable pavements.  2. It is stored in the ponds that work as a retention and settlement structure.  3. It will be used in the Biotope for flushing toilets (Q3).  4. Drinking water (Q1) is imported to the system to supply the other human uses. The water demand is minimized  by the use of efficient faucets and low flush toilets.  5. Biotope’s wastewater is discharged into the sewage system and treated by the local public utility, in a separated  stream from the rain water.  6. Rain water overflow is returned to the groundwater via soakaways.   

 

 

45   


SCENARIOS    6.2.5. WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION  In the ‘BAU Scenario’, toilet flush accounts for more than 75% of the total water demand, whereas  the faucets used for hygiene accounts for more than 10% (please refer to Section 6.1). Together they  represent more than 85% of the total water demand. In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, the minimization of  water demand is focused on these two uses of water.   Low flush toilet  A  typical  toilet  uses  7.5  to  9  liters  per  flush,  while  dual  low  flush  toilets  use  2  to  4  liters  (Lazarus,  2009). For the following calculation, the lowest typical consumption (7,5L) and the highest dual low  flush (4L) are considered.     Efficient Faucets  Self‐regulating  flow  restrictors  to  faucets  reduce  pressure  and  flow  rates  and  minimize  wastage.  They reduce water consumption by approximately two thirds (Lazarus, 2009).   These  two  technologies  are  capable  of  minimizing  the  water  demand  in  toilet  flush  and  hygiene  faucets  from  an  annual  average  of  4.328m³  in  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’  to  2.200m³  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’. The total demand is reduced from 4.992m³ per year in the ‘BAU Scenario’ to 2.864m³ per  year in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ (Tables 23 and 24).  Table 23. Implemented technologies to water demand minimization in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

 

BAU DEMAND 

NEW DEMAND

toilet flush 

3.787  m³/yr 

180  m³/yr 2.020  m³/yr

TOTAL 

4.328  m³/yr 

2.200

Hygiene/faucets 

541  m³/yr 

m³/yr

REDUCTION

LITERATURE SOURCE 

64%

(Lazarus, 2009) 

47%

(Lazarus, 2009) 

49%

  Table 24. Yearly water demand in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ for each use and the total demand. 

  

EFFICIENT DEMAND

drinking water, coffee and tea

184

hygiene 

180

toilet flush 

2.020

dishwasher 

306

food processing 

174

TOTAL DEMAND 

2.864

    6.2.6. MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT  The rain water is collected from roofs, paved and pond areas of the entire Sunrise Campus. The rain  water from the roofs is harvested and stored in the ponds (Figure 21). Moreover, an infiltration and  a  collection  system  are  used,  limiting  peak  runoff  in  sewer  system  and  reducing  overflow  from  combined system. For this to happen, permeable pavements are used in parking lots and roads. This  type of pavement consists of three layers. A base layer of 300mm of coarse gravel (3,5‐5,0cm), a top  layer of 100mm of fine graded gravel (0,3‐2cm), and a pavement made of modular blocks (Burkhard  et al., 2000). 

46   


SCENARIOS    Drainage  pipes  will  collect  the  infiltrated  water  that  will  be  already  clean  of  oil  and  petrol  contamination from the roads by the pavements. Together with the storm water collected from all  of the Sunrise Campus roofs, it will be discharged into the ponds. The ponds work as a retention and  settlement structure. Outflows from the ponds are directed via an outlet structure, into a receiving  watercourse.  Then, in each building of the campus, including the Biotope, the rain water from the ponds passes  through a sand filter in the down pipe before entering to the main tank, according to each building’s  need. In the Biotope, submersible pumps then deliver it, not without passing through a regular water  filter, and it is used for toilet flush (Q3).   To assess the water harvested and used, the input water consumption of toilet flush was multiplied  by the discharge coefficient 0,8 (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010). Therefore, it is expected that new  water  (rain  water)  is  added  to  the  system  in  every  cycle.  The  multisource  assessment  is  therefore  20% of the water used for toilet flush, resulting in 403m³/yr.  In the Sunrise Campus, the total amount of potential water harvest is 155.219m³/year, considering  the roof, paving and ponds as surfaces capable of water harvest (Table 25). For this calculation, the  average  of  annual  rainfall  in  the  Netherlands  was  considered  76,5cm/year  (Royal  Dutch  Meteorological Institute, 2007). However, the portion that is harvested in the Biotope implantation  area is 46.283m³. This amount of water is able to fulfill the Biotope’s yearly water demand.    Table 25. Potential water harvest according to the Dutch rain fall. 

 

 

SUNRISE CAMPUS  BIOTOPE    

IMPLANTATION AREA (A) 202.900 60.500

RAINFALL NL m² m²

0,765 0,765

m/yr m/yr 

POTENTIAL RAIN HARVEST 155.219  m³ 46.283  m³

  In the ‘BAU Scenario’, the total water demand of the Sunrise Campus is 104.567m³/yr (please refer  to Section 4.3). Considering that in the Netherlands and in the region of Venlo the average rainfall is  nearly constant (Figure 22), it is sufficient to harvest water for the maximum of three months.  The  volume of the ponds is designed to have space for 26.142m³, which is sufficient to harvest water for  three  months  of  use.  According  to  Burkhard  et  al.,  the  ideal  depth  of  the  pond  for  it  to  act  as  retention and settlement structure is from 0,6 to 1,8m (Burkhard et al., 2000). Thus, the depth of  the  ponds  is  considered  to  be  1,8m.  The  total  area  of  the  ponds  needed  for  the  BAU  situation  is  14.523m². In the ‘Efficient Scenario’ the ponds design represents 15.113m² (Figure 14) (the area was  calculated using Autocad software).   If there is an overflow from the pond, it is directed via a soakaway into a receiving water course. The  soakaway  are  underground  structures,  which  normally  are  circular  shafts.  They  are  filled  with  medium gravel, into which runoff can be discharged (Burkhard et al., 2000). Finally, the wastewater  is  not  treated  onsite,  but  it  is  discharged  into  the  sewage  system  where  it  will  be  treated  by  the  public utilities. 

47   


SCENARIOS   

  Figure 22. Average rainfall in the region of Eindhoven. Venlo is located 60km of Eindhoven and thus it is assumed that  they have a similar rainfall. Source: Weather and Climate, 2009. 

6.2.7. BIODIVERSITY  In the ‘Efficient Scenario’, the roofs are managed for the use of photovoltaic panels; therefore, these  roofs are not to be used to increment the amount of green areas. However, the ponds are potential  places for habitats of different species. Besides the fact that they function as retention structures,  they  also  integrate  the  area  with  the  surrounding  landscape,  serving  as  habitat  for  wildlife.  The  surrounding areas of the ponds are considered to be gardens. All the green areas are located within  the  Biotope  s  implantation  site.  The  total  area  that  is  able  to  promote  biodiversity  in  the  Sunrise  Campus and in the Biotope is 31.000m² (Table 26).  Table 26. Biodiversity variations in the Biotope  and Sunrise Campus implantation areas  in the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

 

 

green roof  not controlled  garden  pond  constructed wetland controlled  greenhouse  Total   

SUNRISE CAMPUS 0 16.300 14.700 0 0 31.000

m² m² m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE     0  16.300  14.700  0  0  31.000 

m²  m²  m²  m²  m²  m² 

  6.2.8. ‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT  The  energy  and  water  are  resumed  into  three  different  evaluation  indices  that  are  explained  in  Section 3.1. These indices are the demand minimization (DMI), the waste output (WOI) and the self‐ sufficiency  (SSI)  indices.  They  are  expressed  in  Table  27  for  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’.  Furthermore,  biodiversity is evaluated according to two different indices: green area (GAI) and local species (LSI),  for the Biotope ’s and Sunrise Campus’ implantation areas (please refer to Section 3.2). These indices  are also shown in Table 28 for the ‘Efficient Scenario’.   Energy  The DMI for energy is 0,55, i.e. the ‘Efficient Scenario’ is able to reduce its energy demand in 55%  when  compared  to  the  ‘BAU  Scenario’.  The  WOI  is  the  same  as  in  the  BAU  (‐1)  scenario,  because  strategies such as energy cascading or recycling are absent, and the output is not minimized. Finally,  with the application of PV cells on the roof and PV windows, the SSI achieves 0,29, and the Biotope   is able to produce 29% of its total demand, with renewable and local energy.  48   


SCENARIOS    Consequently, the building has a moderate improvement towards self‐sufficiency when  comparing  to  its  energy  demand.  The  remaining  demand  is  to  be  imported  to  the  building  from  public  companies.    Water  By reducing the water demand with low flush toilets and by using efficient faucets, it was possible to  reduce the water demand in 57% (DMI=0,43). Moreover, when using rain water to flush the toilets,  the  multisource  increases,  although  in  a  small  scale,  and  the  self‐sufficiency  index  becomes  0,14.  However, like in the energy system, cascading and recycling are not being used and the WOI remains  the same as in the ‘BAU Scenario’ (‐1,00).  Table 27. Energy and water assessment for the ‘‘Efficient Scenario’’. 

 

EFFICIENT ENERGY

Conventional Demand (Do)  New Demand (D) Cascade (C)  Recycle(R)  Consumption (Co) Multisource (M)  DMI= (Do‐D)/Do  WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D  SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

3.590 1.625 0 0 0 467 INDICES 0,55 ‐1 0,29

EFFICIENT WATER 

MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr

4.992  2.864  0  0  0  403 

m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr 

0,43  ‐1  0,14 

     

   Biodiversity  The biodiversity area in this scenario is considered to be the pond and its surrounding area (Figure  13), which is a not controlled area and different ecosystems can take place. The others open areas in  the Sunrise Campus are considered to be paved and they are not assessed in this scenario.   As a result, the GAI in the Biotope is 0,51 and for the Sunrise Campus is 0,15, i.e. the total green area  corresponds to 51% of the Biotope’s implantation area, whereas it also indicates 15% of the Sunrise  Campus  area.  Without  the  existence  of  greenhouses  and  constructed  wetlands,  the  LSI  is  1.  This  means that local species can make use of the total amount of the green areas (Table 28).   Table 28. Biodiversity assessment for the ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

 

SUNRISE CAMPUS

Implantation area (A)  Not controlled green (NCG) Controlled green (CG)  Total green (T)  GAI = T/A  LSI = T‐CG/T 

   

202.900 31.000 0 31.000 0,15 1

BIOTOPE     m² m² m² m²

60.500 31.000 0 31.000 0,51 1

m²  m²  m²  m²     

 

49   


SCENARIOS    6.3.

SCENARIO 3 – BIO‐DIVERSE 

In  this  scenario,  the  biodiversity  guides  an  energetic  and  material  engagement  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  and  the  Biotope.  As  a  consequence,  the  built  up  and  green  areas  will  become  interdependent. In its design, priority is given to the amount of green areas inside and outside the  building.  According  to  McDonough  et  al.,  the  vitality  of  ecosystems  depends  on  the  relationships  between  the  species,  their  uses,  and  exchanges  of  materials  and  energy  in  a  given  place  (McDonough et al., 2003).  The design of the Biotope in this scenario mimics a  natural landscape, and  the three  blocks of the  building  create  a  parody  of  three  small  hills.  These  hills  are  covered  with  green  roofs,  of  which  nature will take control (Figures 23 and 24). Furthermore, due to the new shape of the buildings, its  area  is  10%  bigger  than  in  the  first  and  second  scenarios.  However,  the  human  function  area  will  remain the same as in the previous scenarios. The extra area will be occupied by green spaces and  consequently,  the  water  demand  will  increase.  Moreover,  the  blocks  have  four  floors  instead  of  three, and the distance between them will follow the same proportions as in the ‘Efficient Scenario’  (Figure 14), in order to enhance the natural lighting in the Biotope.   N 

  Figure 23. ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ plan view. 

50   


SCENARIOS    Furthermore,  the  vegetation  is  also  seen  as  an  energy  source  in  this  scenario.  The  garden  waste,  together with the kitchen waste, will be digested through anaerobic digestion, producing methane  that will be used within the Biotope as electricity and heat.  The wastewater from all the buildings of the Sunrise Campus will be cleansed in a ‘Living Machine’  (Todd, 1996) and recycled, creating a step towards a building’s circular metabolism. Moreover, the  green waste of the other buildings will be used for energy production of the Biotope. This waste is  not assessed as external input, because the clean water and energy produced from the waste output  of the other buildings becomes food for the Biotope and for the Sunrise Campus.  The main design characteristics of the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ are:     

Biotope  area: 13.750m²/ Human functions area:12.500m²  Biotope  roof area: 7.980m²  Number of workers: 960  Building orientation: 3 blocks in the east‐west axis. The distance between the blocks (45m) is  3 times their height (15m) (please refer to Figure 14, Section 6.2).  Sunrise Campus buildings:  green roofs in all roofs (the organic waste of the green roofs are  added in the bio‐digestion process)   

  Figure 24. ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’: Block Schematic Section AA. 

6.3.1. ENERGY FLOW   The energy flow for this scenario follows some of the parameters of the ‘Efficient Scenario’, with a  few  modifications.  The  most  important  is  the  addition  of  green  roofs,  and  consequently,  the  subtraction  of  PV  cells  that  were  in  the  roof  in  the  previous  scenario.  The  production  of  energy  is  now dependent on anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste and PV windows (Figure 25).  The implementation of green roofs provides strong insulation in warm days (75%), whereas in cold  days this efficiency is reduced to 15% (Liu et al., 2003). This causes an imbalance between heating  and  cooling  demand  in  the  building  throughout  the  year  and  as  a  consequence,  it  influences  the  ATES system.  In this case, the ATES system should be tested and its installation effectiveness should be evaluated.  In  what  follows,  two  alternatives  were  studied  for  the  energy  of  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’.  One  includes an ATES system (a), and the other excludes it (b). After that, a comparison between them is  made and one of the sub‐scenarios is chosen to represent the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

51   


SCENARIOS   

  Figure 25. ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ Energy management. The ATES system is included in the Sub‐scenario (a), and it is not in  sub‐scenario (b). Schematic Section AA.  Figure 25 – Legend:  1. Passive lighting and heating  2. Solar tubes  3. Insulation materials, use of led lamps, CPU management  4. Green roof  5. Organic waste from Biotope  and green roofs of other buildings are added to the  anaerobic digester  6. Anaerobic digester  7. Energy is produced in the  anaerobic digester is used in the Biotope   8. ATES system (only in Sub‐Scenario (a))  9. Extra energy from ‘green companies’ 

  6.3.2. ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION  a. ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a) ‐ without ATES ‐ energy demand minimization  In this Section, the technologies that were taken into consideration in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a),  and their implementation are explained. They are listed in the following table after which they are  explained.  First,  lighting  reductions  with  passive  lighting  and  dimming  control  were  taken  into  accountl. Second, the use of LED lamps instead of regular incandescent bulbs was considered. Third,  the cooling and heating demand were minimized, by the implementation of passive ventilation and  implementation of insulation materials in the buildings envelope, and green roofs. Lastly, the ATES  system was assessed, reducing the remaining heating and cooling demand.  The  lighting  demand  and  office  equipment  minimization  are  to  be  the  same  as  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  and  they  are  not  to  be  assessed  in  this  Section  (please  refer  to  Section  6.2.2  for  the  referred assessment). In this Section, heat and cold demand will be assessed for the two alternatives  in the different sub‐scenarios.    

 

52   


SCENARIOS    Table 29. Implemented technologies to energy demand minimization in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a). 

TECHNIQUE  

(1)  LIGHTING  

(2)  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT 

(3)  COOLING 

(3)  HEATING  

REDUCTION 

Literature Source 

passive lighting + diming control

40.00%

(Bodart et al., 2002) 

use of led lamps instead of regular  incandescent bulb 

90.00%

(MacKay, 2008) 

CPU management and standby and  active mode power reductions for  computers  passive ventilation

40.00%

(Waide et al., 2007) 

10.00%

(Kolokotroni et al., 2006)

green roof  ATES 

75.00% 70.00%

insulation materials: floors, walls,  windows and roofs  green roof  ATES 

40.00%

(Liu et al., 2003)  (Bridger et al., 2005)  (Nieuwenhuize, 2011)  (MacKay, 2008) 

15.00% 13.75%

(Liu et al., 2003)  (Bridger  et al., 2005)  (Nieuwenhuize, 2011) 

  (1)

Lighting demand minimization (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)    (2) Office Equipment energy demand minimization  (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for  detailed data)    (3) Heat and cold demand minimization    Passive Ventilation (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)   Insulation materials (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)   Green roof and ATES system  Green roofs not only add aesthetic appeal to the unused roof space that is available in most urban  areas;  they  also  provide  many  benefits.  Green  roofs  can  protect  the  roofing  membrane  from  exposure to ultra violet radiation and storm damage. Furthermore, they can reduce energy demand  for air conditioning, through direct shading of the roof, evapotranspiration and improved insulation  values. Moreover, if widely adopted, green roofs could reduce the urban heat island (an elevation of  temperature relative to the surrounding rural or natural areas due to the high concentration of heat  absorbing  dark  surfaces  such  as  rooftops  and  pavements),  which  would  further  lower  energy  consumption in the urban areas (Liu et al., 2003).  According to Liu et al., green roofs are more effective in reducing heat gain than heat loss. The green  roof also significantly moderates the heat flow through the roofing system and reduces the average  of  daily  energy  demand  for  air  conditioning  systems  by  more  than  75%.  However,  in  the  opposite  situation, its effectiveness is only 15% (Liu et al., 2003).  Therefore, the green roof implementation generates an eminent imbalance in the annual heat and  cold  demand.  The  ATES  system  does  not  produce  heat,  but  it  balances  the  heat  and  cold  within  a  building  throughout  the  year.  The  great  difference  in  insulation  in  different  seasons  creates  a  misbalance in the ATES system. As a result of the considerable reduction of the cooling demand, the  53   


SCENARIOS    heating efficiency of the ATES system becomes very low (Table 30). For more detailed information in  the ATES calculation, please refer to the ‘Efficient Scenario’.   Table  30  expresses  the  results  of  the  implementation  of  the  technologies  explained  above  for  heating and cooling demand minimization. The remaining demand of cooling is to be fulfilled with  conventional air conditioned systems, fueled with electricity. The heating demand will be completed  through central heating systems powered with natural gas, which has to be imported to the system.   The table below expresses the results of the implementation of the technologies explained above for  heating and cooling demand minimization. With the implementation of the green roof, the heating  efficiency of the ATES system drops significantly.   For  the  cooling  demand  assessment,  first  the  demand  was  reduced  by  the  use  of  passive  night  ventilation, whereas, for the heating demand, insulation materials were first considered. After that,  the implementation of green roofs is assessed. It is considered an efficiency of 75% for the cooling,  whereas  15%  for  the  heating  demand  minimization.  The  remaining  demand  was  minimized  by  the  use of the ATES system.  For  that,  it  was  first  considered  that  an  ATES  system  minimizes  70%  of  the  cooling  total  demand,  which corresponds to a reduction of 93MWh. The same load of energy (93MWh) was reduced from  the heating demand, which represents only 13,6% out of the total heating demand.   After  that,  the  energy  spent  by  the  pumps  needed  for  the  system  was  added  to  the  calculation.  Please refer to Section 6.2.2 for more details of this calculation.   Table 30. Yearly heat and cold minimization assessment for the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a). 

COOLING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND  

586

TECHNOLOGY 

MWh

 

REDUCTION

NEW DEMAND

passive night ventilation 

10%

528

MWh

green roof 

75%

132

MWh

ATES 

70%

40

MWh

40

MWh

(Bridger et al., 2005) (Nieuwenhuize, 2011)   

1335

MWh

 

COOLING ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a) DEMAND

LITERATURE SOURCE (Kolokotroni  et al.,  2006)  (Liu et al., 2003) 

  HEATING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND   TECHNOLOGY 

REDUCTION

NEW DEMAND

insulation materials 

40%

801

MWh

(MacKay, 2008) 

green roof 

15%

681

MWh

(Liu et al., 2003) 

13,6%

588

MWh

588

MWh

(Bridger et al., 2005) (Nieuwenhuize, 2011)   

ATES  HEATING ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a)  DEMAND

LITERATURE SOURCE

 

 

 

PUMP DEMAND (ELECTRICITY) 

 

 

ATES cooling pumps (COP 4) 

‐ 35%

14

MWh

(Nieuwenhuize, 2011)

ATES heating pump (COP 40) 

‐4% 

23

MWh

(Nieuwenhuize, 2011)

ATES other pumps (COP 4)

0% 

TOTAL PUMP DEMAND (ELECTRICITY) 

2

MWh

(Nieuwenhuize, 2011)

39

MWh

 

54   


SCENARIOS    The pumps have a total demand of 39MWh/yr, in the form of electricity. Therefore, this amount of  energy is added to the ‘others demand’. In the ‘BAU Scenario’, the ‘others demand’ is 546MWh/yr  (Table 12), and in the Efficient Scenario is 585MWh/yr.  b. ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b) energy demand minimization  The energy demand minimization for this sub‐scenario, ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b), follows the same  parameters  as  the  above  sub‐scenario  (a),  described  above,  but  the  ATES  system  is  excluded.  The  tables below show the technologies used and the assessment of demand reduction.  Table 31. Implemented technologies to energy demand minimization in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b). 

TECHNIQUE  

LIGHTING  

OFFICE  EQUIPMENT 

REDUCTION 

Literature Source 

passive lighting + diming control

40.00%

(Bodart et al., 2002) 

use of led lamps instead of regular  incandescent bulb 

90.00%

(MacKay, 2008) 

CPU management and standby and  active mode power reductions for  computers  passive ventilation 

40.00%

(Waide et al., 2007) 

10.00%

(Kolokotroni et al., 2006) 

green roof insulation materials: floors, walls,  windows and roofs  green roof

75.00% 40.00%

(Liu et al., 2003)  (MacKay, 2008) 

15.00%

(Liu et al., 2003) 

COOLING 

HEATING   

Table 32. Heat and cold assessment in ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b). 

COOLING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND   TECHNOLOGY  passive night ventilation  green roof  COOLING ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b) DEMAND   HEATING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND   insulation materials  green roof  HEATING ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b)  DEMAND

REDUCTION 10,00% 75,00%

40,00% 15,00%

586 NEW  DEMAND  528 132 132

MWh

MWh MWh MWh

1335 801 681 681

MWh MWh MWh MWh

LITERATURE SOURCE (Kolokotroni et al., 2006) (Liu et al., 2003) 

(MacKay, 2008)  (Liu et al., 2003) 

  c. Comparison of the Bio‐diverse sub‐scenarios (a) and (b)  The table below compares the sum of heating and cooling demand in each Bio‐diverse sub‐scenario  and in the ‘Efficient Scenario’, where there is no place for green roofs. In addition, it compares the  demand minimization that ATES system provided in three situations.  In the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a),  the combinations of the ATES system with green roof reduces the  heating and cooling energy demand in 161MWh/year, when compared to the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’  (b),  where  only  green  roofs  are  implemented.  This  means  that  in  the  sub‐scenario  (b),  there  is  an  augmentation of 25% in the energy demand.   55   


SCENARIOS    Table 33. Comparison of the yearly heating and cooling assessment for the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’s (a) and (b) and  ‘Efficient Scenario’. 

  ‘EFFICIENT SCENARIO’   ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (A)  ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (B) 

HEATING AND COOLING  TECHNOLOGIES  ATES  green roof and ATES green roof

HEATING AND  COOLING DEMAND  718 MWh 667 MWh 813 MWh

ATES DEMAND  MINIMIZATION  722  MWh 133  MWh 0  MWh

However,  when  comparing  the  demand  minimization  of  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  and  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’ (a), the heating efficiency of the ATES system drops from 54% in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ to  16% in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a), due to the implementation of the green roof.  Moreover, the  total  amount  of  energy  minimized  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  through  this  system  is  722MWh,  whereas in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (a), it decreases to 133MWh. This means a reduction of 81% in  the heating and cooling minimization generated by the referred technology.  Concluding,  it  is  possible  to  state  that  the  ATES  system,  when  combined  to  green  roofs,  does  not  function  as  efficiently  as  it  is  expected.  Therefore,  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  (b)  is  taken  into  consideration in the following assessment of energy.   (4) Others demand  In  this  scenario,  the  wastewater  will  be  treated  through  the  ‘Living  Machine’  system,  instead  of  simply  being  discharged  into  the  sewer  system  as  in  the  ‘BAU’  and  ‘Efficient  Scenario’.  In  the  previous scenarios, the energy spent by the water treatment system is not accounted because the  process is realized outside the study area.   According to Albion Water Ltda., the ‘Living Machine’ licensed water company, this system’s power  consumption  is  178kWh/day  for  a  system  designed  to  treat  1000m³/day  (Worell  Water  Technologies,  2007).  The  ‘Living  Machine’  cleanses  all  the  water  used  by  human  function  in  the  Sunrise  Campus.  According  to  Kujawa,  the  average  quantity  of  wastewater  is  80%  of  the  water  demand in a building (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010). In the Sunrise Campus, the demand of water is  104.567m³/year  (Annex  3),  and  therefore,  the  wastewater  is  83.654m³/year,  and  consequently,  321m³/day. This results in an extra energy demand of 0,057MWh/year. This value is very low when  compared to the total energy demand (1.720MWh/yr) (Table 34) and will not be considered for the  energy assessment.  d. ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b) demand minimization  The  total  energy  demand  for  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’  (b)  is  1.720MWh.  The  electricity  use  is  responsible for 908MWh whereas the heat and cold are responsible for 813MWh of the energy use  (Table 34).    

 

56   


SCENARIOS    Table 34. Energy demand in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ for each use and the total demand per year. 

Energy 

Total energy demand 

Lighting  Office  Equipment  Cooling  Heating  Others  NEW ELECTRICITY DEMAND HEAT/COLD DEMAND NEW ENERGY DEMAND

35 327 132 681 546 908 813 1.720

MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh 

  6.3.3. ENERGY PRODUCTION   In the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ (b), the Biotope produces energy through bio‐digestion and through the  implementation  of  solar  PV  windows  on  the  South  façades.  In  what  follows,  these  strategies  are  explained.  (1)

 Anaerobic digestion of food waste and green waste 

In  this  Scenario,  anaerobic  digestion  that  operates  with  high  solids  reactors  (up  to  30%)  is  to  be  implemented, for the treatment of food and garden waste. According to Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., this  type of digestion has grown in use in the past decade, and it can be described as (Kujawa‐Roeleveld  et al., 2010):    Anaerobic bacteria Organic matter + H2O                                   new cells + CO 2 + CH4 + NH3 + H2S  The beneficial end product is methane (CH4). Other products are sludge water, carbon dioxide and  traces  of  ammonia  and  hydrogen  sulphide.  The  sludge  water  can  be  dewatered  to  produce  a  supernatant and a filter cake. The filter cake and the filtrate are to be used as a suitable fertilizer,  because they have soil conditioning effects (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  However, it is not going  to be assessed in the further results, because it is considered to be part of the nutrients flow which is  out of the scope of the present thesis.  The  process  of  anaerobic  digestion  consists  of  three  phases:  hydrolysis,  acidogenis  and  methanogens. In these phases, different bacteria are active and are called the hydrolyzing bacteria,  non‐methanogenic and methanogenic respectively. The maintenance of an environment that keeps  the acidogenes and methanogens in dynamic equilibrium is (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010):        

Be oxygen free  Not contain inhibiting salts  Have a 6,5 < pH < 7,5  Be of adequate alkalinity, 1.500 to 7.500mg/L  Have sufficient nutrients, phosphorus and nitrogen  Be temperature steady at either mesophilic or termophilic conditions   Have a constant solids loading rate  

57   


SCENARIOS    The high solids anaerobic digestion is an aerobic process where the solids content in the reactor are  25  to  35%.  Many  processes  of  this  type  are  in  existence  internationally.  The  Dry  Anaerobic  Composting  (DRANCO)  process  of  organic  waste  uses  a  solid  concentration  of  30  to  35%  (Kujawa‐ Roeleveld et al., 2010; De Baer, Luc, 2010) and can be used as a model for the Sunrise Campus. The  cycle time is 16 to 21 days and the biogas production is 5 to 8m³ for each cubic meter of reactor. The  gas content is 55% methane and the energy production is 140 to 200m³ of biogas per tonne of raw  organic waste at 40 to 60% dry solids (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  According to Lundie et al., one person in household produces 86,66kg of wet food waste in a yearly  base  (Lundie  et  al.,  2005).  To  assess  the  total  wet  food  of  the  Biotope,  this  production  was  proportional to the working days in a year (260) and working hours a day (8). This amount is reduced  to  20,4kg  per  person  per  year.  The  total  amount  of  workers  in  the  Biotope  is  960.  Therefore,  the  total waste food production in the Biotope is 19.754kg (Table 35).  Table 35. Food waste in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ per year. 

 

Waste production/ person‐yr 

Food waste 

20,4  kg

Workers in  Biotope   960

Total waste  produced  19.754

kg

LITERATURE SOURCE (Lundie et al., 2005)

The  total  amount  of  green  areas  from  green  roofs  in  the  Sunrise  Campus  (including  the  Biotope  green  roof),  green  wall  gardens  in  the  Biotope  and  ponds  sum  136.318m²  (see  Section  6.3.7).  According to Gaston et al., a square meter of urban garden produces 0,34kg of green waste (Gaston  et al., 2005). Therefore, the total amount of green waste produced annually in the Sunrise Campus in  the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ is 46.416kg (Table 36).   Table 36. Green waste in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ per year. 

  Garden waste 

Waste production 

Green area

0,34kg/m²  81.725 m²

Total waste  produced  46.416kg

LITERATURE SOURCE (Lundie et al., 2005);  Section 3.6.7 (green areas) 

It follows that the total amount of the garden and food waste produced by the Biotope and Sunrise  Campus in this scenario is 66.170kg/year that are to be digested through anaerobic treatment. The  energy production of anaerobic digestion is 200m³ per ton (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010), which is  equal to 1,92MWh/ton of waste (conversion factor of 0,00961 (Graaff et al., 2010)).  When  the  full  amount  of  organic  waste  produced  in  the  Biotope  is  treated  though  anaerobic  digestion,  it  yields  127MWh  of  potential  energy.  Combined  heat  and  power  (CHP)  generation  systems can be used to produce heat and electricity at an efficiency of 85% (of which 40% electricity  and 60% heat)  (Graaff et  al., 2010). This would result in a production of 65MWh of electricity and  43MWh of heat on an annual base (Table 37).   

 

58   


SCENARIOS    Table 37. Combined heat and power from organic waste bio‐digestion per year. 

Total  organic  waste 

energy production rate  Total  Energy  potential 

66.170 kg  1,92MWh/ton

127MWh

Total  energy  available  for CHP  108MWh

Total  Total  heat  electricity  produced  produced  65MWh

43MWh 

LITERATURE  SOURCE 

(Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010);  (Graaff et al., 2010) 

  (2) PV windows  In the proposed design, the South façade of the three blocks sum a total area of 2.317m² (calculated  through  the  Autocad  software,  according  to  Figures  23  and  24).  Considering  the  PV  window  avaragee power of 4,6W/m² (refer to Efficiency Scenario for more details), it yields a total electricity  production of 93MWh per year.  The total energy produced in this scenario through anaerobic digestion and PV window is 201MWh  per  year.  The  electricity  produced  is  136MWh/yr,  whereas  the  heat  produced  is  65MWh  per  year  (Table  38).  The  total  energy  demand  is  1.720MWh/yr  (Table  34).  In  this  scenario  the  Biotope  still  needs  to  import  a  great  amount  of  its  energy  demand.  The  extra  energy  is  to  be  imported  from  companies that produce energy from renewable sources.  Table 38. Implemented technologies and yearly energy production in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

TECHNOLOGY 

HEAT 

ELECTRICITY

Literature Source 

ANAEROBIC DIGESTION 

65  MWh

43

MWh

(Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al.,  2010); (Graaff et al., 2010) 

PV WINDOW  TOTAL                          201MWh 

0  MWh 65  MWh

93 136

MWh MWh

(Schueco, 2011) 

  6.3.4. WATER FLOW   The water management in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ is similar to the ‘Efficient Scenario’, because it  aims  to  reduce  human  water  consumption  in  the  Biotope,  by  installing  water  efficient  appliances.  Moreover,  in  both  scenarios,  the  surface  water  runoff  is  managed  by  minimizing  the  local  hydrological  impact.  However,  different  from  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’,  constructed  wetlands  are  implemented as a part of the wastewater management that will  work together with the retention  ponds. Furthermore, a ‘Living Machine’ (Todd, 1996) is added to the program of the building. This  ‘Living Machine’ will clean all the human wastewater of the Sunrise Campus, and the Biotope will be  able  to  export  back  the  same  water  in  Q3  (please  refer  to  Section  5.2),  promoting  recycling.  In  addition,  the  water  demand  is  going  to  be  higher  than  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’,  because  of  the  implementation of gardens within the building area.    Figure 26. Water flow in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. represents the water flow in the Biotope for the  ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. The rain water is collected from roofs and permeable pavements and treated  in  constructed  wetlands  and  stored  in  the  ponds.  It  is  used  for  flushing  toilets  and  irrigation.  The  Sunrise Campus’ wastewater (black water and grey water) is treated in the ‘Living Machine’ (Todd, 

59   


SCENARIOS    1996). The treated water  will be reused for toilet flush and irrigation, creating a loop in the water  flow.   

The  extra  water  that  is  not  used  within  the  building  is  returned  to  the  groundwater  via  soakways,  preventing  flooding.  For  other  activities  that  require  a  better  water  quality,  drinking  water  is  supplied to the building by the local public water company. 

  Figure 26. Water flow in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’.  Legend:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The rain water is collected from roofs and permeable pavements.  It is stored treated in constructed wetlands and stored in ponds (Q3).  The water is used in the Biotope for flushing toilets and irrigation (Q3).  Drinking water is imported to the system (Q1)  The Sunrise Campus’ wastewater (black water and grey water) is treated in the Living Machine. The treated  water will be reused for toilet flush and irrigation (Q3), creating a loop in water flow.  6. After  treated  in  a  Living  Machine  (Q3), extra water  will be  discharged  into  a  local  watercourse,  to prevent  flooding.   

6.3.5. WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION  Within  the  Biotope  there  will  be  1.250m²  of  gardens,  which  corresponds  to  10%  of  the  human  function  area.  On  the  one  hand,  it  increases  the  biodiversity  in  the  area.  On  the  other  hand,  it  increases  the  water  demand  of  the  building.  It  was  assumed  that  the  garden  water  demand  for  irrigation  is  half  of  the  greenhouse  irrigation  demand  in  the  Netherlands,  which  according  to  Stanghellini  is  0,75m³  of  irrigation  water  per  square  meter  (Stanghellini,  2009).  This  results  in  an  extra  demand  of  469m³  per  year  (Table  40).  The  irrigation  water  is  also  recycled  in  the  ‘Living  Machine’.   The  water  demand  minimization  in  this  scenario  follows  in  the  same  way  as  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’. The demand is reduced through low flush toilets and use of efficient faucets (please, refer  to the ‘Efficient Scenario’ for more detailed data about those reductions).  Like in the previous scenario, the technologies applied are capable of minimizing the water demand  in  toilet  flush  and  hygiene  faucets  from  an  annual  average  of  4.328m³  to  2.200m³.  This  means  a  reduction of 49% in the described uses. Although the water demand is higher than in the ‘Efficient  60   


SCENARIOS    Scenario’, because of the garden area, it is still reduced if compared to the BAU situation. The total  demand is 3.332m³/yr (Table 40), whereas in the ‘BAU Scenario’ is 4.992m³/yr (Table 13).  Table 39. Implemented technologies to water demand minimization in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

 

BAU DEMAND 

faucets  toilet flush 

541  m³/yr 3.787  m³/yr

TOTAL 

4.328  m³/yr

REDUCTION 64% 47%

LITERATURE SOURCE (Lazarus, 2009) (Lazarus, 2009)

NEW DEMAND  180  m³/yr 2.019  m³/yr 2.200  m³/yr

  Table 40. Water demand in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ for each use and the total demand per year. 

 

BIO‐DIVERSE DEMAND  

drinking water, coffee and tea

184

hygiene 

180

toilet flush 

2.020

dishwasher 

306

food processing 

174

garden irrigation 

469

TOTAL DEMAND 

3.332

    6.3.6. MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT  The rain water is collected from roofs and permeable pavements (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’  for  detailed  data).  In  this  scenario,  green  roofs  are  used  as  part  of  the  storm  water  management  strategy. According to Liu et al., green roofs delay runoff into the sewage system; hence, they help to  reduce  the  frequency  of  combined  sewage  overflow  (CSO)  events,  which  is  a  significant  environmental  problem  in  urban  areas.  Moreover,  the  plants  and  the  growing  medium  can  also  remove airborne pollutants picked up by the rain, thus improving the quality of the runoff (Liu et al.,  2003).  The  rain  water  is  stored  in  constructed  wetlands.  According  to  Asano,  constructed  wetlands  are  artificial wetlands, designed to utilize natural aquatic plants and organisms to improve water quality,  retain  rain  water  for  flood  control  during  heavy  rain  events,  and  provide  wildlife  habitat.  A  constructed wetland can also serve as habitat for wildlife, and potentially as a recreational site if it is  designed  to  maintain  its  principal  functions  while  safeguarding  public  health  (Asano,  2006).  The  wetlands have two functions in this scenario. First, they have the same functions of ponds, which is  to retain the rain water. Second, they also act as purification ponds, because they can be used for  preliminary rain water treatment consisting of a screen and sand removal tank before the water is to  be used in the Biotope in quality 3 (please refer to Section 5.2).   According  to  Burkhard  et  al.,  the  wetlands  consist  of  a  watertight  pool,  filled  with  a  medium  and  planted with aquatic plants (macrophytes), which are able to grow in a water saturated root zone. At  the upstream end of the wetland, an inlet structure distributes the inflow. At the downstream end,  an outlet structure collects the treated wastewater (Burkhard et al., 2000).  

61   


SCENARIOS    After the wastewater is used within the building, it is to be treated in a Tidal Wetland Living Machine  (TWLM) or ‘Living Machine’. This system was chosen for the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ because of its low  energy  demand,  and  the  combination  of  water  treatment  with  wetland  plants  and  animals,  which  enhances  biodiversity  in  the  campus.  This  system  cleanses  sewage  and  industrially  contaminated  water using natural biological processes, mostly consisting of higher plants, such as reeds, through  which the influent flows (White, 2006) (Todd, 1999).   A  Tidal  Wetland  Living  Machine  (TWLM)  uses  mainly  bacteria,  but  also  employs  other  living  organisms such as plants and gastropods to aid in the mineralization and removal of contaminants  from  the  water.  The  system  comprises  multiple  flood  and  drain  (tidal)  wetland  cells  (Figure  27).   Tidal  wetland  cells  flood  and  drain  in  a  serial  fashion.  A  recycle  loop  passes  water  several  times  through the treatment system (Austin et al., 2005; Worell Water Technologies, 2007).     The  TWLM  consists  of  four  or  six  tidal  wetland  cells.  It  includes  a  first  lagoon  that  has  an  inlet  for  receiving  wastewater  to  be  treated  and  a  first  vertical  flow  marsh  cell  that  has  an  outlet  on  the  bottom.  A  second  lagoon  has  an  inlet  for  receiving  water  from  the  first  marsh  cell  and  a  second  vertical flow marsh cell that has an outlet on the bottom. The first and second lagoons are adapted  to  function  essentially  aerobically  and  to  contain  plants  having  roots  positioned  to  contact  water  that  is  flowing  into  them.  Each  lagoon  is  adapted  to  maintain  a  population  of  grazing  aquatic  invertebrates. The first and second marsh cells are adapted to contain plants having roots positioned  to contact water that is flowing into them (Austin et al., 2005).   

  Figure 27. Tidal wetland Living Machine. Source: Worell Water Technologies, 2007. 

 

 

62   


SCENARIOS    The system is particular for alternating marsh cells and lagoons. The overall hydraulic regime in this  system preferably involves fill and drain cycles wherein wastewater is alternately pumped between  cells and lagoons. The vertical flux of water in and out of the marsh cells is designed to cycle over a  predetermined period, and is therefore referred to as tidal (Austin et al., 2005).    The TWLM achieves advanced biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total suspended solids (TSS), and  total nitrogen removal at a fraction of the energy cost of conventional technologies. Simultaneous  nitrification and denitrification is a key feature of the TWLM system. Nitrification occurs in drained  wetland cells while denitrification occurs in flooded wetland cells (Austin et al., 2005; Worell Water  Technologies, 2007).    The ‘Living Machine’ achieves an advanced tertiary treatment suitable for reuse systems (Austin et  al., 2005; Worell Water Technologies, 2007). In the Sunrise Campus, the water treated in the ‘Living  Machine’ is reused for toilet flush within the buildings. The extra cleansed water is discharged into a  receiving water course like in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ (Figure 26) (please refer to Section 6.2).  To  assess  the  outputs,  the  input  water  demand  was  multiplied  by  the  discharge  coefficient  0,8  (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010). Therefore, it is expected that new water (rain water) is added to the  system  in  every  cycle.  The  multisource  assessment  is  therefore  20%  of  the  water  used  for  toilet  flush, resulting in 403m³/yr.  6.3.7. BIODIVERSITY   In  this  scenario,  a  large  amount  of  green  areas  emerges.  Biotic  aspects  of  the  business  site  environment, that is, flora, fauna, and the landscape they inhabit are addressed. This characteristic is  developed in three different areas of the Biotope and Sunrise Campus. First, the green areas within  the building are about 10% of the constructed area. Second, the wastewater treatment system, the  ‘Living Machine’, besides purifying the water, enhances the quantity of species in the building. Third,  green roofs and the ponds, which are seen as potential habitats for many plants and animals species,  are  extensively  used  in  the  Sunrise  Campus.  As  a  result,  the  total  area  that  is  able  to  promote  biodiversity in the Sunrise Campus and in the Biotope is 136.318m² and 65.328m² respectively (Table  41).  As  described  previously,  the  flow  rate  of  reclaimed  water  possibly  will  need  to  be  adjusted  to  accommodate  natural  seasonal  changes  that  affect  the  growth  and  life  cycle  of  some  species.  For  instance, some wetland plants are not able to sustain extended periods of inundation or may require  an  annual  dry  period.  Thus,  if  the  proper  conditions  are  not  created,  adapted  or  invasive  plant  communities  will  replace  these  plant  species  and  the  specific  habitat  that  they  support.  Inlet  and  outlet  structures  should  be  designed  so  that  water  levels  and  flow  rates  can  be  adjusted  as  necessary. Bypass or transfer structures should also be provided to transfer water to different areas  of the wetland as needed (Asano, 2006).  The total area for the wetlands and ponds is 16.000m2 (Figure 23). It was assessed that half of this  area is constructed wetland, and work as a part for the water treatment system and is classified as a  controlled green area. The other half is the retention pond that works as a water storage and is a not  controlled area. As a result, the total not controlled green area in the Sunrise Campus and Biotope is  128.318m² and 57.328m² respectively. The controlled green area is 8.200m² for the Sunrise Campus  and the Biotope.  63   


SCENARIOS    Table 41. Biodiversity variations in the Biotope and Sunrise Campus implantation areas in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

 

 

SUNRISE CAMPUS  BIOTOPE  

green roof   not controlled  garden  pond  constructed wetland and ‘Living Machine’ controlled  greenhouse     Total 

78.970 41.348 8.000 8.200 0 136.318

m² m² m² m² m² m²

7.980  41.348  8.000  8.200  0  65.328 

  m² m² m² m² m² m²

  6.3.8. ‘BIO‐DIVERSE SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT  The  energy  and  water  are  resumed  into  three  different  indices  that  are  explained  in  Section  3.1:  demand  minimization  (DMI),  waste  output  (WOI)  and  self‐sufficiency  (SSI).  For  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’,  they  are  expressed  in  Table  42.  Furthermore,  biodiversity  is  evaluated  according  to  two  different  indices:  green  area  (GAI)  and  local  species  (LSI),  for  the  Biotope’s  and  Sunrise  Campus’  implantation areas. These indices are also explained in Section 3.2 and the results of the ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’ are expressed in Table 43.  Table 42. Energy and water assessment for the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

 

BIO‐DIVERSE ENERGY

Conventional Demand (Do)  New Demand (D) Cascade (C)  Recycle(R)  Consumption (Co) Multisource (M)  DMI= (Do‐D)/Do  WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D  SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

3.590 1.720 0 0 0 201 INDICES 0,52 ‐1,00 0,12

MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr

BIO‐DIVERSE WATER  4.992  3.332  0  1.991  0  498 

m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr 

0,33  ‐0,40  0,75 

     

 Energy  The ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ has considerably minimized its energy demand, achieving a DMI of 0,52.  However,  its  own  multisource  (anaerobic  digestion  of  solid  waste  and  PV  windows)  is  able  to  produce  only  12%  of  the  scenario  demand  (SSI=0,12),  representing  low  grades  of  self‐sufficiency.  The  external  demand  is  provided  by  the  local  public  utility.  It  is  expected  that  in  this  scenario  the  electricity is imported from energy companies that produce renewable energy. Analogously, for the  heating demand, conventional gas should be imported to the campus. The WOI is the same as in the  ‘BAU’ and ‘Efficient’ scenarios (‐1,00), because strategies such as energy cascading or recycling are  absent and the output is not minimized.   

 

64   


SCENARIOS     Water  The  water  demand  is  increased  when  compared  to  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  due  to  the  implementation of gardens inside the Biotope. Consequently, the DMI decreases to 0,33. Rain water  is harvested and used for irrigation and low flush toilets. It is recycled by a ‘Living Machine’ and re‐ used  within  the  building.  To  assess  the  recycled  water,  the  toilet  and  irrigation  water  input  (Table  40) was multiplied by the discharge coefficient 0,8 (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010). Therefore, 80% of  the  water  demand  of  toilet  flush  and  irrigation  water  is  recycled  water,  treated  by  the  ‘Living  Machine’.  The  multisource  (rain  water)  is  the  other  20%  that  is  to  be  harvested.  Drinking  water  is  imported to the system from the local public utility.   As a result, the wastewater output is minimized and the WOI is ‐0,40. This represents that 60% of  the wastewater is re‐introduced to the system. Finally, the SSI is 0,75, and it is represents the use of  rain water that is harvested in the Biotope.    Biodiversity  The  biodiversity  area  in  this  scenario  is  considered  to  be  the  constructed  wetland/  pond,  its  surrounding area and green roofs throughout the campus (Figure 23).  Table 43. Biodiversity assessment for the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

 

SUNRISE CAMPUS

Implantation area (A) Not controlled green (NCG) Controlled green (CG) Total green (T)  GAI = T/A  LSI = T‐CG/T 

202.900 128.318 8.200 136.518 0,67 0,94

m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE  60.500 57.328 8.200 65.528 1,08 0,87

m²  m²  m²  m² 

  As a result, the GAI for the Sunrise Campus is 0,67 and for the Biotope  is 1,08, i.e. the total green  area corresponds to 67% of the Sunrise Campus implantation area, whereas it also indicates 108% of  the Biotope ’s area. The biodiversity area in the Biotope’s is bigger than the implantation area of the  Biotope itself due to the design of internal gardens in the buildings on different floors.   Because of the great amount of gardens and green roofs in this scenario, the Biotope’s the Sunrise  Campus’ local species index are 0,94 and 0,87 respectively. This means that local species can make  use of almost all the green areas.   

 

65   


SCENARIOS    6.4.

SCENARIO 4 – PRODUCER 

In this scenario, the production of clean energy, water and food are the main concerns. The technical  design  is  based  on  the  ‘‘greenhouse  village  neighborhood’  (Mels  et  al.,  2010),  a  neighborhood  designed  together  with  greenhouses  where  they  exchange  heat,  nutrients  and  water  in  different  qualities.  N 

Figure 28. ‘‘Producer Scenario’’: plan view. 

The  design  results  from  the  necessity  of  coupling  2  hectares  of  greenhouse  to  the  12.500m²  of  human  functions  in  the  Biotope,  in  order  to  cope  with  the  heating  demand  in  the  Biotope.  The  Producer Biotope is divided into three blocks, and has two floors. The distance between the blocks  (24m)  is  3  times  their  height  (8m),  to  achieve  the  optimum  passive  lighting  effect  (please  refer  to  Figure  15  and  Section  6.2.2).  The  greenhouses  are  to  be  placed  in  the  East  and  West  sides  of  the  building blocks. They are covered with PV windows on their South façades as well as on their roofs.  Natural  lighting  and  ventilation  will  be  provided  through  solar  tubes  and  ventilation  tubes.  In  this  scenario, two alternative technologies are applied to the human function’s roof, generating two sub‐ scenarios. In the sub‐scenario (a), the roofs are covered with PV cells, whereas in the sub‐scenario 

66   


SCENARIOS    (b),  wind  turbines  are  to  be  placed  on  the  roofs.  They  are  compared  and  the  most  efficient  technology is chosen for further calculations (Figures 28 and 29).   In  order  to  produce  more  energy  than  what  is  necessary  to  fulfill  the  Biotope’s  demand,  the  ‘greenhouse  village’  (Mels  et  al.,  2010)  works  together  with  Fine  Heat  Wired  Heat  Exchangers  (FiWiHEx) ATES system (Mels et al., 2010; Kristinsson, et al., 2008); two anaerobic digesters, one for  solid  waste  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.3),  and  a  UASB  (Upflow  Anaerobic  Sludge  Balnket)  reactor  (Graaff et al., 2010; Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010) that will treat the wastewater; and PV windows.  In the ‘Producer Scenario (a)’, PV cells are to be installed on the human functions roof, and in the  ‘Producer  Scenario  (b)’,  wind  turbines  will  be  placed.  The  water  system  works  with  greenhouses  coupled  with  constructed  wetlands  and  the  UASB  reactor,  which  will  produce  energy  by  the  digestion of the wastewater. In this scenario the UASB links the energy and water system.  The main design characteristics of the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ are:      

Biotope  area: 12.500m² (human functions)  Greenhouse area: 20.000m²  Number of workers: 960  Building orientation: 3 blocks in the east‐west axis. The distance between the blocks (24m) is  3 times their height (8m), for the optimum use of direct sunlight and heat (Figure 15).  Sunrise Campus buildings: use of PV cells in all roofs (it is not going to be assessed because  each building uses its produced energy)   

  Figure 29. ‘‘Producer Scenario’’: Building Schematic Section AA. In the ‘Producer Scenario (a)’ PV cells will be installed in  the human’s function block, whereas in the ‘Producer Scenario (b)’, wind turbines will be placed. 

 

 

67   


SCENARIOS    6.4.1. ENERGY FLOW   Figure 30 represents the energy flow in the Biotope in the ‘Producer Scenario’. The energy system  comprises  of  a  closed  greenhouse  (a  greenhouse  that  does  not  release  excess  heat  through  ventilation); heat exchangers in the greenhouse; a FiWiHEx ATES system, which consists of a piped  heat distribution system to greenhouses and the human function area of the Biotope; a heating and  cooling system consisting of floor and ceiling pipes in the human function area of the Biotope, and a  cooling tower. The South façades of the three blocks and the roofs of the greenhouses are covered  with PV windows. Moreover, the human functions blocks are roofed with PV cells (in the ‘Producer  Scenario  (a)’  and  wind  turbines  ‘Producer  Scenario  (b)’.  The  kitchen  waste  and  black  water  are  digested, producing heat and electricity. Vacuum toilets are used in the building to keep the stream  of black water in concentrated state, which is used in the anaerobic process to produce energy. 

  Figure 30. ‘Producer Scenario (a)’: energy flow.   Legend:  1. PV windows  2. Roof: solar tubes, PV cells (sub‐scenario (a)), wind‐turbines (sub‐scenario (b)).  3. Insulation materials; use of led lamps, CPU management  4. Greenhouse: heat produced is used in human functions of the Biotope   5. ATES FiWiHEx System: responsible for heat exchange between the greenhouse and human functions  6. Use of vacuum toilets for separation of the water streams. The organic waste (black water, food and greenhouse  waste) from Biotope  is added to two anaerobic digesters (one for solid waste and the other for black water)  7. Anaerobic digesters  8. Energy (heat and electricity)  produced in the anaerobic digester is used in the Biotope   9. Extra heat and electricity production is exported to other buildings 

   

 

68   


SCENARIOS    6.4.2. ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION  The energy demand minimization follows the same issues for lighting, office equipment, and passive  ventilation and insulation materials as the ‘Efficient Scenario’ and they are not to be assessed in this  Section  (for  more  detailed  data  please  refer  to  Section  6.2).  However,  the  heating  and  cooling  system is connected to an energy producing greenhouse. All the technologies mentioned are listed  in the table below. Next, they are described and the new heat and cold demand is calculated.  For  the  assessment,  it  was  first  taken  into  account  lighting  reductions  with  passive  lighting  and  dimming  control.  Second,  the  use  of  LED  lamps  instead  of  regular  incandescent  bulbs  was  considered.  Third,  the  cooling  and  heating  demand  were  minimized,  by  the  implementation  of  insulation  materials  in  the  buildings  envelope.  Lastly,  the  ATES  FiWiHEx  system  was  assessed,  reducing the remaining heating and cooling demand.  Table 44. Implemented technologies to energy demand minimization in the ‘Producer Scenario’. 

TECHNOLOGY 

LIGHTING 

OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  COOLING 

HEATING 

(1) (2)

(3) a. b.

REDUCTION  Literature Source 

passive lighting and diming  control  use of led lamps instead of  regular incandescent bulb 

40,00%

(Bodart et al., 2002) 

90,00%

(MacKay, 2008) 

CPU management and standby  and active mode power  reductions for computers  insulation materials  ATES FiWiHEx 

40,00%

(Waide et al., 2007) 

10,00% 100,00%

insulation materials: floors,  walls, windows and roofs 

40,00%

ATES FiWiHEx 

65,89%

(MacKay, 2008)  (Bridger et al., 2005); (Nieuwenhuize,  2011); (Mels et al., 2010)  (MacKay, 2008)  (Bridger et al., 2005); (Nieuwenhuize,  2011); (Mels et al., 2010) 

  Lighting demand minimization (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)    Office Equipment energy demand minimization  (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for  detailed data)    Heat and cold demand minimization   Insulation materials (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)  ATES FiWiHEx and ‘greenhouse village’ system 

The ‘greenhouse village’ is a design for a neighborhood that provides its own wastewater treatment,  water supply and greenhouse products. The basic elements of the design are an energy‐producing  greenhouse, houses and an anaerobic digester (Mels et al., 2010). In the present study, the houses  are replaced by the human functions’ area of the Biotope.  The  basics  elements  of  the  energy  system  for  climate  control  in  the  greenhouse  connected  to  a  building block are (Figure 31) (Mels et al., 2010):   A closed greenhouse that does not use windows to release excess heat  69   


SCENARIOS     Heat exchangers in the greenhouse   An aquifer that stores hot and cold water (ATES system), and its management  systems with pumps and flow control   A heating and cooling system that consists of floor and ceiling pipes   A cooling tower 

  Figure 31. Energy system in a greenhouse connected to a building block. Source: Mels et al., 2010. 

The ‘Energy Producing Greenhouse’ or ‘greenhouse village’ system concept is attributed to the high‐ quality  and  innovative  Dutch  glasshouse  horticulture  in  the  moderate  West  European  climate  and  the thick sand/clay layers in the Rhine delta, which works as a substrate for seasonal heat storage.  The  glasshouse  horticulture  becomes  a  source  of  energy  without  being  an  energy  consumer.  The  term  ‘closed’  relates  to  maintenance  and  control  of  the  inside  climate  of  the  greenhouse,  which  means that no ventilation of the greenhouse by means of windows is performed. Moreover, such a  concept allows low‐impact urban food production (Amosov, 2010).  According  to  Mels  et  al.,  the  basic  concept  of  the  energy  producing  greenhouse  is  to  harvest  the  excess heat produced by the greenhouse in the summer. Moreover, the FiWiHEx (Fine Heat Wired  Heat Exchangers) are used in these systems. They increase the groundwater temperature from 8oC  to  25‐27oC  while  maintaining  the  air  temperature  of  a  greenhouse  at  a  maximum  of  30oC.  The  heated groundwater is stored in the aquifer. At night or during the winter, the stored heat can be  used to warm up the greenhouse and the building block. The Biotope is equipped with a heating and  cooling system consisting of floor, wall and possibly ceiling pipes. Moreover, a cooling tower has to  be added to the system to keep the balance of the aquifer and to ensure that its temperature does  not exceed 25oC, avoiding heating and cooling of the soil (Mels et al., 2010).  

70   


SCENARIOS    As a result, Kristinsson and Timmeren state that by using FiWiHEx system, the energy consumption  in  a  greenhouse  is  reduced  from  50m³  of  natural  gas/m2  of  plantation  to  zero  (Kristinsson  et  al.,  2008), and therefore, the cooling reduction in this ATES system is 100% (Table 45). The greenhouses  do  not  need  to  be  cooled  either,  since  they  are  already  cooled  by  the  cooling  tower.  The  heat  produced by the greenhouse is stored in the ATES system. For the cooling system, the same model  as in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ is used for calculations.   For  the  cooling  and  heating  demand  assessment,  it  was  first  reduced  the  demand  by  the  use  of  insulation materials. The remaining demand was minimized by the use of the ATES system.  For  that,  it  was  first  considered  that  the  cooling  reduction  in  the  FiWiHEx  ATES  system  is  100%  (Kristinsson  et  al.,  2008).    This  corresponds  to  a  reduction  of  528MWh.  The  same  load  of  energy  (528MWh)  was  reduced  from  the  heating  demand,  which  represents  66%  out  of  the  total  heating  demand.   After  that,  the  energy  spent  by  the  pumps  needed  for  the  system  was  added  to  the  calculation.  Please refer to Section 6.2.2 for more details of this calculation.  The table below expresses the results of the implementation of the technologies explained above for  heating and cooling demand minimization.  Table 45. Heat and cold minimization assessment for the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year. 

COOLING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND  

586

TECHNOLOGY 

MWh

 

REDUCTION

NEW DEMAND

10%

528

MWh

(MacKay, 2008)

100%

0

MWh

(Mels  et al., 2010)

0

MWh

 

1335

MWh

 

Insulation materials  ATES FiWiHEx  COOLING ‘PRODUCER SCENARIO’ DEMAND

LITERATURE SOURCE

  HEATING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND   TECHNOLOGY 

REDUCTION

NEW DEMAND

insulation materials 

40%

801

MWh

(MacKay, 2008)

ATES FiWiHEx 

66%

273

MWh

(Mels et al., 2010)

273

MWh

 

HEATING ‘PRODUCER SCENARIO’ DEMAND

LITERATURE SOURCE

 

 

PUMP DEMAND (ELECTRICITY) 

 

ATES FiWiHEx cooling pumps (COP 4) 

‐2,5%

14

MWh

ATES FiWiHEx heat pump (COP 40) 

‐10%

132

MWh

ATES FiWiHEx pumps (COP 4) 

‐5%

13

MWh

159

MWh

TOTAL PUMP DEMAND (ELECTRICITY) 

(Bridger et al., 2005) (Nieuwenhuize, 2011)   

  (4) Others demand minimization  The others demand in the ‘Producer Scenario’ is not minimized and it is assessed like in the ‘Efficient  Scenario’. Please refer to Section 6.2 for more detailed information. In addition, the pumps energy  demand of the ATES FiWiHEx system is added to it. The pumps have a total demand of 159MWh/yr,  in the form of electricity. Therefore, this amount of energy is added to the ‘others demand’. In the 

71   


SCENARIOS    ‘BAU  Scenario’,  the  ‘others  demand’  is  546MWh/yr  (Table  12),  and  in  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’  it  is  705MWh/yr.  (5) Total ‘Producer Scenario’ demand  The  total  annual  energy  demand  for  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’  is  1.339MWh.  The  electricity  use  is  responsible  for  1.066MWh  whereas  the  heat  and  cold  are  responsible  for  273MWh  of  the  energy  use (Table 46).   Table 46. Yearly energy demand in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ for each use and the total demand. 

Energy  Lighting  Office  Equipment  Cooling  Heating  Others  NEW ELECTRICITY DEMAND HEAT/COLD DEMAND NEW ENERGY DEMAND

Total energy  demand/yr  35 327 0 273 705 1.066 273 1.339

MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh 

  6.4.3. ENERGY PRODUCTION   In  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’,  producing  energy  is  the  most  important  feature.  Energy  is  produced  through  all  possible  technologies  on  site.  Electricity  is  produced  by  PV  windows,  PV  cells  (sub‐ scenario  (a)),  and  wind  turbines  (sub‐scenario  (b)).  Anaerobic  digestion  of  green  waste  and  wastewater generates heat and power (CHP). Finally, the greenhouses, besides producing food and  organic matter for bio‐digestion, also generate heat for the human functions of the Biotope.  In what follows, two alternatives were studied for the energy ‘Producer Scenario’. One includes PV  cell  on  the  human  function  roofs  ‘Producer  Scenario  (a)’,  and  the  other  applies  wind  turbines  on  these roofs ‘Producer Scenario (b)’. After that, a comparison between them is made and one of the  sub‐scenarios is chosen to represent the ‘Producer Scenario’.  a. ‘Producer Scenario’ (a) – PV cells on human function’s roof    (1) Anaerobic digestion   In the ‘Producer Scenario’ the anaerobic digestion works with three different streams: garden waste,  kitchen waste and black water. For that, two different digesters are to be used. For the treatment of  food and garden waste an anaerobic digestion that operates with high solids reactors (up to 30%) is  to  be  implemented  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.3).  At  the  same  time,  another  reactor  (a  UASB  reactor) that is suitable for diluted and concentrated wastewater is to be used.   

 

72   


SCENARIOS    a. Food and garden waste  The  kitchen  waste  follows  the  same  calculation  as  in  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.3  for  more  detailed  data).  The  total  waste  food  production  in  the  Biotope  is  19.754kg  (Table 35).  The total amount of green areas in the Sunrise Campus and in the Biotope is 32.000m² (see Section  6.4.7). Therefore, the total amount of green waste produced annually in the Sunrise Campus in the  ‘Producer Scenario’ is 10.880kg (Table 47) (please refer to Section 6.3.3 for more detailed data).   Table 47. Green waste in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ per year. 

 

Waste production 

Garden waste 

Green area

Total waste  produced  10.880kg

0,34kg/m²  32.000 m²

LITERATURE SOURCE (Lundie et al., 2005);  Section 3.6.7 (green areas) 

  Table 48. Combined heat and power from organic waste bio‐digestion per year. 

Total  organic  waste  30.634 kg 

energy  Total  production rate  Energy  potential  1,92MWh/ton  59MWh 

Total energy  Total heat  Total  available for  produced   electricity  CHP  produced  50MWh 30MWh 20MWh

LITERATURE  SOURCE  (Kujawa‐Roeleveld  et al., 2010); (Graaff  et al., 2010) 

It follows that the total amount of the garden and food waste produced by the Biotope and Sunrise  Campus in this scenario is 30.634kg/year, which are to be digested through anaerobic treatment. It  is assumed that the energy production of anaerobic digestion is 200m³ per ton (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et  al.,  2010),  which  is  equal  to  1,92MWh/ton  of  waste  (conversion  factor  of  0,00961  (Graaff  et  al.,  2010)).  When  the  full  amount  of  organic  waste  produced  in  the  Biotope  is  treated  though  anaerobic  digestion, it yields 59MWh of potential energy per year. Combined heat and power (CHP) generation  systems can be used to produce heat and electricity at an efficiency of 85% (of which 40% electricity  and 60% heat)  (Graaff et  al., 2010). This would result in a production of 20MWh of electricity and  30MWh of heat on an annual base (Table 48).  b. Wastewater  In this scenario, the black water from the toilet (urine and faeces) is separated from the grey water  (please  refer  to  Section  6.4.4)  in  all  the  buildings  in  the  Sunrise  Campus.  Vacuum  toilets  are  to  be  used for its collection and the energy is recovered by anaerobic treatment.  Vacuum  toilets  operate  with  a  pump  generated  vacuum  using  small  volumes  of  water  to  flush.  Water is used only for rinsing the toilet bowl. The vacuum system operates pneumatically (vacuum  pumps, ejectors or compressors) and needs a water connection to the toilet and electricity for the  vacuum units. The transport can be both in the vertical direction for limited distances and horizontal  directions for long distances (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  73   


SCENARIOS    According  to  Graaff  et  al.,  anaerobic  treatment  is  regarded  as  the  core  technology  for  energy  and  nutrient  recovery  from  source  separated  black  water  because  it  converts  organic  matter  to  methane,  which  can  be  used  to  produce  electricity  and  heat,  while  at  the  same  time  anaerobic  treatment yields low amounts of excess sludge. Moreover, the nutrients are largely conserved in the  liquid  phase  and  can  be  subsequently  recovered  with  physical‐chemical  processes  such  as  precipitation and ion‐exchange or removed biologically (Graaff et al., 2010). They are to be used as  fertilizers in the greenhouse.  However, it is not going to be assessed in the further results, because  it is considered to be part of the nutrients flow, which is out of the scope of the present thesis.  The  anaerobic  treatment  of  wastewater,  like  in  the  organic  solid  waste,  is  based  on  the  biological  degradation of organic material in which methane gas and carbon dioxide and water are produced.  The  complete  biological  degradation  proceeds  in  four  stages:  hydrolisis,  acidification,  acetogenesis  and methanogenesis. In the anaerobic treatment, different bacteria capable of these four stages are  to be present (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  Various  types  of  anaerobic  reactors  have  been  developed  for  the  treatment  of  wastewater.  In  the  present scenario the UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Balnket) is used, because, according to Kujawa‐ Roeleveld  et  al.,  it  is  the  most  well‐known  UASB  reactor.  This  system  is  unfit  for  the  digestion  of  concentrated  slurries  but  suitable  for  diluted  and  concentrated  wastewater  and  can  be  part  of  a  multi‐stage system (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  The influent enters the reactor through a distribution box in which the flow is divided into a number  of  sub‐streams.  These  streams  flow  through  pipes  to  the  bottom  of  the  reactor  and  come  into  contact with the active anaerobic sludge blanket. The degradation of organic matter occurs mainly in  this sludge blanket. Therefore, in the upper part of  the reactor, three‐phase separator is installed,  which separates sludge, water and biogas (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010).  Graaf et al. state that with a methanisation level of 60%, 12,5L of CH4/cap/d can be produced from  black  water  (Standard  Temperature  and  Pressure  (STP)).  It  yields  an  average  of  335MJ/cap/year  (Graaff et al., 2010). The efficiency of combined heat and power (CHP) is 85% (Graaff et al., 2010),  resulting in a capacity 67,7MJ/cap/year, which is equal to 0,019MWh/cap/year.   Table 49. Energy production from anaerobic treatment in the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year.  

Type of waste  Kitchen and  garden waste   wastewater   

Total energy   Total electricity   Total heat  

Energy production  Energy production Sunrise  Biotope  (MWh/yr)   Campus (MWh/yr)  50  0 18 

82

68     

82

Total (MWh/yr) 

150  60  90 

literature source (Graaff et al.,  2010), (Kujawa‐ Roeleveld et al.,  2010),  (Liu et al., 2003)       

  Vacuum toilets are to be installed in all the buildings of the Sunrise Campus, where 5.308 people are  expected  to  work.  To  assess  the  total  wastewater  in  the  Sunrise  Campus,  this  production  is  calculated proportionally to the working days in a year (260) and working hours a day (8). The total  74   


SCENARIOS    Biotope energy production from anaerobic digestion of black water is 18MWh/yr, and in the Sunrise  Campus it is 82MWh/yr, from which 40% is electricity and 60% is heat (Table 49).   In the ‘Producer Scenario’, the yearly total energy production of kitchen and garden waste, and black  water is 150MWh, from which 60MWh/yr is electricity and 90MWh/yr is heat.  (2) Greenhouse Village’   Besides  being  a  food  producer,  each  hectare  of  greenhouse,  according  to  Mels  et  al.,  is  able  to  produce heat for 100 houses in the Netherlands weather conditions (Mels et al., 2010). According to  SenterNovem,  a  household  in  the  Netherland  consumes  184Nm³  of  natural  gas  annually  (SenterNovem, 2007), which is equal to 1,76MWh/yr (conversion factor 0,0096 (Graaff et al., 2010)).  It is assumed that a standard house in the Netherlands has 100m² of area. Therefore, one hectare of  greenhouse  produces  177MWh/yr  and  consequently,  2ha  of  greenhouse  produces  354MWh/yr  (Table 50). In the ‘Producer Scenario’, the Biotope demand for heat is 273MWh/yr (Table 46). The  extra heat will be exported to the others building in the Sunrise Campus.  Table 50. ‘greenhouse village’ energy production in the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY  ‘GREENHOUSE  VILLAGE’ 

GREENHOUSE  AREA  2  ha 

AVERAGE HEAT  PRODUCTION  177 MWh/ha

HEAT  PRODUCTION  354 MWh

LITERATURE SOURCE (Mels et al., 2010)  (SenterNovem, 2007) 

  (3) PV window  The  area  of  the  South  façades  of  the  three  blocks  and  the  roof  of  the  greenhouses  sum  a  total  of  11.400m² (Figure 28 and 29). The assessment of the energy production of PV windows follows the  same as in the other scenarios. Please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for more detailed data. The total  electricity produced by PV windows is 456MWh/year.  Table 51. PV windows energy production in the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY  PV window 

AVERAGE POWER  AREA DELIVERED  (figures 28 and 29)  4,6 W/m2  11.400 m2

ENERGY  PRODUCTION  456 MWh 

LITERATURE  SOURCE  (Schueco, 2011)

  (4) PV cells  The area of the roofs that cover the human function zones of the Biotope is 6.250m² (Figure 28). The  energy  production  of  such  technology  follows  the  same  as  in  the  other  scenarios.  Please  refer  to  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  for  more  detailed  data.  The  total  electricity  produced  by  PV  cells  is  602MWh/year.  Table 52. PV cells energy production in the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY  PV cells   

AVERAGE POWER  DELIVERED  11 W/m2   

AREA (figures 28 and 29)  6.250 m2

ENERGY  PRODUCTION  602 MWh

LITERATURE  SOURCE  (MacKay, 2008)  

  75   


SCENARIOS    (5) Total energy production ‐ ‘Producer Scenario (a)’  The  following  table  expresses  the  main  technologies  used  for  the  production  of  energy  in  the  ‘Producer Scenario (a)’. The total energy produced by the Biotope is 1.562MWh per year, from which  1.118MWh/yr is in the form of electricity and 444MWh/yr as heat.  Table 53. Total energy production in the ‘Producer Scenario (a)’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY 

HEAT

ELECTRICITY

  

Literature Source 

ANAEROBIC DIGESTION 

90

MWh

60

MWh

‘GREENHOUSE VILLAGE’  PV WINDOW 

354 0

MWh MWh

0 456

MWh MWh

602

MWh

1.118

MWh

PV CELLS  TOTAL  ENERGY                                  1.562MWh

444

MWh

(Graaff et al., 2010), ,  (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al.,  2010),(Liu et al., 2003)  (Mels et al., 2010)  (Schueco, 2011)  (Urban Green Energy Inc.,  2010) 

  b. ‘Producer Scenario’ (b) – Wind turbines on human building’s blocks roof  (1) Anaerobic digestion (please refer to ‘Producer Scenario (a) for detail data)  (2) ‘greenhouse village’ (please refer to ‘Producer Scenario (a) for detail data)  (3) PV window (please refer to ‘Producer Scenario (a) for detail data)  (4) Wind turbines  According to MacKay, the power of the wind, for an area A is:  1 2

 

Where, ρ is the air density and it is equal to 1,3kg/m³ (MacKay, 2008); and v is the wind speed. The  wind  speed  in  the  region  of  Eindhoven  is  8,83knots  (Windfinder,  2010).  One  knot  is  equal  to  0,514m/s, therefore, the wind speed in the Sunrise Campus is 4,5m/s.  

  Figure 32. Wind mill Eddy. Source: Urban Green Energy Inc., 2010. 

The wind turbine selected for the Biotope is a small‐scale wind turbine called Eddy (Figure 32). This  turbine is chosen as an example of the small scale wind turbines that is available in the market. It is  produced by Urban Green Energy and has an area (A) is 2,1m² (Urban Green Energy Inc., 2010). This  turbine is dual‐axis design, which utilizes both horizontal and vertical forces along the length of the  axis.  76   


SCENARIOS    Therefore, the total power from the Eddy turbine is 124W. However, according to MacKay, the wind  turbine efficiency is 50% (MacKay, 2008). Therefore, the power that is available for direct use in the  Biotope  through  the  use  of  a  wind  turbine  is  62W,  which  is  equivalent  to  a  total  energy  of  0,54MWh/year. MacKay also states that the wind turbines should be spaced at a distance of at least  5 times their diameter (MacKay, 2008). In this case, the diameter is 1,5m (Urban Green Energy Inc.,  2010);  therefore,  they  should  be  spaced  each  7,5m.  On  the  roof  surface  of  each  building  of  the  human function blocks of the Biotope (dimensions: 30x70m), it is possible to implement four rows of  nine  wind  turbines  each.  On  the  roof  of  the  three  blocks  that  compose  the  Biotope  the  108  wind  turbines are to be placed. Together, they produce 58MWh/year (Figure 28 and Table 54).  Table 54. Windmills energy production in the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY 

ENERGY  PRODUCTION/  WINDMILL/YEAR  0,54  MWh 

108 WINDMILLS 

ENERGY PRODUCTION

LITERATURE SOURCE

58

(Urban Green Energy  Inc., 2010) 

MWh

  (5) Total energy production ‐ ‘Producer Scenario (b)’  The  following  table  expresses  the  main  technologies  used  for  the  production  of  energy  in  the  ‘Producer Scenario (b)’. The total energy produced by the Biotope is 1.018MWh per year, from which  574MWh is in the form of electricity and 444MWh as heat.  Table 55. Total energy production in the ‘Producer Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY 

HEAT

  

ELECTRICITY

ANAEROBIC DIGESTION 

90

MWh

60

MWh

PV WINDOW  ‘GREENHOUSE VILLAGE’  WIND TURBINES 

0 354

MWh MWh

456 0 58

MWh MWh MWh

TOTAL  ENERGY                                 1.018 MWh

444

MWh

574

MWh

Literature Source  (Graaff et al., 2010)  (Anaerobic Digestion,  2011)  (Schueco, 2011)  (Mels et al., 2010)  (Urban Green Energy Inc.,  2010) 

  c. Comparison of ‘Producer Scenario (a)’  and Producer Scenario (b)’  In  the  ‘Producer  Scenario  (b)’,  wind  turbines  are  to  be  placed  on  the  roof  of  the  human  function  zones. They generate 58MWh/yr and the total Biotope energy production is 981MWh/yr. However,  if PV cells are to be installed in their place, they will generate 602MWh per year and the total energy  production of the Biotope is to be 1.562MWh/yr. The PV cells produce more than ten times energy  than the wind turbines. Therefore, the ‘Producer Scenario (a)’ (Table 53) is taken into consideration  in the following assessment of energy.    6.4.4. WATER FLOW   The water management in the ‘Producer Scenario’ also aims at reducing human water consumption  in  the  Biotope  by  installing  water  efficient  appliances.  Moreover,  the  surface  water  runoff  is  managed by minimizing local hydrological impact. However, differently from the previous scenarios,  the  ‘greenhouse  village’  system  will  be  implemented.  This  system  is  able  to  treat  the  wastewater  and to produce drinking water. It is done through the collection and treatment of the condensation  77   


SCENARIOS    of the irrigation water that evaporates. The drinking water is to be used by the human functions of  the Biotope.     Figure  33  represents  the  water  flow  in  the  Biotope  for  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’.  The  rain  water  is  collected from roofs and permeable pavements, treated in constructed wetlands and stored in the  ponds.  Then,  it  is  used  as  irrigation  water  (Q2)  in  the  greenhouses  in  the  Biotope.  The  water  is  condensed and collected. After another filtration it is to be used for human uses in the Biotope (Q1).  The wastewater is separated into three water streams by the use of vacuum toilets. The black water  is  to  be  used  for  anaerobic  digestion  in  a  UASB  reactor,  whereas  the  grey  water  returns  to  the  constructed wetland, and starts another cycle. The extra water that is not used within the building is  returned to the groundwater via soakways, preventing flooding. 

  Figure 33. ‘Producer Scenario’: water flow    1. The rain water is collected from roofs and permeable pavements.   2. It is pre‐treated in constructed wetlands and stored in retention ponds (Q2).  3. The grey water from the human functions in the Biotope is treated in a bioreactor (Q2).  4. Water irrigation tank (Q2).  5. Greenhouse irrigation (Q2), water condensation, collection and reuse (Q2).  6. 15% of the water is discharged into the public sewage system.  7. Filtration activated carbon, re‐hardening and quality monitoring (Q1).  8. Drinking water tank (Q1).  9. Drinking water is distributed to Sunrise Campus buildings.  10. Within each building, water is consumed.  11. Grey water collection and discharge into open wetlands. The water starts another cycle.  12. Vacuum toilets are used in the buildings and the black water is collected and sent to a UASB reactor, where it  is digested and energy is produced.  13. UASB reactor.   

 

 

78   


SCENARIOS    6.4.5. WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION  Within the Biotope in the ‘Producer Scenario’, there is 2ha of greenhouses which produce vegetables  that  are  to  be  consumed  by  the  workers  of  the  Biotope  (Figure  31  and  32).  Moreover,  these  greenhouses  produce  heat,  and  are  part  of  the  water  treatment  of  the  system.  According  to  Stanghellini, the water demand of a greenhouse in the Netherlands is 0,75m³ per square meter per  year (Stanghellini, 2009). This results in an extra water demand of 1.500m³ per year.  The water demand minimization in this scenario follows by the use of efficient faucets and vacuum  toilets. The water consumption for the faucets are assessed as in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ (please refer  to Section 6.3 for more details).   According to Agudelo et al., a vacuum toilet consumes 0,8 to 2l per flush (Agudelo‐Vera, et al., 2011).  It is considered in this report that a typical (BAU) toilet consumes 7.5l per flush (Lazarus, 2009) and  that  a  vacuum  toilet  consumes  2l.  As  a  result,  the  choice  of  using  the  vacuum  toilet  generates  a  reduction of 73,3% in water consumed for toilets, when compared to the ‘BAU Scenario’ (Table 56).  The new water demand is 3.354m³ and  the different demands are expressed in Table 57.  Table 56. Implemented technologies to water demand minimization in the ‘Producer Scenario’. 

  faucets  toilet flush  TOTAL 

BAU DEMAND  541  m³/yr 3.787  m³/yr 4.328  m³/yr

REDUCTION 26% 73% 72%

NEW DEMAND 180 m³/yr 1.010 m³/yr 1.190 m³/yr

LITERATURE SOURCE (Agudelo‐Vera  et al., 2011) (Lazarus, 2009) 

  Table 57. Water demand in the ‘Producer Scenario’ for each use and the total demand per year. 

 

PRODUCER DEMAND

drinking water, coffee and tea

184

hygiene 

180

toilet flush 

1.010

dishwasher 

306

food processing 

174

greenhouse 

1.500

TOTAL DEMAND 

3.354

  6.4.6. MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT  The  rain  water  is  collected  from  roofs  and  permeable  pavements  (please  refer  to  Section  6.2  for  detailed data) (Figure 33). It is stored in constructed wetlands, that work as a secondary treatment  for  domestic  sewage  and  as  retention  ponds  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.2  for  more  details).  It  is  used  as  irrigation  water  (Q2).  The  grey  water  from  the  human  uses  of  the  Biotope,  after  being  treated in an aerobic bioreactor, is combined to the rain water for the irrigation.  The  grey  water  of  the  Biotope  is  purified  in  an  aerobic  bioreactor.  Before  treatment  the  liquid  fraction  of  the  anaerobic  digester  (UASB)  (please  refer  to  Section  6.4.3),  which  contains  the  nutrients, is mixed with the grey water.  According to Mels, the treatment purposes in this aerobic  bioreactor  are:  removal  of  oxygen  consuming  organic  pollutants,  conversion  of  ammonium  into  79   


SCENARIOS    nitrate (nitrification), partial denitrification, i.e. transformation of nitrate into gaseous nitrogen. By  partial  denitrification  the  nitrate  concentrations  in  the  irrigation  water  can  be  tailored  for  the  specific  demands  of  the  greenhouse  plants.  After  treatment,  this  water  is  used  for  irrigating  the  greenhouse. The excess sludge of the aerobic bioreactor is brought into the UASB digester (Mels, et  al., 2010).  Greenhouse  plants  will  evaporate  the  irrigation  water.  The  vapor  condenses  and  is  collected.  The  collected water is of high quality. It can be used as drinking water (Q1) after being filtrated through  activated carbon and re‐hardened, and quality monitored, because pure distilled water is too low in  salts  for  human  consumption  (Mels  et  al.,  2010).  Moreover,  small  volumes  of  drained  irrigation  water (approximately 15%) will have to be discharged (into the public sewage system) to keep the  salt concentrations at a low level. As a result, small volumes of external water (rain water) are still  needed for the water cycle (Mels et al., 2010). The rain water stored in the wetland is to be use.   The  wastewater  will  be  separated  into  grey  and  black  water  with  the  use  of  vacuum  toilets.   According  to  Graaff  et.al,  separation  of  domestic  wastewater  at  the  source  results  in  black  water  from the toilet (faeces and urine) and less polluted grey water from showers, laundry and kitchen.  The  main  benefits  of  such  approach  include  the  possibility  of  recovering  energy  and  nutrients  and  the efficient removal of micro‐pollutants. Grey water has a high potential of reuse because it is the  major fraction (70%) of domestic wastewater and has a relatively low level of pollution. Black water  contains  half  of  the  load  of  organic  material  in  domestic  wastewater,  the  major  fraction  of  the  nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, and can be collected with a small amount of water when  vacuum toilets are used (Graaff et al., 2010).   The  grey  water  will  be  collected  and  discharged  into  the  constructed  wetland,  and  this  water  will  start another cycle. The black water will be treated through anaerobic treatment in a UASB reactor,  which  by  converting  organic  matter  into  methane,  produces  electricity  and  heat  (please  refer  to  Setion 6.4.3). The UASB reactor connects the energy and water flows. The excess of sludge will be  treated and used  as a fertilizerin the greenhouse (it is not going to be assessed in the present thesis,  because it is part of the nutrient cycle that is out of the scope).  6.4.7. BIODIVERSITY   In this scenario, the biodiversity area is composed of greenhouses and constructed wetlands. Both  have a stipulated function related to human functions in the Biotope. Therefore, both are controlled  green areas, with the implementation of specific species that are able to cope with the determined  functions (Table 58).  Table 58. Biodiversity variations in the Biotope and Sunrise Campus implantation areas in the ‘Producer Scenario’. 

 

 

green roof  not controlled  garden  pond  constructed wetland  controlled  greenhouse  Total   

SUNRISE CAMPUS 0 0 6.000 6.000 20.000 32.000

m² m² m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE     0  0  6.000  6.000  20.000  32.000 

m²  m²  m²  m²  m²  m² 

  80   


SCENARIOS    The total area for the wetlands and ponds is 12.000m2 (Figure 28). It was assessed that half of this  area is constructed wetland, and work as a part for the water treatment system and is classified as a  controlled green area. The other half is the retention pond that works as a water storage and is a not  controlled area. The total greenhouse area is 20.000m².  6.4.8. ‘PRODUCER SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT  Like  in  the  previous  scenarios,  the  energy  and  water  are  resumed  into  three  different  indices  that  are  explained  in  Section  3.1:  demand  minimization  (DMI),  waste  output  (WOI)  and  self‐sufficiency  (SSI).  For  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’,  they  are  expressed  in  Table  59.  Furthermore,  biodiversity  is  evaluated  according  to  two  different  indices:  green  area  (GAI)  and  local  species  (LSI),  for  the  Biotope’s and Sunrise Campus implantation areas. These indices are also explained in Section 3.2 and  are expressed in Table 60.   Energy  The  ‘Producer  Scenario’  has  considerably  minimized  its  energy  demand,  achieving  a  DMI  of  0,63.  Producing energy is a crucial feature in this scenario. The total energy produced by the greenhouse,  PV windows, PV cells and anaerobic digestion is assessed as multisource. There are no cascading and  recycling strategies for the energy system in this scenario.   Like in the previous scenarios, the WOI is ‐1, because strategies such as energy cascading or recycling  are absent and the output and consumption are not minimized. The SSI becomes 1,17, which means  that  this  scenario  is  able  to  produce  more  energy  than  is  needed,  and  it  becomes  an  energy  exporter.  The  heat  and  electricity  consumption  is  smaller  than  their  demand.  In  both  cases  the  Biotope becomes an exporter.   Water  The water demand is increased when compared to the ‘Efficient Scenario’, due to the greenhouses  inside the buildings, and the DMI becomes 0,33.   The  rain  water  is  harvested  and  used  for  irrigation  in  the  greenhouses.  After  treated,  it  becomes  drinking water and is reused in the Biotope. From there, the grey water is treated and enters back to  the  cycle.    To  assess  the  recycled  water,  the  total  water  demand  was  multiplied  by  the  discharge  coefficient 0,8 (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010). The multisource (rain water) is the other 20% that is  to be harvested.   Table 59. Energy and water assessment for the ‘Producer Scenario’. 

  Conventional Demand (Do)  New Demand (D) Cascade (C)  Recycle(R)  Consumption (Co) Multisource (M)  DMI= (Do‐D)/Do  WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D  SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

PRODUCER ENERGY 3.590 1.339 0 0 0 1.562 INDICES 0,63 ‐1,00 1,17

MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr MWh/yr

PRODUCER WATER  4.992  3.354  0  2.682  0  671 

m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr  m³/yr 

0,33  ‐0,20  1,00 

     

81   


SCENARIOS    Although the water demand increases due to irrigation water, recycling is also enhanced by the use  of the ‘greenhouse village’. As a result, the WOI is ‐0,33. This represents that 66% of the wastewater  is re‐introduced to the system. Finally, the SSI is 1,00, indicating that the water flow in this scenario  has a circular metabolism.   Biodiversity  The biodiversity area in this scenario is considered to be the greenhouses and constructed wetlands  which are considered to be controlled, and ponds that are not controlled. This results in the LSI of  0,19 for both Biotope and Sunrise Campus.   On the other hand, the GAI in the Sunrise Campus is 0,16 and in the Biotope  is 0,53, i.e. the total  green  area  corresponds  to  16%  of  the  Sunrise  Campus  implantation  area,  whereas  it  also  corresponds to 53% of the Biotope ’s area.   Table 60. Biodiversity assessment for the ‘Producer Scenario’. 

 

SUNRISE CAMPUS

Implantation area (A) Not controlled green (NCG) Controlled green (CG) Total green (T)  GAI = T/A  LSI = T‐CG/T 

   

202.900 6.000 26.000 32.000 0,16 0,19

m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE  60.500 6.000 26.000 32.000 0,53 0,19

m²  m²  m²  m² 

 

82   


SCENARIOS    6.5.

 SCENARIO 5  –  HYBRID  

The  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’  brings  together  all  the  other  scenarios’  features:  efficiency,  biodiversity  and  productivity. This scenario is able to balance these three characteristics. It joins the best results from  the previous scenarios, at the same time that it connects the different flows in the Sunrise Campus.  The implementation of green roofs, green walls and internal gardens in its design makes it similar to  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’.  Moreover,  this  scenario  is  also  seen  as  a  producer  of  energy  and  water  that it is done by the implementation of the ‘greenhouse village’, PV windows, PV cells, anaerobic  digestion and ATES system. Indeed, food production in greenhouses is also present in this situation.   Moreover, the Hybrid Biotope is a producer of drinking and irrigation water that will satisfy all of the  Biotope’s water demand.  N 

  Figure 34. 'Hybrid Scenario’: plan view 

 

 

83   


SCENARIOS    The Hybrid Biotope is a block divided into seven sub‐blocks (Figure 34 and 35). Their functions are  intertwined by human functions, internal gardens and greenhouses. Each sub‐block has a footprint  of  2.817,5m².  The  design  was  solved  with  the  purpose  of  achieving  the  maximum  sunlight  in  the  greenhouses and human functions sub‐blocks. Based on the ‘Efficient Scenario’, the length of each  sub‐block (35m) is more than three times the height of the building (11,5) (please refer to Section  6.1 for detailed information). The human function and greenhouses sub‐blocks contain three stories,  whereas  the  garden  halls  are  located  only  on  the  ground  floor  (Figure  35).  They  are  located  in  between the other sub‐blocks, and the sun rays are not obstructed.  The two human function blocks are covered with green roofs and green external wall (East and West  walls) and are located in the center of the building. In the extremity of the Biotope, greenhouses are  implemented and they will produce food and heat for the human function blocks. The greenhouses  and garden blocks will be covered with PV windows on their roofs, as well as the South façades.   The main design characteristics of the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ are:        

Biotope  area: 31.250m²; human function area: 12.500m²;   Greenhouse area: 12.500m²; Garden area: 6.250m²  Biotope  roof area: 14.577,5m²  Number of workers: 960  Building  orientation:  East‐West  axis.  The  building  is  divided  in  7  blocks:  2  human  function (3 stores); 2 greenhouse (3 stores); 3 gardens (1store)  The length of the blocks (34,5m) is 3 times their height (11,5m) (Figure 35).  Sunrise  Campus  buildings:  mix  of  the  use  of  the  roofs  between  PV  cells  (this  is  not  going  to  be  assessed  because  each  building  uses  its  produced  energy)  and  green  roofs. 

  

  Figure 35. ‘Hybrid Scenario’: Schematic Section AA. L (length)> 3 x h (height), to allow passive heating and sunlight. 

   

 

84   


SCENARIOS    6.5.1. ENERGY FLOW   The energy system is very similar to the ‘Producer Scenario’. It comprises of a closed greenhouse (a  greenhouse  that  does  not  release  excess  heat  through  ventilation);  heat  exchangers  in  the  greenhouse, an ATES system, a piped heat distribution system to greenhouses and human functions  sub‐blocks, a heating and cooling system consisting of floor and ceiling pipes in the human functions  sub‐blocks, and a cooling tower. Moreover, PV windows are to be implemented in the South façade  and on the roof of the blocks of greenhouses. PV cells are also to be implemented, but they will be  placed  on  the  green  roofs,  enabling  the  production  of  energy  and  enhancement  of  biodiversity  at  the same time. Finally, anaerobic digestion of kitchen, garden and black water are to generate heat  and electricity (Figure 36).  The choice of adding green roofs in the human function blocks will create a different scenario for the  energy  flow  when  compared  to  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.2  for  the  comparison  between  the  implementation  of  the  ATES  system  combined  with  green  roofs  and  its  implementation when not combined with green roofs). Although the efficiency of the ATES system is  reduced, it still is an important factor for the reduction of the demand in this scenario. Moreover,  the implementation of green roofs is crucial for the enhancement of the biodiversity in this scenario  (please refer to Section 6.5.7).  

  Figure 36. ‘Hybrid Scenario’: energy flow.   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

PV windows  Green roof and PV cells  Insulation materials, use of LED lamps, CPU management (in the human function blocks)  Green house: heat produced is used in human functions of the Biotope. Green waste production.  Internal gardens: heat produced is used in human functions of the Biotope. Green waste production.  ATES FiWiHEx System: responsible for heat exchanges between the greenhouse, gardens and human function  blocks  7. Use  of  vacuum  toilets  for  separation  of  the  water  streams.  The  organic  waste  (black  water,  food  and  greenhouse waste) from Biotope  is added to two anaerobic digesters (one for solid waste and the other for  black water)  8. Anaerobic digesters  9. Energy (heat and electricity)  produced in the anaerobic digester is used in the Biotope   10. Extra electricity production is exported to other buildings 

    85   


SCENARIOS    6.5.2. ENERGY DEMAND MINIMIZATION  In this Section, the technologies that were taken into consideration in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ and their  implementation are explained. They are listed in Table 61 after which they are explained. The energy  demand minimization follows the same issues for lighting, office equipment, passive ventilation, and  insulation  materials  as  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  (for  more  detailed  date  please  refer  to  Section  6.2).  Besides  that,  green  roofs  are  added  in  the  human  function  blocks,  and  the  energy  demand  minimization  that  they  generate  is  assessed  like  in  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’  (a).  The  heating  and  cooling system is connected to an energy producing greenhouse and their calculation follows as in  the ‘Producer Scenario’. However, in this scenario, the green roofs are combined with ATES system,  which reduces its efficiency (please refer to Section 6.3.2).  For  the  assessment,  it  was  first  taken  into  account  lighting  reductions  with  passive  lighting  and  dimming  control.  Second,  the  use  of  LED  lamps  instead  of  regular  incandescent  bulbs  was  considered.  Third,  the  cooling  and  heating  demand  were  minimized,  by  the  implementation  of  passive  ventilation  and  insulation  materials  in  the  buildings  envelope,  and  green  roofs.  Lastly,  the  ATES system was assessed, reducing the remaining heating and cooling demand.  Table 61. Implemented technologies to energy demand minimization in the ‘Producer Scenario’. 

TECHNOLOGY 

LIGHTING 

OFFICE  EQUIPMENT 

COOLING 

HEATING 

REDUCTION  Literature Source 

passive lighting and diming  control  use of led lamps instead of  regular incandescent bulb 

40,00%

(Bodart et al., 2002) 

90,00%

(MacKay, 2008) 

CPU management and standby  and active mode power  reductions for computers  insulation materials  green roof  ATESFiWiHEx 

40,00%

(Waide et al., 2007) 

10,00% 75.00% 100,00%

insulation materials: floors,  walls, windows and roofs 

40,00%

(MacKay, 2008)  (Liu et al., 2003)  (Bridger et al., 2005); (Nieuwenhuize,  2011); (Mels et al., 2010)  (MacKay, 2008) 

green roof 

15.00%

(Liu et al., 2003) 

ATESFiWiHEx 

16,47%

(Bridger et al., 2005); (Nieuwenhuize,  2011); (Mels et al., 2010) 

  (1) Lighting demand minimization (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)    (2) Office  Equipment  energy  demand  minimization    (please  refer  to  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  for  detailed data)    (3) Heat and cold demand minimization   a. Insulation materials (please refer to ‘Efficient Scenario’ for detailed data)  b. Green roof (please refer to ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’ for detailed data)  c.  ATES FiWiHEx (please refer to ‘Producer Scenario’ for detailed data)   

86   


SCENARIOS    The lighting demand, office equipment and others demand minimization are to be the same as in the  ‘Efficient Scenario’ and they are not to be assessed in this Section (please refer to Section 6.2 for the  referred assessment). In this section, heat and cold demand will be assessed.  For  the  cooling  and  heating  demand  assessment,  it  was  first  reduced  the  demand  by  the  implementation  of  insulation  materials.  The  remaining  demand  was  minimized  by  the  use  of  the  ATES  FiWiHEx  system.  Then,  the  green  roof  implementation  was  considered,  which  was  able  to  reduce 396MWh of the yearly demand.  After  that,  it  was  considered  that  the  cooling  reduction  in  the  ATES  FiWiHEx  system  is  100%  (Kristinsson,  et  al.,  2008).    This  corresponds  to  a  reduction  of  132MWh.  The  same  load  of  energy  (132MWh) was reduced from the heating demand, which represents 16,47% out of the total heating  demand.  The  total  cooling  demand  per  year  is  zero,  whereas  the  heating  demand  is  549MWh/yr.  Table  62  expresses  the  results  of  the  implementation  of  the  technologies  explained  above  for  heating and cooling demand minimization.  After  that,  the  energy  spent  by  the  pumps  needed  for  the  system  was  added  to  the  calculation.  Please refer to Section 6.2.2 for more details of this calculation.  Table 62. Yearly heat and cold minimization assessment for the ‘Hybrid Scenario’. 

COOLING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND   TECHNOLOGY 

586

MWh

REDUCTION

NEW DEMAND

passive night ventilation 

10%

528

MWh

(Kolokotroni et al., 2006)

Green roof 

75%

132

MWh

(Liu et al., 2003) 

100%

0

MWh

(Mels et al., 2010) 

0

MWh

1335

MWh

ATES FiWiHEx  COOLING ‘HYBRID SCENARIO’ DEMAND  

LITERATURE SOURCE

  HEATING ‘BAU SCENARIO’ DEMAND   TECHNOLOGY 

REDUCTION

NEW DEMAND

insulation materials 

40,00%

801

MWh

(MacKay, 2008) 

Green roof 

15,00%

681

MWh

(Liu et al., 2003) 

ATES FiWiHEx 

16,47%

549

MWh

(Mels et al., 2010) 

549

MWh

HEATING ‘HYBRID SCENARIO’ DEMAND  

LITERATURE SOURCE

  PUMPS DEMAND 

 

ATES FiWiHEx cooling pumps (COP 4) 

2,5%

13

MWh

ATES FiWiHEx heat pump (COP 40) 

2,47%

33

MWh

ATES FiWiHEx pumps (COP 4) 

0,25%

3

MWh

TOTAL PUMPS DEMAND 

 

49

MWh

(Bridger et al., 2005)  (Nieuwenhuize, 2011) 

  (4) Others demand minimization  The others demand in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is not minimized and it is assessed like in the ‘Efficient  Scenario’. Please refer to Section 6.2 for more detailed information. In addition, the pumps energy  demand of the ATES FiWiHEx system is added to it. The pumps have a total demand of 49MWh/yr, in  the  form  of  electricity.  Therefore,  this  amount  of  energy  is  added  to  the  ‘others  demand’.  In  the  87   


SCENARIOS    ‘BAU  Scenario’,  the  ‘others  demand’  is  546MWh/yr  (Table  12),  and  in  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’  it  is  595MWh/yr.  (5) Total ‘Hybrid Scenario’ demand  The total energy demand for the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is 1.506MWh. The electricity use is responsible for  908MWh whereas the heat and cold are responsible for 549MWh of the energy use (Table 63).   Table 63. Energy demand per year in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ for each use and the total demand. 

Energy  Lighting  Office  Equipment  Cooling  Heating  Others  NEW ELECTRICITY DEMAND HEAT/COLD DEMAND NEW ENERGY DEMAND

Total energy  demand/yr  35 327 0 549 595 908 598 1.506

MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh  MWh 

  6.5.3. ENERGY PRODUCTION   In  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’,  energy  is  produced  through  all  possible  technologies  on  site.  Electricity  is  produced by using PV windows. Organic waste bio‐digestion produces heat and power (CHP). In this  scenario,  black  water  from  all  the  buildings  in  Sunrise  Campus  and  organic  waste  from  food  production  are  added  to  the  bio‐digestion  process.  Finally,  besides  producing  food  and  organic  matter  for  bio‐digestion,  the  greenhouses  also  generate  heat  for  the  human  functions  of  the  Biotope.  (1) PV windows  The area of the South façade in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ has 684m². PV windows are also added to the  roofs  of  the  gardens  and  greenhouses  sub‐blocks,  which  has  the  footprint  of  10.412m².  The  assessment  of  the  energy  production  of  PV  windows  follows  the  same  as  in  the  other  scenarios  Please  refer  to  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  for  more  detailed  data.  The  total  electricity  produced  by  PV  windows is 447MWh/year (Table 64).  Table 64. PV windows energy production in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY  AREA (roofs of gardens and  greenhouses, and South  façade)  PV WINDOW  11.096 m² 

AVERAGE  POWER  DELIVERED  4,6 W/m²

ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION  447 MWh

LITERATURE  SOURCE  (Schueco, 2011)

  (2) PV cells  PV  cells  will  be  placed  on  the  green  roofs.  This  enables  the  production  of  energy,  and  the  enhancement of biodiversity at the same time (Figure 37). It was considered that the PV cell area is  half  of  the  green  roof  area.  Thus,  the  total  green  roof  area  is  4.000m²  and  the  PV  cells  area  is 

88   


SCENARIOS    2.000m². The total electricity produced in one year by PV cells in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is 193MWh  (Table 65).  Table 65. PV cells energy production in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY  PV cells 

AVERAGE POWER  DELIVERED  11 W/m2 

AREA (figures 28 and 29)  2.000 m2

ENERGY  PRODUCTION  193 MWh

LITERATURE  SOURCE  (MacKay, 2008)

 

  Figure 37. PV cells installed on green roofs. Source: Swale Borough Council, 2011. 

(3) Anaerobic digestion   In the ‘Producer Scenario’ the anaerobic digestion works with three different streams: garden waste,  kitchen waste and black water. For that, two different digesters are to be used. For the treatment of  food and garden waste an anaerobic digestion that operates with high solids reactors (up to 30%) is  to  be  implemented  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.3).  At  the  same  time,  another  reactor,  a  UASB  reactor, that is suitable for diluted and concentrated wastewater, is to be used.  a. Food and garden waste  The  kitchen  waste  follows  the  same  calculation  as  in  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’  (please  refer  to  Section  6.3.3  for  more  detailed  data).  The  total  waste  food  production  in  the  Biotope  is  19.754kg  (Table 35).  The total amount of green areas from green roofs in the Sunrise Campus is  82.875m² (see Section  6.5.7). Therefore, the total amount of green waste produced annually in the Sunrise Campus in the  ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is 28.178kg (Table 66) (please refer to Section 6.3.3 for more detailed data of the  calculation).   Table 66. Green waste produced yearly in the ‘Bio‐diverse Scenario’. 

  Garden waste 

Waste production 

Green area

0,34 kg/m²  28.178 m²

Total waste  produced  28.178 kg

LITERATURE SOURCE (Lundie et al., 2005);  Section 3.5.7 (green areas) 

89   


SCENARIOS      Table 67. Yearly combined heat and power from anaerobic digestion of organic waste. 

Total  organic  waste  47.932 kg 

energy  Total  production rate  Energy  potential  1,92MWh/ton  92MWh 

Total energy  Total heat  Total  available for  produced   electricity  CHP  produced  78MWh 47MWh 31MWh

LITERATURE  SOURCE  (Kujawa‐Roeleveld  et al., 2010); (Graaff  et al., 2010) 

It follows that the total amount of the garden and food waste produced by the Biotope and Sunrise  Campus in this scenario is 47.932kg/year, which are to be digested through anaerobic treatment. It  is assumed that the energy production of anaerobic digestion is 200m³ per ton (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et  al.,  2010),  which  is  equal  to  1,92MWh/ton  of  waste  (conversion  factor  of  0,00961  (Graaff  et  al.,  2010)).  When  the  full  amount  of  organic  waste  produced  in  the  Biotope  is  treated  though  anaerobic  digestion, it yields 92MWh of potential energy per year. Combined heat and power (CHP) generation  systems can be used to produce heat and electricity at an efficiency of 85% (of which 40% electricity  and 60% heat)  (Graaff et  al., 2010). This would result in a production of 47MWh of electricity and  31MWh of heat on an annual base (Table 67).  b. Wastewater    The  black  water  is  assessed  as  in  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’  (please  refer  to  Section  6.4.3).  The  total  Biotope  energy  production  from  anaerobic  digestion  of  black  water  is  18MWh/year,  and  in  the  Sunrise  Campus  is  82MWh/year,  from  which  40%  is  electricity  and  60%  is  heat  (please  refer  to  Section 6.3.3 for detailed calculation) (Table 68).   Table 68. Yearly energy production from anaerobic treatment in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’.  

Type of waste  Kitchen and  garden waste   Black water    Total energy   Total electricity   Total heat  

Energy production  Energy production Sunrise  Biotope  (MWh/yr)   Campus (MWh/yr)  78  0 18 

82

96     

82

Total (MWh/yr) 

178  71  107 

literature source (Graaff et al.,  2010) (Anaerobic  Digestion, 2011)  (Liu et al., 2003)       

  In the Producer Scenario, the total energy production, in one year, of kitchen and garden waste, and  black water is 178MWh, from which 71MWh is electricity and 107MWh is heat. 

90   

 


SCENARIOS    (4) ‘Greenhouse Village’   The  greenhouse  production  of  energy  is  assessed  in  the  same  way  as  in  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’  (please  refer  to  Section  6.4.3).  The  greenhouse  and  internal  garden  areas  are  seen  as  heat  producers. Together they have a total area of 18.750m² (please refer to Section 6.5.7). As a result,  this system provides a total of 332MWh of heat per year (Table 69).  Table 69. ‘Greenhouse village’ energy production in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ per year. 

TECHNOLOGY  ‘GREENHOUSE VILLAGE’ 

GREENHOUSE  AREA  1,87  ha 

EFFICIENCY 176,82

MWh/ha

HEAT  PRODUCTION  332 MWh/yr

LITERATURE SOURCE (Mels et al., 2010) (SenterNovem, 2007) 

The following table expresses the main technologies used for the production of energy in the ‘Hybrid  Scenario’. The total energy produced by the Biotope is 1.150MWh per year, from which 711MWh is  in the form of electricity and 439MWh as heat.  Table 70. Total yearly energy production on the ‘Hybrid Scenario’. 

TECHNOLOGY 

HEAT 

  

ELECTRICITY

ANAEROBIC DIGESTION 

107

MWh

71

MWh

PV WINDOW  PV CELL  ‘GREENHOUSE VILLAGE’  TOTAL                       1.150MWh 

0 0 332 439

MWh MWh MWh MWh

447 193 0 711

MWh MWh MWh MWh

Literature Source  (Graaff et al., 2010),  (Anaerobic Digestion, 2011)  (Schueco, 2011)  (MacKay, 2008)  (Mels et al., 2010) 

   

 

91   


SCENARIOS    6.5.4. WATER FLOW   The water management in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is similar to the ‘Producer Scenario’. The demand is  reduced through the installation of water efficient appliances. Moreover, the surface water runoff is  managed  minimizing  local  hydrological  impact.  Like  in  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’,  the  ‘greenhouse  village’  system  will  be  implemented.  This  system  is  able  to  treat  the  wastewater  and  to  produce  drinking water. It is done through the collection and treatment of the condensation of the irrigation  water that evaporates. The drinking water is to be used by the human functions of the Biotope.  Figure  38  represents  the  water  flow  in  the  Biotope  for  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’.  Please  refer  to  the  ‘Producer Scenario’ for more details of the ‘greenhouse village’ system. In the ‘Hybrid Scenario’, the  demand of the water flow differs from the ‘Producer Scenario’, because of difference in green areas  within the Biotope. 

  Figure 38. ‘Hybrid Scenario’: water flow  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

The rain water is collected from roofs and permeable pavements.   It is pre‐treated in constructed wetlands and stored in retention ponds (Q2).  The grey water from the human functions in the Biotope is treated in a bioreactor (Q2).  Water irrigation tank (Q2).  Greenhouse irrigation (Q2), water condensation, collection and reuse (Q2).  15% of the water is discharged into the public sewage system.  Filtration activated carbon, re‐hardening and quality monitoring (Q1).  Drinking water tank (Q1).  Drinking water is distributed to Sunrise Campus buildings.  Within each building, water is consumed.   Grey water collection and discharge into open wetlands. The water starts another cycle.  Vacuum toilets are used in the buildings and the black water is collected and sent to a UASB reactor, where it  is digested and energy is produced.  13. UASB reactor. 

   

 

92   


SCENARIOS    6.5.5. WATER DEMAND MINIMIZATION  The  greenhouses  water  consumption  is  added  to  the  new  demand  (Table  71).  The  water  demand  minimization in this scenario follows by the  use of  efficient faucets and vacuum toilets. The water  consumption for the faucets are assessed as in the ‘Efficient Scenario’ (please refer to Section 6.2.5  for more details). In addition, vacuum toilets are used and are assessed as in the ‘Producer Scenario’  (please refer to Section 6.4.5 for details in the calculation).The tables below show the results of the  use  of  the  mentioned  technologies  in  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’  and  the  new  water  demand  and  uses  respectively.  Table 71. Implemented technologies to water demand minimization in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’. 

  faucets  toilet flush  TOTAL 

BAU DEMAND  541  m³/yr 3.787  m³/yr 4.328  m³/yr

REDUCTION 26% 73% 72%

NEW DEMAND 180 m³/yr 1.010 m³/yr 1.190 m³/yr

LITERATURE SOURCE (Agudelo‐Vera et al., 2011) (Lazarus, 2009) 

  Table 72. Water demand in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ for each use and the total demand per year 

 

BIO‐DIVERSE DEMAND  

drinking water, coffee and tea

184

hygiene 

180

toilet flush 

2.020

dishwasher 

306

food processing 

174

greenhouse 

937

2.791

TOTAL DEMAND 

  6.5.6. MULTISOURCE AND RUNOFF MANAGEMENT  Multisource and runoff management follows the same as in the ‘Producer Scenario’. Please refer to  this scenario for detailed information.  6.5.7. BIODIVERSITY   The ‘Hybrid Scenario’ is at the same time a producer of clean energy and water and a place where  biodiversity  is  generated.  The  green  areas  are  given  high  importance.  Not  controlled  areas  are  present  in  this  scenario  in  the  form  of  green  roofs  (in  the  Biotope  and  other  buildings  in  Sunrise  Campus), green walls and internal gardens. The wetlands and greenhouses are considered controlled  green areas. The total amount of green areas in the Sunrise Campus is 82.875m² and 34.100m² in the  Biotope implantation area (Table 73).  Table 73. Biodiversity variations in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’. 

 

 

green roof/wall not controlled  garden  pond  constructed wetland  controlled  greenhouse    Total 

SUNRISE CAMPUS 42.525 6.250 10.800 10.800 12.500 82.875

m² m² m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE     5.775  6.250  10.800  10.800  12.500  46.125 

m²  m²  m²  m²  m²  m² 

93   


SCENARIOS    6.5.8. ‘HYBRID SCENARIO’: ASSESSMENT  Like  in  the  previous  scenarios,  the  energy  and  water  are  resumed  into  three  different  indices  that  are  explained  in  Section  3.1:  demand  minimization  (DMI),  waste  output  (WOI)  and  self‐sufficiency  (SSI).  For  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’,  they  are  expressed  in  Table  74.  Furthermore,  biodiversity  is  evaluated  according  to  two  different  indices:  green  area  (GAI)  and  local  species  (LSI),  for  the  Biotope’s  and  Sunrise  Campus’  implantation  areas.  These  indices  are  also  explained  in  Section  3.2  and are expressed in Table 75.   Energy   The ‘Hybrid Scenario’ has considerably minimized its energy demand, achieving a DMI of 0,58. The  total energy produced by the greenhouses, PV windows, PV cells and anaerobic digestion is assessed  as  multisource.  Like  in  the  previous  scenarios,  the  WOI  is  ‐1,  because  strategies  such  as  energy  cascading or recycling are absent. Moreover, the output and consumption factors are not minimized.  The SSI becomes 0,76, which means that this scenario is almost able to produce 76% of its demand.  However, it still needs to import electricity and heat.   Water  The water demand has decreased when compared to the ‘Producer Scenario’. This happens because  the  green  area  within  the  Biotope  is  smaller  in  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’.  With  the  implementation  of  efficient faucets and vacuum toilets, the DMI is 0,44.   The  rain  water  is  harvested  and  used  for  irrigation  in  the  greenhouses.  After  treated,  it  becomes  drinking water and is reused in the Biotope. From there, the grey water is treated and enters back to  the cycle.  To assess the recycled water, the toilet and irrigation water are summed. The multisource  (rain water) is the difference between the new demand and the recycled water.  The  rain  water  is  harvested  and  used  for  irrigation  in  the  greenhouses.  After  treated,  it  becomes  drinking water and is reused in the Biotope. From there, the grey water is treated and enters back to  the  cycle.    To  assess  the  recycled  water,  the  total  water  demand  was  multiplied  by  the  discharge  coefficient 0,8 (Kujawa‐Roeleveld et al., 2010). The multisource (rain water) is the other 20% that is  to  be  harvested.  Moreover,  the  WOI  is  ‐0,20.  This  represents  that  80%  of  the  wastewater  is  re‐ introduced  to  the  system.  Finally,  the  SSI  is  1,00  representing  that  the  Biotope    is  totally  self‐ sufficient in relation to its water demand.  Table 74. Energy and water assessment for the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ per year. 

  Conventional Demand (Do)  New Demand (D) Cascade (C)  Recycle(R)  Consumption (Co) Multisource (M)  DMI= (Do‐D)/Do  WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D  SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

HYBRID ENERGY 3.590 1.506 0 0 0 1.150 INDICES 0,58 ‐1,00 0,76

HYBRID WATER  MWh MWh MWh MWh MWh MWh

4.992  2.791  0  2.233  0  558 

m³  m³  m³  m³  m³  m³ 

0,44  ‐0,20  1,00 

     

94   


SCENARIOS     Biodiversity  In the ‘Hybrid Scenario’, not controlled green areas are present in this scenario in the form of green  roofs (in the Biotope and other buildings in Sunrise Campus), green walls and internal gardens. The  wetlands and greenhouses are considered controlled green areas.   As a result, the GAI for the Sunrise Campus and for the Biotope are 0,41 and 0,76 respectively, i.e.  the total green area corresponds to 41% of the Sunrise Campus implantation area, whereas it also  indicates 76% of the Biotope ’s area.   The local species index in the Sunrise Campus is 0,72 and 0,49 in the Biotope . These numbers show  the balance between controlled and not controlled green areas in both the campus and the building.   Table 75.  Biodiversity assessment for the ‘Hybrid Scenario’.  

 

SUNRISE CAMPUS

Implantation area (A) Not controlled green (NCG) Controlled green (CG) Total green (T)  GAI = T/A  LSI = T‐CG/T 

202.900 59.575 23.300 82.875 0,41 0,72

m² m² m² m²

BIOTOPE  60.500 22.825 23.300 46.125 0,76 0,49

m²  m²  m²  m² 

     

 

95   


DISCUSSION     7. DISCUSSION  Aiming at understanding an effective way of designing a building that avoids possible damages that  it can cause to the surrounding environment, such as depleting ecosystems and bio‐chemical cycles  on which it depends, four scenarios were developed and compared to the ‘BAU Scenario’. They were  evaluated  according  to  the  three  tenets  of  the  ‘Cradle  to  Cradle’  theory  (waste  equals  food,  celebrate diversity, and use Solar income). These criteria are summarized in three indices for energy  and water, and two for biodiversity (please refer to Section 3). The results of the assessment of all  the scenarios are described in Table 76 and Figures 39 to 41.  For the energy assessment, the demand minimization index is similar for the ‘Efficient’, ‘Bio‐diverse’,  and  ‘Hybrid’  scenarios.  They  achieve  more  than  50%  of  demand  minimization  by  using  the  chosen  technologies.  The  ‘Producer  Scenario’  has  achieved  a  higher  DMI  than  the  other  scenarios.  This  happens  because  of  the  implementation  of  the  ATES  FiWiHEx  in  combination  with  greenhouses  which allowed it to achieve a 100% reduction of the energy used for cooling in the building.   Although the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ uses the same system, its DMI is lower. This is because the fact that  the minimization of the heating demand drops significantly with the implementation of green roofs  (from  66%  in  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’  to  16%  in  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’).  This  happens  because  the  green roof implementation generates an eminent imbalance in the annual heat and cold demand. At  the same time, the ATES system does not produce heat, but it balances the heat and cold within a  building  throughout  the  year.  The  great  difference  in  insulation  in  different  seasons  creates  a  misbalance  in  the  ATES  system.  As  a  result  of  considerable  reduction  of  the  cooling  demand,  the  heating efficiency of the ATES system becomes very low.   Table 76. Results of energy, water and biodiversity assessment. Demand Minimization (DMI), Waste Output (WOI), Self‐ sufficiency (SSI), Garden Areas (GAI) and Local Species (LSI) indices. 

 

BAU 

EFFICIENT

BIO‐DIVERSE

PRODUCER 

HYBRID

0,52

0,63 

0,58

DMI= (Do‐D)/Do 

0,00 

energy 0,55

WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D 

‐1,00 

‐1,00

‐1,00

‐1,00 

‐1,00

SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

0,00 

0,29

0,12

1,17 

0,76

DMI= (Do‐D)/Do 

0,00 

water 0,43

0,33

0,33 

0,44

WOI=‐(D‐C‐R‐Co)/D 

‐1,00 

‐1,00

‐0,40

‐0,20 

‐0,20

SSI=(C+R+M)/D 

0,00 

0,14

0,75

1,00 

1,00

GAI = T/A 

biodiversity‐ Sunrise Campus 0,06  0,15 0,67

0,16 

0,41

LSI = T‐CG/T 

1,00 

0,94

0,19 

0,72

GAI = T/A 

0,21 

biodiversity‐ Biotope  0,51 1,08

0,53 

0,76

LSI = T‐CG/T 

1,00 

0,19 

0,49

1,00

1,00

0,87

   

 

96   


DISCUSSION     1,20 1,00 0,80 DMI

0,60

SSI 0,40 0,20 0,00 BAU

EFFICIENT BIO‐DIVERSE PRODUCER

HYBRID  

Figure 39. Energy results: DMI and SSI. The WOI is not represented because it has the same value (‐1,00) for all  scenarios. 

In  all  scenarios,  including  the  BAU,  the  waste  output  indices  for  energy  have  the  same  value.  This  happens  because  energy  cascading  and  recycling  are  not  used  in  any  of  the  scenarios.  Cascading  energy is possible by using high quality energy only for purposes that require it, and lower quality  energy  where  this  will  suffice.  By  linking  various  energy  producing  and  consuming  functions,  a  cascade can be formed (Dobbelsteen et al., 2010). In the functions Biotope of the different scenarios,  it was not possible to create such a link. However, for further studies, cascading energy should be re‐ evaluated,  however,  in  a  bigger  scale  than  the  Biotope  scale.  There,  it  would  be  possible  to  link  industrial  and  human  functions  by  energy  cascading.  Furthermore,  the  losses  of  electrical  and  heating  appliances  are  neglected  (please  refer  to  Section  3.1).  Consequently,  their  consumption  remains  the  same.  For  further  analysis,  a  more  detailed  study  of  each  electrical/heating  appliance  should be done, in order to establish different consumptions for each scenario (Figure 39).   The self‐sufficiency indices represent the use of renewable resources in relation to the demand of  each  scenario.  The  ‘Efficient  Scenario’  achieves  a  moderate  self‐sufficiency  (0,29)  in  energy  which  represents its intention towards overall positive effects in the building’s design. However, the ‘Bio‐ diverse  Scenario’  shows  a  shy  result  for  its  self‐sufficiency  in  energy  (0,12).  This  scenario  opts  for  bringing  as  much  as  biodiversity  as  possible  in  detriment  of  energy  production.  The  energy  is  only  produced from digestion of solid organic waste and PV windows that are to be installed in the South  facades. The energy production of the digestion of solid waste was very low, representing only 6% of  the total energy demand in this scenario. This explains why the result of the SSI for the ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’ is not as pleasing as in the other scenarios. Still, the energy production can be augmented  by importing organic waste from the outside of the boundaries of the study area.  At the same time, the ‘Producer Scenario’ achieves a very high index for self‐sufficiency (1,17), and it  becomes an energy exporter. PV cells in the sub‐scenario (a) showed themselves very efficient when  compared  to  the  wind  turbines  in  the  sub‐scenario  (b).  The  PV  cells  produce  more  than  ten  times  energy  than  the  wind  turbines.  Therefore,  because  of  their  low‐efficiency,  wind  turbines  were  not  considered in any scenario. 

97   


DISCUSSION     Finally,  the  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’  achieves  a  very  high  grade  of  self‐sufficiency  (0,76),  although  it  still  needs to import electricity and heat to meet its demand. In all the assessments, the efficiency of the  PV cells considered was 10%. This is, according to Mackay, the efficiency of “very cheap” and “lower‐ efficiency panels” (MacKay, 2008, pp. 41). He also states that “typical solar panels have an efficiency  of about 10%; expensive ones perform at 20%” (MacKay, 2008, pp. 47). The “cheap” technology was  chosen because it is more accessible. However, if the PV cells were to produce twice the electricity  assessed  in  the  Section  6.5.3,  the  electricity  produced  would  suppress  the  demand.  It  is  up  to  the  stakeholders to define the budget that they want to spend on the buildings construction. However, if  the  cheapest  PV  cells  are to  be  implemented,  another  solution  for  this  scenario  to  become  totally  self‐sufficient would be to import organic waste to produce the needed electricity and heat.   

1,00 0,75 0,50 0,25

DMI SSI

0,00

WOI

‐0,25 ‐0,50 ‐0,75 ‐1,00

 

BAU        EFFICIENT      BIO‐DIVERSE     PRODUCER      HYBRID

 

Figure 40. Water results: DMI, SSI and WOI for each scenario.

The  water  demand  is  also  minimized  in  all  scenarios  by  using  efficient  faucets  and  dual  flush  or  vacuum  toilets.  However,  the  larger  the  green  area  within  the  Biotope,  the  higher  is  the  water  demand.  The  implementation  of  greenhouses  and  gardens  diminish  the  DMI  for  the  water  (Figure  40).   Moreover, in the ‘Producer’ and ‘Hybrid’ scenarios, where the ‘greenhouse village’ is implemented,  obtain 100% of self‐sufficiency in water demand is obtained, representing that the total amount of  water used is provided by the rain water harvest. Therefore, if on the one hand the implementation  of the ‘greenhouse village’ increases the demand in water, on the other hand, the scenarios become  more self‐sufficient and the waste output is minimized, bringing an overall positive effects.   The  water  waste  output  index  is  not  minimized  in  the  ‘Efficient  Scenario’.  Nevertheless,  with  the  implementation of recycling water strategies in the ‘Bio‐diverse’, ‘Producer’ and ‘Hybrid’ scenarios,  the  output  is  minimized.  In  the  ‘Producer’  and  ‘Hybrid’  scenarios,  it  achieves  its  peak,  when  the  irrigation and toilet water are recycled by the ‘greenhouse village’ system. The ‘Producer Scenario’  achieves a better index (‐0,20), because it has a higher percentage of irrigation water in its demand.   The  self‐sufficiency  is  the  ratio  between  resources  harvested  and  the  minimized  demand  (please  refer  to  Section  3.1).  Thus,  if  the  SSI  is  less  than  1,  there  is  the  necessity  of  importing  external  98   


DISCUSSION     resources, generating a cost. On the other hand, if the SSI is greater than 1, there is a surplus in the  production of energy which can be sold, generating profit. The resources that are not harvested by  multisource, recycling and cascading are the external demand, which is imported to the system. The  external demand and yearly expenses with energy and water demand are assessed in the following  table for each scenario. The price of electricity for industrial consumption in 2011 in the Netherlands  is considered €0,0975 per kWh of electricity and €0,0336 per kWh of natural gas (Europe's Energy  Portal, 2011). The water is considered to cost €1,51 per cubic meter (Geuden, 2007).  Table 77. Yearly expenses of external demand. 

    electricity (MWh)  heat (MWh)  water (m³)    electricity (€)  heat  (€)  water (€)  Total (€) 

1.BAU 

2.Efficient

3.Bio‐diverse

4.Producer  5.Hybrid

EXTERNAL DEMAND 2.255  1.335  4.992 

467  431  2.124 

903  616  844  COST

‐52  ‐616  0 

246  110  0 

219.863  44.847  7.538  272.247 

45.533  14.482  3.207  63.221 

88.043  20.698  1.274  110.014 

‐5.070  ‐20.698  0  ‐25.768 

23.985  3.696  0  27.681 

  The total yearly expenses of the ‘BAU Scenario’ for electricity, heat and water that is imported from  the  system  is  €272.247.  These  expenses  decrease  60%  in  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’,  77%  in  the  ‘Efficient Scenario’, and 56% in the ‘Hybrid Scenario’. In the ‘Producer Scenario’, the total demand of  energy,  water,  and  heat  is  smaller  than  the  building’s  demand.  The  excess  is  exported.  Therefore,  the expenses decrease 109%.  However, to make a comprehensive cost analysis of the enterprise, different information should be  added  to  this  sheet.  The  buildings  construction  costs  is  extremely  significant,  as  well  as  its  maintenance expenses. For instance, the ‘Producer’ and ‘Hybrid’ scenarios, which have the cheapest  annual  expenses,  have  greenhouses  and  constructed  wetlands  in  their  design.  The  greenhouses  need a great amount of constructed area, and both greenhouses and wetlands require workers to  maintain them. Moreover, these scenarios are those that contain a higher number of technologies  implemented,  which  will  result  in  higher  costs  when  compared  to  other  scenarios.  Thus,  this  estimate  of  expenses  only  represents  the  external  demand  of  the  Biotope,  and  a  more  detailed  analysis should be done in a further step in order to evaluate the profitability of each scenario.  Finally,  the  bio‐diversity  indices  express  the  amount  and  quality  of  the  green  areas  in  the  Biotope  and  in  the  campus.  As  it  is  expected,  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’  achieves  a  better  performance,  accounting  for  more  biodiversity  area  than  the  implementation  area  of  the  Biotope.  Its  LSI  is  also  very high when compared to the others, promoting habitat for local species in the campus. This is  due  to  the  existence  of  internal  gardens  on  different  floors  of  the  building  and  to  the  implementation  of  green  roofs  throughout  the  campus.  In  the  ‘Producer  Scenario’,  in  spite  of  the  great amount of green areas in the Biotope, they are planned to produce food or clean water, and  the  local  species  index  is  decreased.  The  ‘Hybrid  Scenario’  is  able  to  mix  a  significant  amount  of 

99   


DISCUSSION     green  area  with  more  than  half  of  them  being  exclusively  used  to  generate  biodiversity  in  the  Campus and in the Biotope (Figure 41).  1,2 1 0,8 0,6 0,4

GAI (Biotpe) LSI (Biotpe)

0,2 0

Figure 41. Biodiversity indicators (LSI and GAI) for the Biotope.  

 

The energy and water cycle, and biodiversity were chosen to represent the scenarios evaluation. An  analysis of the nutrient cycles should be also explored in further studies to create a more complete  assessment. Moreover, the materials that will be used for the construction of the buildings play an  important  role  in  further  evaluation.  The  materials  should  use  as  less  energy  as  possible,  avoid  dioxide carbon emissions, discharge the least amount of waste production as possible, and use the  least amount of land use as possible (for excavation and disposal).    During the development of this thesis, the main difficulty was to find out how different technologies  would  work  together,  as  for  instance  in  the  case  of  the  green  roofs  and  the  ATES  system.  More  studies  should  be  made  to  understand  the  coexistence  of  these  technologies.  Moreover,  although  there was an effort for using consolidated technologies that are available in the market, some of the  used  technologies  are  still  in  study  phase.  This  is  the  case  of  the  ‘greenhouse  village’.  This  system  was only implemented partially and there are still some missing data of this technology. These cases  should be re‐evaluated if they are to be applied in the future development of the Biotope and the  Sunrise Campus.   Furthermore,  a  range  of  technologies  were  selected  from  the  ones  that  have  commercial  accessibility,  available  technical  knowledge  and  that  have  been  already  tested.  When  these  technologies  were  designated,  others  were  excluded.  Thus,  there  are  still  other  technologies,  that  can always be joined to the current study, and improve the designs of the scenarios.  In  addition,  the  Biotope  and  the  Sunrise  Campus  are  interdependent  (please  refer  to  Section  2.3),  and  therefore  another  difficulty  was  to  define  the  boundaries  of  the  buildings’  design  and  assessment.  Because  of  this  relationship,  and  because  the  biodiversity  cannot  be  measured  only  locally,  the  roof  of  other  buildings  were  assessed  for  the  biodiversity  indices.  Moreover,  in  the  scenarios  where  the  digestion  of  waste  is  present,  the  other  buildings  waste  (within  the  Sunrise  Campus) is used and they are not considered to be imported. When using the other buildings waste 

100   


DISCUSSION     to producing energy and clean water, this waste becomes “food” for the Biotope and for the Sunrise  Campus.     Finally, the approach used in this thesis managed to join two different evaluation methods. It takes  the  UHA  method,  and  complements  it  with  the  biodiversity  study  of  each  design,  bringing  a  comparison of the scenarios. If the two methods were to be done separately, the results would be  different.  On  the  one  hand,  according  only  to  the  UHA,  the  best  overall  results  would  be  of  the  ‘Producer Scenario’, where the DMI, WOI and SSI for energy and water. On the other hand, if only  the  biodiversity  is  assessed,  the  ‘Bio‐diverse  Scenario’  would  be  the  best  option,  with  the  highest  indices of green area and local species. The ‘Hybrid Scenario’ shows that a balance of these different  characteristics is possible. Thus, it shows itself as a very suitable option.   Hence,  the  approach  suggested  induces  different  solutions  when  managing  the  combination  of  different  technologies that can be applied in such situations. It results on a  consistent  comparison  between  the  scenarios.  However,  the  scenarios  and  their  calculation  are  still  in  a  representative  scale. The present thesis managed to bring an overall idea for decision making by handling different  technologies  and  biodiversity  in  the  campus  and  the  building.  Therefore,  once  the  stakeholders  define  the  most  suitable  scenario  for  them,  the  technical  possibilities  should  be  checked,  and  calculations of the determined scenario should be further detailed in every technology used. After  that, the architecture project would be able to be developed and it will meet the desirable design  results.      

 

101   


CONCLUSION  

  8. CONCLUSION  Urban  systems  are  the  world’s  most  significant  users  of  resources  and  play  a  key  role  towards  a  sustainable  development.  To  guarantee  global  sustainability,  urban  areas  must  be  planned  to  manage  their  resources  strategically  (Agudelo  et  al.,  2009).  In  this  thesis,  this  strategic  way  of  thinking was related to the three tenets of the ‘Cradle to Cradle’ theory, where a balance between  the  management  of  resources  and  the  enhancement  of  the  biodiversity  in  the  study  area  was  pursued. This equilibrium would be the most effective way for the Biotope to integrate society with  its supporting environment.  Therefore,  aiming  at  understanding  this  balance  in  a  building’s  design,  four  scenarios  were  developed for the case study and compared to the ‘BAU’ situation. They were evaluated according  to  their  capability  of  mimicking  ecosystems,  and  they  were  designed  towards  a  circular  metabolic  profile. Moreover, they were designed and evaluated according to their capability of harvesting and  using the most renewable and local resources as possible. Finally, they were also planned to increase  the diversity within the Sunrise Campus and the Biotope.  All  the  scenarios  aim  at  bringing  feasible  options  for  the  Biotope,  and  vary  in  their  design,  spatial  orientation,  and  multisource  technologies.  All  of  them  intent  to  prevent  the  destruction  and  depletion  of  the  surrounding  environment,  even  though  they  still  depend  on  resources  such  as  energy,  water  and  materials  for  their  functioning.  The  human  functions  of  all  the  developed  scenarios remain as described in the Master Plan. However, different technologies were chosen and  combined in different ways, according to the main objective of each scenario. The use of different  technological functions brought out different results for energy, water and biodiversity assessments.    Moreover, although the scenarios developed have different characteristics, all of them represent a  step  towards  a  more  efficient  design  according  to  the  three  criteria  stipulated.  The  four  scenarios  bring up possible solutions that balance differently the three tenets evaluated. In the scenarios with  exchange  of  flows  between  functions,  there  are  more  possibilities  for  re‐using  and  recycling. In  the  search  for  a  building  design  which  at  the  same  time  mimics  a  circular  metabolism,  uses  renewable resources and brings up biodiversity for its region, the ‘Hybrid Scenario’ took shape. Its  design  intends  to  mix  the  main  features  of  the  previous  scenarios,  achieving  the  center  of  their  balance. It produces great amount of renewable energy and water, at the same time that it brings  biodiversity to the Biotope and the Sunrise Campus. Even though it is not entirely self‐sufficient yet,  it  can  become  autarkic  by  implementing  other  technologies  that  are  out  of  the  selection  of  technologies of this thesis, or by importing organic waste.  Concluding,  by  understanding  the  local  resources  and  their  flows,  many  technologies  can  be  assembled in multiple ways with the objective of managing their connections. The design appears as  the  medium  through  which  these  technologies,  human  activities  and  ecosystems  interact.  By  creating  a  balance  between  flows  and  functions,  it  is  possible  to  generate  a  diverse,  clean  and  healthy environment.   

 

102   


REFERENCES   

References Agudelo, Claudia, Mels, Adiaan and Rovers, Ronald. 2009. Urban water tissue: analysing the urban  harvest potential. Wageningen : lecture notes: Urban Environmental Management, 2009.  Agudelo‐Vera, C., et al. 2011. Urban Harvest Approach: A Resources Based Approach for Sustainable  Urban Planning. s.l. : Forthcoming, 2011.  Amosov, Maxim. 2010. Design of sustainable autarkic multifunctional built environment at the Shipo  Airport. Wageningen : Master thesis Wageningen University. Urban Environmental Technology and  Management., 2010.  Anaerobic Digestion. 2011. Anaerobic Digestion. Anaerobic Digestion. [Online] 2011. [Cited: July 27,  2011.] http://www.anaerobic‐digestion.com.  Andersson, O. 2007. Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Thermal Energy Storage for Sustainable  Energy Consumption. 2007.  Asano, Takashi. 2006. Water reuse : issues, technologies, and applications. New York : Metcalf &  Eddy | AECOM, 2006.  Austin, D. and Lohan, E. 2005. Integrated Tidal Wastewater Treatment System and Methods.  6881338 US, 2005.  Bergen, Scott D., Bolton, Susan M. and Fridley, James L. 2001. Design principles for ecological  engineering. Ecological Engineering. February 2001, Vol. 18, pp. 201‐210.  Bingemer, H.G. and P.J., Crutzen. 1987. The production of methane from solid wastes. s.l. : J.  Geophys., 1987.  Bodart, M. and De Herde, A. 2002. Global energy savings in office buildings by the use of  daylighting. Energy and Buildings. 2002, Vol. 34, pp. 421‐429.  Bridger, David W. and Allen, Diana M. 2005. Designing Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems.  American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air‐Conditioning Engineers. 2005, Vol. 47.  Burkhard, R., Deletic, A. and Craig, A. 2000. Techniques for water and wastewater management: a  review of techniques and their integration in planning. Urban Water. 2000, Vol. 2.  De Baer, Luc. 2010. The DRANCO Technology: A Unique Digestion technology for solid organic  waste. Organic waste System. [Online] 2010. [Cited: August 11, 2011.] http://www.ows.be/.  de Graaff, M. S., et al. 2010. Anaerobic Treatment of Concentrated Black Water in a UASB Reactor at  a Short HRT. Water. 2010, Vol. 2.  Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency ‐ Australian Government. 2011.  http://www.climatechange.gov.au/challenge/publications/methanequickref.html.  www.climatechange.gov.au. [Online] 01 2011.   Dickinson, J. S., et al. 2009. Aquifer thermal energy storage: theoretical and operational analysis.  Geotechnique. 2009, Vol. 59.  103   


REFERENCES    Direct, UK LEDS. 2011. UK LEDs direct. UK LEDs direct. [Online] March 20, 2011. [Cited: March 20,  2011.] http://www.ukledsdirect.com/led‐white‐light‐bulbs‐2‐c.asp.  Dobbelsteen, A. and de Jong, T. 2010. Exergy potential maps. Delft : Lecture notes, Delft University,  2010.  Dual flush toilets. 2009. Toilet Cleanerss. [Online] 2009. [Cited: June 20, 2011.]  http://toiletcleanerss.com/2011/05/15/dual‐flush‐toilet/.  Europe's Energy Portal. 2011. Industrial Prices. Europe's Energy Portal. [Online] August 2011. [Cited:  August 07, 2011.]  Ficker, Ursula. 2009. Low Energy Cooling for Sustainable Buildings. Sttutgart : John Wiley & Sons,  Ltd, 2009.  Gaston, K. J., et al. 2005. Urban domestic gardens (IV): the extent of the resource and its associated  features. Biodiversity and Conservation. 2005, 14.  Gaston, K., Warren, P., Thompson, K. and Smith, R. 2005. Urban Domestic Garden (IV): the estend  of resources and its associated features. Biodiversity and conservation. 2005, 14.  Gemeente Venlo. 2010. Structuurvisie Sunrise Campus.  http://www.venlo.nl/wonen_milieu/structuurvisies/Pages/SunriseCampus.aspx. [Online] January 11,  2010. [Cited: September 10, 2010.]  http://www.venlo.nl/wonen_milieu/structuurvisies/Documents/Sunrise%20Campus/kaart%20Struct uurvisie%20Sunrise%20Campus.pdf.  Geuden, P.J. 2007. Water Supply Statistics 2006. the Netherlands : Vewin, 2007.  Geudens, P.J.J.G. 2007. Water Supply Statistics. the Netherlands : Vewin 2008, 2007.  Gil, Knier. 2002. How do Photovoltaics Work? NASA Sciences. [Online] March 06, 2002. [Cited:  March 06, 2011.]  Girardet, H. 1996. Giant Footprints. Human Settlements ‐ Our Planet 8.1 ‐ UNEP Newsletter. [Online]  June 1996. [Cited: May 2, 2010.] http://www.ourplanet.com/imgversn/81/girardet.html.  Graaff, M.S., et al. 2010. Anaerobic Treatment of Concentrated Black Water in a. Water. 2010, 2.  Han, Y., Xu, S. and Xu, X. 2008. Modeling multisource multiuser water resources allocation. Water  resources management. 2008, Vol. 22, pp. 911‐923.  Jensen, M. and Malter, A. 1995. Protected Agriculture. A Global Review. Washington, D.C. : World  Bank, 1995. World Bank Technical Paper 253.  Keen, Meg. 2002. Urban Ecology. In J. Birkeland, Design for Sustainability. A Sourcebook of  integrated eco‐logical solutions. . UK : Earthscan Publications Ltd., 2002.  Kolokotroni, M., Giannitsaris, I. and Watkins, R. 2006. The effect of the London urban heat island  on building summer cooling demand and night ventilation strategies. Solar Energy . 2006, Vol. 80.  104   


REFERENCES    Kristinsson, J. and Timmeren, A. 2008. Fine‐Wire Heat Exchanger can effective heat and cool houses.  Dublin : PLEA, 2008.  Kujawa‐Roeleveld, K. and Rodic‐Wiersma, L. 2010. Urban Water and Waste: Treatment and Reuse .  Wageningen University : Lecture notes ‐ ETE31304, 2010.  Lazarus, N. 2009. BedZED: Toolkit Part II, A practical guide to producing affordable carbon neutral  developments. s.l. : BioRegional, 2009.  Lindström, Gösta. 2011. Sandwich Wall Systems: For a Sustainable Future. Concrete Issues. [Online]  March 05, 2011. [Cited: Macrh 5, 2011.]  http://www.concreteissues.com/stories/story?id=sandwich+wall+systems+‐ +for+a+sustainable+future‐567.  Liu, K. and Baskaran, B. 2003. Thermal Performance of Green Roofs Through Field Evaluation.  Chicago : Proceedings for the First North American Green Roof Infrastructure Conference, 2003.  Lundie, S. and M., Peters G. 2005. Life cycle assessment of food waste management options. Journal  of Cleaner Production 13 . 2005, Vol. 13.  Lundie, Sven and Peters, G. 2005. Life cycle assessment of food waste management options. Journal  of Cleaner Production. 2005, Vol. 13.  MacKay, David J. C. 2008. Sustainable Energy — without the hot air. Cambridge : UIT Cambridge  Ltd., 2008.  McDonough, William and Braungart, Michael. 2002. Cradle to Cradle. Remaking the Way We Make  Things. New York : North Point Press, 2002.  McDonough, William, et al. 2003. Applying th Principles of Green Engineering to Cradle‐to‐Cradle  Design. Environmental Science and Technology. December 01, 2003, pp. 434‐441.  Mels, A., et al. 2010. Greenhouse Village, the greenhouse‐powered, self‐sufficient neighborhood.  s.l. : Wageningen University, lecture notes, 2010.  Mitsch, W.J. 1996. Ecological Engineering: a new paradigm for engineerings and ecologists. [book  auth.] P.C. (Ed.) Schulze. Engineering within ecological constraints. Washington DC : National  Academy Press, 1996, pp. 114‐132.  Mohanty, Brahmanand. 2001. Standby power losses in household electrical appliances and office  equipment. French Agency for the Environment and Energy Management (ADEME). [Online] 2001.  http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/sdissues/energy/op/clasp_mohanty.pdf.  Nederlof, M.M. and Frijns, J. 2010. Zero‐Impact Water Use in the Built Environment. Amsterdam :  Techne Press, 2010, pp. 199‐208.  Newman, P. 1999. Sustainability and cities: extending the metabolism model. 1999, pp. v.44, 219‐ 226. 

105   


REFERENCES    Nieuwenhuize, D.J.D. (2011). 2011. Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in urban areas ‐ A way to  reduce the Regional Ecological Footprint? s.l. : Master thesis, Wageningen University, 2011.  Passivent. 2011. Cross‐flow and Passive Stack Ventilation. Passivent. [Online] Passivent, March 2011.  [Cited: March 10, 2011.] http://www.passivent.com/cross_flow_passive_stack.html.  Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute. 2007. KNMI. 2007. [Online] June 04, 2011. [Cited: June 04,  2011.] http://www.knmi.nl/about_knmi/  Ryn, Sim Van der and Cowan, Stuart. 2007. Ecological Design ‐ 10th Aniversary edition. Washington  DC : Island Press, 2007.  Scheuten Solar. 2011. Scheuten Solar. [Online] June 04, 2011. [Cited: June 04, 2011.]  http://www.scheutensolar.nl/.  Schueco. 2011. Schüco Ventilated Façade SCC 60 with ProSol TF. ttp://www.schueco.com/web/com.  [Online] Ferbruary 2011.   SenterNovem. 2007. Cijfers en tabellen 2007 ‐ Kompas, enerhiebewust wonen en werken. the  Netherlands : s.n., 2007.  Snep, Robert, Van Ierland, Ekko and Opdam, Paul. 2009. Enhancing biodiversity at business sites:  what are the opinions, and which of these do stakeholders prefer? Landscape and Urban Planning.  2009, Vol. 91, pp. 26‐35.  Solartube International, Inc. Solartube. Solartube. [Online] Solatube International, Inc.[Cited: March  20, 2011.] http://www.solatube.com/index.php.  Stanghellini, Cecilia. 2009. Water Management in the greenhouse. Fruit & Veg Tech . 2009, Vol. 9, 2.  Studio Marco Vermeulen. 2009. Master Plan Sunrise Campus ‐ Trade Port West, Venlo. Rotterdam :  Gemeente Venlo, 2009.  Swale Borough Council. 2011. Swale Borough Council. Swale Borough Council. [Online] 2011. [Cited:  August 12, 2011.]  Todd, J. 1996. The technological foundations of eco‐villages. Fidhorn : Fidhorn express, 1996.  Tood, John, Brown, Erica J.G. and Wells, Erik. 2003. Ecological Design Applied. Ecological  Engeneering. August 2003, Vol. 20, pp. 421‐440.  Twinn, C. 2003. Arup Journal. Bedzed. [Online] 2003. [Cited: August 25, 2011.]  http://www.arup.com/_assets/_download/download68.pdf.  Tzoulas, Konstantinos and James, Philip. 2010. Making biodiversity measures accessible to non‐ specialists: an innovative method for rapid assessment of urban biodiversity. Urban Ecossystems.  2010, Vol. 13, pp. 113‐127.  UN‐HABITAT . 2008. State of the World’s Cities 2008/2009 ‐ Harmonious Cities. London : Earthscan,  2008.  106   


REFERENCES    United Nations Environment Programme. 2007. Buildings and Climate Change. Status, Challenges  and Opportunities. s.l. : UNEP, 2007.  Urban Green Energy Inc. 2010. Specification for UGE‐600 (edy). Urban Green Energy. [Online] 2010.  [Cited: January 20, 2011.] http://www.urbangreenenergy.com/products/eddy/downloads.  van der Vleuten‐Balkema, A. J. 2003. Sustainable wastewater treatment, developing a methodology  and selecting. Eindhoven  : Eindhoven University Press, 2003.  Vermeulen, Studio Marco. 2010. Sunrise Campus. Studio Marco Vermeulen. [Online] 2010. [Cited:  May 2, 2010.] http://www.marcovermeulen.nl/projecten/selectie/85/sunrisecampus/english/.  Waide, P., Amann, J. and Hinge, A. 2007. Energy Efficiency in the North American Building Stock.  Paris : International Energy Agency, 2007.  Weather and Climate. 2009. Average rainfall in Eindhoven, Netherlands. World Weather and  Climate Information. [Online] 2009. [Cited: August 25, 2011.]  White, Rodney R. 2006. Building the Ecological City. Cambridge : Woodhead Publishing Ltd., 2006.  Windfinder. 2010. Windfinder ‐ Wind & weather forecast Eindhoven. Windfinder. [Online] 2010.  [Cited: December 10, 2010.] http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/eindhoven.  Worrell Water Technologies' Living Machine. 2010. Worrell Water Technologies' Living Machine®.  living machines. [Online] 2010. [Cited: December 20, 2010.]  http://www.livingmachines.com/about/how_it_works/.  Worell Water Technologies. 2007.  http://www.livingmachines.com/images/uploads/resources/living_machine_brochure.pdf.  www.livingmachines.com. [Online] 2007. [Cited: March 20, 2011.]—. 2007. Living Machine: System  Description and Scientific Basis. 2007.     

 

107   


ANNEX 1 – TECHNOLOGY INDEX    Annex 1 – Technology index    ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES

page 

anaerobic digestion solid waste  anaerobic digestion wastewater  ATES  ATES FiWiHEx  CPU management  green roofs  greenhouse village  insulation materials  passive lighting and diming control  PV cells  PV windows  solar tubes  use of LED lamps  wind turbines 

62 78 46 74 43 57 80 45 42 48 48 42 43 81

   WATER TECHNOLOGIES

page

anaerobic digestion wastewater  constructed wetlands  efficient faucets  greenhouse village 

78 66 50 80

Living Machine

66

low flush toilets  vacuum toilets 

50 79

   

 

108   


ANNEX 2 – POTENTIAL WATER APPLICATIONS (ASANO, 2006)    Annex 2 – Potential Water Applications (Asano, 2006)  GENERAL CATEGORY 

POTENTIAL APPLICATION

Agricultural irrigation 

Crop irrigation Commercial nurseries  Public parks and school yards Roadway medians and roadside plantings  Residential lawns  Golf courses  Cemeteries  Greenbelts  Industrial parks 

Landscape irrigation 

Industrial 

Groundwater recharge 

Recreation/environmental

Non‐potable urban uses  

Indirect potable use  

 

Cooling water Boiler feed water  Process water  Heavy construction (dust control, concrete curing,  fill compaction, and cleanup)  Groundwater replenishment Barrier against brackish or seawater intrusion  Ground subsidence control  Surface water augmentation Wetlands enhancement  Fisheries  Artificial lakes and ponds  Snowmaking  Toilet flushing Fire protection  Air conditioning  Sewer flushing  Commercial car wash  Driveway and tennis court wash down  Blending with public water supplies (surface water or groundwater) 

 

109   


ANNEX 3 – WATER APPLICATION QUALITIES AND VOLUMES IN SUNRISE CAMPUS BUILDINGS    Annex 3 – Water application qualities and volumes in Sunrise Campus Buildings  DEMAND TYPE  QUALITY  QUANTITY (m³/year) l/day  WORKERS  PRODUCTION  industrial production   drinking water, coffee and tea  wash basin  toilet flush  dishwasher  total human use     OFFICES  drinking water, coffee and tea  wash basin  toilet flush  dishwasher  total human use     R&D  industrial production   drinking water, coffee and tea  wash basin  toilet flush  dishwasher  total human use     BIOTOPE  drinking water, coffee and tea  wash basin  toilet flush  dishwasher  food processing  total human use     OTHER USES  car wash  irrigation     total human use Q1  total human use Q2  total human use Q3  total human use  total industrial production 

   Q2  Q1  Q1  Q3  Q2           Q1  Q1  Q3  Q2           Q2  Q1  Q1  Q3  Q2           Q1  Q1  Q3  Q2  Q1           Q3  Q2     Q1  Q2  Q3  Q1+Q2+Q3 Q2 

    

  

  

              

54.146     52.640       57 220    169 650    1.183 4.552    95 368    1.505                459 1.766    1.352 5.202    9.468 36.417    765 2.944    12.046             30.276     22.245       306 1.177    901 3.468    6.312 24.278    510 1.963    8.030                  183 706    541 2.080    3.787 14.566    306 1.177    173 667    4.992                                     4.144       1.678       20.751       26.574       74.885      

300 

2400 

1600 

960 

110   


ANNEX 4 – WATER CONSUMPTION IN WORKING ENVIRONMENTS IN THE NETHERLANDS.    Annex 4 – Water Consumption in Working Environments in the Netherlands.  Domestic water consumption 2007  in  the Netherlands (Geudens,  2007) 

l/ person.day

bath   washbasin   toilet flush  washing, by hand   washing, by machine   washing up, by hand   washing up, by machine  

2,5 5,3 37,1 1,7 15,5 3,8 3

food preparation  drinking coffee, tea and water 

1,7 1,8

other   total 

5,3 127,5

office/ human use in  production halls  water consumption  2007  bath washbasin toilet flush washing, by hand washing, by machine washing up, by hand washing up, by  machine  food preparation drinking coffee, tea  and water  other total3

Human water  consumption in working  environments  (l/ person.shift)    2,17  15,17  0  0  0  1,23  0,70  0,74    20 

                                                                                         3

 According to Cijfers en tabellen 2007,  the average consumption of water in offices is 20l/day (SenterNovem,  2007) 

111   


Acknowledgment     First of all, I would like to thank my supervisor, Ingo Leusbrock, for all the time he spent with me.    I would also like to thank my teachers, Claudia Agudelo‐Vera for her extensive support and her  always helpful remarks and suggestions, and Ljiljana Rodic‐Wiersma, for broadening my vision and  enriching the discussion of the thesis. Appreciation also goes to Bas van de Westerlo, for the  inspiring discussions we had.    I could not forget to thank my good friends for the cultural and knowledge exchange during this  period. They were always by my side for whatever I needed, and I know they will be there for a long  time. Thank you Jack, Yasmina, Sampurna, Maria and Taicia.    Furthermore, I would like to thank my parents, Debora and Jakub, and my brothers, Daniel and  Marcelo, who always made me feel that they were nearby, even though there is an ocean between  us.    Finally, I would like to thank my partner and friend, for bringing me to this country where I could  learn so many good and new things. Ivan, thank you for everything!   

112   


Master Thesis Léa Gejer  

Designing a Circular Metabolic Building: The case of Biotope and Sunrise Campus.

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you