Art section_LeCITYdeluxeUSA

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ART Markowicz Fine Art

APR-MAY 2014

111 NE 40th Street Miami, FL 33137 Phone: 305-308-6398 www.markowiczfineart.com

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Interview by Claudia Trimde//Marius Koller

Connie McSilver When Fantasy Seeps Into Reality

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pleasure of speaking to Connie McSilver and delving deep into her artistic process.

“I draw my inspiration from people around me” When did you realize that you want to be an artist? Let me tell you how I started this. This will go all the way to my grandmother. My grandmother had Alzheimer’s. I was about 8 years old and my job was to take my grandma out for a walk. We would go for a walk and she would hold my hand and she would see things. “Connie, there are men in the trees! Be careful,”she’d exclaim. I’d tell her that I don’t see anything and she would point at the branch and outline the figure of a man for me. Do all of your sculptures start from your initial painting? Yes, indeed. All of my sculptures start from a painting. If I’m going to do a 3D sculpture, I sculpt out all sides, but I always start with

a flat and go from there. I have loads of fun doing it all. Both your drawings and sculptures are very colorful. Have you considered doing black and white pieces? I do have some black and white pieces, but they all have at least a touch of color. Where do you take all of your inspiration from? I draw my inspiration from people around me-from people in general. You use little pieces of everybody. I don’t do much thinking; I just sit down and start working on the piece. I’m in my mid 70s. At that age, you know a lot of fascinating people, and so my pool of inspiration is never dry. You are 74 years old and you are so youthful and active. What is your secret? The secret is to keep busy; every second of every day. I just had an amazing thing happen to me that doesn’t usually happen to women. I have been made a Vice Chairman of the board The New York University. I am also hoping to sell my art work in quantity as I want to be able to donate meaningful profits to help with student aid at the school as well

APR-MAY 2014

onnie McSilver is an artist with an unconventional background. In addition to being an extraordinary sculptor and painter, Connie McSilver also is a noted psychoanalyst, acclaimed social worker, and a philanthropist. Combined with her indelible sense of humor, her work reflects her fascination with people, her belief in the sole spirit and soul whether interpreted through happiness and joviality or sadness and sorrow. Her art dictates this partiality for people through inherent humor and colorful extravagance. Her drawings and two and threedimensional works depict a camouflaged and masked human figure that transcends into a fantasy world. Connie McSilver, whose bold and colorful sculptures and paintings were exhibited in the Next Generation Green Room from the Florida Grand Opera, at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts. She was also selected as the Featured Artist by Bernard Markowicz, owner of Markowicz Fine Art where McSilver’s emotionally charged pieces are now on display. McSilver, takes a que sera, sera approach to her artwork by sketching out her first draft with her head turned away from canvas. Thereby, allowing her subconscious to guide the direction of her work. Le CITY deluxe had the

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David Tamargo The Urban Hunter Interview with Miami's Prodigy Artist

FEB-MAR 2014

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avid Tamargo is a Cuban-American artist whose work serves as a visual journey into situational fantasy. Using landscapes to focus on the formation of identity, Tamargo works in various mediums such as photography, installation, sculpture, performance, jewelry and video. Le CITY Deluxe had the pleasure of interviewing the prodigy artist and speak to him about his projects and vision of Miami. What is the message behind urban hunting? Modern man, evolutionarily speaking, is still a hunter. Although he has traded spears for cash and credit cards, the hunter is still alive inside. Urban Hunting addresses the struggle of interpreting modern society. I asks the question; “how will the imagined world of our present day be interpreted by future humans?” Searching cities around the world for the imaginary beasts within them. Urban Hunting gives life to otherwise inanimate objects. These images emerge from the perspective of the primal human species, connecting the millions of years of evolution for man. The art I produce remains faithful to its social function by reflecting the decay of our way of life while expressing that our world is changeable. Where was your first urban hunting ground? Urban Hunting started and will always be connected to the South Florida landscape. My first Urban Hunting progressed out of an everexpanding landscape originating in southwest Miami-Dade. After 6 months exploring Miami it ventured from the Florida Keys to Tampa, then all the way up the East Coast and eventually out west. It outgrew its prior concept surrounding personal exploration experiences

and as I sought landscapes identifiable to a wider audience it went from being regional to international.

"I feel artists have a responsibility to create art that does not exist merely to entertain, but also guide and instruct; to improve our collective existence." Tell us about that vision of the future for the world... I feel artists have a responsibility to create art that does not exist merely to entertain, but also guide and instruct; to improve our collective existence. Since present human knowledge and history remains as fragile as the libraries of Alexandria I consider how much of it will survive if electricity were lost. My photos from New York City exemplify my point by considering what future humans excavating the lost city of Manhattan may imagine when they unearth the Wall Street Bull. As natural disasters prove that a city capable of surviving the fate of Pompeii or an Atlantis has yet to be built, I consider the message contemporary art is sending to the future and warn of the fallacy

of not acting to prevent such realities. What’s unique about Miami compared to L.A or NYC? My naïve impressions as it relates to the art communities are that LA is obsessed with inventing overnight success while New York is an extremely tight nucleus. I always assumed I was not compared to a glamorous unattainable ideal of success while in South Florida because so many of us come from parents who migrated to the United States.I balance my life spending 6 months in Miami in the comfort of being myself, and the rest of the time traveling or in Los Angeles exploring the art community. Where do you see Miami in the next 30, 50, 100 years?As long as the community demands we maintain the arts in our public schools and as electives in our universities then artists will continue to be produced and bring national attention to the city. If Miami is not underwater being reclaimed by the coral reefs, or wiped out by a major storm as the Rolling Stone Magazine prophesied, then in another 3 decades it could very likely be the center of attention in America for its vibrant artistic environment. Artists from other cities and countries are paying attention and have been for a while now. Where can our readers view your work? I exhibit internationally and am represented by Natology Project which curates artistic experiences in Los Angeles and Miami. A physical Miami gallery does not currently represent me so you can follow my developments online at www.davidtamargo.com and see my art daily on Instagram: @davidtamargo


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ART BASEL The MuseuM of ConTeMporary arT mocanomi.org

Art Basel Guide 2013 by James Cubby

DEC- JAN 2013/14

Art Basel was founded in 1970 in Basel, Switzerland by Basel art collectors and gallery owners Trudi Bruckner, Balz Hilt and Ernst Beyeler. This show has become the single most important art event in the world. In 2002, under the leadership of Samuel Keller and the help of many local art enthusiasts, Art Basel Miami Beach premiered and created a cultural explosion in Miami. Art Basel Miami Beach has grown immensely since its first year. Now in its 12th year, Art Basel Miami Beach, once again, gathers a selection of some of the world’s top modern and contemporary galleries to Miami with 258 international galleries from 31 different countries.

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Located on 125th Street in North Miami, is another hub during Art Week with its annual Vanity Fair party that attracts an A-list crowd and major art figures. MOCA, North Miami, and the Fontainebleau have commissioned British artist Tracey Emin to create new limitededition works to commemorate Emin’s first U.S. exhibition, “Angel Without You”, opening December 4 at MOCA.

arT Basel MiaMi BeaCh Located at the Miami Beach Convention Center, becomes the base for what is known as the most important art event in America. Design Miami (www.designmiami. com), one of the week’s most popular fairs, is located in the pavilion directly across the street from Art Basel Miami Beach.


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oTher fairs

The largest and most global art fair in the world, brings its 7,000 square foot pavilion to the sands of Miami Beach. This fair, with an outdoor beach lounge, features over 100 exhibitors, 15 Breeder Program galleries, a variety of crated projects, art programs and tours.

Located in midtown Miami include the Miami Project (www.miami-project.com) with 65 galleries from around the world, Red Dot Miami (www. reddotfair.com) with exhibits from approximately 60 galleries, and SPECTRUM Miami (www. spectrum-miami.com) with a roster of exhibitions, music, entertainment and special events. ART ASIA (www.artasiafair.com), the premier international Asian art fair, is a major attraction during Art Week.

ConTeXT www.contextartmiami.com

aqua arT MiaMi www.aquaartmiami.com Located at the Aqua Hotel on Collins Avenue, is one of the best fairs for emerging art featuring 45 powerful young galleries with a variety of programming that includes performance art, new media and solo installations.

MiaMi BeaCh also hosTs neW MaTerial www.newmaterialartfair.com

The sister fair to Art Miami and located next to Art Miami, brings an impressive selection of emerging and mid-career artists with a showing from 65 international galleries.

arT MiaMi www.art-miami.com Known as Miami’s premier anchor fair, kicks off Art Week and showcases some of the best modern and contemporary art with exhibitions from over 125 international galleries.

A boutique exposition premiering this year, and UNTITLED (art-untitled.com), a curated art fair returning to the beach for the second year.

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arT Basel 2013 Event Calendar

Art Basel 2013 comes to Miami from December 5 to 8, 2013. The best Modern and contemporary galleries will present work by today's most exciting artists. With nearly half this year's exhibitors coming from the United States and Latin America, the 2013 Miami Beach show once again asserts its status as the premier destination for galleries from those regions.

December 4, 2013

Art Basel Public Opening Night 8:30pm -10:00pm Access: Free public access A special evening program with live performances, as part of the Public sector. Curated by Nicholas Baume, Director & Chief Curator, Public Art Fund, New York. Art Basel www.artbasel.com/miamibeach Collins Park, 2100 Collins Ave, Miami Beach

December 5, 2013

9am-Rubell Family Collection Private View ‘Contemporary Chinese Art from the Rubell Family Collection Contemporary Chinese Art from the Rubell Family Collection’. Opening with interactive food installation by Jennifer Rubell. Hosted by the Rubell family. Rubell Family Collection www.rfc.museum 95 NW 29th Street, Miami

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December 5, 2013

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10am- 11:30 am Art Basel | Conversations | Premiere: Doug Aitken. Artist talk featuring Doug Aitken in conversation with Michelle Kuo One-hour panel discussions are followed by a

30-minute Q&A session Access: Free public access Miami Beach Convention Center Hall C auditorium. Art Basel www.artbasel.com/miamibeach Collins Park, 2100 Collins Ave, Miami Beach

December 5, 2013

9pm-10pm Art Basel | Film Tango at the Edge of the Fair Access: Free public access An evening film program shown at SoundScape Park on the 7,000-square-foot outdoor projection wall of the New World Center. Curated by David Gryn, Director of Artprojx, London. Art Basel www.artbasel.com/miamibeach Soundscape Park, 500 17th Street, Miami Beach

December 6, 2013

5pm-6pm Art Basel | Salon | ‘Brancusi in New York. 1913 – 2013' Art History Access: With Art Basel VIP card or ticket Location: Hall C auditorium, entrance through Magazines sector Matthew Affron, The Muriel & Philip Berman Curator of Modern Art, Philadelphia


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Museum of Art; Dr. Jérôme Neutres, Curator and Writer, Special Advisor to the president of the Réunion des Musées NationauxGrand Palais and a board member of the Guimet Museum, Paris; Jean-Jacques Neuer, International Art Lawyer and representative of the Constantin Brancusi Estate Art Basel www.artbasel.com/miamibeach MBCC, Convention Center Drive, Miami Beach

December 6, 2013

9am-All Day The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse New works from international artists and permanent installations The Margulies Collection www.margulieswarehouse.com 591 NW 27th Street, Miami

December 7, 2013

10am-10pm Audemars Piguet | 'Curiosity' a monumental artwork by Kolkoz Access: Free public access Audemars Piguet and Galerie Perrotin present ‘Curiosity’, a monumental artwork by Kolkoz. This work will take the form of a Swiss chalet floating in front of the iconic modernist structure, the disused Miami Marine Stadium. More information available from November 20. Public viewing during open hours. Audemars Piguet www.audemarspiguet.com/en/partnerships/art-basel Miami Marine Stadium

December 7,2013

6pm-3am YoungArts & Visionaire | World Premiere ‘A Portrait of Marina Abramović’ Wednesday, December 04 - Saturday, December 07

Access: Free public access Contact: +1 305 377 1140, events@youngarts,orgVenue: The Jewel Box @ the YoungArts Campus The world premiere of ‘A Portrait of Marina Abramović’, a 3D film and installation by Matthu Placek. YoungArts & Visionaire www.youngarts.org The YoungArts Campus, 2100 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami

December 8

2013 10:30am-12:30pm Parodi Lecture in the Philosophy of Art with Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev Access: Free public access Contact: education@pamm.orgOrganizer: Pérez Art Museum www.pamm.org 1103 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami

December 8

2013 8pm-10pm Walls of Artseen 2013 Presented by New World School of the Arts Visual Artists Access: Free public access Contact: Maggy Cuesta, +1 305 237 3620, mcuesta@mdc.edu New World School of the Arts www.artseenspace.wordpress.com 2215 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami

DEC- JAN 2013/14

8:30pm Art Basel | Feature Film 'Nan Goldin – I Remember Your Face' (2013) by Sabine Lidl Access: Free public access (limited seating) The United States premiere of 'Nan Goldin – I Remember Your Face' (2013) by Sabine Lidl will be screened in the presence of Nan Goldin and Sabine Lidl, and will be followed by a Q&A with the artist and film director. Along with an exemplary insight into the seminal American photographer’s life, the film offers viewers a candid, sensitive and at times humorous perspective on contemporary culture. Art Basel www.artbasel.com/miamibeach Colony Theatre, 1040 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach

December 7, 2013

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Iran Issa Khan arT Basel in MiaMi

DEC- JAN 2013/14

“gALLERIES fRom ALL ovER ThE woRLD CAmE To ShowCASE IN mIAmI. ThAT’S whEN mIAmI REALLy goT oN ThE mAP.”

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INTERvIEw CLAuDIA TRImDE // PhoTogRAPhy woRLD RED EyE


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Biography Born in Tehran and raised in Europe and the United States, Iran, Issa-Khan began her photography career in the late 1970s. Issa-Khan photographed Paulina Porizkova, Christy Turlington, Iman, Andie Mac Dowell, Debbie Dickinson Talisa Soto, and other supermodels.

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for something like that. New York was already known for its art scene. Miami has become such an art place since Art Basel. First few years of it were unbelievable .The art was unreal. Galleries from all over the world came to showcase in Miami. That’s when Miami really got on the map. Now, art collectors buy art here and they fall in love with this place. Not only do they buy the art, they bought the whole city. Art Basel is like a dream that lasts 4 days. Now we have all these galleries opening up all over the Beach, Wynwood, Design District. Everywhere. And now we have people coming to Miami that would’ve never lived here otherwise. Did Art Basel change since its beginning here in Miami? Yes. Because now you have more gallery showings, more young artists being shown, you have more international people coming from all over the world and it’s much more commercial. Although commercial, it’s still magical. A beautiful city as it is, becomes more beautiful. Each gallery, each event, takes you into different parts of the world. So for four to five days, we become one with the world. Where would you like to see Art Basel go from here? I wouldn’t change anything except for one thing: I want Art Basel to be longer. I want it to be a full week instead of four days, so you have time to see everything.That’s what I would love to see.

Do you think we owe a lot to Art Basel for what Miami has become today? Absolutely. We have to give credit to Art Basel because it turned this city into an art place. Prior to this, it was more personal. Small galleries. Now it’s world wide. Look what has happened to Wynwood, to Design District, and to Miami Beach. It’s amazing. It’s amazing how the whole city has been transformed in such short period of time. We have more architects moving here, more big companies setting up their businesses here. Miami has also become a great pace for young up-and-coming artists. For them, it’s a great stepping stone with a touch of glamour. Tell us about your most significant piece of work? As an artist, you are never satisfied with your work. You think you can always do better and it is never enough. You need to push and push and push. As an artist, when you think that you are the best, it is time for you to stop. You should always think that tomorrow something new and better is going to happen. Right now I’m doing nature shots, but tomorrow, I don’t know what I’m gonna work on. That’s the most exciting thing about being an artist. What would be one advice that you would give to a young artist? Never believe the press. Believe in yourself and never be satisfied with what you have done. Always strive to be better. Never take yourself seriously because that’s when you are finished

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ran Issa Khan has an eye for everything beautiful. Though the lens of her camera, she caught a glimpse of true splendor –Miami. Falling head over heels for the tropical paradise, Iran Issa Khan aspired to share it with the rest of the world. The opportunity struck 11 years ago when Art Basel was scouting for the notable locale to host the world’s most legendary art fair. Iran, along with some of Miami’s most influential power players of South Florida, joined forces to bring Art Basel to Miami. Tell us about the history of Art Basel in Miami? Were you involved in it since the beginning? Yes. A friend of mine Sam Keller was the one who started Art Basel in Miami. All of the people who are involved in Miami’s art scene played a role. Sam Keller felt that Miami was so close to South America and that’s the market that Art Basel was looking for. Another key figure who helped bring Art Basel to Miami, was Craig Robins. Robins was instrumental. I was involved in the Art Basel because I am an artist and I am very involved socially in here. I know everybody, so I became one of the people who was making it happen. We all worked together to bring Art Basel to Miami. Is Art Basel just a concept similar to the Art Basel in Basel, Switzerland? No. It is a franchise that goes in different parts of the world. Art Basel Miami is a part of it and was an instant success. Miami was hungry

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DmITRy PRuT Owner of Avant Gallery

Inspiration Through Forward Thinking

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vant Gallery is a gem that is tucked away on the 23rd Street of Miami Beach. It will electrify your spirit, and deliver inspiration through forward thinking art and design.Avant Gallery represents, promotes and showcases worldrenowned, mid-career, as well as emerging talent from the disciplines of art, design, and passionate manufacturing. Le CITY Deluxe had the pleasure to interview the owner of the gallery Dmitry Prut to learn what his 5,000 square show room has in store during the upcoming Art Basel.

"wE’RE kNowN AS A hyBRID of ART AND DESIgN, foCuSINg oN CoLLECT-ABILITy AND INvESTmENT quALITy." What sort of art do you have on display? We’re known as a hybrid of art and design, focusing on collect-ability and investment quality. It ranges from bigger names like Damien Hirst and Guy Le Baube, to more emerging talent such as Nathan Sawaya, Alec Monopoly and DAIN. We also represent special collections from Lladro and Baccarat. Are you hosting any events for Art Basel? Yes, one in each location. At the Downtown

location we will be hosting a very special exhibition of works by Roman Kriheli, featuring the unveiling of his highly-anticipated “The Most Beautiful Woman in the World” painting, which has been getting some buzz in the media recently. At the Miami Beach location we will feature photographer Guy Le Baube and LEGO sculptor Nathan Sawaya in an exhibition titled “Bodies”. Do you think Art Basel changed Miami? Unquestionably and for the better. Miami is still a relatively young cosmopolitan city with lots of new money clientele who appreciate the finer things in life, but art is certainly a category that makes folks spend dollars in a cultural way. Art Basel caps off this notion every December and brings a very like-minded atmosphere into town. What is by far your favorite piece in the gallery? It’s always the next one that has yet to arrive, but I am really looking forward to Kriheli’s unveiling of what is being dubbed as his contemporary version of the Mona Lisa. Not even I have seen it, so this is quite exhilarating and I’m very honored to be involved

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How did Avant Gallery come about? Essentially it was a passion project that became a business endeavor. I was always around art, growing up as an artist myself. After spending some time doing high-profile event marketing in the corporate world, it wasn’t until I was about 27 that I realized I’d like to take a shot at the business of art and cater to that same type of affluent consumer demographic, this time with my own agenda and product. When did Avant Gallery open? In 2007 with a small location off Lincoln Road.

Do you have any locations outside of Miami Beach? We’re adding a Downtown and Brickell location at the Epic Hotel, preview exhibition opening during Art Basel.

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fine arT Bazaar PRESENTED By AvANT gALLERy

Le City Deluxe in collaboration with Avant Gallery is pleased to offer a curated selection of extraordinary objet d'art with limited availability and unlimited personality. For more information on select pieces, please visit www.avantgallery.com

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1) Utopia, 2012 Ysabel LeMay 58x42 inches C-printEdition of 7

4) Running Corporatism, 2013 Alec Monopoly 48x50 Spray-paint, acrylic on canvas

2) I Love Life, 2012 STMTS 48x60 inches Collage, acrylic and spray-paint on canvas

5) SeaMoss, 2013 DAIN 48X60 inches

3) St. Jean Cap Ferrat, 1987 Guy Le Baube 47x32 inches Archival pigment print Edition of 15

6) Brigitte Bardot Copy + Paste, 2013 Alejandro Vigilante 54x34 inches Transfer and acrylic on wood

7) Esculetin, 2012 Damien Hirst Woodcut print on 410gsm Somerset White Paper19 Ă— 22 inche Edition of 55 8) Red Skull, 2012 Nathan Sawaya 17x15x14 inches LEGO bricks and glue 9) Millionaire, 2012 Marco Costa 72x42x33 inches Wooden structure, polished brass, silver plated wheels

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ART

AndyWarhol Museum

Vol 1 Spring 2013

Director E R I C S H I N E R Commands Pittsburg ’s Landmark Museum

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he Andy Warhol Museum is one of four Carnegie Museums in Pittsburgh, which also happens to be the artist’s hometown. Le CITY USA met with Director Eric Shiner to discuss art, Andy and the museum. How do you think Andy Warhol would interpret the modern era of celebrity? He would be on Cloud Nine. In our contemporary society, fame and celebrity fuel most of our interactions with brands, media outlets and even each other. Andy would be tuned in 24-7 if he could be, that’s for sure. Where do you see Andy Warhol’s legacy in 100 years? I know that based solely on the treasures in our archives and art collections here at The Andy Warhol Museum, that there will still be new areas of interest and scholarship emerging on Andy Warhol well into the future. He left so many things behind for us to unearth about him that I know we will still be talking about him, exploring his life and work and making new discoveries even 100 years from now. The Museum’s newest exhibit, “Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years,” is quite impressive.

Which aspects of the museum do you consider most valuable in regards to social contribution? Our social media presence and our education department definitely are the two areas of our business that make the biggest contributions to society. Social media allows us to share new information on Warhol with over 540,000 followers, making us the 7th most-followed museum in the world. Our education department not only teaches students, both young and old, about Warhol, but we have a special commitment to disenfranchised communities both here in Pittsburgh and abroad when we send exhibitions to distant shores, all in an effort to give voice to those that don’t have it. Our motto is: Let’s turn the anomaly into the paradigm. Which aspects of Andy Warhol’s life do you identify with most? Like Andy, I was born and raised in western Pennsylvania, and I think that this area of the world has an innate passion for both the high and the low in life. I can therefore empathize with Andy’s interests in the kitsch, the rare, the valuable and the mundane. I dare say it is in our blood here! Also, as a gay man I think I can identify with Andy’s own relationships with his hometown and why he felt the need to get to New York City as fast as he could. Luckily, I made the choice to come back however, and I’m really happy that I did so that I can help make it better for queer youth who are growing up here today. How did you become Director for the museum? As an undergrad, I wrote my graduation thesis on medieval Japanese castle architecture. Of course, with such a tight focus, I couldn’t

find a job in that field to save my life, but I was contacted by the Carnegie Museums to ask if I’d be interested in a curatorial internship at the about-to-open Andy Warhol Museum. Although I knew very little about contemporary art, I realized it was the opportunity of a lifetime, so I jumped at the chance. After that year, I went off to work in Japan, and ultimately found my way to Osaka where I went to graduate school with a focus on Japanese contemporary art. I wrote my master’s thesis on the work of artist Yasumasa Morimura, who considers himself to be the conceptual son of Andy Warhol. After moving back to the States, I eventually landed in New York City where I worked as an independent curator, scholar and writer, all on the topic of Asian contemporary art. In 2008, I was approached by The Andy Warhol Museum to become their first Milton Fine Curator of Art. Because of my background at the museum, the transition was very easy. Two years after coming in as curator, I was named Director of the museum, and it has been nothing less than a great—and fun—adventure in arriving at this point in my career. What is your dream scenario for the future of the Andy Warhol museum? My dream is simple: I want us to be the coolest museum in the world with the largest social media presence of any museum in the world. I want us to be fully endowed so that we can be here forever, and I want our exhibitions and programs to be leaders in the field. I also want to make sure that people know that we are located here in Pittsburgh and that a visit to the museum is a must. Probably most importantly, I want my team here to have fun in their jobs as they promote and protect Andy Warhol’s legacy.

Vol 1 Spring 2013

It is a fantastic show indeed. Generally, when undertaking such a large-scale project, there is a ton to do in securing the artwork for the show and asking institutions and private individuals around the globe to lend their treasures for the run of the show. It also took tons of hard work and dedication from everyone at the museum to install the show in a truly beautiful installation that makes people think deeply about Warhol’s place in the overarching art world.

Interviewed by Mary Marr & Natalie Koho

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El Director E R I C S H I N E R un cargo importante del Museo Pittsburgh

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he Andy Warhol Museum es uno de los cuatro Museos Carnegie de Pittsburgh, que también es la ciudad natal del artista. Le CITY USA se reunió con su Director, Eric Shiner, para hablar sobre arte, Andy y el museo. ¿Cómo crees que Andy Warhol interpretaría la era moderna de las celebrities? Él estaría en el septimo cielo. En nuestra sociedad contemporánea, la fama y las celebridades alimentan gran parte de nuestra interaccion con las marcas, medios de comunicación e incluso entre sí. Andy estuviera sintonizado las veinticuatro horas al dia y siete dias a la semana si pudiese, eso es seguro. ¿Dónde ve el legado de Andy Warhol en 100 años? Sé que basarse únicamente en los tesoros de nuestros archivos y colecciones de arte aquí en el Museo Andy Warhol, que todavía habrá nuevas áreas de interés y becas emergentes sobre Andy Warhol en el futuro. Dejó muchas descubrir y sé que seguiremos hablando de él, explorando su vida y obra y hacer nuevos descubrimientos incluso de aquí a 100 años. La nueva exhibición del Museo,“Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years”, es bastante impresionante. Es un espectáculo fantástico de hecho. Por lo general, al llevar a cabo tal proyecto a gran escala, hay muchas cosas por hacer en la obtención de la obra de arte para la exposición. Solicitar a instituciones y particulares de todo el mundo a prestar sus tesoros para el funcionamiento de la muestra.También requirió mucho trabajo y una gran dedicación de todo el mundo en el museo para ubicar la exhibición en una instalación verdaderamente hermosa que haga a la gente piense profundamente sobre el lugar de Warhol en el mundo del arte global.

¿Qué aspectos de la vida de Andy Warhol se identifica con la mayoría? Al igual que Andy, que nació y se crió en el oeste de Pennsylvania, y creo que esta zona del mundo tiene una pasión innata. Por tanto, puedo empatizar con Andy en intereses como el kitsch, lo raro, el valor y lo mundano. Me atrevo a decir que aquí está en nuestra sangre. También, como un hombre gay creo que puedo identificar las relaciones propias de Andy con su ciudad natal y por qué sentía la necesidad de llegar a Nueva York lo más rápido que pudo. Por suerte, tomé la decisión de volver, y estoy muy contento de haberlo hecho para que yo pueda ayudar a que sea mejor para los jóvenes gay que están creciendo hoy aquí. ¿Cómo llegaste a ser director de un museo? Como estudiante universitario, escribí mi tesis sobre la arquitectura medieval de los castillos japoneses. Por supuesto, con un enfoque tan estrecho, no pude encontrar un trabajo en este campo para salvar mi vida, pero me contactaron desde los Museos Carnegie para preguntarme si estaría interesado en ser el responsable del Andy Warhol Museum. Aunque sabía muy poco sobre el arte contemporáneo, me di cuenta de que era la oportunidad de mi vida, así que lo aproveché. Después de ese año, me fui a trabajar a

Japón, y finalmente encontré mi camino en Osaka donde fui a la escuela de posgrado con un enfoque en el arte contemporáneo japonés. Yo escribí mi tesis sobre la obra del artista Yasumasa Morimura, que se considera a sí mismo como el hijo conceptual de Andy Warhol. Después de regresar a Estados Unidos, que finalmente aterricé en la ciudad de Nueva York donde trabajé como comisario independiente, erudito y escritor, en el tema del arte contemporáneo asiático. En 2008, se me acercaron del Museo Andy Warhol para convertirme en su primer curador del Milton Fine of Art. Debido a mi experiencia en el museo, la transición fue muy fácil. Dos años después de entrar en la curaduría, fui nombrado director del museo, y ha sido nada menos que una genial -y divertida- aventura para llegar a este punto de mi carrera ¿Cuál es su escenario ideal para el futuro del museo Andy Warhol? Mi sueño es simple: quiero que seamos el mejor museo del mundo con mayor presencia en los medios sociales que cualquier otro museo. Quiero que seamos plenamente dotados para que podamos estar aquí para siempre, y quiero que nuestras exposiciones y programas sean líderes en nuestro campo. Yo también quiero asegurarme de que la gente sepa que estamos ubicados aquí en Pittsburgh y que una visita al museo es una visita obligada. Probablemente lo más importante, es que mi equipo está aquí para divertirse com su trabajo a medida que promueven y protegen el legado de Andy Warhol.

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¿Qué aspectos del museo considera más importantes en lo que se refiere a la contribución social?

Nuestra presencia en los medios sociales y nuestro departamento de educación sin duda son las dos áreas de nuestro negocio que hacen las mayores contribuciones a la sociedad. Los medios sociales nos permiten compartir información nueva sobre Warhol con más de 540.000 seguidores. Nuestro departamento de educación no sólo enseña a los estudiantes, jóvenes y mayores, sobre Warhol, pero tenemos un compromiso especial con las comunidades marginadas, tanto aquí en Pittsburgh y en el extranjero, cuando enviamos muestras a tierras lejanas, todo en un esfuerzo para dar voz. Nuestro lema es: Vamos a convertir la anomalía en el paradigma.

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ART

Adamar Fine Arts Located in the heart of the Miami Design District, Adamar Fine Arts represents contemporary paintings, sculpture, works on paper and installations by prominent national and international artists. Their artist list includes the works of Warhol, Dine, Katz, Haring, Sultan, Rauschenberg, Frankenthaler, Borower, Howe, Rietmeyer, Tolla, Rose, Migdal and Velez.

Art Gallery Guide Top Galleries Featuring

Works by Warhol

Tamar Erdberg, Director. 4141 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami. 305.576.1355 www.adamargallery.com

Robert Fontaine Gallery Opening in the Wynwood Arts District in 2010, the Robert Fontaine Gallery provides a platform for emerging, mid-career, established and master artists ranging from Pop artists like Andy Warhol to digital artists and even urban interventionist (aka ‘street’) art. Artist list includes well known artists like: Francesco Clemente, Salvador Dalí, Robert Indiana, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Willem de Kooning, and Roy Lichtenstein. 2349 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami. 305.397.8530 www.robertfontainegallery.com

Jimmy D. Robinson, Inc. Rare Art Collections

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Markowicz Fine Art

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Located in the upscale Miami Design District, this gallery features an impressive list of work from artists including: Francis Bacon, Olivier Chalmin, Steven Gagnon, Alexandra Gestin, Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, Robert Indiana, Alex Katz, Wilfredo Lam, Manolo Valdes, Anne Valverde, Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselmann. Markowicz is the exclusive agent in the US of Alain Godon. 114 NE 40th Street, Miami. 305.308.6398 www.markowiczfineart.com

Robinson specializes in brokering large collections of art as well as multi-million dollar paintings and single works of art to a private clientele, 4 & 5-star hotels and Corporations Worldwide, including Contemporary, Impressionism, Old Masters, American & European Paintings. Besides collections, Robinson is one of the biggest sellers of Paul Jenkins’ works of art along with Rauschenberg, Stella, Mitchell, Warhol, Janklow, and Appel. 2804 Crosley Drive East, West Palm Beach. 561.602.1400 www.jimmydrobinson.net

Hemphill Gallery Miami/ h+gallery The Hemphill Gallery originated in New York City in 1995 from a private collection. The gallery specializes in contemporary art by wellknown artists like Richard Artschwager, Tauba Auerbach, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Damien Hirst, Julian Schnabel, Amy Sillman, Andy Warhol, and Christopher Wool. 7340 SW 48th Street, Miami. 305.205.5820 www.hemphillgallery.com


ART THEFT A Billion Dollar Business

Written by: James Cubby

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ART

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or centuries, thieves have targeted valuable art and collectables from museums and private collections, making the theft of art a major problem. While the majority of art thefts are from private collections, high profi le museums are still a main focus of art crimes. Recently, headlines such as, “Stolen $3 million painting found in Miami Beach hotel,” “Daring Art Heist Nets Picasso, Matisse,” “A Picasso and a Gauguin Are Among 7 Works Stolen From a Dutch Museum,” are just a few that have shocked the art world and general public. One of the most dramatic art heists in history happened just last year as impeccably timed art thieves broke into the Kunsthal Museum in Rotterdam in the early morning and made off with seven borrowed paintings, including valuable works by Picasso, Monet, Gauguin, Matisse and Lucian Freud.

Vol 1 Spring 2013

The world of art thievery has been glamorized by Hollywood fi lms like The Thomas Crown Affair, where a bored wealthy financier orchestrates an elaborate heist and steals a painting valued at $100 million, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Art crime is in fact no glamorous affair and, according to the FBI, “is a looming criminal enterprise with estimated losses running as high as $6 billion annually.” The FBI has a dedicated Art Crime Team comprised of 14 special agents and three trial attorneys standing by for prosecutions. The FBI works closely with the National Stolen Art File, a computerized index of reported stolen art, in their

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investigations. Art crimes are a big business according to The Journal of Criminal Law

Art crime is, in fact, no glamorous affair. and Criminology, and account for over $1 billion dollars in art is stolen every year. Art crimes are complicated affairs with thieves crossing borders and often holding onto the valuable merchandise for years. Last year, FBI agents arrested two people at the Loews Hotel in Miami Beach for trying to sell a painting by Matisse valued at $3 million that was stolen more than a decade ago. The painting, “Odalisque in Red Pants,” is the property of the Sofía Imber Contemporary Art Museum in Caracas, Venezuela, who at first did not realize the painting was missing and unwittingly displayed a copy in the original’s place. The question arises, how does one find a lost or stolen piece of art and how can one protect themselves from such crimes? The Association for Research into Crimes against Art (ARCA) is an organization that works to combat art crime by joining forces with not only law enforcement experts but also international scholars, art professionals and even concerned citizens. While prevention is a major focus, victims of art theft still must seek assistance. In addition to the FBI’s National Stolen Art File, there are many places to register lost, stolen or looted art, and possibly also track or recover lost artworks. Trace (www. trace.com) and The Art Loss Register (www. artloss.com), both claim to have the world’s largest global database of lost, stolen, or seized property. Both organizations help art collectors to register lost artwork and claim successes at recovering art that has been lost or stolen. Art collectors can also benefit from these databases to check art that they are considering for purchase to see if the art is stolen. SAZTV (www. saztv.com) is another

good resource to find lost or stolen art and collectables throughout the world and works with a host of different links and databases of stolen art including dedicated police sites and a database of art stolen by well-known artists. The ICOM Red List (www.icom.museum/ redlist), set up by the International Council of Museums, originally concentrated on lost African artifacts but has since expanded to cover a framework that includes Latin America, Iraq and Afghanistan. Despite the security measures of art collectors and museums, art theft is prevalent and continues with billions of dollars of art still missing. It’s surprising that this type of thievery can still happen with modern security systems, and sadly, only a small percentage of stolen art is ever recovered.


Un negocio rentable

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esde hace siglos, el robo de obras de arte y piezas de colección valiosas a museos y coleccionistas privados se ha convertido en un serio problema. Aunque las colecciones privadas son las más afectadas por los robos, los museos más destacados e importantes continúan siendo el foco de atención de los ladrones. Últimamente algunos titulares como “Recuperan cuadro robado por valor de 3 millones en un hotel de Miami Beach”, “Audaz golpe: roban obras de Picasso y Matisse”, “Roban obras de Picasso y Gauguin entre las 7 piezas sustraídas a un museo holandés” alarmaban al mundo del arte y también al público general. Uno de los golpes más grandes e impecables de la historia del arte tuvo lugar el año pasado en el Museo Kunsthal de Róterdam. Los ladrones huyeron a primera hora de la mañana con siete pinturas valiosísimas entre las que se encontraban obras de Picasso, Monet, Gauguin, Matisse y Lucian Freud.

El robo de obras de arte no tiene nada de glamour. El robo de obras de arte ha sido mitificado y considerado glamuroso por la industria cinematográfica de Hollywood. Un ejemplo de ello es la película “El caso Thomas Crown”, donde un financiero millonario orquesta minuciosamente el robo de una pintura valorada en 100 millones de dólares al Museo Metropolitano de Arte. Pero de hecho, el robo de arte no tiene nada de glamour. Según el FBI “se trata de un acto de delincuencia que supone pérdidas de seis mil millones de dólares al año”. El FBI cuenta con un equipo dedicado exclusivamente a este tipo de delitos, compuesto por catorce agentes especiales y tres abogados encargados de los procedimientos judiciales. En sus

investigaciones, el FBI trabaja con los archivos del NSAF, una base de datos indexada que contiene información de todas las denuncias relacionadas con robos de obras de arte. Sin duda se trata de un negocio rentable. Según la publicación del Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology anualmente los robos de obras de arte alcanzan los mil millones de dólares.

Los robos de obras de arte son operaciones complejas, en la mayoría de los casos los ladrones tienen que cruzar fronteras y guardar el valioso botín durante años para evitar ser atrapados. El año pasado el FBI arrestó en el hotel Loews de Miami Beach a dos personas que intentaban vender una pintura de Matisse robada hace más de una década y valorada en tres millones de dólares. La pintura denominada “Odalisca con pantalón rojo” pertenece al Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Sofía Imber de

Caracas, Venezuela. En un primer momento nadie en el museo se enteró del robo, y sin darse cuenta estuvieron exponiendo durante un tiempo una copia en lugar de la pintura original. Entonces surge la pregunta: ¿Cómo se puede recuperar una obra de arte robada y cómo protegerse ante este tipo de delitos? La Asociación para la Investigación de Crímenes de Arte (ARCA) trabaja para impedir el robo de obras de arte de forma conjunta con especialistas internacionales, profesionales del arte e incluso con ciudadanos a quienes les preocupa este tema. Aunque la asociación se centra principalmente en la prevención, también brinda apoyo a las víctimas de este tipo de delitos. Además de la base de datos NSAF del FBI, hay varios sitios donde se puede denunciar la pérdida o robo de obras de arte, y en ocasiones también es posible rastrearlas y hasta recuperarlass. Trace (www.trace. com) y The Art Loss Register (www.artloss. com) aseguran tener la mayor base de datos de bienes perdidos, robados o confiscados a nivel mundial. Ambas organizaciones brindan un espacio para que los coleccionistas registren las obras de arte perdidas así como las recuperadas. Los coleccionistas también pueden beneficiarse de estas bases de datos para comprobar que las obras de arte que desean adquirir no sean robadas. SAZTV (www.saztv.com) también es una buena herramienta para recuperar colecciones o piezas de arte robadas a nivel mundial. Incluye enlaces a otras bases de datos como departamentos policiales dedicados al robo de arte o listas de obras robadas de artistas reconocidos. La lista roja de ICOM (www. icom.museum/redlist) creada por el Consejo Internacional de Museos, inicialmente se dedicaba a recuperar piezas perdidas originarias de África, pero actualmente se ha extendido y también abarca Latinoamérica, Irak y Afganistán. Pese a las medidas de seguridad adoptadas por los museos y coleccionistas, el robo de obras de arte es un delito recurrente que supone miles de millones de dólares en pérdidas. Resulta sorprendente que aún hoy, con los sistemas de seguridad actuales, este tipo de robos continúe siendo tan frecuente. Lamentablemente hoy en día sólo se logra recuperar un pequeño porcentaje de la totalidad de las obras robadas.

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PORTFOLIO

I think of my work as the search for underlying order and beauty in the seeming chaos of life.”

Max Eremine

Spring “Isobella With the White Umbrella” In-camera double exposure on 35mm film Model: Sophia J. (Factor Model Management) Makeup & Hair: MaraZ


Goddess “...as the flower fadeth� Model: Sophia J. (Factor Model Management) Makeup: Veronica T. Sitterding Hair Stylist: Stephen Posta


“The Brave Tin Soldier� Long-exposure with multiple light sources Model: Meghan Otis (Click Models) Makeup & Hair: MaraZ


“Seraph� Long-exposure with multiple light sources Model: Vivica Ex Astris Makeup & Hair: Valeriya Shindrova


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APR-MAY 2014

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