Page 1

LANDSCAPES OF PRESSURE

Kathrin Golda-Pongratz


LANDSCAPES OF PRESSURE

Kathrin Golda-Pongratz


“The territory no longer precedes the map, nor does it survive it. It is nevertheless the map that precedes the territory —precession of simulacra— that engenders the territory, and if one must return to the fable, today it is the territory whose shreds slowly rot across the extent of the map. It is the real, and not the map, whose vestiges persist here and there, in the deserts that are no longer those of the Empire, but ours. The desert of the real itself.”

“El territorio ya no precede al mapa, ni le sobrevive. En adelante, será el mapa el que preceda al territorio –precesión de los simulacros–, y el que lo engendre, y si fuera preciso retomar la fábula, hoy serían los jirones del territorio los que se pudrirían lentamente sobre la superficie del mapa. Son los vestigios de lo real, no los del mapa, los que todavía subsisten espacidos por unos desiertos que ya no son los del Imperio, sino nuestro desierto. El propio desierto de lo real”. Jean Baudrillard Jean Baudrillard2 1

       

2

      1

Baudrillard, Jean: Simulacra and Simulation. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor 1994, p. 1. Baudrillard, Jean: Cultura y simulacro. Editorial Kairós, Barcelona 1978, p. 9f.


Kathrin Golda-Pongratz

LAND SCAPES OF PRESSURE paisajes de presi贸n


LAND SCAPES OF PRESSURE

What turns landscapes into landscapes of pressure is, in the first place, a map—a scaled register of the territory in which the simulacrum of an envisioned project is set. What matters for the project, its promoters and its investors is the territory’s location: the coordinates, proximities, political context, municipal boundaries and infrastructures previously set in it. What is also important is its supposed availability; its emptiness and its disposition to be filled; its quality of being a remnant, a terrain vague seen as a receptacle of promises, possibilities and expectations, as Ignasi de Solà-Morales wrote.1 What does not matter is the territory’s idiosyncrasy—its inner logics, historic traces, gradations of rurality and productivity as such. As pure surface and constructible land, it is subject to the logics of the global economy and consequently converted into an object of speculation. Its contemporary context is globalization, which increasingly bypasses the national state and, therefore, effects an integral reconfiguration of the urban scale.2 Under these conditions, it is the map “that engenders the territory”, as Baudrillard writes, as a “precession of simulacra”.3 Precedent forms and acts of speculation filled other parts of that same map, representing the edges of a Spanish metropolis, some years ago. Expansionist urban policies and planning practices of the last two decades, the creation of a real-estate bubble and its final bursting with the advent of the financial crisis have engendered a dramatic change in the real Spanish landscape. What was urbanized at an astonishing pace in the first decade of the 21st century has been left behind unfinished and now constitutes urban fringes, vast suburban fields and even natural resorts, especially along the Spanish coast, that are scantly populated ghost towns of orphaned housing structures and half-finished infrastructures all over the country. Territories where flows of global money enhanced local urban development as well as real-estate speculation are facing a sudden standstill as one of the consequences of the global financial crisis.4

UNDER THE LOGICS OF GROWTH

Until a few years ago, the logics of dispersion and spatial segregation determined Spanish economic growth and, as a motor for the creation of jobs, were the basis and consequence of increasing wealth. Migration pressure and increasing real-estate speculation on the part of local and international investors, constructors and banks, and the related corruption in city councils have converted the country into a sprawling, suburbanized territory. Water supply problems, a massive loss of rural territory on major city peripheries and especially along the coastline, and a consequently severe ecological disequilibrium are long-term side effects of these developments. A report by the Ministry of Housing reveals that never in

4

1 de Solà-Morales, Ignasi: Territorios. Gustavo Gili, Barcelona, 2002. 2 See: Smith, Neil: “Revanchist City, Revanchist Planet”. In: Urban Politics Now. Re-Imagining Democracy in the Neoliberal City. BAVO (Eds.), Rotterdam 2007, p. 39. 3 Baudrillard, Jean: op. cit., p. 1. 4 Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin: “You can imagine the opposite. Terminological reflections on ephemeral architecture”. In: Moinopolis. Ephemerality and Architecture. Moinopolis Laboratory of Thoughts on Spatial Matters (Ed.), Mannheim 2013, p. 37.


PAISAJES DE PRESIÓN

Lo que convierte los paisajes de presión en tales es, en primer lugar, un mapa: un registro a escala del territorio en el cual se inscribe el simulacro del proyecto que se ha concebido. Lo que importa en el proyecto, para sus promotores e inversores, es el emplazamiento de los terrenos, sus coordenadas, sus proximidades, sus contextos políticos, sus límites municipales, las infraestructuras previamente inscritas en ellos. Importa, además, su supuesta disponibilidad: están vacíos y pueden ser llenados; son, en palabras de Ignasi de Solà-Morales1, deshechos, restos, terrain vagues portadores de promesas, posibilidades y expectativas. Lo que no importa es la idiosincracia del territorio, sus lógicas internas, las huellas de su historia, sus diferentes niveles de ruralidad, su productividad. Concebido como una mera superficie y como un suelo apto para ser construido, está sujeto a la lógica de la economía global y, por consiguiente, se convierte en un objeto de especulación. Su contexto contemporáneo es la globalización, que desborda cada vez más el Estado-Nación y comporta la reconfiguración global de la escala urbana2. En estas condiciones, “el mapa engendra el territorio”, como afirma Baudrillard, “como precesión de los simulacros” 3. Hace algunos años, formas y actos de especulación han llenado otras partes del mismo mapa, que representa los terrenos limítrofes de una metrópolis española. Las políticas de urbanismo expansionistas y las prácticas de planificación de las últimas dos décadas, la creación de la burbuja inmobiliaria y su pinchazo con la crisis financiera, han modificado de forma radical el paisaje real español. Los terrenos urbanizados a un ritmo vertiginoso en la primera década del siglo XXI han quedado sin terminar, formando periferias urbanas y vastos campos suburbanos. Incluso recursos naturales, especialmente a lo largo de la costa española, se han convertido en ciudades fantasma escasamente pobladas, compuestas por complejos de viviendas huérfanas e infraestructuras inacabadas y dispersas. Los flujos globales de dinero, tras promover el desarrollo urbano local y la especulación del ladrillo en los territorios, se han detenido en seco a causa de la crisis financiera mundial4.

BAJO LA LÓGICA DEL CRECI

La lógica de la dispersión y de la segregación espacial ha determinado el crecimiento económico en España y, en tanto que motor de la creación de empleo, ha constituído la base del crecimiento económico hasta hace pocos años. La presión de la inmigración y la creciente especulación inmobiliaria de los inversores nacionales e internacionales, constructoras y bancos, sin olvidar la corrupción en ayuntamientos, ha convertido el país en un territorio disperso y suburbanizado. Consecuencias a largo plazo de este desarrollo son graves deficiencias en el suministro del agua, la pérdida masiva de territorio rural en las periferias de las grandes ciudades, sobre todo en la costa, y un serio desequilibrio ecológico.

1 de Solà-Morales, Ignasi: Territorios. Gustavo Gili, Barcelona, 2002. 2 See: Smith, Neil: “Revanchist City, Revanchist Planet”. En: Urban Politics Now. Re-Imagining Democracy in the Neoliberal City. BAVO (Eds.), Rotterdam 2007, p. 39. 3 Baudrillard, Jean: op. cit., p. 10. 4 Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin: “You can imagine the opposite. Terminological reflections on ephemeral architecture”. En: Moinopolis. Ephemerality and Architecture. Moinopolis Laboratory of Thoughts on Spatial Matters (Ed.), Mannheim 2013, p. 37.


AND DISPERSION

the history of Spain has more land been urbanized and housing built than in the decade between 1997 and 2007.5 A massive overproduction of multi-family housing for the middle classes evoked and incited the mass dream of ownership. “Unfortunately we have, among other things, missed out on the potentials and possibilities of housing production. On the peripheries, we have built hundreds of new housing units in one go, to the extent that urbanized and built land in Spain has doubled within the last thirty years”6 is how the phenomenon and its enormous consequences are summed up. By the early 21st century, after the tourist boom of the 1980s, there had been an excessive total urbanization of the coast. In places like Murcia and Alicante, the development of gated communities with golf courses in ecological reserves has caused huge problems due to massive water extraction. Mono-functional residential developments in southern Spain, having fallen into some decay and having to deal with an ageing snowbird society, are surrounded by informal settlements for seasonal workers and a second ring of apartment blocks quickly thrown up for speculative purposes and second homes which, since the bubble burst in 2008, are unfinished and can no longer be financed.7 Large sectors of the population incurred debt to buy property, to invest in construction and realize the dream of home—or second home—ownership. Using colourful billboards and adverts, real-estate developers promised modern, comfortable and harmonious lives in new housing developments, in close contact with nature but conveniently connected to the metropolis. Everyone wanted to keep up with what was (and still is) considered a status symbol, a sign of integration and success for immigrants, and a guaranteed investment for all of Spanish society. El boom del ladrillo (the construction boom) that for over a decade seemed to guarantee welfare and realize the dreams of citizens and politicians alike, has brought about a dramatic change in the social and physical landscape. With the outbreak of the financial crisis, the construction sector has ground to a halt, unemployment has risen dramatically and people who can no longer pay their mortgages are losing their properties to the banks but are not exempted from their debts. Consequently, a whole sector of Spanish society, its middle class, is in danger of sinking into poverty, while no political solutions are given and citizen unrest is on the rise.8 Urban peripheries offer a perfect portrait of social pressure, where construction and the real-estate sector boomed at an astonishing rate until the financial crisis broke out.

6

5 Ministerio de Vivienda (Ed.): Informe sobre la situación del sector de la vivienda en España. Madrid 2010, p.8. 6 Herreros, Juan: “De la periferia al centro. La ciudad en tiempos de crisis.” In: Alfaya, Luciano/ Muñiz, Patricia (Ed.): La ciudad, de nuevo global. Santiago de Compostela 2009, p. 253. 7 Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin: “Formen der Mixicidad und Segregation in Spanien”. In: Soziale Mischung in der Stadt. Harlander, Tilman/ Kuhn, Gerd (Eds.), Stuttgart 2012, p. 221 f. 8 The PAH (“Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca”, http://afectadosporlahipoteca.com) is a voluntary civic association which helps affected citizens facing eviction to find legal support and a new place to live. In several larger Spanish cities it has started occupying empty buildings to resettle evicted families. In June 2013, the PAH brought the Spanish case to the European Parliament and was distinguished with the European Citizen Prize 2013 for its antieviction commitment.


MIENTO Y LA DISPERSIÓN

Un informe del Ministerio de la Vivienda admite que nunca en la historia de España se había urbanizado tanto terreno como en la década 1997-20075. En estos años, una masiva sobreproducción de edificaciones multifamiliares para la clase media reflejó e incitó el sueño masificado de la compra de una vivienda. “Desgraciadamente hemos perdido, entre otras, la oportunidad de la vivienda. A golpes de varios cientos de unidades a la vez, se han construido las periferias que tenemos, hasta el punto de que, en las últimas tres décadas, en toda España se ha duplicado la superficie construida del país” 6. Con el cambio de siglo, y tras el boom turístico de los años 80, se ha producido una urbanización excesiva de la costa. En lugares como Murcia o Alicante, la construcción en reservas naturales de urbanizaciones protegidas con verjas y de campos de golf ha ocasionado una demanda de agua insostenible. Tras sufrir una cierta decadencia y enfrentarse al envejecimiento del cliente de sol y playa, las urbanizaciones monofuncionales del sur de España se hallan cada vez más cercadas por asentamientos informales de trabajadores de temporada y por un segundo anillo de bloques de apartamentos construidos a toda prisa que constituyen objetos de especulación y segundas residencias y que, tras el pinchazo de la burbuja inmobiliaria en 2008, no están terminados y carecen de financiación7. Una gran parte de la población española se endeudó para adquirir un piso, comprar una segunda residencia, o simplemente invertir en el ladrillo. Con carteles de colores chillones y anuncios, los promotores inmobiliarios prometían una vida moderna, acogedora, confortable y harmónica en sus nuevas urbanizaciones, en contacto con la naturaleza pero al mismo tiempo dotadas de excelentes comunicaciones con las metrópolis. Todo el mundo quería adquirir lo que era (y sigue siendo) un símbolo de estatus social, un signo de integración y de éxito para los inmigrantes y, para la sociedad española en general, lo que parecía una inversión de futuro ideal. El boom del ladrillo, que durante más de una década parecía a un tiempo garantizar el bienestar y realizar los sueños de los ciudadanos y de los políticos, ha operado un cambio radical en el paisaje social y físico. Con el estallido de la crisis financiera, el sector de la construcción ha frenado en seco, el desempleo ha subido espectacularmente y las personas que no pueden pagar sus hipotecas están perdiendo sus hogares –que pasan a ser propiedad de los bancos– , pero no por ello dejan de pagar lo que adeudan. A consecuencia, un amplio sector de la población española, la clase media, corre el riesgo de caer en la pobreza. No se dan soluciones políticas y el descontento entre los ciudadanos aumenta8. Las periferias urbanas constituyen el perfecto retrato de 5 Ministerio de Vivienda (Ed.): Informe sobre la situación del sector de la vivienda en España. Madrid 2010, p. 8. 6 Herreros, Juan: “De la periferia al centro. La ciudad en tiempos de crisis.” En: Alfaya, Luciano/ Muñiz, Patricia (Ed.): La ciudad, de nuevo global. Santiago de Compostela 2009, p. 253. 7 Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin: “Formen der Mixicidad und Segregation in Spanien”. En: Soziale Mischung in der Stadt. Harlander, Tilman/ Kuhn, Gerd (Eds.), Stuttgart 2012, p. 221 f. 8 La PAH (“Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca”, http://afectadosporlahipoteca.com) es una asociación cívica de voluntarios que apoya a ciudadanos afectados por un desahucio forzado en la búsqueda de soporte legal y un nuevo hogar o lugar de residencia temporal. Ha empezado a ocupar edificios vacios para realojar a familias afectadas en varias ciudades españolas. En junio de 2013, la PAH llevó el caso español al Parlamento Europeo a Bruselas y ha sido galardonada con el premio Ciudadano Europeo 2013 por su compromiso social con respecto a los desahucios.


MAPPING EUROVEGAS

While there was no proposal to address, much less solve, this urban and social challenge, it was followed by an even bolder and less sustainable urban project: the inscription of Eurovegas, either in the plains of Madrid, beyond these half-finished, scantly inhabited residential developments, or in the fertile peri-urban farmland and territorial reserves of the metropolitan area of Barcelona. For two years, an updated copy of Las Vegas, partly financed by the Las Vegas Sands company on European soil, a conglomerate of mega-casinos of uncertain financing, a complex of 800 hectares with casinos, hotels, golf courses, shopping and convention centres, became the political asset of the moment. Politicians armed themselves with a map when they stepped onto one of the plots they had previously pointed to as a piece of land to host the simulacrum of a supposedly wealth- and growth-inducing project. Maps of suburban Madrid versus maps of peripheral Barcelona were overwritten in a frenzied contest to attract the global investor; Getafe, Leganés, El Molar, Torrejón de Ardoz, Paracuellos del Jarama, Valdecarros and Alcorcón on the outskirts of Madrid jostled with the villages and urban regions of Montcada i Reixac, Gavà, Abrera, Terrassa, Sant Boi, Cornellà, Viladecans and El Prat de Llobregat in the metropolitan area of Barcelona. All were ready to lose their scale on paper—and, eventually, in reality—and abandon their original connotations and identities to be related to the mega-project. Meanwhile, local people drew their own maps, published the land in question online and led protest marches and routes of discovery through the threatened landscapes, and rallied to protest against this contemporary version of Bienvenido, Mister Marshall 9 and the introduction of Las Vegas as a new urban model for Spain. The sheer imposition of the project onto the urban discourse and the imaginations of politicians and citizens as a promise for some and a threat for others, its inscription onto the map and even its ultimate failure has put these urban outskirts under pressure and definitively changed their meanings.

A SPATIAL PRODUCT WITH

In fact, Eurovegas has converted the territory into a spatial product and a tool for the manoeuvres of global capital, which as such offers “precise expressions of value and exchange stored in arrangement and presence”.10 The projection of Eurovegas onto the territory has exposed it to the logics of globalization and imposed the rules of the game of spatial production which is played the same, whether in Nevada, Macao, Castile or Catalonia. The investor claimed exceptional conditions by supposedly creating a pool of wealth in return. According to the former president of the Community of Madrid, who welcomed the construction of the project in Madrid, a mega-casino of this kind, calling for fundamental changes in Spanish land and labour laws,

8

9 Film by Luis García Berlanga (1953) that describes a Spanish village in the post-war years, enthusiastically preparing for the visit of the Americans to present the Marshall Plan in Spain; finally, neither the Americans nor the financial support arrives. 10 Easterling, Keller: Enduring Innocence. Global architecture and its political masquerades. MIT Press, Cambridge/ Mass., 2005, p. 7.


I REIXAC

UN PLAN B PARA THE STRIP

MONTCADA

A PLAN B FOR THE STRIP


Estimate location of Eurovegas Ubicaci贸n estimativa de Eurovegas

Approximate scale 1 : 5.000 Escala aproximada 1 : 5.000


la presión social, allí donde la construcción y el sector inmobiliario crecieron a un ritmo vertiginoso hasta el estallido de la crisis.

MAPEANDO EUROVEGAS

A pesar de que no había un plan para paliar o incluso superar este reto urbano y social, surgió un proyecto urbano aún más desmesurado e insostenible: la inscripción de Eurovegas, ya sea en las llanuras de Madrid, más allá de las promociones inmobiliarias inacabadas y escasamente pobladas, o en las fértiles tierras agrícolas periurbanas del sur del área metropolitana de Barcelona. Las Vegas Sands financiaría en parte esta transposición actualizada de Las Vegas al viejo continente. Este emporio del ocio de financiación incierta, que ocuparía 800 hectáreas y estaría compuesto por varios casinos, hoteles, campos de golf, centros comerciales y de convenciones, fue durante dos años un gran activo político en España. Mapa en mano, los políticos pisaron terrenos que antes habían señalado con el dedo, terrenos destinados a servir de simulacro de un proyecto que prometía generar riqueza y crecimiento. Los mapas del Madrid suburbano o del área metropolitana de Barcelona pronto se llenaron de anotaciones, en reñida competición para atraer al inversor global: localidades como Getafe, Leganés, El Molar, Torrejón de Ardoz, Paracuellos del Jarama, Valdecarros y Alcorcón, en las cercanías de Madrid; o Montcada i Reixac, Gavà, Abrera, Terrassa, Sant Boi, Cornellà, Viladecans y El Prat de Llobregat, en la periferia de Barcelona, apostaban por perder su escala sobre papel –y, eventualmente, también en la realidad–, y estaban listas para abandonar paulatinamente sus connotaciones e identidades originales para incribirse en el megaproyecto. Al mismo tiempo, algunos ciudadanos se insurgían contra la instauración de Las Vegas como un nuevo modelo urbano para España, y trazaban sus propios mapas, colgaban sus “piezas en juego” en la red, participaban en manifestaciones u organizaban visitas guiadas para descubrir aquellos paisajes que esta versión actualizada de Bienvenido, Mister Marshall 9 ponía en peligro. La simple implantación de este proyecto en el discurso sobre urbanismo y en el imaginario de los políticos y de los ciudadanos –en forma de promesa para unos, de amenaza para los demás–, su inscripción en el mapa e incluso su fracaso final, sometió a una gran presión estos espacios periféricos y modificó definitivamente su significado.

UN PRODUCTO

De hecho, Eurovegas ha convertido el territorio en un producto espacial y en un instrumento de maniobra del capital global; ofrece “expresiones precisas de valor e intercambio almacenados en disposición y presencia” 10. La llegada de Eurovegas ha librado el territorio a la lógica de la globalización y ha impuesto unas mismas reglas de producción del espacio, ya sea en Nevada, Macao, Castilla o Catalunya.

9 Pelicula de Luis García Berlanga (1953) que describe una aldea española en los años de posguerra que se prepara con entusiasmo a la visita de los Americanos para que presenten el Plan Marshall en España; al final, ni los Americanos ni la ayuda financiera llegan. 10 Easterling, Keller: Enduring Innocence. Global architecture and its political masquerades. MIT Press, Cambridge/ Mass., 2005, p. 7.


LEGAL EXEMPTION

would be “a major investment in these times of crisis” and would ultimately “create 200,000 jobs in the service industries, not counting all the jobs involved in its construction”.11 Her successor agreed that it would be “the next two years’ most important investment in Spain, if not the entire world”.12 In the face of these promises, the government promised to facilitate whatever was needed or requested by the investor, who was selling simulacra and dreams in exchange for legal exemption. A reduction from 40% to 10% in taxes on gambling winnings was offered to Sheldon Adelson’s gambling empire. As a tax-free zone and legal lacuna, the landscapes in question also became objects of our imagination; while architects and urban planners reclassified the various properties on their drawing boards and were generously rewarded for it, rendered images were distributed by the media and inserted into the collective imagination. Simulated images as another form of spatial product replaced fields of artichokes, community gardens and dry plains with shining towers, illuminated esplanades, multicoloured fountains and luxurious gaming zones. What constitutes these territories, which are impregnated by the simulacra of a gambling city, “whose shreds slowly rot across the extent of the map”?13 Their seemingly irrelevant idiosyncrasies are what the photographs in this book explore, as well as, to quote Marc Augé, “the singularity that constitutes them and the universality that relativizes them”.14

MADRID’S (SUB)URBAN EDGES AFTER THE BOOM DEL LADRILLO Where the Spanish capital encounters the landscapes of the Meseta, the dry Castilian plateau that contains and surrounds it, the meetings of urban and rural are harsh and abrupt. The liminal zones of the metropolitan area are perhaps the most radical indicator for the expansionist urban policies and rampant planning practices of recent decades. These urban edges dramatically illustrate the impacts of the real-estate bubble and its final bursting with the outbreak of the financial crisis and the resulting decadence of mass housing projects in the last five years. They are monumental reminders of the failure of suburban dreams and the dissipation of resources, and a symbol of the negative impacts of uncontrolled speculative urban policies. Immense satellite towns, the largest of which was built to provide new homes for 75,000 people, had been planned since the mid-1990s as part of Programas de Actuación Urbanística or Programmes of Urbanistic Action (PAUs). This took the form of converting rural land into new satellite towns with low densities, vast open spaces and few places for public and community activities. These new towns, hostile and non-urban in design, comparable to the mass-produced urban fabrics of the early 20th century and the housing estates of the Franco era, extended into the landscape. Their encounter with the rural

10

11 Aguirre, Esperanza, quoted in: “Aguirre: Eurovegas estará en marcha en 2-3 años desde que se coloque la primera piedra.” In: El Mundo. Madrid, 9.9.2012. 12 González, Ignacio, quoted in: “Eurovegas comenzará a construirse este año en los terrenos de Alcorcón.” In: La Vanguardia. Barcelona, 9.2.2013. 13 Baudrillard, Jean: op. cit., p. 1. 14 Augé, Marc: An Anthropology for Contemporaneous Worlds. Stanford University Press, Stanford 1999, p. 90.


ESPACIAL CON EXENCIÓN LEGAL

El inversor exigía condiciones excepcionales a cambio de crear una hipotética fuente de prosperidad. Según la entonces presidenta de la Comunidad de Madrid, una incondicional del proyecto, este megacasino, que requería adaptar elementos cruciales de las leyes laboral y territorial españolas, sería „una inversión muy importante en estos tiempos de crisis“ y „crearía 200.000 puestos de trabajo en el sector de los servicios, sin contar el empleo generado por su construcción“11. Según su sucesor, „ en los próximos dos años será la inversión más importante en España, si no en todo el mundo“12. Deslumbrado por tantas promesas, el gobierno se comprometió a plegarse a todas las exigencias de un inversor que vendía simulacros y sueños a cambio de sortear la legalidad. Así, el imperio del juego de Sheldon Adelson se beneficiaría de una reducción de impuestos del 40% al 10%. Al ser una zona libre de impuestos y beneficiarse de una laguna legal, los paisajes en juego también se convirtieron en objetos de nuestra imaginación: mientras arquitectos y urbanistas recalificaban las propiedades en sus mesas de dibujo y en compensación recibían jugosos honorarios, los medios de comunicación difundían las imágenes del futuro complejo, inscribiéndolas en el imaginario colectivo. Como un producto espacial más, las imágenes virtuales de relucientes rascacielos, plazas iluminadas, fuentes multicolores y lujosos casinos reemplazaron a los campos de alcachofas, huertos comunitarios o secas llanuras. Pero, ¿cómo son realmente estos territorios sobre los que se inscriben los simulacros de una ciudad del juego, “cuyos jirones se pudren lentamente sobre el mapa?” 13. Las fotografías de este libro exploran sus idiosincracias, en apariencia irrelevantes, así como, en palabras de Marc Augé, “la singularidad que las constituye y la universalidad que las relativiza” 14.

LOS LÍMITES (SUB) URBANOS DE MADRID Cuando Madrid se encuentra con los paisajes de la Meseta, el árido altiplano de Castilla cuyo centro es la capital de España, el encuentro entre el mundo urbano y el mundo rural es más bien abrupto. Las zonas limítrofes del área metropolitana son quizás el indicador más radical de las políticas urbanísticas expansionistas y del descontrol en la planificación que han caracterizado las últimas décadas. Estos márgenes urbanos ofrecen un testimonio implacable del impacto de la burbuja inmobiliaria, cuyo inevitable pinchazo ha comportado la completa paralización de los proyectos de edificación de viviendas en los últimos cinco años; son recordatorios monumentales del naufragio de los sueños suburbanos, del despilfarro descontrolado de recursos, y simbolizan las consecuencias negativas de las políticas urbanísticas especulativas descontroladas. A mediados de 1990 se construyeron inmensas ciudades satélite, la mayor de las cuales debía albergar a 75.000 personas,

11 Aguirre, Esperanza, citada en: “Aguirre: Eurovegas estará en marcha en 2-3 años desde que se coloque la primera piedra.” En: El Mundo. Madrid, 9.9.2012. 12 González, Ignacio, citado en: “Eurovegas comenzará a construirse este año en los terrenos de Alcorcón.” En: La Vanguardia. Barcelona, 9.2.2013. 13 Baudrillard, Jean: op. cit., p. 10. 14 Augé, Marc: An Anthropology for Contemporaneous Worlds. Stanford University Press, Stanford 1999, p. 90.


quickly became a physical symbol of the failure of blind urban expansionism. The largest of these developments, Vallecas, foresaw the construction of 28,000 new flats. The extension of Valdecarros, a kind of mega-PAU further southeast, envisaged the construction of a further 48,000 flats, a new business district and several amusement attractions. It is currently at a standstill, an involuntary urban monument to the post-boom. What remains are unfinished, scantly populated ghost towns: skeletons of multi-storey housing structures, networks of wide asphalted streets and unconnected street lamps lining car parks that end in fields, rows of benches overlooking empty ponds and half-inhabited apartment blocks with bricked-up basements of shops that have never opened their doors. How can you feel attached to such a place, if you are allocated one of these new flats by the social housing lottery? How must it feel to live in a half-finished urbanized landscape, next to skeletons of buildings and cranes that have stood still for years and are slowly beginning to decay? What must it be like to have bought one of these semi-detached homes with fields at the back and a water feature at the front, where the proud owners end up living without neighbours? What can you hold onto in these wastelands of architectural surplus? Will the mutilated landscape ever merge with the built structures that consume it? Or is the clash of the two, and the aesthetics of their discordant encounter already a condition of our post-modern existence? On this periphery of peripheries, the large car parks of IKEA, do-it-yourself mega-stores and 24/7 supermarkets hint at unlimited consumption and wellbeing. The rural has lost its rurality, but the urban has not yet acquired urbanity. Vestiges of dry but colourful vegetation, plains and hills rub shoulders with unfinished concrete structures, empty walled courtyards and fenced-off wasteland for sale. Faced with the consequences of these unbridled expansionist urban policies, surely the big question is “What comes next?” Is there any idea of how to deal with what has already left harmful traces?

JUNKET URBANISM FOR TWO

15

These questions remain unanswered, and apparently no lessons have been learned. With the question of the future of these ghost towns still in the air, the land beyond their unfinished skeletons was already being gambled for more. Valdecarros seemed to be one of the options to bring Eurovegas within reach of the Spanish capital. The investor called for 1,000 hectares of development land, and the offers soon came, from Barcelona, too, triggering a game of urbanistic poker fired by the eternal rivalry of the two cities, long since of national impact. Barcelona, the Catalan metropolis that claims to be Spain’s leading smart city, a resourceful, productive, selfsufficient urban agglomeration, also envisioned the mega-casino project as an economic paradise and a solution to the ongoing

12

15 A junket is a person or firm, some of which are listed in the NASDAQ index, whose work consists in approaching rich casino gamblers, paying for their expenses, financing their bets and making sure they pay their debts. Explained in: “Duelo a 300.000 la apuesta.” In: El País. Madrid, 11.6.2013.


TRAS EL BOOM DEL LADRILLO

siguiendo los Programas de Actuación Urbanística (PAU); amplios territorios rurales se transformaron en nuevas ciudades dormitorio, cuyas bajas densidades y amplios espacios abiertos hacía muy poco adecuadas para desarrollar actividades comunes. Estas nuevas ciudades, de diseño más bien hostil y antiurbano, que de alguna manera recuerdan a los tejidos urbanos prefabricados de principios del siglo XX o a los complejos de viviendas construidos en los tiempos de Franco, se expanden de forma dispersa por el paisaje. La invasión del mundo rural fue todo un símbolo de este expansionismo urbano carente de escrúpulos. La más grande de estas urbanizaciones, Vallecas, preveía la construcción de 28.000 nuevos apartamentos. La extensión de Valdecarros, una especie de gigantesco PAU, aún más alejado del centro en dirección sureste, consistía en la construcción de 48.000 apartamentos, un nuevo centro de negocios y varios parques de atracciones. Ahora, con las obras paralizadas, se ha convertido en un involuntario monumento urbano al post boom inmobiliario. Terminado el frenesí constructor, han quedado ciudades espectrales inacabadas y muy escasamente pobladas: esqueletos de complejos de apartamentos de múltiples pisos, redes de anchas calles asfaltadas que no se dirigen a ninguna parte y farolas que nunca alumbran, junto con aparcamientos vacíos que se transforman sin solución de continuidad en campos de cultivo, hileras de bancos que miran a estanques sin agua, y bloques de apartamentos medio vacíos cuyas plantas bajas, selladas con ladrillo, nunca han albergado una tienda. De ganar una familia una de estas viviendas en la lotería, ¿podría llegar a sentir apego por un lugar tan desolado? ¿Cómo debe ser vivir en una casa adosada en medio de un paisaje semiurbanizado, junto a esqueletos de construcciones y grúas que llevan años corroyéndose, prácticamente sin vecinos, con los inmensos campos por horizonte? ¿Se integrará un día el paisaje mutilado con las estructuras prefabricadas que lo han consumido? ¿O la estética de este encuentro tan poco harmónico ya se ha convertirtido en una condición de nuestra existencia postmoderna? En esta periferia de las periferias, tras el gran aparcamiento de IKEA, los gigantescos almacenes donde se compra de todo y los supermercados 24/7 prometen un consumo y un bienestar ilimitados. El ámbito rural ha perdido su ruralidad, mientras que lo urbano aún no tiene rasgos de urbanidad. La vegetación agreste y colorida de la meseta se asoma por las plantas bajas de las estructuras de cemento inacabadas, patios vacíos amurallados, o tierras de nadie valladas en venta. En vista de los resultados, acaso la cuestión principal no debería ser: ¿y ahora qué? ¿Qué hacer con los huellas que han dejado tras de sí las políticas urbanas expansionistas?

URBANISMO

15

No obstante, no se aprendió de los errores. Cuando aún no se habían encontrado respuestas para resolver el futuro de estas ciudades desiertas, se decidió apostar los terrenos situados

15 Un junket es una persona o empresa intermediaria, algunas de ellas incluso cotizan en el índice estadounidense de NASDAQ, cuyo trabajo consiste en captar a jugadores adinerados, hacerse cargo de sus viajes, su alojamiento y otros gastos o caprichos, financiar sus apuestas y encargarse de que abonen sus deudas. Explicado en: “Duelo a 300.000 la apuesta.” En: El País. Madrid, 11.6.2013.


CITIES IN CRISIS

financial crisis. Accordingly, it staked highly on the gambling table. This represents a trend of the first decade of the 21st century, which saw the city proclaiming further extension and promotion of the tourist industry and event-oriented architecture of consumerism as motors for urban development. The ongoing competition with Madrid is another driving force. At the same time, the city’s planning apparatus offers few urbanistic tools with which to prevent the total commercialization of the city and the loss of its reputation as a compact, socially-oriented and integrative city. In the innovation district of 22@ and in a broader framework of large-scale urban renewal on its eastern edge, Barcelona is, on paper, planning a mix of functions. Reality, however, shows that real-estate developers still prefer to separate housing and offices.16 As a result, brownfields, underprivileged neighbourhoods and liminal territories are eliminated and replaced by business parks and large singlefunction housing developments that remain unfinished or partly abandoned. Highly indebted banks have taken over ownership from indebted and unemployed former inhabitants, and what seemed to be a suburban promise and the urban expression of a welfare state has suddenly become the physical representation of a social drama.

THE BARCELONA OPTION For the construction of the macro-casino, Barcelona was even prepared to sacrifice the last remaining farmland and truly self-sufficient reserves. The Prat de Llobregat delta in the west of the metropolitan area, selected to compete with Madrid’s hinterland for the installation of the casino complex, betrays its ecological and regional significance in its name: the Llobregat river meadow. This area of 3,350 hectares, apart from being a natural resource, a strategic wetland and the site of a major aquifer, produces 15% of Catalonia’s entire agricultural production: 22,000 tonnes of vegetables a year.17 It is home to micro-industries with 1,500 agriculture-related jobs and is an important natural resource within the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Faced with the American magnate’s interest in setting up the European Las Vegas on this land, the Catalan Government did not hesitate to commission a local architecture practice to reclassify the land and turn farmland into buildings for gambling and tax-evading leisure activities. In terms of tourism and a productive economy, “Catalonia aims to be the Massachusetts of Europe”, said the head of the President’s Office in an open letter that came as a response to critical voices and declared that it would be irresponsible of the Catalan government not to study this “great opportunity” with respect to the “volume of tourists” it could attract.18 The choice of El Prat nonetheless reduces the whole concept of landscape productivity to absurdity. It neglects the richness and

14

16 17 18

Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin: op. cit. (2012), p. 223. Plataforma Aturem Eurovegas: Salvem el Delta del Llobregat. Barcelona 2012, p. 2. Joan Vidal de Ciurana in an official letter issued by the Generalitat de Catalunya, Office of the President, 12.8.2012


JUNKET PARA DOS CIUDADES EN CRISIS

más allá de las grúas y de los edificios a medio terminar. El inversor exigía, como condición sine qua non, 1.000 hectáreas edificables. Valdecarros se erigió en una de las opciones para acercar Eurovegas a Madrid. Con la entrada en liza de Barcelona, empezaba una partida de póker urbanística de alcance nacional, agudizada por la competición que libran las dos ciudades. Barcelona, la metrópolis catalana que se considera a sí misma la smart city de España, una aglomeración ubana productiva, autosuficiente e inventiva, vio en este proyecto un paraíso económico y una solución para la crisis económica, por lo que puso todos sus recursos sobre la mesa de apuestas, fiel a la tendencia seguida en la primera década del siglo XXI, en la cual Barcelona se ha expandido y ha promocionado ante todo la industria del turismo, con una arquitectura consumista organizada en torno a eventos como fuerza propulsora. Por otro lado, el aparato de planificación de la ciudad ofrece pocas herramientas ubanísticas que impidan la total comercialización de la ciudad y el deterioro de su reputación como ciudad compacta, dotada de sensibilidad social e integradora.            Tanto en el distrito tecnológico 22@ como su ámbito de renovación urbana a gran escala al este de la ciudad, Barcelona apuesta, sobre el papel, por una diversificación de funciones. Sin embargo, la realidad muestra que los promotores inmobiliarios siguen prefiriendo separar los edificios destinados a viviendas de los bloques destinados a oficinas16. En consecuencia, han desaparecido antiguas zonas industriales, barrios desfavorecidos y tierras de nadie, y en su lugar se han construido parques de negocios y promociones monofuncionales de apartamentos que, o bien no están terminados, o se encuentran en un estado de semiabandono. Las viviendas de los propietarios endeudados y sin empleo han pasado a manos de bancos a su vez muy endeudados. Lo que pretendía ser una promesa suburbana y la expresión urbana del éxito económico se ha convertido en la representación física de un drama social.

LA OPCIÓN BARCELONA

Para conseguir el macrocasino, Barcelona debía sacrificar sus últimas reservas agrícolas realmente autosuficientes. El mismo nombre del delta del Prat de Llobregat, el territorio elegido para derrotar a Madrid, indica su relevancia ecológica y regional: prado del río Llobregat. Esta área de 3.350 hectáreas, además de ser un humedal estratégico y una zona de protección para un acuífero de vital importancia, produce con sus 22.000 toneladas anuales de vegetales el 15% de la producción agrícola de Catalunya17. Además, alberga a microindustrias relacionadas con la agricultura que generan 1.500 puestos de trabajo, y es un importante recurso natural del área metropolitana de Barcelona. Ante el interés del magnate estadounidense por implantar el modelo Las Vegas en Europa en este territorio, el gobierno catalán no dudó en encargar a un despacho de arquitectos local la recalificación de los terrenos que lo componen para facilitar su transformación en una región 16 17

Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin: op. cit. (2012), p. 223. Plataforma Aturem Eurovegas: Salvem el Delta del Llobregat. Barcelona 2012, p. 2.


multi-layered logics of a working landscape which, as Tony Hiss writes of a similar territory in Queens, “makes it possible for you to feel in this particular place that, whatever has happened to the world in the last half century, right here you’re still standing inside the boundaries of an ancient and abundantly productive region of working countryside”.19 It also leads to an extreme conflict between the role of local production and cities’ increasing tendency to “[transform] themselves into platforms of production for the global economy.”20

B FOR THE STRIP

A PLAN

Initially, the proximity to local and transnational infrastructures like Barcelona’s port and airport seemed to be a decisive plus, but it turned out to be an obstacle: the creation of a strip lined with high-rises would not be possible in El Prat, due to its location in the airport’s entry lane. This prompted the entrance of the municipality of Montcada i Reixac into the game as plan B for “the strip”. A vaguely defined area, revealed by a glance at the map as the only available space in this densely urbanized industrial hinterland, stretches out beyond an industrial complex and goes by the beautiful name of Pla de Rocamora. It was hard to imagine an ultra-modern strip of skyscrapers and vast casinos replacing the beaten paths of that Mediterranean landscape and transforming it into a gambling city.

THE DELIRIOUS GAMBLE HAS BEGUN

Finally, in early September 2012, Madrid was chosen by the American investor, winning the game over the project. After a long and obscure dispute between Valdecarros and the alternative location of Alcorcón, the American magnate chose the latter as the largest uninterrupted territory just ten minutes away from the centre of Madrid. The local government had offered whatever was requested: unlimited building heights for the complex’s skyscrapers (in a second phase, completed in 15 years, it would host Spain’s tallest skyscrapers), a new highspeed train stop and perhaps a new airport. “We will change any urban planning regulations that need changing”, said Madrid’s Councillor for Justice in a television interview early in 2012.21 Instead of taking this defeat as proof of its stricter respect for legislation and concentrating on criteria of sustainability and new opportunities for resourceful landscape urbanism, Barcelona presented another phantasmagorical project the very next day: Barcelona World, located in the province of Tarragona, was to be financed and run by a businessman who had made his fortune in the real-estate bubble and convinced the son of a Chinese magnate to invest in this counter-response to Eurovegas that will include six theme parks and several hotel complexes with a total of 12,000 rooms.22

16

19 Hiss, Tony: The Experience of Place. Alfred A. Knopf, New York 1990, p. 107. 20 Smith, Neil: op. cit., p. 39. 21 “Aguirre tocará las normas urbanísticas que haya que tocar para lograr el casino.” In: El País, Madrid edition, 31.1.2012. 22 In the first week of abril 2014, “BCN World” was agreed as a future reality in the Catalan Parliament. The two political parties Convergencia i Unió (CIU) and the Catalan Socialist Party (PSC) agrees on a legislation change to favour the gambling business. This change implies to reduce the tax on gambling winnings to 10%, to reduce the “urbanistic limitations” and to allow gambling on credit, under the condition that these measures will “reactivate the Catalan economy”. See: Ara (2014): “La sociovergència aposta per BCN World”. 31.3.2014. “Starting to move earth


VALDECARROS

BEYOND THE SKELETONS OF MAS ALLÁ DE LOS ESQUELETOS DE


Approximate location of Eurovegas according to El País Ubicación aproximada de Eurovegas según El País Approximate scale 1 : 5.000 Escala aproximada 1 : 5.000


especializada en el ocio y la evasión fiscal. En cuanto a turismo y economía productiva , “Catalunya quiere ser la Massachusetts de Europa”, afirmó el jefe de prensa de la Presidencia en una carta abierta en respuesta a las voces críticas, y declaró que el gobierno catalán sería irresponsable si no estudiase esta “gran oportunidad” de atraer un importante “volumen de turistas”18. La elección de El Prat reduce el concepto de productividad del paisaje al absurdo. Menosprecia la riqueza y multifacética lógica de un paisaje productivo que, como escribe Tony Hiss sobre Queens, un territorio comparable de Estados Unidos, “te hace sentir que, en este lugar en particular, independientemente de lo que haya ocurrido en los últimos 50 años, te hallas en una región con una economía funcional muy antigua y muy productiva”19. Y ha provocado un conflicto muy grave entre el papel que juega la producción local y la paulatina apuesta de las ciudades por “transformarse en plataformas de producción de la economía global”20.

B PARA THE STRIP PLAN

Al principio, parecía que la cercanía de infraestructuras locales y transnacionales como el puerto o el aeropuerto de Barcelona iba a ser una ventaja decisiva, pero pronto se convirtió en un obstáculo: la legislación europea no permitía crear un strip de rascacielos frente a las pistas del aeropuerto de El Prat. Fue entonces cuando el municipio de Montcada i Reixac, el plan B, entró en la partida. El Pla de Rocamora, un área de contornos más bien indefinidos es, según el mapa, la única zona disponible en el densamente poblado extrarradio de Barcelona, y se extiende detrás de una fábrica de cemento. Cuesta imaginar una hilera de rascacielos ultramodernos y de mastodónticos casinos en este castigado paisaje mediterráneo.

LA DELIRANTE PARTIDA HA EMPEZADO

Por fin, a comienzos de septiembre de 2012, Madrid ganó la partida. Tras una larga y opaca disputa entre Valdecarros y la localidad alternativa de Alcorcón, Adelson se inclinó por la segunda opción, por ser el territorio ininterrumpido más extenso y distar tan solo diez minutos del centro de Madrid. El ayuntamiento se plegó a todas las exigencias del magnate estadounidense: no habría limitaciones en cuanto a la altura, de manera que, en una segunda fase de construcción que iba a durar 15 años, el complejo podría presumir de los rascacielos más altos de España. También se abriría una estación para el tren de alta velocidad, y seguramente un nuevo eropuerto. “Vamos a tocar las normas urbanísticas que haya que tocar”, subrayaba a principios de 2012 el consejero de justicia de Madrid en declaraciones a un canal de televisión21. En lugar de considerar que su derrota era la prueba de que en Catalunya la legislación se toma más en serio y de darle la vuelta a la tortilla proclamando las ventajas de la sostenibilidad y de las oportunidades que ofrece un ingenioso urbanismo de paisajes, Barcelona se desquitó presentando otro proyecto fantasmagórico

18 Joan Vidal de Ciurana en una carta oficial emitida por la Generalitat de Catalunya, Oficina del President, 12.8.2012. 19 Hiss, Tony: The Experience of Place. Alfred A. Knopf, New York 1990, p. 107. 20 Smith, Neil: op. cit., p. 39. 21 “Aguirre tocará las normas urbanísticas que haya que tocar para lograr el casino.” En: El País, Madrid edition, 31.1.2012.


Meanwhile, changes to land legislation were being pushed through in the autonomous region of Madrid—even the smoking laws were to be revised—to bring the vast plains beyond the old village centre of Alcorcón closer to a 6-17 billion investment, 72,000 jobs and another 15,000 in its construction, which required, in return, legal changes in the admission of foreign labour and the prevention of money laundering, social security exemptions, free availability of public land and the relocation of a large existing rubbish dump.

LEAVING EUROVEGAS. ON THE LIMITS OF EXPANSION AND UTOPIA 23

Alcorcón, the land that was likened to the Mojave Desert for nearly two years, now stands for unfulfilled promises and the failure of the project. By December 2013, the game was suddenly over. It was reported in the press that Las Vegas Sands had asked for exemption from legislative changes or compensation for them, conditions to which the Spanish government simply could not agree. “We do not see a way to continue this large-scale development”, declared Adelson in a press statement in midDecember. He abandoned Madrid with the words: “Developing integrated resorts in Europe has been a vision of mine for years, but there is a time and place for everything and right now our focus is on encouraging Asian countries, like Japan and Korea, to dramatically enhance their tourism offering through the development of integrated resorts there.”24 Suddenly, Eurovegas has become a dystopia, and the ultra-modern future has disintegrated into territorial debris under the pressure of empty words. “Such a superiority, such an originality, made the moderns think they were free from the ultimate restrictions that might limit their expansion. Century after century, colonial empire after colonial empire, the poor premodern collectives were accused of making a horrible mishmash of things and humans, of objects and signs, while their accusers finally separated them totally—to remix them on a scale unknown until now”, writes Bruno Latour.25 Spain, thriving for eternal modernization, has blindly served as a territorial laboratory for the American investor. In this sense, it changed places with its former colonies, vast parts of American territories, and marked the start of another period in this new era of recolonization, determined by the limits of capitalism and the challenges of globalization. Looking out over the grain fields beyond Alcorcón, with your back to the precarious structures of a decade of rampant capitalism, you can once again admire the power of simulacra and the imagination of the unknown scale. We might wonder what was more surprising: the blind belief in simulating wellbeing by repeating the failed logics of a recent past or the

18

after the summer and begin the construction in the last semester of 2015 (...), so that the first of the six resorts -1.100 hotel rooms, a commercial area and casinos- would open at the very end of 2017 (...).” See: La Vanguardia (2014): “Los promotores de BCN World esperan abrir el primer ‘resort’ el 2018”. 2.4.2014. 23 Members of the Aturem Eurovegas platform designed an alternative film poster, alluding to Leaving Las Vegas: “Leaving EuroVegas. A hate story”. On: http://aturemeurovegas.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/leaving_eurovegas-copy.jpg 24 Adelson, Sheldon, quoted in: “El Gobierno rechaza las peticiones de Adelson para instalar Eurovegas”. In: El País, 13.12.2013. 25 Latour, Bruno: We have Never Been Modern. Harvard University Press, Cambridge/ Massachusetts 1993, p. 38.


solo un día después de anunciarse la decisión: se llamará Barcelona World, estará situado en la provincia de Tarragona y lo financiará un hombre de negocios que ha amasado su fortuna durante la burbuja inmobiliaria y que ha persuadido al hijo de un magnate chino para que invierta en esta respuesta a Eurovegas. El proyecto incluye seis parques temáticos y varios complejos hoteleros, con un total de 12.000 habitaciones22. Al mismo tiempo, se aprobaban modificaciones en la legislación del suelo de la Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid y se flexibilizaba la ley sobre el tabaco. Todo ello, para llevar a las vastas planicies que se extienden alrededor de la antigua villa de Alcorcón la inversión de entre 6 y 17 mil millones de euros, con la creación de 72.000 empleos y otros 15.000 adicionales para la construcción, la presencia de los cuales exigiría también modificar la legislación sobre la admisión de mano de obra extranjera, el manual de prevención del lavado de capital, exenciones en la cotización a la seguridad social, la libre disponibilidad del espacio público y el traslado de un gran vertedero municipal.

LEAVING EUROVEGAS, O DE LOS LÍMITES DE LA EXPANSIÓN Y LA UTOPÍA

23

Alcorcón, la región que durante casi dos años quiso ser el desierto del Mojave, simboliza tanto las promesas incumplidas como el fracaso del proyecto. En diciembre de 2013, el espejismo terminó. La prensa informó que Las Vegas Sands había pedido que todas sus inversiones quedarían protegidas ante qualquier ulterior modificación legislativa – exigencias que el gobierno de España no estaba en condiciones de aceptar. “No vemos cómo podemos llevar a cabo este proyecto a gran escala”, afirmó Adelson en una declaración de prensa a mediados de diciembre. Abandonó Madrid con estas palabras: “Ha sido mi idea personal durante años, pero hay un tiempo y un lugar para todo, y en este momento nuestra atención se dirige a Asia, a Japón o Corea, para mejorar nuestra oferta turística mediante el desarrollo de complejos integrados”24. De pronto, Eurovegas se ha convertido en una distopía, y el futuro ultramoderno que invocaban palabras vacías de contenido se ha desintegrado en un territorio de deshechos. “Esta superioridad, esta originalidad, llevó a los modernos a creer que se habían liberado de las últimas restricciones que limitaban su expansión. Siglo tras siglo, imperio colonial tras imperio colonial, los colectivos premodernos pobres fueron acusados de realizar una mezcolanza horrible de las cosas y los humanos, de los objetos y los signos, mientras que sus acusadores finalmente los separararon por completo, para remezclarlos después a una escala desconocida hasta entonces”, escribe Bruno Latour25.

22 En la primera semana de abril de 2014, el Parlament de Catalunya pacta “BCN World” como una futura realidad. Convergència i Unió (CIU) y el Partit dels Socialistes de Catalunya (PSC) acuerdan un cambio legislativo para favorecer el negocio del juego: se reduce el impuesto al juego a un 10%, se rebajan las “limitaciones urbanísticas” y se permite el juego a crédito, a cambio de “reactivar la economía catalana”. Ver: Ara (2014): La sociovergència aposta per BCN World. 31.3.2014. “Comenzar a mover terrenos tras el verano e iniciar las obras de construcción el último semestre de 2015 (...), con lo que el primero de los seis resorts —1.100 plazas hoteleras, con zona comercial y casinos— abriría muy a finales de 2017 (...):” Ver: La Vanguardia (2014): “Los promotores de BCN World esperan abrir el primer ‘resort’ el 2018.” 2.4.2014. 23 Integrantes de la plataforma cívica Aturem Eurovegas diseñaron un póster de pelicula alternativo, haciendo alusión a Leaving Las Vegas: “Leaving EuroVegas. A hate story”. On: http://aturemeurovegas.files.wordpress. com/2012/03/leaving_eurovegas-copy.jpg 24 Adelson, Sheldon, citado en: “El Gobierno rechaza las peticiones de Adelson para instalar Eurovegas”. En: El País, 13.12.2013. 25 Latour, Bruno: We have Never Been Modern. Harvard University Press, Cambridge/ Massachusetts 1993, p. 38.


phantasmagorical project itself. Did we really want and imagine mega-casinos, golf courses and speculative architectures to exploit both those who work there and the territory? Are we not, in fact, facing “the desert of the real itself”?26

REFE RENCES Ara (2014): “La sociovergència aposta per BCN World”. 31.3.2014.

Augé, Marc (1999): An Anthropology for Contemporaneous Worlds. Stanford University Press, Stanford. Baudrillard, Jean (1994): Simulacra and Simulation. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor. de Solà-Morales, Ignasi (2002): Territorios. Gustavo Gili, Barcelona.

Easterling, Keller (2005): Enduring Innocence. Global architecture and its political masquerades. MIT Press, Cambridge/ Massachusetts. El Mundo (2012): “Aguirre: Eurovegas estará en marcha en 2-3 años desde que se coloque la primera piedra.” 9.9.2012. El País (2012): “Aguirre tocará las normas urbanísticas que haya que tocar para lograr el casino.” 31.1.2012. El País (2013a): “Duelo a 300.000 la apuesta.” 11.6.2013. El País (2013b): “El Gobierno rechaza las peticiones de Adelson para instalar Eurovegas.” 13.12.2013. Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin (2012): “Formen der Mixicidad und Segregation in Spanien.” In: Soziale Mischung in der Stadt. Harlander, Tilman/ Kuhn, Gerd (Eds.), Krämer, Stuttgart, pp. 220-225. Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin (2013): “You can imagine the opposite. Terminological reflections on ephemeral architecture.” In: Moinopolis. Ephemerality and Architecture. Moinopolis Laboratory of Thoughts on Spatial Matters (Ed.), Mannheim, pp. 30-39. Herreros, Juan (2009): “De la periferia al centro. La ciudad en tiempos de crisis.” In: Alfaya, Luciano/ Muñiz, Patricia (Ed.): La ciudad, de nuevo global. Santiago de Compostela, pp. 251265. Hiss, Tony (1990): The Experience of Place. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. La Vanguardia (2013): “Eurovegas comenzará a construirse este año en los terrenos de Alcorcón.” 9.2.2013. La Vanguardia (2014): “Los promotores de BCN World esperan abrir el primer ‘resort’ el 2018”. 2.4.2014. Ministerio de Vivienda (Ed.) (2010): Informe sobre la situación del sector de la vivienda en España. Madrid. Plataforma Aturem Eurovegas (2012): Salvem el Delta del Llobregat. Barcelona. Smith, Neil (2007): “Revanchist City, Revanchist Planet.” In: Urban Politics Now. Re-Imagining Democracy in the Neoliberal City. BAVO (Eds.), NAi, Rotterdam, pp. 30-42.

20

26

Baudrillard, Jean: Simulacra and Simulation. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor 1994, p.1.


España, aspirando a una modernización perpetua, se ha prestado ciegamente a ser el laboratorio territorial del inversor norteamericano. Ha recuperado la función que en otros tiempos interpretaron sus inmensas colonias del continente americano, con lo que inaugura una nueva era de recolonización determinada por los límites del capitalismo y los retos de la globalización. Cuando miramos los campos de cereales que se extienden en las afueras Alcorcón, más allá de las precarias construcciones levantadas en una década de capitalismo desenfrenado, nos damos cuenta del poder que ejercen los simulacros y la imaginación a una escala desconocida hasta la fecha. Uno no sabe de qué sorprenderse más: de la confianza ciega que tenemos en la simulación de la prosperidad, en repetir las lógicas fracasadas del pasado reciente; o del carácter puramente espectral del proyecto. ¿Realmente deseábamos tantos megacasinos y campos de golf? ¿Acaso no explotan estas arquitecturas especulativas tanto al territorio como a los que en él trabajan? ¿No nos hallamos, de hecho, ante “el desierto de lo real” 26?

REFE RENCIAS Ara (2014): “La sociovergència aposta per BCN World”. 31.3.2014.

Augé, Marc (1999): An Anthropology for Contemporaneous Worlds. Stanford University Press, Stanford. Baudrillard, Jean (1978): Cultura y simulacro. Editorial Kairós, Barcelona. Trad. de Antoni Vicens y Pedro Rovira.   de Solà-Morales, Ignasi (2002): Territorios. Gustavo Gili, Barcelona.   Easterling, Keller (2005): Enduring Innocence. Global architecture and its political masquerades. MIT Press, Cambridge/ Massachusetts.   El Mundo (2012): “Aguirre: Eurovegas estará en marcha en 2-3 años desde que se coloque la primera piedra”. 9.9.2012.   El País (2012): “Aguirre tocará las normas urbanísticas que haya que tocar para lograr el casino”. 31.1.2012.   El País (2013a): “Duelo a 300.000 la apuesta”. 11.6.2013.   El País (2013b): “El Gobierno rechaza las peticiones de Adelson para instalar Eurovegas”. 13.12.2013.   Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin (2012): “Formen der Mixicidad und Segregation in Spanien”. En: Soziale Mischung in der Stadt. Harlander, Tilman/ Kuhn, Gerd (Eds.), Krämer, Stuttgart, pp. 220-225.   Golda-Pongratz, Kathrin (2013): “You can imagine the opposite. Terminological reflections on ephemeral architecture”. En: Moinopolis Journal. Ephimerality and Architecture. Moinopolis Laboratory of Thoughts on Spatial Matters (Ed.), Mannheim, pp. 30-39. Herreros, Juan (2009): “De la periferia al centro. La ciudad en tiempos de crisis.” In: Alfaya, Luciano/ Muñiz, Patricia (Ed.): La ciudad, de nuevo global. Santiago de Compostela, pp. 251-265. Hiss, Tony (1990): The Experience of Place. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. La Vanguardia (2013): “Eurovegas comenzará a construirse este año en los terrenos de Alcorcón.” 9.2.2013. La Vanguardia (2014): “Los promotores de BCN World esperan abrir el primer ‘resort’ el 2018”. 2.4.2014. Ministerio de Vivienda (Ed.) (2010): Informe sobre la situación del sector de la vivienda en España. Madrid. Plataforma Aturem Eurovegas (2012): Salvem el Delta del Llobregat. Barcelona. Smith, Neil (2007): “Revanchist City, Revanchist Planet.” In: Urban Politics Now. Re-Imagining Democracy in the Neoliberal City. BAVO (Eds.), NAi, Rotterdam, pp. 30-42.

26

Baudrillard, Jean: Cultura y simulacro. Editorial Kairós, Barcelona 1978, p. 9f.


22


Carles Guerra

INFINITE SPACE, ETERNAL DEBT ESPACIO INFINITO, DEUDA ETERNA


INFINITE SPACE, ETERNAL DEBT

Over the last decade, Madrid has grown as Chinese cities do. It has become Asian in scale. The old neighbourhood of Vallecas has spread like a concrete tongue that hangs over the south. And although Madrid has not yet used up all its territory, that tongue could be a symbol of an exhausted metropolis. This city without natural boundaries, without anything to limit its growth, was only brought to a halt by the collapse of the property bubble. Madrid is still surrounded by the fields of the central plateau. Now, the promise of continuous growth has been replaced by infinite debt. In Spain, housing and urban space are destined to be linked to the credit economy for decades to come. As Maurizio Lazzarato would say, when this debt circulates through the system it turns into a market asset, it becomes eternal.1 The empty apartments in the Ensanche de Vallecas may be uninhabited, but they still generate profit on the debt market. Their image is that of the spectre of a capital that is constantly moving from one place to another, without the need for a fixed abode. But we should bear in mind that during those years of wild speculation Madrid became a hypertrophic city. It resisted all attempts to mould it. The momentum of the economy gave a leading role to engineers such as those who buried Madrid’s most emblematic motorway, the M-30 which has shaped the city in the absence of an identity. Unlike Barcelona, which has been kept in check by the Plan Cerdà (1859) and by a geography that confines it between the mountains and the sea, Madrid spilled over successive urban development plans in the twentieth century. Since the Plan Castro in 1860 the Spanish capital has refused to submit to an overall plan. The most recent design competition for the construction of the Linear Park of the Manzanares River was awarded to an interpretative project. The MRIO team determined its main lines of action based on a strategy that does not have predetermined answers.2 As one of the architects in the team said, “Madrid rejects any project that attempts to impose forms on it.”3 In the wake of this process, the areas surrounding cities don’t just have a favoured relationship to urban growth, they are also the new horizon for financial capital. Bruno Latour has already suggested that the former distinction between “first nature” –the nature we live in– and “second nature” –which has been created by capital– has been reversed.4 Now, second nature is where we live. The economy dictates the conditions that create our habitat, and leaves no possibility of counteracting it with a first nature. In a sense this is so because we have naturalised the environment produced by the economy. Or as French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard put it, the landscape used to surround the factory, but now a factory surrounds the landscape.5 And so, in the eyes of capital, the spaces that surround a growing city are

24

1 Maurizio Lazzarato, The Making of the Indebted Man. Essay on the Neoliberal Condition. Los Angeles: Semiotext(e), 2011. 2 The Linear Park of the Manzanares River is an urban plan by the MRIO team of architects. Team Director: Ginés Garrido. Design team: Burgos & Garrido, Porras & La Casta, Rubio & Álvarez (Madrid) and West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture (Rotterdam). 3 Carles Guerra, “Salir de Madrid” in Cultura/s - La Vanguardia, 2 May 2007. 4 Bruno Latour, “The Affects of Capitalism”. Lecture given at The Royal Academy Lecture in the Humanities and Social Sciences in Copenhagen on 26 February 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i-ZKfShovs. Retrieved 20 March 2014. 5 Jean-Luc Godard, Numéro deux (1975).


AGRICULTURA URBANA CONTRA CASINOS

EL PRAT DE LLOBREGAT

URBAN AGRICULTURE VERSUS CASINO CLUSTERS


Approximate location of Eurovegas according to El Peri贸dico Ubicaci贸n aproximada de Eurovegas seg煤n El Peri贸dico

Approximate scale 1 : 5.000 Escala aproximada 1 : 5.000


ESPACIO INFINITO, DEUDA ETERNA

A lo largo de la última década, Madrid ha crecido como las ciudades chinas. Ha adquirido una dimensión asiática. El antiguo barrio de Vallecas se ha extendido como una lengua de cemento que cuelga por el sur. Y aunque Madrid no ha agotado sus confines, esa lengua podría emblematizar una metrópolis exhausta. A esa ciudad sin fronteras naturales, sin un límite de crecimiento, sólo la detuvo el estallido de la burbuja inmobiliaria. Los campos de la meseta siguen rodeándola. Ahora, la promesa del crecimiento constante se ha visto reemplazada por una deuda infinita. En el Estado Español, el espacio urbano y la vivienda quedarán asociados a la economía del crédito durante décadas. Tal como diría Maurizzio Lazzarato, cuando esta deuda entra en circulación se convierte en una activo de los mercados, se hace eterna1. Los pisos vacíos del Ensanche de Vallecas, a pesar de no estar habitados, siguen deparando beneficios en el mercado de la deuda. Su imagen es el espectro de un capital que circula incesantemente de un lugar para otro, sin necesidad de domicilio fijo. Pero es necesario recordar que durante esos años de especulación salvaje, Madrid adquirió una dimensión hipertrófica. Ha sido imposible moldearla. Los impulsos de la economía trasladaron el protagonismo a los ingenieros, como esos que soterraron la M-30, la vía más emblemática que a falta de una identidad ha dado forma a la ciudad. A diferencia de Barcelona, una ciudad atenazada por el Plan Cerdà (1859) y su configuración geográfica que la encierra entre el mar y las montañas, Madrid ha desbordado los sucesivos planes urbanísticos del siglo XX. Desde los días del Plan Castro (1860), la capital se resiste a una planificación integral. El último de los grandes concursos para ejecutar las obras del Parque Lineal del Manzanares se resolvió con una propuesta interpretativa. El equipo MRIO definió sus principales líneas de acción en función de una estrategia sin respuestas predeterminadas2. Como dijo unos de los arquitectos responsables del equipo, “Madrid no permite ningún proyecto que le imponga formas”3. Tras este proceso, el territorio que rodea a las ciudades no sólo mantiene una relación especialmente privilegiada con el crecimiento urbano, sino que se convierte en el renovado horizonte del capital financiero. Bruno Latour ya ha sugerido que la antigua distinción entre una naturaleza de primer orden –aquella en la que vivimos– y una naturaleza de segundo orden –aquella otra creada por la economía del capital– han invertido posiciones4. Hoy la naturaleza de segundo orden es el espacio que habitamos. Las condiciones dictadas por la economía constituyen nuestro espacio vital, frente al cual no hay posibilidad de oponer una naturaleza de primer orden. En cierto modo, porque hemos naturalizado el entorno generado por la economía. 1 Maurizio Lazzarato, La fábrica del hombre endeudado. Ensayos sobre la condición neoliberal. Buenos Aires: Amorrortu, 2013. 2 El Parque Lineal del Manzanares ha sido un proyecto realizado por el equipo de arquitectos MRIO. 
Director del equipo: Ginés Garrido. Equipo de diseño: Burgos & Garrido, Porras & La Casta, Rubio & Álvarez (Madrid) y 
West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture (Rotterdam). 3 Carles Guerra, “Salir de Madrid” en Cultura/s - La Vanguardia, 2 de mayo de 2007. 4 Bruno Latour, “The Affects of Capitalism”. Conferencia impartida en The Royal Academy Lecture in the Humanities and Social Sciences en Copenhague el 26 de febrero de 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i-ZKfShovs. Consultado el 20 de marzo de 2014.


a stage for future possibilities. This land no longer belongs to the order of the natural, even if it still contains agricultural crops and all those things that we –apparently– associated with an Arcadia unsullied by urban exploitation.

A DEVALUED PRESENT

26

The photographic series that Kathrin Golda-Pongratz has produced in Alcorón and Valdecarros on the outskirts of Madrid and Prat de Llobregat in Barcelona can no longer be interpreted as areas bordering the city. An artichoke field, the horizon dotted with buildings, now proclaims an imminent transformation. The quality of these lands is pushed into the background by the valuation cycles that they are subject to. The pressure does not even come from their nearness to a city or to its staggering growth. These lands, which are used for mixed or residual purposes, or not used at all because they are simply waiting for the activation of their value on the property market, have already been absorbed into the second nature that Bruno Latour talks about. The drama of these territories is that they have been earmarked for future uses, confined by capital that strives for maximum profitability. Even if it means downgrading any current use to the status of non-productive. These lands are victim to the prospect of future earnings. The most striking consequence of this land management can be seen in the fact that the present has been devalued, along with the knowledge or know-how that goes with it. This devaluing is applied inexorably, doomed to impoverish the natural environments that had not yet been absorbed into the nature of the economy. And wiping out work in the process, together with all memory of earlier forms of exploitation. This is why these photographs focus on farm work, particularly on tasks that prepare the land for sowing: a technology that condenses knowledge but is nonetheless stigmatised and scorned as obsolescent. Compared to the enormous ghostly, disembodied production of financial capital, agriculture is still considered to be too close to the material realm. Its cycles are too unmanageable. One of the photographs of the fields in Prat de Llobregat shows a fig tree on the side of a road. In rural areas, fig trees symbolised farm ownership by offering free fruit as a way of welcoming passers-by. As such, they are reminders of the transition towards other forms of land ownership. In the countryside, a fig tree indicated a private property through the paradox of offering its fruits free of charge to anybody who approached its boundaries. In the photograph, however, the tree stands beside a fence made out of leftover bits of junk. The tree’s presence in the landscape has lost its capacity to signify. It has been alienated. The economy that is all around it deprives this tree of any power to practice the exception that it once embodied. It was an unspoken mechanism, an emblem of the coexistence of different notions of ownership. Something like what Bruce Chatwin recounted in the Songlines (1986), when he described how Australian aborigines inherited land rights that were passed down from generation to generation by means of songs that mentioned all kinds of landscape elements, some real and some imaginary.


O como dijo el cineasta francés Jean-Luc Godard, si antes “la naturaleza rodeaba a la fábrica”, hoy es al revés, “una fábrica rodea a la naturaleza”5. Lo que significa que los espacios que aún circundan una ciudad en expansión se contemplan como un escenario de posibilidades para el capital. Esos terrenos han dejado de pertenecer al orden de lo natural, aunque allí persistan cultivos agrícolas y todo aquello que –en apariencia– asociábamos a una arcadia alejada de la explotación urbana.

UN PRESENTE DES VALORIZA DO

Las series fotográficas que Kathrin Golda-Pongratz ha realizado en Alcorcón, Valdecarros y el Prat de Llobregat ya no pueden ser interpretadas como áreas limítrofes de la ciudad. Un campo de alcachofas con el horizonte salpicado de construcciones ha pasado a ser el anuncio de una transformación inminente. La calidad de estos territorios queda relegada por los ciclos de valorización a los que se someten. La presión ni siquiera procede de la cercanía de la ciudad y su apabullante crecimiento. Los terrenos que albergan usos heterogéneos o residuales, o que simplemente carecen de ellos porque están a la espera de que se catalice su valor inmobiliario, ya han sido absorbidos por la segunda naturaleza de la que hablaba Bruno Latour. El drama de esos terrenos es que han sido confinados a usos futuros, marcados por un capital que aspira a la mayor rentabilidad. Aunque para conseguirlo sea necesario degradar cualquier uso presente a algo improductivo. Esos terrenos son víctimas de una expectativa de ganancias futuras. La consecuencia más dramática de esta gestión del territorio se aprecia en un presente que ha sido desvalorizado y con él cualquier conocimiento o saber local. Una condición que se aplica de manera implacable, garantizando el empobrecimiento de los entornos naturales que no han sido asimilados por la naturaleza de la economía. Con ello también se extingue el trabajo y todo recuerdo de los procesos de explotación anteriores. De ahí la atención que estas series prestan a las labores del campo, en especial aquellas que moldean el terreno para ser cultivado. Una tecnología que, a pesar de acumular saber, se estigmatiza con el desprecio de la obsolescencia. Frente a una producción fantasmal, descorporeizada y pantagruélica como la del capital financiero, la agricultura aún resulta demasiado próxima al reino de lo material. Sus ciclos demasiado incontrolables. Una de las vistas de los campos del Prat de Llobregat muestra una higuera al lado de una calzada. En los ámbitos rurales este árbol ha simbolizado la propiedad agrícola mediante la gratuidad de sus frutos como una forma de dar la bienvenida a los transeúntes. Asimismo, la higuera recuerda la transición hacia otros modelos de propiedad del terreno. En un contexto rural, la higuera denotaba una propiedad privada a través de la paradoja que representa el ofrecimiento gratuito de sus frutos a cualquiera que se acercara a los límites de esa finca. Sin embargo, en la fotografía observamos ese árbol alineado con una verja construida con restos y desechos de chatarra. Su presencia en el

5

Jean-Luc Godard, Numéro deux (1975).


So much so that by the time the British wanted to take possession of the land, Chatwin says, it was like a plate of spaghetti.

ECONOMIC AND SIGNIC ABUNDANCE

While the territories portrayed in this book have not yet been physically occupied by buildings, they are already part of a new land valuation regime. In some cases the layout of the streets projects a virtual city. The potential uses of these lands that were initially conquered by building projects have been reduced, and urban laws loom on all fronts, further restricting the uses permitted in the interstices. Citizen by-laws spread their model of governance into zones that had not previously come under the domain of financial capital. In this sense, the photos show a time of waiting. As if the photographs were protecting these areas from a changing land use that is already on the way. For a few moments, the plans to build mega-casinos like Eurovegas in these areas on the outskirts of Barcelona and Madrid generated a highly unusual space-time relationship. It completely upset the scale by which land revaluations are usually measured. The possibility of these projects implied that within a certain period there would be spectacular capital gains, from nothing (given that capital does not contemplate the productivity of the activities that currently take place on those lands) to the fullest economic and signic abundance. After all, casinos are a sui generis laboratory of the speculative economy. For this reason, the emptiness that the photographs show is simply the future site of the new investments that force us to see the present us something unfinished, undervalued, and inefficient. Without a doubt, poor in comparison to any future possibility.

DESTRUC TION OF DESTRUC TION

Most of these images could be summed up as the persistence of a horizon, which will also change its meaning and at the same time become vertical, as befits the horizons of capitalism. But nonetheless, these series do not seek to postpone this moment. In fact, these photographs (contrary to the attributions of the medium) belong to the future rather than to a nostalgia for things that have been lost or are on the verge of being lost. Just as the views of Paris in the photographs of J. Eugène A. Atget (1857-1927) were not intended to transmit a yearning for the past, but to leave a record –in the face of the emergence of the new city– of a space that was inhabited and used in specific ways; a precedent within which to frame the new power of urbanisation. The photographs of Kathrin GoldaPongratz are helping to build up a historicity of the territory that may be important in a future that is shaping up to be amnesic. So that regardless what is written upon these lands or what is built on them, they will not appear to have been abandoned by the stories that criss-crossed it in the past. Before the capital gains come into being, we have to identify some of the qualities that these lands contained, and we shall create an inventory of traces of their earlier usage.

28


paisaje ha perdido la capacidad de significar. Ha sido enajenado. La economía que lo rodea priva este árbol de cualquier potencia para crear la excepción que antes encarnaba. Constituía un dispositivo tácito, emblema de la coexistencia de diferentes nociones de la propiedad. Algo parecido a lo que relataba Bruce Chatwin en the Songlines (1986), al recordar cómo los aborígenes australianos heredaban los derechos de la tierra de generación en generación mediante canciones que relataban un itinerario que citaba elementos muy dispares del paisaje, algunos reales y otros imaginarios. Hasta tal punto que, como dijo el escritor –y llegado el momento en que los británicos quisieron apropiarse de las tierras– aquello era lo más parecido a un plato de espaguetis.

ABUNDANCIA ECONÓMICA Y SÍGNICA Aunque los terrenos retratados en este libro aún no hayan sido ocupados por la construcción, ya han sido tomados por un nuevo régimen de valorización del suelo. En ciertos casos, los trazados de las calles erigen una ciudad virtual. Los usos potenciales de esos terrenos conquistados en primera instancia por un proyecto de construcción se han reducido y las leyes urbanas acechan desde todos los frentes, restringiendo aún más los usos permitidos en cualquiera de los intersticios. La normativa ciudadana extiende su modelo de gobierno hasta zonas que antes no pertenecían al dominio del capital financiero. En este sentido, las fotos muestran un tiempo de espera. Como si las fotografías protegieran esos terrenos de un cambio de usos anunciado. Las expectativas de ubicar macrocasinos como el de Eurovegas en esos lugares cercanos a Barcelona y Madrid generó, por unos instantes, una relación de espacio y tiempo del todo inusual. Hizo añicos la escala con la que habitualmente se podía medir la revalorización de los terrenos. La contingencia de esos proyectos planteaba un plazo controlado para hacer efectiva la plusvalía más espectacular, pasando de nada (ya que el capital no interpreta como algo productivo las actividades que ahora tienen lugar en esos terrenos) a un pleno de abundancia económica y sígnica. Un casino no deja de ser un laboratorio sui generis de la economía especulativa. Por eso, el vacío que presentan las fotos no es más que el lugar donde se acomodarían las nuevas inversiones que obligan a contemplar el presente como algo incompleto, infravalorado e ineficiente. A todas luces, pobre respecto a cualquier posibilidad futura.

DESTRUC CIÓN

La mayoría de esas imágenes podrían ser reducidas a la persistencia de un horizonte que también mudará de significado. A la vez que se volverá vertical, tal como corresponde a los horizontes del capitalismo. Sin embargo, aplazar ese momento no es el objetivo de estas series. De hecho, estas fotografías (contrariamente a las atribuciones propias de este medio) pertenecen al porvenir y no a la nostalgia de aquello perdido o de inminente desaparición. Del mismo modo que las vistas de París tomadas por el fotógrafo J. Eugène A. Atget (1857-1927) no fueron hechas para añorar el pasado sino para dejar constancia de un espacio habitado y circulado de manera específica ante


As Eyal Weizman says, it is the best way to document “the destruction of destruction.”6 What we see in these photographs has already been destroyed by the relentless projection of the economy, and is ready for the second wave of destruction. Atget’s fatalism –he was convinced that those nineteenth century urban landscapes of Paris would disappear– can now be countered by the positivism of a documentary practice in which photography is linked to academic research and to activist uses. The deficiencies of photography open the door to a new way of organising the work of representation. These photographs bring together different types of knowledge: they connect the techniques and methods of the new urbanism with the remains of a type of knowledge that is barely expressed, encrypted in a repertory of gestures that the photos document as if they were discourses inscribed onto the surface of the land. They are not just images of landscapes, but also a place from which to contemplate the unstoppable advance of the economy, but this time as “first nature”. In order to understand the processes and cycles that these quasi-urban undergo, documentary photography must grapple with a space and also a time. The time that this type of photography requires is the time of an economic cycle that unfolds like a geological force, transforming the landscape, requiring us to imagine a specific resistance.

30

6

Eyal Weizman, The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza. New York: Verso, 2011.


DESTRUC CIÓN

la emergencia de la nueva ciudad, un antecedente en el que inscribir el nuevo poder de la urbanización. Las fotos de Kathrin Golda-Pongratz están ayudando a dotar el territorio de una historicidad que pueda ser relevante en un futuro que se prevé amnésico. Que se escriba lo que se escriba sobre estos terrenos o se edifique lo que se edifique en ellos, el espacio no parezca que haya sido abandonado por todos los relatos que lo surcaron con anterioridad. Antes de que tomen forma las plusvalías habrá que identificar algunas de las cualidades que estas tierras encerraban, así como inventariar rastros de sus usos anteriores. Será como dice Eyal Weizman, la mejor manera de levantar acta de “la destrucción de la destrucción”6. Lo que vemos en esas fotografías ya ha sido destruido por la implacable proyección de la economía y está preparado para la segunda oleada de destrucción. El fatalismo de Atget –que sabía a ciencia cierta que aquellos pasajes urbanos del París del XIX desaparecerían– hoy puede ser contrarrestado por el positivismo de una práctica documental que asocia la fotografía con una investigación de corte académico y un uso de carácter activista. La insuficiencia de la fotografía es la ventana por la que se cuela una nueva forma de organizar el trabajo de la representación. Esas fotografías convocan diferentes tipos de saber: articulan las técnicas y métodos del nuevo urbanismo con los restos de un saber apenas expresado, cifrado en un repertorio de gestos que las fotos han documentado como si fueran discursos inscritos sobre la superficie del campo. Constituyen, más allá de las vistas de paisajes, un lugar desde el que pensar el incesante avance de la economía, pero esta vez como naturaleza de primer orden. Comprender los procesos y ciclos por los que atraviesan esos espacios casi urbanos exige un uso de la fotografía documental que se confronta tanto a un lugar como a un tiempo. El tiempo que requiere esta fotografía es el tiempo de un ciclo económico que se despliega como una fuerza geológica que altera el paisaje y frente al que hace falta imaginar una resistencia específica.

6

Eyal Weizman, The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza. New York: Verso, 2011.


32


WHERE THE DIE IS CAST DONDE LOS DADOS ESTÁN ECHADOS

ALCORCÓN


Approximate location of Eurovegas according to El País Ubicación aproximada de Eurovegas según El País Approximate scale 1 : 5.000 Escala aproximada 1 : 5.000


INDEX ÍnDICE

Kathrin Golda-Pongratz

LANDSCAPES OF PRESSURE PAISAJES DE PRESIÓN

1-22

Montcada I Reixac

A plan B for The Strip Un plan B para The Strip Beyond the skeletons of Valdecarros Más allá de los esqueletos de

Carles Guerra

INFINITE SPACE, ETERNAL DEBT ESPACIO INFINITO, DEUDA ETERNA 23-31

El Prat de Llobregat urban agriculture versus casino clusters agricultura urbana contra casinos

Alcorcón where the die is cast donde los dados están echados


Kathrin Golda-Pongratz is an architect and PhD in urban planning based in Barcelona. She is a professor of International Urbanism at Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences and a visiting professor at the Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería in Lima/ Peru. Her photographic œuvre is closely linked to her work as an architect and urban researcher. The project Landscapes of Pressure arises from the conviction that contemporary politics of land management respond to the logics of the global economy and consequently convert any territory within a metropolitan agglomeration into an object of speculation. Parts of this series has been at display at the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona in 2014. Kathrin Golda-Pongratz es arquitecta y doctora en urbanismo afincada en Barcelona. Es profesora de urbanismo internacional en la Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas de Frankfurt/ Alemania y profesora visitante en la Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería in Lima/ Perú. Su obra fotográfica está estrechamente relacionada con su trabajo como arquitecta y urbanista. El proyecto Paisajes de presión parte de la convicción de que las políticas de estructuración territorial responden principalmente a la lógica de la economía global y en consecuencia convierten cualquier territorio metropolitano en objeto de especulación. Partes de esta serie han sido expuestas en la Fundació Joan Miró de Barcelona en 2014.

Carles Guerra is an artist, art critic and freelance curator. He was formerly the director of La Virreina Centre de la Imatge and the chief curator of the Museu d‘Art Contemporani MACBA de Barcelona. His main research focus centres around postmedial documentation practices and cultural politics of the postfordist era. He is associate professor at at the Pompeu Fabra University of Barcelona. Carles Guerra es artista, crítico de arte y comisario independiente. Ha sido director de La Virreina Centre de la Imatge y Conservador Jefe del Museu d‘Art Contemporani de Barcelona. Sus principales líneas de investigación se han centrado en torno a las prácticas documentales postmedia y las políticas culturales del postfordismo. Es profesor asociado de la Universitat Pompeu Fabra.


credits créditos The author likes to thank Martina Millà, curator at the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona, for giving her a space to exhibit and discuss her work. La autora quiere agradecer a Martina Millà, comisaria de la Fundació Joan Miró de Barcelona, por haberle ofrecido un escpacio para exponer y discutir su trabajo. © Texts Textos Kathrin Golda-Pongratz / Carles Guerra Translations Traducciones Text of KGP into Spanish Texto de KGP al castellano Albiol Sunyer Proofreading Revisiones Elaine Fradley Text of Carles Guerra into English Texto de Carles Guerra al inglés Nuria Rodríguez © Photographs Fotografías Kathrin Golda-Pongratz All photographs are taken with a RolleiFlex T camera. Todas las fotografías están tomadas con una cámara RolleiFlex T. Scans & Image edition Edición de imágenes Xavi Alías, Ignasi López [lê_booqs] Maps Cartografías Marta Serra, Álex Cuesta, Ignasi López Book design Diseño editorial Ignasi López [lê_booqs] Book made in LATELIÉ (Caldes de Montbui) Printing & Binding Impresión y encuadernación SYL (Cornellà de Llobregat) Box Production Producción de la caja Creus Cal·lígraf (Caldes de Montbui)

ISBN: 978-84-616-9007-7 D.L.: B 11401-2014


01#pressured_landscapes This is the first book of the open collection #pressured_landscapes launched by Kathrin Golda-Pongratz & Ignasi López

Este libro es el núm 1 de la colección abierta #pressured_landscapes iniciada por Kathrin Golda-Pongratz & Ignasi López + info: www.pressured-landscapes.net

This book was printed and bound at SYL (Cornellà de Llobregat)

on Cyclus Offset, Coral Plus (Torras Papel) and SIRIO black papers. The employed font is Helvetica.

Este libro se terminó de imprimir y encuadernar en SYL (Cornellà de Llobregat). Se utilizaron los papeles Cyclus Offset, Coral Plus (Torras Papel) y SIRIO black, y los tipos Helvetica para el cuerpo de texto.

First edition, 600 books Primera edición, 600 libros Barcelona, Junio June 2014.

Collaboration Colaboración

lê_ booqs


Profile for LA BIBLIOGRÀFICA

Landscapes of Pressure  

Landscapes of Pressure by Kathrin Golda-Pongratz. Texts: Kathrin Golda-Pongratz, Carles Guerra. Design: Lê_Booqs. Finalist at FAD Awar...

Landscapes of Pressure  

Landscapes of Pressure by Kathrin Golda-Pongratz. Texts: Kathrin Golda-Pongratz, Carles Guerra. Design: Lê_Booqs. Finalist at FAD Awar...

Profile for le_books
Advertisement