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Mount Wachusett Community College

Computer Graphic Design Academic Program Review 2013

Submitted by: Associate Professor Leslie Cullen, Department Chair, Computer Graphic Design Programs


Mount Wachusett Community College

Computer Graphic Design Academic Program Review 2013

Submitted by: Associate Professor Leslie Cullen, Department Chair, Computer Graphic Design Programs With Contributions by: Rebecca Gerry and Robert Mayer, Adjunct Faculty; Patricia Brewerton, Coordinator Career Planning and Placement; Fagan Forhan, Director of Experiential Learning Opportunities and Civic Engagement; Shawn LaRoche, MWCC Research Analyst Dermot Mac Cormack, External Consultant Associate Professor, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

TABLE OF CONTENTS: §

Section I: Data

2

§

Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population

24

§

Section III: Curriculum

48

§

Section IV: Instructional Support

62

§

Section V: Additional Questions and Program Evaluation Summary

72

§

Appendix

78


SECTION I: Data • Enrollment • Student Persistence • Course Completion Rates • Employment and Transfer • Student Surveys Please see Appendices A–D for all data and support material relating to Section I: Data.

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In the spring of 2013, the Mount Wachusett Community College Office of Institutional Research provided the following data and statistical information on the Computer Graphic Design Certificates and Programs:

ENROLLMENT: The complete enrollment data can be found in Appendix A. A summary review of the enrollment data from FY2008 to FY2012 shows an overall enrollment decrease of 22% for all print and web design degrees and certificates. While FY2009 and FY2010 reflect a 4% and 16% increase respectively, enrollments began to decrease by 7% in FY2011. In FY2012 the CGD and CGW programs saw a significant overall decrease of 31% from the previous year. This major decline in enrollments in FY2012 (fall 2011-spring 2012) affected course offerings and enrollments through spring 2013. Several classes needed to be combined and course substitutions were judiciously made to accommodate the students who were enrolled from fall 2011 through spring 2013. Having seen relatively steady enrollments from FY2008 to FY2011, there were no precursors or indications that we would face such a steep decline in FY2012. Consequently, short of anecdotal information, we have been unable to document a clear cause for such a decrease in enrollments. While these enrollment numbers proved surprising and challenging for the CGD and CGW programs, by fall 2012 the total enrollments improved to 76 full and part-time students. Enrollments have remained steady through the spring of 2013 with 68 full and part-time students. However, it should be noted that these numbers do not equate to the complete FY2013 data, and this data will not be available for comparison until late July 2013. The CGD department is confident based on the full and part-time numbers, as well as the number of courses offered in fall 2012 and spring 2013, that there will be a marked increase in enrollments from FY2012 to FY2013. CGD/CGDC/CGW/CGWC Enrollments    

FY2008

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

FY2012

% Change   FY08-­‐FY12  

CGD

62

70

62

60

49

-­‐21%

CGDC

8

9

15

12

4

-­‐50%

TOTAL CGD/CGDC  

70

79

77

72

53

-­‐24%

CGW

63

62

75

76

46

-­‐27%

CGWC

7

5

17

10

10

43%

TOTAL CGW/CGWC  

70

67

92

86

56

-­‐20%

TOTAL

140

146

169

158

109

-­‐22%

4%

16%

-­‐7%

-­‐31%

% change  in  total   enrollments  from   previous  year  CGD  

% change  in  total   enrollments  from   previous  year  all   MWCC  programs  

7%  

8%

3

2%

-­‐5%


Factors Effecting Enrollment: Although only anecdotal and not data driven, we believe there were several factors that may have lead to a decline of the CGD enrollments in fall 2011.

The Economic Recession The economy must be viewed as the largest contributor to our enrollment decline. By fall of 2011, the country was in the greatest recession it has seen in decades. According to the Department of Labor Statistics, unemployment rates were at 9% by September 2011 (http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000). We surmise that parents and students alike were leery of paying for a degree in graphic and web design that has historically been one of the most competitive industries. Even during the best economic times, graphic designers need to develop strong networks, have a highly competitive and professional portfolio, and must compete with a fervent and active industry of creative individuals. When money is tight and unemployment rates high, this industry may not be the “go to” field for parents and students for fear of the competition all designers face in obtaining jobs. Like all creative careers, including the visual and performing arts, designers face keen job competition as employment is based on one’s creativity and how they stack up against others. Although strong and promising positions are available nearly everywhere in graphic, web, interactive and UX/UI design (User Experience/User Interface Design) competition is fierce for these positions. This isn’t anything new, but when parents and their children are looking for guaranteed jobs in a poor economy, areas in Business, Nursing, and the Health Services fields will likely be sought first.

Advising Issues Additionally, it should be noted that in fall 2011, a new student to the CGD major indicated directly to the CGD department chair that she received highly negative commentary about enrolling as a CGD and Photography major at MWCC. This student indicated that when she came in to register for classes in the summer of 2011, she met with a “male” advisor who asked her why she would want to go into graphic design and photography since there “were no jobs.” This particular commentary and scenario was highly troubling to the CGD chair and the department as a whole. If such information is being projected towards incoming advisees and prospective students, we will continue to see a lack of enrollment. Whomever the advisor was, he was highly misinformed. According to all of the labor and career websites reviewed for this report, and as is further addressed and noted in Section II, graphic design has a predicted growth of 13% between 2010 and 2020 nationwide and 3% in Massachusetts and web designers/developers has a predicted growth increase of 22%.

Staff and Adjunct Issues Another issue the CGD department faced, that we believe may have affected enrollments, was the direct effect of an apathetic and difficult staff member, who also taught as an adjunct faculty member. This individual had regular and direct contact with the students within our labs, and negative commentary ran rampant among our students in 2010 regarding this matter. Recognizing the power of students’ opinions, especially their commentary via social networks and between their friends and peers, we believe this had a strong negative impact on the perception of our programs. In the fall of 2011 the CGD department hired new lab staff to accommodate students needs and to improve the interpersonal relationships with our students.

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Weaker Direct Marketing Lastly, as will be further noted within Section II, a decrease in direct marketing efforts for the past several years has had an effect on the CGD programs. In our 2008 Program Review, the CGD department was able to obtain several sample newspaper ads, as well as a radio spot, that were produced by the Marketing and Communications Department for the targeted and direct marketing of our graphic and web design programs. Since our last review we have limited evidence of these targeted marketing efforts. This is a weakness that needs to be addressed, and a greater push needs to be made to address the needs of programs like CGD and CGW that rely on the visibility and recognition generated by targeting our external audience.

Plans for Improving Enrollments: Please see Appendix B for materials relating to the following improvement plans:

Advising In late March 2012, the CGD Department Chair, met with the entire MWCC advising staff to conduct an information session on Graphic Design. The goal was to showcase our program, and delineate the appropriate qualifications and interests of a new student who should entertain the idea of becoming a graphic design major. The advising staff was also provided with an informational handout called “Understanding Graphic Design� (See Appendix B). This information session should have proved highly useful to the advising staff, and we believe repeat sessions should be held annually in early spring to discuss changes in the curriculum, to understand the current job market, and to explore key topics of this everchanging and fast-paced field. Proper, knowledgeable advising is the key to the success of our student enrollments. CGD faculty members are not advisors for new, incoming freshmen; therefore, having advisors equipped with the proper tools and knowledge to discuss this industry with our prospective students is imperative to our enrollment success. A strong recommendation is to have a selected advising liaison between the department chair and the entire advising staff. This is something the CGD department did for years, by working with Glenn Roberts and Elaine Murray, but this was recently eliminated. Having a direct contact person within advising is important and would allow the CGD department to provide information, to discuss concerns, and to keep dialogue open between the faculty and the advising staff.

Advising Materials The CGD department chair creates advising packets for all continuing students in the CGD and CGW programs and posts this material to the department Blackboard site each registration period. Additionally, informational materials are provided to the advising staff to help with spring and summer enrollments. Again, continuing to ensure that our students as well as the advising staff is well equipped with proper advising materials is the key to maintaining and increasing enrollments. Any barriers whatsoever between proper advising and our students need to enroll in classes must be carefully evaluated and eliminated. The most recent advising materials can be found in Appendix B.

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Improved Marketing In the immediate weeks following our fall 2011 enrollment decline the CGD department took action by meeting with Robin Duncan, Vice President of Marketing and Communications. We discussed our needs for targeted and direct marketing to help increase enrollments. That same semester the CGD department was included in the Career Focus magazine published by the college in a feature called “Create Your Future Through Visual Arts & Design” and a new “cluster brochure” developed by the Admissions office. Although to date no further targeted marketing has been produced for CGD, the department chair will continue to seek the support of the Division Dean and Marketing to help target and recruit new students. Please see Appendix B for samples of this work. Several ideas for increased marketing include: •

The redevelopment of the CGD website to include all possible SEO (search engine optimization) techniques. The CGD department, in collaboration with the Marketing Department, is currently addressing this work. This should be complete by fall 2013. A draft of the current website can be found in Appendix B.

Promotion of our Spring Exhibit to all local newspapers and beyond, including the Worcester Telegram. The more publicity the CGD programs have, the more likely they are to attract new students.

Promoting and showcasing CGD student work at local art shows and galleries. Perhaps some high schools would allow CGD students to display a small exhibit of their best work for a period of time within their schools.

Promoting and showcasing CGD student work at the Leominster and Devens campuses.

Showcasing and exhibiting area high school students’ work within the CGD gallery.

Targeted screen advertising at the Gardner Cinema and Fitchburg Cinema World theaters.

Admissions Recruitment In February 2012, the CGD department met with members of the Admissions staff to discuss strategies and targeted recruitment for the CGD and CGW programs. The admissions staff was very helpful in suggesting recruitment strategies and provided e-marketing materials, as well as a list of area high schools with strong art programs. Some of the main strategies discussed were: high school visits by CGD faculty and students; the production of direct marketing materials (flyers, posters, brochures) for the admissions staff to take to college fairs; and specifically work to target the area high school art and graphic design students. Subsequently, a recruitment flyer was produced by a student in the CGD department and was provided to the Admissions staff to be utilized at college fairs and during recruitment visits at area high schools. See Appendix B for a sample of this flyer. Additionally, several current students from the CGD and CGW programs visited their high school alma maters to present these recruitment flyers to faculty and students. While these strategies are effective, such recruitment efforts have proven to be extremely time consuming and outside of the capabilities and resources of the full-time faculty with 6


full workloads. Greater support from Admissions and other areas of the administration is needed for successful long-term recruitment.

Aspire/Title III and Curriculum Redevelopment In fall 2013, full and part-time faculty from the CGD and CGW programs will be utilizing the Aspire program to keep our content current and pertinent to the workforce needs and our students’ interests. The primary goals of the curriculum redevelopment will be to restructure and align the CGD and CGW courses and content; change the programs’ names to offer greater recognition and appeal for prospective students; create strong curriculum maps with logical and realistic projects across all classes, and develop clear and measurable objectives-based teaching modules. Of greatest potential is the concept that the two programs be redeveloped into one graphic and interactive/web design degree program that is a cohesive curriculum aimed at providing training in all areas of print, digital and interactive media. Several of these recommendations are noted in the CGD Program Evaluation Report developed by Dylan Mac Cormack, Professor of Graphic and Interactive Design, Tyler School of Art, Temple University (See Appendix C).

STUDENT PERSISTENCE: As reported by the Office of Institutional Research, CGD yields persistence rates significantly higher than the MWCC average in the Fall to Spring and Spring to Fall Persistence. With the exception of fall 2009 to fall 2010 and fall 2011 to fall 2012, when the persistence rates of the CGD degree programs declined, the CGD and CGW degree programs yield numbers higher than the college-wide rates. A review of the data from the most recent academic year—Fall 2011 to Spring 2012 and Spring 2012 to Fall 2012 persistence—reflect that the CGD totals yield rates higher than or consistent with the college as a whole. One exception where CGD rates are lower is the in Fall 2011 to Fall 2012 persistence in which CGD yields a persistence rate 8 points lower than the college as a whole. Additionally, this fall-to-fall persistence has declined over the last 5 years from 57% to 51%. Although 51% is on par with the college average over 5 years, the decline does reflect a need for a stronger action plan and strategies to improve persistence especially as it relates to the fall-to-fall attrition. Please see Appendix A for the complete persistence data.

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Fall to  Spring  Persistence  -­‐  CGD   Major  

Fall 2007-­‐ Spring  2008  

Fall 2008-­‐ Spring  2009  

Fall 2009-­‐   Spring  2010  

Fall 2010-­‐   Spring  2011  

Fall 2011-­‐   Spring  2012  

81%

85%

85%

90%

84%

71%

100%

73%

56%

25%

69%

78%

85%

78%

76%

80%

100%

64%

56%

44%

75% 67%  

83% 68%  

82% 71%  

79% 68%  

73% 71%  

Computer Graphic   Design/Print  Degree   Computer  Graphic   Design  Certificate   Computer  Graphic   Design/Web/Multi-­‐ Media  Degree   Computer  Graphic   Web  Certificate   CGD  TOTAL   MWCC  TOTAL      

  Major  

Computer Graphic   Design/Print  Degree   Computer  Graphic   Design  Certificate   Computer  Graphic   Design/Web/Multi-­‐ Media  Degree   Computer  Graphic   Web  Certificate   CGD  TOTAL   MWCC  TOTAL         Major   Computer  Graphic   Design/Print  Degree   Computer  Graphic   Design  Certificate   Computer  Graphic   Design/Web/Multi-­‐ Media  Degree   Computer  Graphic   Web  Certificate   CGD  TOTAL   MWCC  TOTAL  

 

 

Spring to  Fall  Persistence  -­‐  CGD  

 

 

Spring 2008-­‐ Fall  2008  

Spring 2009-­‐ Fall  2009  

Spring 2010-­‐ Fall  2010  

Spring 2011-­‐ Fall  2011  

Spring 2012-­‐ Fall  2012  

72%

68%

56%

66%

66%

75%

88%

89%

60%

100%

76%

61%

65%

50%

60%

67%

67%

63%

100%

100%

73% 58%  

67% 59%  

64% 58%  

59% 57%  

66% 58%  

  Fall  to  Fall  Persistence   -­‐  CGD  

Fall 2007-­‐ Fall  2008  

Fall 2008-­‐   Fall  2009  

Fall 2009-­‐   Fall  2010  

Fall 2010-­‐   Fall  2011  

Fall 2011-­‐   Fall  2012  

59%

58%

50%

67%

61%

67%

80%

60%

43%

25%

57%

52%

58%

44%

40%

25%

75%

55%

50%

56%

57% 48%  

57% 49%  

55% 59%  

52% 48%  

51% 59%  

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Persistence Summary Factors that affect CGD persistence remain the same from year to year and plans for improvements are as follows: •

One major issue we face each year is that many of our students enroll in CGD without any prior knowledge or experience in graphic design. Many students on the first day of class can’t provide a clear definition of what graphic design is. While we work closely with our students during the first week to explain to them the expectations and requirements of the curriculum and the creative and critical thinking skills this field of study requires, most students do not realize what this field entails until they have explored and experienced it first hand. Many will make it through the first year of the curriculum, but as our spring to fall and fall to fall persistence rates suggest, these students will not register for the advanced second year classes. Furthermore, as noted in section 1.2 and 1.2.1 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report (see Appendix C), Professor Mac Cormack notes the importance of changing the name of the current design program to clearly reflect what the curriculum is and to move away from technology as the key component of the curriculum. He notes, “Prospective students should know that they are about to embark on a possible career in graphic design that is supported by technology, not the other way around.” Far too often students see the word “computer” in our current title and feel confident in their aptitude for computers. However, we must be clear that computers are merely our tool and not the emphasis of our degree programs. The focus and emphasis must be shifted back to graphic design. A clear name is fundamental to our ability to attract students who are passionate about the visual communications fields and not just the computer.

Common factors that affect students’ completion of the CGD curriculum are lack of academic responsibility and time management skills, and the inability to seek guidance and support when it is needed most. Students are underprepared for the rigors of college, as well as the time commitment and management that this program of study requires. Most graphic and web design projects within the CGD curriculum will take students anywhere from 15-30 hours to complete and require a great deal of expertise and effort. Many students are not prepared for, or motivated enough, to maintain this high level of work and academic rigor. While we can’t individually effect strong change in student’s preparedness for college work, we should be tailoring our marketing efforts to those who have had some previous experience and interests in graphic design, as well as recruiting students from area high schools who have a vested interest in the arts, communication and design from their previous course work.

Financial constraints and the ability to balance work and school is an issue for most of our students. As counterproductive as it may be to the successful completion of the CGD and CGW degree programs, most of our students have no choice but to work 25 or even 40 hours per week while they are in school. Many of our students are often ill equipped to manage their time between college coursework and work/home life. To lessen students’ financial burden, preparing students with a greater understanding of financial aid and scholarship opportunities is one step that the institution as a whole must continue to work on from the initial intake of a student 9


through Admissions. As a department, we can assist with these efforts at the individual advising level. While we can’t control or fix a student’s financial needs, ensuring each student feels connected and supported by the faculty is a key to students’ success. We will continue to make every effort to provide guidance, and most importantly, the mentoring and individual support most of our student population is in need of. •

Lastly, while we can’t point to one specific issue (as noted above), many personal issues should be accounted for our students’ lack of persistence, and we have some clear programmatic issues that must be addressed. As outlined throughout section 3 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report (Appendix C), through a variety of focus groups conducted and moderated by Professor Mac Cormack in March 2013, students indicated some very clear concerns that would likely have an impact on student persistence. Issues addressed within this report and expressed by the students include courses with an excessive workload that resulted in dilution of quality student work, lack of organization within the class content and pedagogy, and concerns and apprehensions about taking some courses due to teaching methods and the atmosphere within class. As a department we must resolve these issues and it is believed that the Title III/Aspire training in fall 2013 will help mitigate many of these issues with proper instructional training and teaching strategies that will improve pedagogy across all of our courses. We hope to improve persistence and retention with greater consistency among teaching styles, and will do our best to ensure students are getting fair, competent and highly knowledgeable instruction. With the teambased curriculum assessment and program redesign, each course will be carefully reviewed and restructured if necessary.

COURSE COMPLETION RATES: The entire course completion data can be found in Appendix A.

Graphic Design Print (CGD) First year CGD classes have lower completion rates than second year classes. Trend averages from 2008 to 2012 show completion rates in the first two semesters within a range of 72% to 81%. Three classes represent the lowest completion rates: CGD101 Design Theory with 73%, CGD109 Introduction to Web Media with 74%, and CGD235 Typography in Visual Communication with 72%. On average, 76% of CGD students complete their first year classes. However, 10% of first year students fail these 6 courses and 16% withdraw. Several theories and factors likely contribute to these lower completion rates. While many have been previously noted under the enrollment and persistence summaries, key distinct factors may effect the completion of these first year classes. Through the Title III/ASPIRE grant, the CGD department hopes to develop strategies that improve the completion rates in the courses noted below. •

Course workload may be a common factor affecting the CGD completion rates in CGD101 and CGD109. In the fall and spring semester of a student’s first year there are three CGD courses required per semester as the graphic design core. 10


As noted previously, many students are not fully aware of the high expectations of such a creative discipline. We believe many students come in with personal assumptions of the courses that do not match the actual rigor and requirements of the course curriculum. Through Aspire/Title III and a team curriculum redevelopment planned for fall 2013, the CGD department hopes to create a logical and realistic plan across the core graphic design classes that will stagger and map creative project due dates throughout the two semesters, thus easing the burden on students. Additionally, based on student feedback obtained within class, and information gathered from the consultant’s visit and review, students are consistently noting an overload of work among some classes which leaves them feeling that their only option to manage the situation is to prioritize and choose where to do their best work versus where to do the minimum to get by. Faculty must be cognizant and careful to not overload students with “busy work” and last minute additions to project expectations. Course project modules must be developed with clear embedded skills and objectives measured by rubric–based assessments that students are presented with at the start of the project. As noted in section 3.0 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report, “The question is quality, not quantity. By adding so much work, students may never fully realize their projects, or be able to pay close attention to all the necessary details of their work.” •

Another issue within the first year of the curriculum was also addressed in section 3.5 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report. Students expressed concerns regarding the CGD235 Typography in Visual Communication course being offered online and taught remotely for the first half of the semester. Professor Mac Cormack notes the need for one-on-one training for such an essential area of study and a critical design skill. With a completion rate of only 72%, a failure rate of 15% and a withdrawal rate of 19% over the past 5 years, CGD235 is a course that will require a complete review and Title III redesign.

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Computer Graphic  Design  PRINT  1st  Year   Course       Number  

CGD101                    

Trend Averages  

1ST  SEMESTER   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit  

73%  

% Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit  

66% 11%   16%       7%  

75% 7%   14%       5%  

CGD109

% Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit  

74%

             

% Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete  

66% 9%   18%      

 

% Grade  <  76  

8%

CGD104                    

Course Number  

78%

                                         

Trend Averages  

 

             

2ND  SEMESTER   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or   Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or   Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or   Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete  

 

% Grade  <  76  

CGD105                     CGD235                       CGD240  

76% 71%   10%   15%       6%   72%   68%   15%   19%       6%   81%   71%   7%   13%       13%  

Computer Graphic  Design  PRINT  2nd  Year   3RD  SEMESTER   CGD102  

% Completed:  Earned  Credit  

4TH SEMESTER   93%    

                      CGD204  

% Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit  

91% 8%   6%       10%       85%  

             

% Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete  

80% 5%   12%      

 

% Grade  <  76  

7%

12

                     

CGD103     %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or       Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete       %  Grade  <  76           CGD106   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or       Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete  

94%

 

10%

% Grade  <  76  

87%     7%       12%       97%   88%   10%   7%      


Computer Graphic Design Web (CGW) Due to the duplication of first year core classes across the CGD Print and CGW Web program (with the exception of CGD235 and CGD112) the first year CGW classes reflect the same lower completion rates versus those required within a student’s second year. Trend averages from 2008 to 2012 show completion rates in the first two semesters within a range of 69% to 81%. Once again, three classes represent the lowest completion rates: CGD101 Design Theory with 73%, CGD109 Introduction to Web Media with 74%, and CGD112 Communication in Multimedia Design with 69%. On average, 75% of CGW students complete their first year classes, and like the CGD program, 10% of first year students fail these 6 courses while 15% withdraw. The same theories and factors apply to CGD101 and CGD109, however, it should be noted that CGD112 has the lowest completion rate of all of the CGD and CGW program courses. With a completion rate of only 69%, a failure rate of 15% and a withdrawal rate of 16% over the past 5 years, CGD112 is viewed as a barrier course and will require a complete review and subsequent revision through the Title III grant. Computer Graphic  Design  WEB  1st  Year   Course       Number    1  ST  SEMESTER   CGD101   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit       %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete       %  Grade  <  76       CGD104   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit       %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete       %  Grade  <  76       CGD109   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit       %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete      

% Grade  <  76  

Trend Averages  

Course     Number    

73% 66%   11%   16%       7%   78%   75%   7%   14%       5%   74%   66%   9%   18%       8%  

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2ND  SEMESTER   CGD105   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit       %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete       %  Grade  <  76       CGD112   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit       %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete       %  Grade  <  76       CGD240   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit       %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher       %  Failed       %  Withdrew       %  Incomplete      

% Grade  <  76  

Trend Averages  

76% 71%   10%   15%       6%   69%   61%   16%   15%       12%   81%   71%   7%   13%       13%  


When compared to the first year courses, completion rates in the second year of the CGW program reflect much higher completion rates ranging from 80% to 96%. However, these second year courses are comparatively lower in completion rate than those in the second year of the CGD program. While the CGW program can prove to be more technically intensive with the need for students to learn HTML and CSS coding skills, these lower rates will be noted and fully reviewed by the CGD department during the Title III curriculum redevelopment, and remedies will be sought to raise the completion rates for the CGW courses. Computer Graphic  Design  WEB  2nd  Year   CGD110                           CGD241                  

3RD SEMESTER   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete  

 

% Grade  <  76  

  CGD242                  

  %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete  

 

% Grade  <  76  

80% 67%   7%   15%       12%       81%   71%   17%   11%      

                    18%                     14%       85%   78%   16%   13%      

CGD210                         CGD244                  

4TH SEMESTER   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete   %  Grade  <  76       %  Completed:  Earned  Credit   %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher   %  Failed   %  Withdrew   %  Incomplete  

 

% Grade  <  76  

         

         

         

EMPLOYMENT AND TRANSFER: Employment Data from Graduate Surveys Please see Appendix A to review the CGD, CGDC, CGW and CGWC graduate survey results. The survey was sent to a combined 121 graduates of the certificate and degree programs who graduated in the years 2008–2011. Forty-two surveys were returned, resulting in a return rate of 35%. While this tool can be helpful in determining employment data, with a limited one-third return rate, data will likely be skewed and will not be a clear representation of our alumni employment rates.

14

84% 73%   18%   15%       18%       96%   96%       17%          


A review of the survey results indicate the following: Employment Data (Graduate Surveys) 16 of 42 respondents indicated they were employed in the graphic design field resulting in a placement rate of 38% for all respondents. While only 27% of the respondents from 2008 indicated they were employed in the field, 5 out of 10 alumni indicated they were employed in the graphic design field in 2009. Although this number dropped down to 33% in 2011, half of the respondents indicated they were employed in 2011. Consequently, as noted in the chart below, the remaining 50% of graduates from 2011 indicated they had transferred to a 4-year institution for a combined employment and transfer rate of 100% for all 2011 survey respondents. Employed in  the  Graphic  Design  Field  By  Year     #  of  Graduates  

# Respondents  

# Employed  

% of  Respondents   Employed    

2008 TOTALS   2009  TOTALS   2010  TOTALS   2011  TOTALS  

25 39   31   26  

11 10   15   6  

3 5   5   3  

27% 50%   33%   50%  

FOUR  YEAR  TOTAL  

121

42

16

38%

 

Percentage of  Graduates  Responded  

35%  

Transfer Data (Graduate Surveys) Transfer After  Graduation  By  Year  Per  Degree   #  Respondents  

# Transfer  

% Transferred  

Total Employed   and  Transferred   2008-­‐2012  

2008 TOTALS   2009  TOTALS   2010  TOTALS   2011  TOTALS  

11 10   15   6  

6 2   5   3  

55% 20%   33%   50%  

82% 70%   66%   100%  

FOUR  YEAR  TOTAL  

42

16

38%

76%

Between 2008 and 2011, 38% of Computer Graphic Design graduates transferred to another institution. 2008 showed the highest percentage of students who continued their education with 55% of respondents transferring. In 2009, the lowest of all four years, the transfer rate fell back to 20%. However, with the decrease in transfer came an increase in those who were employed with 50% of respondents indicating they were employed in the graphic design field. It is worth noting that out of the 42 respondents from 2008-2011, 76% of these graduates were either employed in the graphic design field or had transferred to a four-year institution.

15


Transfer Data (Office of Institutional Research) The data from the Office of Institutional Research indicates that 40% (14 out of 35) of transferring Computer Graphic Design graduates went on to Fitchburg State University. The remaining transfer students are dispersed among a wide variety of public and private institutions. 50% of those who transferred remained in Massachusetts, and of those students, 70% went on to attend public state colleges or universities. Transfer School   FITCHBURG  STATE   UNIVERSITY   QUINSIGAMOND   COMMUNITY  COLLEGE   UNIVERSITY  OF   MASSACHUSETTS     AT  LOWELL   KEENE  STATE  COLLEGE   UNIVERSITY  OF   MASSACHUSETTS-­‐ DARTMOUTH   BECKER  COLLEGE   CEDARVILLE   UNIVERSITY   CHAMPLAIN  COLLEGE   CLARK  UNIVERSITY   EASTERN  KENTUCKY   UNIVERSITY   FRAMINGHAM  STATE   UNIVERSITY   GEORGIA  PERIMETER   COLLEGE   PALM  BEACH  STATE   COLLEGE   SAVANNAH  COLLEGE   OF  ART  &  DESIGN   SIMMONS  COLLEGE   UNIVERSITY  OF   MASSACHUSETTS   BOSTON    

STATE

2Y 4Y  

Type of   Institution  

2008

2009

2010

2011

2008-­‐ 2011

MA

4

Public

6

1

3

4

14

MA

2

Public

2

0

0

1

3

MA

4

Public

2

0

1

0

3

NH

4

Public

0

2

0

0

2

MA

4

Public

0

0

0

2

2

MA

4

Private

0

0

1

0

1

OH

4

Private

0

0

0

1

1

VT MA  

4 4  

Private Private  

1 0  

0 0  

0 1  

0 0  

1 1  

KY

4

Public

0

0

1

0

1

MA

4

Public

0

0

0

1

1

GA

2

Public

0

1

0

0

1

FL

4

Public

1

0

0

0

1

GA

4

Private

0

0

0

1

1

MA

4

Private

0

1

0

0

1

MA

4

Public

0

1

0

0

1

12

6

7

10

35

When comparing the transfer and graduation rates from 2008-2011, 35 out of 121 graduates, a total of 29%, transferred to a 4-year institution.

16


STUDENT SURVEYS Please see Appendix D to review the complete student survey questions and the results. Please also note the specific comments students made regarding the CGD or CGW programs.

Continuing Students Surveys In the spring 2013 semester, the CGD department administered web-based, anonymous surveys to all of our CGD, CGDC, CGW and CGWC matriculating (continuing) students. Each survey was administered based on a student’s degree program; Computer Graphic Design Print or Computer Graphic Design Web. These student surveys help us to determine how the CGD department is doing with regard to student satisfaction, individualized attention, the classroom environment: hardware, software, classroom cleanliness/climate/temperature, and more. The data is collected via Survey Monkey.

Capstone Surveys A second set of surveys was administered every spring from 2010–2013 to students enrolled in the CGD and CGW Capstone courses. This capstone-level specific survey addresses student satisfaction within their program of study, but also provides insight into students’ experiences, and their overall achievement of learning goals and objectives within the curriculum and the Gen Ed core. The data is collected via Survey Monkey.

Continuing Students Survey Results A summary of the results for the CGD and CGW Continuing Student Surveys conducted in spring 2013 are as follows: Expectations Out of 28 students who took the survey in 2013, 54% (15 out of 28) said that the CGD and CGW programs met 90–100% of their expectations. While another 29% (8 out of 28) students indicated that 80%-90% of their expectations were met. A total of 83% of CGD and CGW students indicated that the Print and Web Design programs were meeting 80-100% of their expectations. Only 14% indicated 70-80% (4 out of 28 students) and 1 student responded with 69% or lower in the CGW survey. These students were given an opportunity to follow-up their ranking. All of the comments relating to these above figures can be found in Appendix D.

17


Computer Graphic  Design—Print  and  Web   2013  Continuing  Students  Survey   To  what  extent  is  the  MWCC   CGD/CGW  Degree  Program                               meeting  your  expectations?  

CGD

CGW

Totals

Answer Options  

Response Percent  

Response Count  

Response Percent  

Response Count  

Total

Total   Count  

90 –  100%  

66.7%

10

38.5%

5

53.6%

15

80 –  90%  

20.0%

3

38.5%

5

28.6%

8

70 –  80%  

13.3%

2

15.4%

2

14.3%

4

69% or  below  

0.0%

0

7.7%

1

3.6%

1

 

answered question  

 

15

 

13

 

28

 

skipped question  

 

3

 

4

 

7

The CGW survey results indicate that out of 10 students, 5 rank their expectations at 90100% while the other 5 rank at 80-100%. In reviewing the comments, there are some responses that may point to the lower satisfaction overall: •

“Well the expectations can be confusing from teacher to teacher one teacher will teach you one way another will teach you a completely different way.”

“I think the program has an extreme amount of detailed information that is very valuable. I wish every professor for the program taught around the same. Ex: This is what we are doing, I will show you how to do it, now you try, any questions, you will be doing homework on what we just learned. I know that might sound like your holding our hands, but it will make me a better designer if I can learn and understand everything that is being taught.”

“I would like there to be more work with websites. I feel like I have created a lot of print work but not enough web work.”

The department chair and faculty will be reviewing these comments as we move through the Title III/ASPIRE training in fall 2013. One of our main goals will be to work towards a greater cohesiveness of teaching styles throughout all of our classes; have transparent and consistent expectations at the start of the courses; and develop pedagogy that fully engages the learning styles of all our students. Greatest Strengths The combined data from the 2013 surveys indicates that faculty expertise ranks highest, at 89%, as the greatest strength in the CGD and CGW programs. Notably, the students also responded that the most current software and the computers ranked next highest in the greatest strengths of the degree programs at 86% and 82% respectively. Any ranking over 70% was noted with a gray highlight as seen in the data chart.

18


Based on  the  classes  you  have  taken,   what  are  the  GREATEST  STRENGTHS  of   the  CGD/CGW  Degree  Program?  Please   check  ONLY  those  you  feel  are  true   STRENGTHS.  Check  all  that  apply.  

CGD

CGW

Totals

Response Response   Response   Response   Total   Total     Percent   Count   Percent   Count   Percent   Count  

Answer Options   Computers  

66.7%

10

100.0%

13

82.1%

23

Monitors

60.0%

9

69.2%

9

64.3%

18

Printers

33.3%

5

92.3%

12

60.7%

17

Scanners

20.0%

3

46.2%

6

32.1%

9

Overhead Projection  Systems  

26.7%

4

61.5%

8

42.9%

12

Most Current  Software  

86.7%

13

84.6%

11

85.7%

24

Faculty Expertise  

86.7%

13

92.3%

12

89.3%

25

Quality of  Instruction  

73.3%

11

76.9%

10

75.0%

21

Faculty Attendance  

66.7%

10

76.9%

10

71.4%

20

Faculty Assistance  with   Advising/Registration  

33.3%

5

69.2%

9

50.0%

14

Faculty Availability  (Outside  of  class)  

40.0%

6

61.5%

8

50.0%

14

Paraprofessional Support  (Tutoring)  

6.7%

1

23.1%

3

14.3%

4

Career Counseling  

13.3%

2

46.2%

6

28.6%

8

Lab Assistant  Support  

66.7%

10

76.9%

10

71.4%

20

Open Lab  Time-­‐-­‐During  class  

66.7%

10

76.9%

10

71.4%

20

Open Lab  Time-­‐-­‐Outside  of  class  

73.3%

11

69.2%

9

71.4%

20

20.0%

3

46.2%

6

32.1%

9

26.7%

4

61.5%

8

42.9%

12

20.0%

3

61.5%

8

39.3%

11

0.0%

0

7.7%

1

3.6%

1

Lab/Classroom Environment-­‐-­‐ Temperature   Lab/Classroom  Environment-­‐-­‐ Cleanliness  of  the  floors,  etc.   Lab/Classroom  Environment-­‐-­‐       Chairs  and  Desks   Other  (please  specify)      

answered question  

 

15

 

13

 

skipped question  

 

3

 

4

 

28    

7

Weaknesses The combined data from the 2013 surveys indicate that the CGD and CGW students rank the Paraprofessional Support (Tutoring) as the weakest aspect of the CGD program. The survey also shows that the Lab/Classroom Environment—Temperature and the Lab/Classroom Environment—Chairs and Desks as the next weakest aspects of the CGD and CGW programs with a 29% and 24% rating respectively. Each of these weaknesses will be reviewed by the department and carefully addressed. We will work with the MWCC Library to obtain qualified tutors and maintain these tutoring positions so that this support is available to our students on a regular basis. As well, the department chair will work closely with the Division Dean and the 19


administration to obtain funding for new and modern computer desks and chairs that provide proper ergonomics for our student use. Currently, the computer desks in the labs are built in, immobile, and constructed of wood with no proper ergonomic placement of the mouse and keyboard, and many of the chairs are in need of replacement due to wear and age. For years we have had several complications with the heating and cooling units within our classrooms. We have sought the assistance of the MWCC facilities experts who have made adjustments and repairs as needed. However, the temperature range within the labs is never satisfactory and should be carefully reviewed by the administration. Extreme temperature ranges within our labs are not unusual, and this is not conducive to a quality learning environment for our students. Based on  the  classes  you  have  taken,   what  are  the  WEAKNESSES  of  the  CGW   Web  Degree  Program?    (Please  keep  in   mind,  if  you  chose  an  option  as  a   strength,  it  can  not  also  be  a  weakness.)                                       Check  all  that  apply.  

CGD

CGW

Totals

Response Response   Response   Response   Total   Total     Percent   Count   Percent   Count   Percent   Count  

Answer Options   Computers  

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Monitors

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Printers

20.0%

3

0.0%

0

14.3%

3

Scanners

6.7%

1

16.7%

2

14.3%

3

Overhead Projection  Systems  

20.0%

3

8.3%

1

19.0%

4

Most Current  Software  

6.7%

1

0.0%

0

4.8%

1

Faculty Expertise  

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Quality of  Instruction  

13.3%

2

0.0%

0

9.5%

2

Faculty Attendance  

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Faculty Assistance  with   Advising/Registration  

6.7%

1

0.0%

0

4.8%

1

Faculty Availability  (Outside  of  class)  

20.0%

3

8.3%

1

19.0%

4

Paraprofessional Support  (Tutoring)  

26.7%

4

25.0%

3

33.3%

7

Career Counseling  

6.7%

1

8.3%

1

9.5%

2

Lab Assistant  Support  

0.0%

0

8.3%

1

4.8%

1

Open Lab  Time-­‐-­‐During  class  

0.0%

0

16.7%

2

9.5%

2

Open Lab  Time-­‐-­‐Outside  of  class  

13.3%

2

0.0%

0

9.5%

2

33.3%

5

8.3%

1

28.6%

6

6.7%

1

8.3%

1

9.5%

2

26.7%

4

8.3%

1

23.8%

5

26.7%

4

33.3%

4

38.1%

8

Lab/Classroom Environment-­‐-­‐ Temperature   Lab/Classroom  Environment-­‐-­‐ Cleanliness  of  the  floors,  etc.   Lab/Classroom  Environment-­‐-­‐     Chairs  and  Desks   Other  (please  specify)      

answered question      

9

20

 

12

 

21


Capstone Surveys Print Competencies Survey A total of 33 Computer Graphic Design Print Degree students responded to the survey between spring 2010 and spring 2013. The results reflect the following (complete results can be found in Appendix D): •

Of the 33 CGD students 46% had high school graphic arts classes before attending MWCC and another 42% indicated they were self-taught in graphic design or was a hobby.

Students had attended the following high schools within our service area: Wachusett Regional, Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical School, Narragansett, Oakmont, North Middlesex Regional, and Ayer.

37.5% of the 33 students indicated that they were minimally prepared and had below average competence in graphic design prior to starting their education at MWCC.

While it should be expected that CGD students completed design work within their classes at MWCC, many students also completed designs outside of their required coursework. 94% of students indicated that they completed servicelearning work and 90% had designed work for a friend or family member while attending classes.

56% of CGD students were planning to continue their education after MWCC while 36% were planning to obtain a job.

Of the students who indicated they would be transferring, the following schools were listed as their transfer institution: Fitchburg State University, Simmons College, Worcester State University, Becker College, Cedarville University (Ohio), UMass Lowell, and Mass Art.

On a scale from 1-5 (1 being the least competent and 5 being the most competent) students ranked their ability/competence/skill level in various areas of graphic design. The four-year average of all the competencies from 2010-2013 is 4.32.

Of the competencies listed, those notably lower than 4.00 are students’ skill and competence with QuarkXPress, Adobe Dreamweaver and Adobe Acrobat. Additionally, students indicated a slight deficiency in the areas of coding and designing websites with HTML, XHTML CSS and utilizing Dreamweaver.

It should be noted that although the total 4-year average of the above skills rated lower than 4.00, students who took the survey in 2013 show a marked improvement in these areas. This is due to our new requirement for all CGD Print majors to take a second level of Creative Web Design in their sophomore, fall semester. The skills/competencies in HTML, XHTML, CSS and the use of Dreamweaver were rated as 4.33 or higher in the 2013 survey results. We can surmise that this curriculum change has directly increased the students’ competence.

Each year from 2010 to 2013, the average of all the competencies/skills rank above 4.00. Notably, 2013 shows the greatest improvement with students indicating a 4.74 overall ranking on all of the skills/competencies in the CGD Print degree program. 21


Utilizing the MWCC Gen Ed assessment rubrics in Written and Oral Communication and Information literacy, students were asked to rank their ability/competence/skill level. The results are very good with students indicating an average ranking of 4.36 on all of the listed competencies/skills over the past 4 years. Interestingly, students in 2012 ranked their skills lower than all other years with an average overall ranking of 3.76. However, there are no clear indicators beyond the students’ responses as to why these numbers would be lower.

Students were given an opportunity to comment on what they feel their CGD print design classes prepared them for the most, the least, and if they had any further comments or recommendations. These comments can be found with the complete survey results in Appendix D. The CGD department will thoroughly review each comment and work to utilize these results to redevelop areas of curriculum in fall 2013.

Web Competencies Survey A total of 26 Computer Graphic Design Web Degree students responded to the survey between spring 2010 and spring 2013. The results reflect the following: •

Of the 26 CGW students 50% indicated they were self-taught in graphic design or was a hobby while 35% had high school graphic arts classes before attending MWCC. Additionally, 27% of these students indicated that had no prior experience in graphic design or web design.

Students had attended the following high schools within our service area: Murdock, North Middlesex Regional and Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical School.

42% of the 26 students indicated that they were minimally prepared and had below average competence in graphic design prior to starting their education at MWCC.

Like the CGD students, CGW students completed design work outside of their required coursework at MWCC. 100% of CGW students indicated that they completed service-learning work and 73% had designed work for a friend or family member while attending classes.

39% of CGW students were planning to continue their education after MWCC while 42% were planning to obtain a job.

Of the students who indicated they would be transferring, the following schools were listed as their transfer institution: Fitchburg State University, Keene State University, Franklin Pierce College, UMass Lowell, and Mass Art.

On a scale from 1-5 (1 being the least competent and 5 being the most competent) students ranked their ability/competence/skill level in various areas of graphic and web design. The four-year average of all the competencies from 2010-2013 is 4.33.

Of the competencies listed, those notably lower than 4.00 are students’ skill and competence with Adobe Flash, InDesign, Acrobat Professional and Fireworks.

Additionally, students indicated a notable drop and deficiency in the 2013 survey in their skill level of competence of 3B: Apply communications principles (analysis, prototyping, flowcharting, storyboarding, image editing) to 22


professional business correspondence, presentations, multimedia and communication pieces. Understanding copyrights and intellectual property also represents a notable decline from previous years. â&#x20AC;˘

The above skills are taught in CGD112 Communication in Multimedia Design. This course was previously noted as a barrier course for students. This data points to a continued need for a full evaluation of this course, including the teaching methodologies employed and course workload.

â&#x20AC;˘

Each year from 2010 to 2013, the average of all the competencies/skills rank above 4.00, ranging from 4.11 to 4.52.

â&#x20AC;˘

The results of the Written and Oral Communication and Information literacy skills/competencies, are equally as good as those in the CGD Print surevy with students indicating an average ranking of 4.37 on all competencies/skills over the past 4 years. Students in 2013 ranked their skills notably higher than all other years with an average overall ranking of 4.76.

Student comments and the complete survey results can be found in Appendix D.

23


SECTION II: Mission, Goals, and Target Population • Program Mission • College Comparisons • Advisory Board • Internal Groups • External Populations • Internal Groups • Other Populations • Job Market • Admissions & Marketing Plan

24


PROGRAM MISSION Computer Graphic Design Print—Associate in Science Computer Graphic Design Web—Associate in Science The Associate in Science Degree Programs in Computer Graphic Design Print and Web prepare students for employment in the highly competitive areas of graphic print, web or interactive media, or transfer to advanced degree programs. Our mission is to engage the creative spirit of life-long learners through a challenging, supportive learning environment and professional, caring faculty. Through a combination of coursework, skills-based training and instruction, and practical experiences, our programs aim to develop each student’s capacity for: critical thinking and problem solving; excellence in design technique and visual literacy; creative expression; a solid working knowledge of state of the art software applications; and the development of outstanding design portfolios. Computer Graphic Design Print—Certificate Computer Graphic Design Web—Certificate The Computer Graphic Design Print and Web Certificate programs prepare students for personal or career advancement, and provide the foundation for further study and exploration in graphic design print, web or interactive media, or a related field. Our mission is to engage the creative spirit of life-long learners through a challenging, supportive learning environment and professional, caring faculty. Through a combination of coursework, skills-based training and instruction, and practical experiences, our certificate programs aim to develop each student’s capacity for: critical thinking and problem solving; excellence in design technique and visual literacy; creative expression; and a solid working knowledge of state of the art software applications.

COLLEGE COMPARISONS Based on a review of other college catalogs, the colleges in our general area that have similar programs are as follows: • • • • • •

Quinsigamond Community College, Worcester, MA Fitchburg State University, Fitchburg, MA UMass Lowell, Lowell, MA Becker College, Worcester, MA Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, NH Keene State College, Keene, NH

Our closest geographic competitors, Quinsigamond Community College and Fitchburg State University have significantly different graphic and web design programs than ours at MWCC. While we provide highly comprehensive and competitive programs for low, in-state tuition costs, so too does Fitchburg State University (FSU), Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) and Greenfield Community College (GCC). All of these colleges serve overlapping areas of the same market of students we aim to serve. When students are comparing colleges several factors, such as their commute, the college tuition and fees, and the course offerings and curriculum, will sway a them in one direction over another. Some of the programs listed above combine various levels of web and interactive design within their two or four year curriculums. Fitchburg State University and Becker College 25


are the only programs that offer distinct web/interactive media degree options. Courses and programs vary in length of completion, options for specialty, and total cost. Please see Appendix E for the following programs’ curriculums and course descriptions.

Associate Degree Level Associate of Arts in Applied Arts New Media Design for Graphic Communications Quinsigamond Community College (QCC), Worcester, MA Quinsigamond Community College is the closest direct competitor from within the Massachusetts Community College system. It’s geographic proximity to MWCC presents the potential that students from the south central Montachusett and Worcester County regions may choose this community college over MWCC. The most significant difference between QCC’s program in Applied Arts and MWCC’s Computer Graphic Design Print (CGD) and Computer Graphic Design Web (CGW) programs is that QCC offers a single Associates degree by combining the print and web curriculums. The CGD and CGW programs at MWCC are distinctively separate programs. MWCC also offers one-year certificate options for students in Print or Web media—the Computer Graphic Design Print Certificate and the Computer Graphic Design Web Certificate. Please refer to the CGD, CGDC, CGW, CGWC curriculum sheets provided in Appendix F. While it was once a distinct advantage within the industry and followed job market trends to have separate degrees in graphic design and web design, the graphic design industry has shifted a great deal over the past four-five years and most designers are no longer experts in just one media type. Designers are now required to know and practice design for print, web and interactivity, they are multi-disciplinary, and have a tool box of technical and problem solving skills that allow them to design for any project/media type. Quinsigamond Community College’s program is a well-rounded, two-year curriculum that matches industry needs by developing multi-faceted designers. The QCC program provides students with a variety of courses in all areas of print, multimedia, web design, photography and interactive design. Also worth noting are two key factors that significantly differ from MWCC’s programs of study: 1. QCC requires only three General Education requirements in English Composition I and II and a Mathematics Elective. They also require two Art Theory Electives and students may take two additional Liberal Arts Electives. This is a minimal Gen Ed core compared to MWCC’s core requirements of a minimum of seven courses. This leaves ample room for the three–four required graphic and web design courses in the Applied Arts program per semester. 2. As stated on the QCC website, the APA program requires that students register simultaneously for all of the APA courses that are offered per semester. It is unclear if they allow part-time students to enroll in their curriculum: “The Applied Arts program is a high demand program and restricts day class offerings to 40 accepted full-time day students per academic year, beginning in the fall semester. Accepted students must register simultaneously for all 4 APA courses required in Semesters 1-3, and for both APA courses required in Semester 4. Early application is recommended.”

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The differences between the two programs are significant. As we move toward Title III curriculum redevelopment in fall 2013, and based on the recommendations noted by Professor Mac Cormack in section 1.0 Structure, of the CGD Program Evaluation Report, the CGD department will be reviewing the potential for combining our print and web design curriculums into one newly titled “Graphic and Interactive Design” program. We will study and utilize QCC’s current model as we work to develop the most sound, well-rounded design curriculum for our students. It should also be noted that students at QCC are required to take two capstone courses in their final semester; one in “Interactive Media Processes Portfolio” and another in “Graphic Production Processes Portfolio.” Both of these capstone courses are 4 credits while the capstone courses within the CGD and CGW programs are only 3 credits each and students at MWCC are only required to take one to graduate. The differences between the two programs are noted in bold and highlighted below. Quinsagamond Community  College  

Digital Design  Concepts  I  

3  

APA 121  

Graphic Design  I  

3

APA 154  

Digital Imaging  and  Media  

3

APA 161  

Digital Photography  

3

ENG 101  

English Composition  &  Literature  I  

3

APA  114  

APA  115   APA  122  

Semester 1  

Semester 2   Digital  Design  Concepts  II   Graphic  Design  II  

3   3  

APA 155  

Digital Illustration  and  Animation  

3

APA 181  

Website Design  I  or  

APA 171  

Fundamentals of  3D  Digital  Design  

3  

ART -­‐-­‐-­‐  

Art Theory  Elective*  

3

ENG 102  

English Composition  &  Literature  II  

3

APA  222  

Semester 3   Publication  Design  

3  

APA 271  

Typography

3

APA 275  

Motion Graphics  

3

APA 282  

Website Design  II  or  

APA 263   ART  -­‐-­‐-­‐  

Digital Video  Fundamentals   Art  Theory  Elective*  

3   3  

       

Mount Wachusett  Community  College     CIS127  

Computer Technologies  

3  

CGD101

Design Theory  

3

CGD104

Digital Imaging  

3

ART263

Drawing I  

3

ENG101

English Composition  I  

3

 

CGD235  

                   

APA  286   APA  287  

4  

  3  

CGD105 CGD240  

Creative Web  Design  I  

3

ART251  

Two-­‐Dimensional  Design  

3  

ENG102

English Composition  II  

3

CGD102  

Semester 3   Publication  Design  

3

3  

CGD204

Advanced Digital  Imaging   3  

MKT142

Marketing

3

Health Elective  

3

Creative Web  Design  II   Topics  in  Mathematics   (or  higher)   Semester  4   Print  Production                         for  Designers   Portfolio  Preparation  

3 3  

CGD Professional   Elective**   Social  Science  Elective  

3

Science Elective   Total  credits  required:  

3 62/ 64  

CGD241   MAT126     CGD103  

4  

CGD106

3   3  

3  

 

Semester 2     Typography  in  Visual   Communication   Electronic  Illustration  

Semester  4   Interactive  Media  Processes   Portfolio   Graphic  Production                                     Processes  Portfolio   Liberal  Arts  Elective**  

Semester 1  

 

Liberal Arts  Elective**  

3

Mathematics Elective   Total  credits  required:  

3 65  

27

 

 

3


Baccalaureate Level: The four-year, baccalaureate level degrees in graphic design or web/interactive design generally require four full years to complete, vary greatly in the available options for specialty, and differ in overall cost compared to MWCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CGD and CGW programs. A review of some of these baccalaureate programs follows:

Bachelor of Science in Communications/Media with a concentration in Graphic Design Fitchburg State University, Fitchburg, MA Fitchburg State University offers two concentrations within the Communications/Media program; one in Graphic Design and a second in Interactive Media. Significant differences in pedagogy and curriculum can be determined via review of the FSU Comm./Mediaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Graphic Design program. Students enrolled at MWCC in Computer Graphic Design Print or Web must take a minimum of 10 required graphic design classes over the course of two years. At FSU, students concentrating in Graphic Design are only required to take six graphic design courses (six prescribed courses and one elective) over the four years. Additionally, there are four Phase III Electives that students must take between their sophomore and senior years, but students are not required to take these electives in their declared concentration. Additionally, all of the six core courses in graphic design at FSU combine and compress the level of software training. Within one course at FSU, students must practice theory, develop concepts and understand aesthetics through traditional and digital means while at the same time learn three to four different and complex software applications, such as QuarkXpress, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and Acrobat. We follow a much different approach at MWCC. In the CGD and CGW programs the use of computers and graphic design software applications are integral and compulsory tools. Therefore, students in the CGD and CGW programs are taught how to utilize each individual software application via instructional scaffolding. Each major software application utilized in the graphic design print and web industries is taught as separate and distinct courses while continually emphasizing core design theory and practices. This allows students to build their skills upon one another and gain a proficient knowledge of every application, while at the same time understanding theory and aesthetics, developing concepts, employing best practices, and developing strong problem solving skills that result in a culminating portfolio. Lastly, our core curriculum in the CGD and CGW programs offers students comprehensive training in key principles, practices and software utilized for both print and web design. Thus, whether our students determine that their strengths or interests lie within print design or web/interactive media, they will be exposed to both mediums in theory and practice within their first three semesters. A student concentrating in Graphic Design at FSU has no web design requirements, and will only gain exposure and practice if they opt to take a Phase Elective in the Interactive Media concentration. See Appendix E for the degree sheets and course descriptions from FSU.

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Students in the CGD and CGW programs must take courses in the following graphic design core: Semester 1: • CGD101 Design Theory Design fundamentals, design process, concept development and problem solving •

CGD104 Digital Imaging Adobe Photoshop; photo editing, compositing and montaging

CIS127 Computer Technologies Overview of technology, information literacy and beginner level of HTML and CSS coding for the web

Semester 2: •

CGD105 Electronic Illustration Adobe Illustrator; 2D design, color and design fundamentals, drawing and sketching

CGD240 Creative Web Design Intermediate HTML, CSS and Dreamweaver

Semester 3: •

CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging Advanced masking, layering, digital compositing and montaging techniques, and preparation of graphics for the web and interactivity. CGD241 Advanced web design structure and aesthetics, advanced HTML and CSS.

Previously noted in Section I: Data, 40% of CGD and CGW graduates transfer to FSU. While our programs do not perfectly align (as noted above) and a true junior level articulation may not be possible, we do hope to work closely with the chair of the Communications/Media department from FSU to develop transfer equivalencies that will lead to a smooth transition from schools. Our goal is to provide a clearer and more distinct pathway between the MWCC and FSU's graphic design programs, and to promote transfer and positive relationships between their department and design faculty. Bachelor of Science in Communications/Media with a concentration in Interactive Media Fitchburg State University, Fitchburg, MA The Interactive Media concentration at FSU requires that students take 5 prescribed Interactive Media courses throughout the four years at FSU, and 3 Phase III Electives as is required in the Graphic Design concentration. The optional Phase Electives dispersed among students’ sophomore to senior years are limited to only three additional Interactive options, including Interactive Media Seminar, DVD Authoring, and Game Design. At MWCC, Computer Graphic Design Web majors must take the seven design core courses (as noted previously) as well as four other web design/interactive media courses in Interactive Web Design, Introduction to Animation, Designing for E-Commerce and Advanced Website Portfolio for a total of 11 graphic and web design courses in two years. The CGW program has a robust and comprehensive curriculum and compresses a great deal of material into just two years.

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In-state tuition and fees for a commuter to attend FSU is $4,492.50. To include room and board is a total of $8,947.50. This is extremely reasonable as it compares well with MWCC.

Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in Design UMASS Lowell, Lowell, MA UMASS Lowell’s Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in Design has many of the core requirements that the CGD and CGW programs have at MWCC. Since 2008, we have had three CGD/CGW majors transfer to UMass Lowell and they each successfully obtained junior level status upon admittance. Students at UMASS Lowell are required to take six studio foundation courses, including Drawing I (a required course in both the CGD and CGW programs), as well as choose eight courses within the design concentration. They have a robust curriculum in graphic design, typography, web design and various interactive media courses. In-state tuition and fees is $11,847 with an additional $10,282 if students choose to room and board at UML. Bachelor of Arts in Design—Graphic Design Concentration

Becker College, Worcester, MA Becker College has a highly comprehensive curriculum requiring courses in graphic design, design software and technology, as well as web design. Many of the CGD and CGW core requirements are also core requirements within the Becker Graphic Design curriculum. Currently no articulation agreement is in place with Becker, but solidifying transfer equivalencies and an articulation agreement would appear to be fairly uncomplicated. That said, we have had only one CGD/CGW student transfer to Becker since 2008. This may be due in large part to the slow economy and the increased cost of attending a private 4-year college like Becker. The total annual cost to attend Becker College in 2012-2013 is $31,500 plus $11,500 for room and board.

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Communications Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, NH Franklin Pierce University is within close proximity to Mount Wachusett Community College, but the expense of attending this institution at $30,900 per year, not including room and board, is likely out of reach for many of our local students. The program at Franklin Pierce requires students to take 16 courses in Graphic Communications. However, only one of these 16 courses is in Web Design. Given today’s industry practices and job requirements, this isn’t enough web design, and students would be underprepared for today’s job market by enrolling in a curriculum that is so narrowly focusing on graphic design by only specializing in print media.

Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design Keene State College, Keene, NH Approximately 45 minutes north of MWCC is Keene State College. At Keene State they offer BA and BFA options in Graphic Design. The BA and BFA programs require students take 40 credits of integrative studies, as well as 3 courses as their foundation: Foundations of Design, Introduction to Art History and Drawing I. The BA program in Graphic Design requires students then take an additional 38 credits in graphic design courses, with various electives to reach a final degree equivalency of 120 credits. The BFA in Graphic Design requires the same integrative studies and foundation classes, but is a far more intense program of study with a minimum of 62 credits in visual arts/graphic design classes. Both curriculums require a strong foundation in graphic design, but have 30


very little focus on web or interactive media with only two required courses; Web-Based Media I and Time-Based I. Again, although a well-rounded degree with advanced graphic design courses, much like Franklin Pierce, there simply isn’t enough coursework in web or interactive design to match today’s industry needs. In-state tuition for New Hampshire residences is $12,776 and $20,161 for out-of-state tuition.

ADVISORY BOARD The CGD and CGW programs have an active advisory board that consists of professionals and alumni employed in the fields of Graphic Design, Advertising, Web Design, and the Printing Press Industries. At each meeting the board members provide feedback and support on issues relating to improved marketing strategies, design curriculum, software and technology needs, and industry trends and best practices. As the 2010, 2011, and 2012 minutes will show, the advisory board has been our most instrumental resource for gaging our fit and currency. Prior to each meeting the CGD department members develop a comprehensive list of questions we want the board members to review and answer during the meetings (please see Appendix G). Innumerable changes to the CGD or CGW curriculums, and/or validation of what we are doing well, has been a direct result of meeting with our Advisory Board. In 2009, various board members were directly contacted and asked to provide feedback and insight to several students who were seeking a “real-world” perspective on the graphic design industry. These advisory board members took phone calls and answered emails for our students with regard to what it is like to be a graphic designer, what major skills are required, how many hours they could expect to work and more. In that same year, Jason Taylor, who has done work for Hasbro and Disney, provided evaluation and feedback via email regarding our upgrade needs and the appropriate iMac computers we should look to obtain. We utilized this information and his recommendation as we prepared our new lease agreement and computer lab upgrade with Apple. New 20-inch iMacs and a new server were purchased and installed in the CGD labs in fall 2010 as a direct result of this evaluation and recommendation. During our 2010 board meeting, the CGD department, especially the CGW program, gained valuable insight into this emergent and ever changing industry; discussion revolved around industry trends, web standards, and emerging technologies. Of great value to us, was the overwhelming response of the board members and the consensus that our curriculum, course content and future planning is right on target and much more advanced than most colleges in the state. One advisory board member noted, “You are leap years ahead of what any other school is doing.” Various recommendations were made and later implemented into our web design curriculum, such as the use of WordPress as a Content Management System (now offered in CGD242), as well as validating our explicit cross training in aesthetics, functionality, usability and design combined with the back end HTML and CSS coding. In 2011, we received feedback from the board members regarding the exhibit work they previously reviewed and carefully judged. The board members felt we should have more tangible, mock up type pieces; package designs, media folders, etc. In addition, changes to the CGD Print curriculum were made based on the recommendations of board members who cited the importance of continued training and use of the PDF digital media file. According to board members, only 20% of the industry actually goes to full print. Most clients are seeking publications and promotions designed and then saved as a PDF. With this information, beginning in fall 2011, students in CGD101 Design Theory, 31


CGD102 Publication Design and CGD103 Designing for Print were required to prepare their final files as PDFs in Adobe Acrobat. The advisory board was heavily involved in 2012 due to our problems with lower enrollments. We asked both our Print and Web Design advisory board members to meet as joint boards to brainstorm ideas for increasing enrollment, to discuss our current fit within the industry, review our pedagogy, and provide insight as to how we compare to other institutions. Many alumni attended this board meeting, all of whom are actively working in the field of graphic design and web design. Their input was invaluable to understanding areas we can improve upon. Moreover, they offered positive feedback indicating that we offer solid, robust programs in Print and Web Media, and that they exceeded their peers in preparedness at the 4-year institutions they transferred to. Please see the minutes for this, and the 2010 and 2011 meetings, in Appendix G. Lastly, for the last several years the CGD department has held its board meetings each spring in early April, judiciously placed on the same evening as the spring exhibit judging. The board members are invited to judge our students spring exhibit submissions prior to attending the board meeting and dinner. Their support and professional expertise has been instrumental in the success of our juried honors exhibitions. Additionally in 2011 and 2012, while judging the student design work, several of the board members assisted with the assessment of student work with a departmentimplemented assessment rubric. These assessments have helped us to gage the quality and professionalism of our student work, and have aided in changes to various course curricula. Please see Appendix G for a sample of this rubric and the results of the assessment. The Advisory Board membership is never the same from year to year, but we work to find a well-rounded voice from all areas of graphic design, web design and production; including a significant representation from our working alumni. The two most recent boards consisted of the following individuals: 2011 CGW Board Members Rebecca Gerry, Adjunct Faculty Member, CGW program Sonya Shelton, Adjunct Faculty Member, CGD Program Tiffany Wrobel, Graphic Designer, Barbanel Design and T.A.Wrobel Designs Alan Bernard, Pre-Press Technician, Travers Printing Jason Taylor, Principal/Designer, Jason Taylor Design Caitlin Donahue, MWCC CGD Alumni and UMASS Lowell student James Concannon, Principal/Graphic Designer, James Concannon Design

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2012 Board Members: Caitlin Donahue, MWCC alum, Graphic Designer, Communispace Matthew Gronowicz, MWCC alum, Web designer, Sevenfour Web Design and Tyco Cynda Joyce, MWCC alum, Graphic Designer/Artist, Cynda Warren Joyce Daniel Lachapelle, MWCC alum, Design and Production, Wayfair.com Gary Lee, Web Designer, Programmer Briana Nobrega, MWCC alum, Web Designer, inConcert Web Solutions Tiffany Wrobel, Graphic Designer, Barbanel Design and T.A.Wrobel Designs Rebecca Gerry, Adjunct Faculty Member, CGW program

RELEVANT INTERNAL GROUPS OR INDIVIDUALS The Computer Graphic Design department is regularly involved with designing work for the Marketing and Communications Department at MWCC, as well as various divisions, departments and clubs. These experiences foster client designer relationships that can otherwise not be replicated in the classroom, and provide our students the opportunity to apply their skills to practical, real world applications. Additionally, the CGD department has an active student club comprised of various students from the CGD and CGW programs. The CGD Club has produced numerous projects for other clubs and campus organizations, takes twice yearly field trips and participates in countless fundraisers for the college as well as local and national non-profit organizations. By working with these internal groups the CGD department is able to measure its currency and fit within the college community based on their needs for design services, and the scope of work they are requesting. Some of the various internal groups we have served and the projects we have developed are listed below (this is not an exhaustive list.) Samples of these projects and related public relations/media stories can be found in Appendix H.

Marketing and Communications Projects CGD Club T-shirt Fundraiser—Fall 2010–Spring 2011 In November 2010, The Marketing and Communications department asked the CGD Club to work with them on a school pride campaign to promote the launch and dedication of the college’s new wind turbines. In various meetings throughout the fall 2011 semester, club members and Leslie Cullen, the Department Chair and CGD Club Advisor, developed a graphic and slogans for a t-shirt design. In December the final graphic was chosen and revisions and enhancements were made in February and March 2010. The CGD club held a community-wide sales drive, selling at tables in the school’s hallway, via email, and through the college’s portal. In all, 258 t-shirts were sold with all profits, totaling $1908.25, donated to the David H. Butler Memorial Scholarship and the Robert H. Gilman Memorial Scholarship. In addition, the main graphic developed for the t-shirts was utilized on advertising banners and a wide variety of collateral materials developed for the dedication event.

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Car Wrap Project—Spring 2011 Through a joint project with the Marketing Department, the Energy Management Program and the CGD Department, students in Professor Leslie Cullen’s CGD106 Portfolio Preparation class were asked to research and design a car wrap for the college’s Toyota Prius. Several students submitted ideas that were reviewed by various administrators at the college, including President Asquino and the college’s Executive Council. The final design was voted on by the Executive Council, and implemented by the student designer, Leslie Cullen, and the Marketing Department. The project was funded by an Energy Management Grant and is still in full use on the college’s state vehicle.

Awards Subsequently, the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) recognized the work done for the wind turbine t-shirt design, advertising banner, and the Prius car wrap. In total these designs were selected for 5 national awards. The National Council for Marketing and Public Relations District 1 (Canada to Maryland) awards: • • •

The wind turbine t-shirt design won a Bronze Medallion of Achievement Award for the specialty advertising campaign category. The wind turbine banners won a Silver Medallion of Achievement Award for the outdoor advertising/billboard category. The Toyota Prius car wrap won a Silver Medallion of Achievement Award for the transit advertising category.

Additionally, as part of a multi-faceted communications project, the CGD department shared the honor of being awarded the Gold Paragon Award in the “Communications Success Story” category from the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations. Finally, in June 2012, also recognized as part of the campus-wide, multi-faceted communications project, these three designs shared the honor of winning the gold Circle of Excellence Award from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) in the Public Relations and Community Relations category. MWCC joined silver award winner Duke University and bronze award winner Thomas More College as the top national winners in the PR/Community Relations category.

Student Activities Various projects have been developed for the Student Activities Office throughout the last five years. Some of these projects include: • • •

A “Scary Karaoke” promotional Poster Student Activities posters showcasing various clubs and events. These are currently on display in the South Cafeteria of the college. World AIDS day Public Service Announcements for a larger collaborative exhibit and event.

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ASPIRE/Title III Promotional Flyers In spring 2013, students worked closely with members of the advising and curriculum development teams to develop promotional flyers, posters and web banners for various ASPIRE program workshops. Directed by Professor Paul Swerzenski, students in CGD112 Communications in Multimedia Design worked individually and within teams and collaborated directly with MWCC personnel to develop the visual communication solutions. Several of these flyers, posters and banners were selected by our professional judges to be showcased in our annual spring exhibit. Additionally, many of these designs won Best of Category and Honorable Mention awards at our 2012 spring exhibit awards ceremony.

Service Learning within MWCC Students in the CGD and CGW programs are required to complete a minimum of one service-learning project for a client of their choice during their final capstone class. Students have worked on countless visual communication projects for all areas of the college and surrounding community. This continuous relationship within the immediate college community continues to foster our student’s client/designer relationships and helps us to map our course curriculum to the communities needs. One successful example is the Serving Our Students campaign at MWCC. After attending the “Bridging Cultures for a Democratic Society” weeklong seminar in July of 2012, Adjunct instructor Robert Mayer developed civic engagement and service learning assignments in his CGD104 Digital Imaging and CGD107 Designing Business Graphics. Of particular interest was a service learning assignment for MWCC’s Serving Our Students program. This resulted in a flyer, logo and business card designed entirely by students and put to use campus-wide. Other service learning projects developed for on campus clients included a t-shirt graphic for the BCT department and their annual Rotary Club Auction, a new logo for the Mount Strummers Ukulele Group, a t-shirt design for the MWCC Relay for Life team. A full list of service learning projects for both on and off-campus clients can be found in Appendix J and is more thoroughly reviewed in Section III, Work-based Learning.

Photography Program Collaborative Project Between CGD and Photography Students In CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging, a joint project was assigned with PHO245 Commercial Photography. CGD students were assigned a project that required them to “hire” a professional photographer from the Commercial Photography class. This venture was a great learning experience for both Photography and Graphic Design students and gave them a taste of life in the real world. On many occasions, graphic designers will need to work with third party vendors and creatives, such as photographers and illustrators, to achieve their visions for their clients work. This opportunity initiated and facilitated by Adjunct Instructor Robert Mayer was an excellent example of our dedicated faculty’s commitment to integrating “real world” learning objectives into the classroom and merging other programs and curriculums with ours.

Art Department The Art Department and the courses they offer are an integral part of our CGD students’ education. Our students are required to take Drawing I and Two-Dimensional Design. Additional art classes are encouraged for professional electives as well. These courses are 35


highly relevant for transfer to any 4-year art or design program, and essential to our students’ success as visual artists and designers. In addition, the CGD and ART program chairs are currently reviewing the idea of developing a cross discipline transfer degree in Art and Graphic Design. This concept addresses a need for CGD students to have more art classes, and likewise, for ART majors interested in graphic design to have more core graphic design classes before transferring. The development of this new degree is ongoing, and is in the preliminary stages of discussions.

Information Technology (IT) Department The CGD Department collaborates regularly with the IT team to maintain industry-level standards with regards to the computers, software and peripherals we choose and utilize within the CGD labs. Throughout the last five years numerous technology changes have been made with the support and guidance of the IT department including the lease and implementation of new 20-inch iMac computers in fall 2008, new PC/Windows based systems in fall 2009, and a refresh of the Macintosh computers in the summer of 2012. Continuous software upgrades are managed by the IT department, regularly taking place during the summer in preparation for the start of classes each fall. File management is a complex component to our needs, and relevant here on campus and externally. The IT department ensures we have full access to a server exclusively built for the CGD department to house all of the students’ large graphic files and to transfer these files from their home computers to campus, and vice versa. A full list of technology upgrades that have been made since 2008 can be found in Appendix I.

Computer Information Systems Department (CIS) We continue to work with the CIS Department to offer courses, which meet the needs of their students. Two classes in particular are regularly enrolled with CIS students, CGD107 Designing Business Graphics and CGD110 Introduction to Animation. CGD107 exposes CIS students to the industry standard photo imaging software, Adobe Photoshop, as well as teaches students how to create effective business and web graphics. Adobe Flash, the program used in our CGD107 course is another program that benefits CIS students interested in Web Design and is often a choice for their program elective. We do feel that over the last several years collaborations between the CIS and CGD faculty have decreased, but we hope to continue to foster this interdisciplinary relationship in the areas of advanced web development such as PHP, JQuery and Javascript. This collaboration would be widely beneficial for graduates who apply to positions in small businesses where employees are expected to have design skills, as well as highly technical web development and programming skills.

Career and Job Placement Office The CGD department is directly and regularly involved with the Career and Job Placement Office. Pat Brewerton, MWCC’s Career Development Counselor, works closely with students in our programs’ capstone courses. She presents in-class seminars on resume writing, portfolio development and job interviewing skills. Additionally, Pat assists with the coordination of cooperative education opportunities and internships. We hope to continue to work with Pat and her network of employers to expand internships/coop opportunities, and to make them more readily available for our students.

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EXTERNAL POPULATIONS Students As previously noted, the CGD department conducts annual student satisfaction surveys. These survey results are a key indicator of areas we can improve upon and equally help us to evaluate what we are doing well. A summary of the results of these surveys can be found in Section I: Data, and the complete data can be found in Appendix D.

Alumni Many of our alumni are also now professionals in Graphic Design, Advertising, Web Design and Interactive Media. Many of these alumni are now members of our advisory board, and more recently attended an alumni focus group with our CGD program consultant in March 2013. Information regarding this focus group can be found in Section 5 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report in Appendix C.

Service Learning and Non-Profit Community Organizations We offer web and print design services to the local non-profit organizations through service/experiential learning. The CGD and CGW students and faculty have been involved in managing and designing a wide variety of visual communication projects with many local organizations such as the Gardner CAC, Sacred Heart School, Before and After School Programs of Leominster, The Spanish American Center, the Boys and Girls Club of North Central Massachusetts, the Groton Fire Department and many, many more. Through service learning we are better able to prepare our course content and skills-based learning to match the needs of this client-based industry.

Guest Lecturers The CGD department has hosted various guest lecturers. These individuals come directly to the classroom and meet with faulty and students to discuss various aspects of graphic design, web design, freelance, the job market and networking, printing and proper paper selections, and more. This is an invaluable resource to the faculty and students, and something we are looking to expand upon.

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JOB MARKET The following information discusses job prospects and projections for Graphic Designers and Web Designers. It includes a discussion on employment needs, educational requirements, entry-level salary ranges and job outlook. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Handbook, O*Net and Career Coach were used as resources for this data.

Graphic Designers According to the Occupational Handbook employment demand for graphic designers is projected to increase by 13% nationwide and 3% in MA from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. High job turnover should result in numerous openings. However, competition for senior graphic designer positions will be very strong. Graphic Designers design or create graphics to meet specific commercial or promotional needs, such as packaging, displays, or logos. May use a variety of mediums to achieve artistic or decorative effects. Graphic designers generally work in a studio where they have access to drafting tables and computers, and are most commonly employed in the following industries: • • • • •

Specialized design services Newspaper, periodical, book Advertising, public relations and related services Printing and related support services Computer systems design and related services

9% 9% 8% 6% 3%

Most graphic designers work full time, but schedules can vary depending on workload and deadlines. In 2010, about 29 percent of graphic designers were self-employed.

State and National Trends Employment 2010  

2020

Percent   Change  

279,200

316,500

+13%  

12,380  

United States   Graphic  Designers  

Employment

Massachusetts Graphic  Designers  

Job Openings   1  

2008

2018

Percent   Change  

Job Openings   1  

7,880

8,140

+3%  

270  

1

Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

Note: The data for the State Employment Trends and the National Employment Trends are not directly comparable. The projections period for state data is 2008-2018, while the projections period for national data is 2010-2020.

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Education According to the Occupational Handbook, the following breakdown of degrees required for graphic designers is as follows: • • •

81% 11% 4%

Bachelor’s degree Associate’s degree Some college

State and National Wages Location United  States   Massachusetts  

2011

Pay Period  

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

Hourly

$12.60

$16.06

$21.16

$28.56

$37.20

Yearly

$26,200

$33,400

$44,000

$59,400

$77,400

Hourly

$15.35

$18.85

$23.73

$30.73

$37.09

Yearly

$31,900

$39,200

$49,400

$63,900

$77,100

National Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Survey State Data Source: Massachusetts Wage Information

Career Coach The following discussion covers forecasted demand as well as job openings within 25 and 50 miles of the college. (Note: oddly enough, the salary rate for 25 miles of Gardner is higher than the salary rate reported for 50 miles from Gardner. It’s usually the other way around, as the 50 mile radius includes Boston) • • •

7712 Employed within 50 miles of Gardner 271 Estimated annual job openings 1463 Approaching retirement age The average retirement age in the U.S. is 65 years old. Graphic Designers in the 55-64 and the 65+ categories are 1-10 years away from retirement. When older workers retire, there will likely be a demand for new workers.

Within a 50 mile radius of Gardner • Entry level pay= $14.95/hour • Median wage= $22.39/hour • Indeed.com indicates 110 jobs are available within a 50 mile radius of Gardner (as of 6/13/2013). Within a 25 mile radius of Gardner • Entry level pay= $15.27 • Median wage= $22.93/hour • Indeed.com indicates there are currently 2 job postings within a 25 mile radius of Gardner (as of 6/13/2013).

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Web Developers/Designers According to the Occupational Handbook employment of information security analysts, web developers, and computer network architects is projected to grow 22 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects for all three occupations should be favorable. According to the Occupational Handbook, many of these workers are employed in computer systems design and related services firms. Most information security analysts, web developers, and computer network architects work full time. Web designers/developers design, create, and modify web sites. Analyze user needs to implement web site content, graphics, performance, and capacity. May integrate web sites with other computer applications. May convert written, graphic, audio, and video components to compatible web formats by using software designed to facilitate the creation of web and multimedia content. Excludes "Multimedia Artists and Animators".

State and National Wages Location United  States   Massachusetts  

2011

Pay Period  

10%

25%

Median

75%

90%

Hourly

$20.56

$28.03

$37.49

$48.83

$60.03

Yearly

$42,800

$58,300

$78,000

$101,600

$124,900

Hourly

$23.26

$31.70

$42.18

$53.96

$66.91

Yearly

$48,400

$65,900

$87,700

$112,200

$139,200

National Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics Survey State Data Source: Massachusetts Wage Information

State and National Trends National Employment Trends are for Information Security Analysts, Web Developers, and Computer Network Architects, which includes Computer Network Architects; Information Security Analysts; Web Developers. Employment 2010  

2020

Percent   Change  

302,300

367,900

+22%  

11,030   Job  Openings   1   —

United States   Information  Security  Analysts,  Web  Developers,   and  Computer  Network  Architects  

Employment

Massachusetts  

2008

2018

Percent   Change  

Job Openings   1  

1

Job Openings refers to the average annual job openings due to growth and net replacement.

Note: The data for the State Employment Trends and the National Employment Trends are not directly comparable. The projections period for state data is 2008-2018, while the projections period for national data is 2010-2020.

40


National Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections State Data Source: Massachusetts Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development

Education According to the Occupational Handbook, the typical required education level for web designers is as follows: • • •

43% 27% 20%

Bachelor’s Degree Associate’s Degree Some education

Career Coach The following discussion covers forecasted demand as well as job openings within 25 and 50 miles of the college. (Note: oddly enough, the salary rate for 25 miles of Gardner is higher than the salary rate reported for 50 miles from Gardner. It’s usually the other way around as the 50 mile radius includes Boston) • • •

11315 Employed within 50 miles of Gardner 438 Estimated annual job openings 1874 Approaching retirement age

Within a 50 mile radius of Gardner • Entry Level= $21.26/hour • Median = $37.36/hour When searching for Web Designer, over 480 jobs were listed within a 50 mile radius of Gardner. These positions were grouped with similar/”like” titles or descriptions listing a web designer. However, when a search was conducted using the exact search terms “web designer”, 39 jobs were available within a 50 mile radius and Web Developer yielded 266 postings. Another key search term often used is UX designer. When this exact term was used, 52 jobs were listed at indeed.com. Within a 25 mile radius of Gardner • Entry Level= $22.52 • Median = $40.04 Indeed.com lists 5 job openings under Web Developer. When searching with UX Designer, 3 jobs were found within a 25 mile radius, and searching with “web designer”, 1 job was found (as of 6/13/2013).

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Summary While the graphic and web design job market is competitive, there are many opportunities for graduates to obtain employment throughout Massachusetts and New England. The main hubs of all design related jobs are within or around the major cities, particularly Boston. Additionally, graduates may find it useful to begin their career as a freelance designer. Working as a contract designer either onsite or at a home office is very common. With the national outlook predicting a 22% increase and growth predicted to be faster than average for Web Developers, we are confident that our web design program is meeting a demand within Massachusetts and nationally. According to O*Net, graphic design is listed as a “Bright Outlook Occupation” and projected to have 100,000 or more job openings between 2010–2020. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), United States Department of Labor, indicates that North Central Massachusetts ranks first in nonmetropolitan areas with the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients for Graphic Design. Nonmetropolitan areas with the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients in this occupation:

Nonmetropolitan area  

Employment(1)

Employment per  thousand   jobs  

North Central   Massachusetts   nonmetropolitan  area

60

2.66

1.81

$22.51

$46,830

80

2.28

1.55

$24.92

$51,840

Northwest Massachusetts   nonmetropolitan  area

60

2.18

1.48

$19.91

$41,410

Southwestern Montana   nonmetropolitan  area

240

2.05

1.40

$21.52

$44,770

Southern Vermont   nonmetropolitan  area

200

1.95

1.33

$18.30

$38,060

Northwestern Connecticut   nonmetropolitan  area

Location quotient  (9)  

Hourly mean   wage  

Annual mean   wage  (2)  

Additionally, Boston ranks 8th out of 10 metropolitan areas with the highest employment level in Graphic Design. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor, ranks Massachusetts in the top five states nationally in key areas of employment for web developers. • •

States with the highest employment level in this occupation: Massachusetts ranks 5th States with the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients in this occupation: Massachusetts ranks 3rd Top paying states with this occupation: Massachusetts ranks 5th 42


In addition, Boston ranks 4th nationally with the highest employment level in this occupation, ranks 6th with the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients, and is within the top ten of the top paying metropolitan areas. Interestingly Burlington, VT and Manchester, NH rank 4th and 7th nationally with the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients. From this data one can conclude that our students have ample opportunities to gain employment within Massachusetts, in or around Boston more specifically, as well as north into New Hampshire and Vermont. With the bright projections of job openings and the growth of the design industry in the fields of graphic design and web development/ design, we are confident with our program’s fit and relevancy now and in the future.

Meeting Job Market Demands To meet job market demands and maintain industry standards, the CGD department continuously reviews and revises our program objectives and makes changes or additions to the curriculum. Since the 2008/2009 academic year, the CGD department has reviewed and revised multiple areas of the Print and Web design degrees to accommodate this continuously evolving industry. These changes include comprehensive curriculum changes including removing courses while adding new ones, adjusting the course sequence, and adding or removing content within our courses. Please see Appendix I for a comprehensive list of changes to our programs since 2008. Other notable changes include extensive technology upgrades, such as the complete upgrade of our computer labs, the addition of new operating systems, new printers, and upgrading our design software to remain current and compliant with the industry standards. Please see the list of technology upgrades we have made since 2008 in Appendix I.

ADMISSIONS/MARKETING PLAN As noted previously in Section I: Data, in our 2008 Program Review/Self-Study the CGD program was well represented in the areas of targeted marketing and recruitment with the use of various print and radio ads. Since that report was published we have evidence of only two marketing examples in which we were included, and no examples of any direct and targeted marketing samples for the CGD and CGW programs. These two samples, the Media Arts and Design Cluster Brochure and the article contained within the Career Focus magazine, can be found in Appendix B. Additionally, until we initiated a meeting with the Admissions staff in spring 2012 (as noted previously under Enrollment in Section I), we had little to no direct contact with the Admissions staff or recruiters. While this may be viewed as a weakness and failure on our department’s part, and we can take responsibility for not directly reaching out, we see this as a failure of the two main departments of this campus whose responsibility it is to market our programs and work to recruit our students. We strongly urge the administration to take a look at the targeted marketing and recruitment efforts that are being developed, or the lack their of, for the college’s degree programs. It is our opinion that targeted marketing should be developed and that each of the various departments/programs would be rotated within this marketing/recruitment plan. This would eliminate the concern over one program getting the lion’s share of attention, and would enable the departments to work directly with Marketing and Admissions to develop holistic, strategic plans that will build and fortify enrollments.

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Areas that the CGD department has worked to informally market the programs and recruit students have been innumerable over the past 5 years. Examples include those previously stated under Marketing and Design projects, and the following:

Twice yearly participation in Open House/Career Fairs Each fall and spring the CGD program participates in the college’s open house, college fairs to actively represent and showcase our department to high school students, their parents, and professionals who visit MWCC. We have continuously added current student work to special slide show presentations, which attract a lot of attention at college fairs. We present slide shows of student work, graduate portfolios, and answer any questions from visiting students interested in the CGD Programs.

T-shirt Fundraisers The CGD department in collaboration with the CGD Club, participated in two major fundraisers. In 2010, the “Catch the Wind, Innovation is a Breeze” t-shirt was well supported by the college and local community. In 2013, Professor Leslie Cullen designed a t-shirt in response to the Boston Marathon bombings. These shirts were sold by the CGD club on campus, as well as spread to various areas nationally through email and social media. These fundraisers collectively raised nearly $4000 and garnered media coverage in the local Gardner News and The Worcester Telegram, as well as the college’s e-newsletter. This kind of media coverage is utilized as an indirect, but substantial marketing tool for area students and parents to see the quality of work being generated from the CGD department. The media coverage for these fundraisers has been included with samples of the work in Appendix H.

CGD Website Redesign Although not yet complete, the CGD faculty and staff has been working to dramatically improve the department’s website by offering all of the pertinent information that prospective students and parents want to know, including job opportunities, course descriptions and detailed program information, and examples of student work. New content is being written and the information architecture is being thoroughly analyzed. We hope to have a well designed and constructed website for prospective students by mid summer 2013. A sample of the current mock-up of this site can be found in Appendix B.

Student Outreach The CGD department chair worked closely with several students in spring 2012, and Started a “Student Ambassador” program. Students from the CGD and CGW programs visited their former high schools; shared recruitment flyers with faculty, counselors and students; provided samples of their own work; and met with students to discuss our Print and Web design programs. Students went to Monty Tech, Leominster CTE, and Quabbin Regional. We hope to have more students participate in this program as we strongly believe the greatest recruitment happens at the peer-to-peer level. A recruitment flyer, designed by one of our freshman design students in fall 2011, was utilized during these visits. A sample of the recruitment flyer can be found (as previously noted) in Appendix B.

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Positive feedback was recently received from Robin Monaco at the Leominster CTE. Her response is as follows: Ms. Cullen Thank you for having Benjamin Stone come to our Graphic Communications Department here in CTE, Leominster High School. He was very informative and the students enjoyed him very much. He will be returning in 2 weeks to show the students some more demonstrations. If there is any information you would like to share so that my students would be more prepared for taking graphic design courses at the Mount, please let me know. Thank you, again, Robin G. Monaco CTE Graphic Communications Instructor

CGD exhibits The CGD department is very fortunate to have exhibit space directly across from the Admissions office at MWCC. The ability to showcase our students’ work in this high traffic area has been one of our greatest marketing tools. The annual CGD Spring Exhibit is an impressive, juried showcase of our students’ print and web design work and demonstrates the skills our students have achieved. This large exhibit of over 100 design projects from 15 design categories is displayed from April through September each year, creating a distinct and unforgettable impression on visitors to the college. Additionally, throughout the year several smaller exhibits are displayed. For the past several years the exhibit that immediate succeeds the larger spring exhibit is our showcase of student’s service learning work. With students working directly with various non-profits and wide segments of the external community, this is another valuable way for people visiting MWCC to see the work our students do and the CGD department’s connection to the community as a whole. We are currently working on plans to improve the gallery space with new signage and a permanent corkboard wall. Both additions will add a more professional and clean appearance to this space.

45


New Online Web Exhibits In spring 2010, the CGD department implemented itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first ever, online web exhibit component to the Spring Exhibit. Nine online and interactive categories were added with over 55 student submissions. Five professional web designers judged the work based on the criteria of navigation, design, functionality and validation of the websites and animations. This was a truly collaborative effort on the part of the CGD web and print faculty, both full and part time. This exhibit, in conjunction with our annual Spring Exhibit Open House and Awards Presentation, are some of our most useful interdepartmental marketing and recruitment tools. Since 2010, we have had two other successful online exhibits. These exhibits can be found at: http://www.cgdclass.com/webexhibit2010.html http://www.cgdclass.com/springexhibit2011/ http://www.cgdclass.com/springexhibit2012/

Service Learning As will be fully addressed in Section III and noted previously, each spring during our capstone courses, the CGD and CGW students are matched with a wide range of nonprofit, service learning projects. These service-learning experiences expose the CGD and CGW programsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; faculty and students to members of greater community in immeasurable ways.

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SECTION III: Curriculum—Program Outcomes • Program/Educational Outcomes • General Education Competencies • Work-based Learning • Student Preparedness • Pedagogical Approach • New Methodologies

48


PROGRAM/EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES Program Outcomes  

Courses

Print and  Web   Competency  1:   Exhibit  a  solid   understanding  of  the   fundamentals  of  design,   including  the  elements   and  principles  of  design   and  typography  as  they   are  applied  to  the   development  of  effective   communication  pieces  for   both  print  and  web   design.  Students  will  have   an  understanding  of  the   concepts  of  copyrights   and  intellectual  property.  

Print: CGD101  CGD102     CGD103  CGD104     CGD105  CGD106   CGD109  CGD204     CGD235  CGD240  

Teaching Methodology  and   Course  Content  

Measurement Used  

Lecture  

Graded Discussion  Forums  

Reading—Handouts and   Textbooks  

Grade and  critique     textbook  exercises  

Textbook Exercises  

Critique reflection  papers   and  discussion  of  articles  

Computer demonstrations  

Design and  layout  of  visual   Web:   CGD101  CGD104     communication  projects.   CGD105  CGD109   CGD110  CGD112   CGD204  CGD210   CGD240  CGD241   CGD242  CGD244    

Written and  oral     analysis  assignments   Oral  presentation   Written  research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews   Written  Exams   Oral  peer  critique   Graded  creative  projects     Presentation  Grade   Student  Surveys  

Print and  Web   Competency  2:   Possess  a  working   knowledge  of  the  design   process  especially  how  it   relates  to:  audience   definition,  research,   analysis,  and  concept   development;  the   production  of  thumbnail   sketches,  rough  drafts,   and  the  preparation  of   final  comprehensive  print   layouts  and  websites.  

Print: CGD101  CGD102     CGD103  CGD104     CGD105  CGD109   CGD204  CGD235   CGD240   Web:   CGD101  CGD104   CGD105  CGD109   CGD110  CGD112   CGD204  CGD240   CGD241  CGD242   CGD244  

Lecture   Reading—Handouts     and  Textbooks   Computer  demonstrations   Online  research   Library  research   Client-­‐based  research     and  interview   Sketch  thumbnails   Create  rough  drafts   Develop  storyboards/   flowcharts   Design  and  layout  of   creative  projects  

Print and  Web   Competency  3:   Transform  digital  images   into  new  pieces  of  art   through  the  use  of  Adobe   Photoshop  with  emphasis   on  the  creation  of  high-­‐ quality  graphics  for  print   and  the  web.  

Print: CGD101  CGD102     CGD103  CGD104     CGD106  CGD204   CGD205  CGD235   CGD240   Web:   CGD101  CGD104   CGD204  CGD205   CGD210  CGD240   CGD241  CGD242   CGD244  

Lecture Reading—Handouts,  Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Graded research/project   overview  reports   Group  peer  critique  of   concepts  and  thumbnails   Graded  thumbnails,   storyboards,  flow  charts   Written  research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews     Graded  creative  projects     Presentation  Grade—   visual  and  oral   Student  Surveys  

Grade and  critique     textbook  exercises   Written  Quizzes  

Software demonstrations  

Oral peer  critique  

Textbook Exercises  

Grade tutorials  

Video/electronic tutorials  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews    

Scanning Assignment   Design  and  layout  of   creative  projects  

Graded creative  projects     Presentation  Grade—   visual  and  oral   Student  Surveys  

49


Program Outcomes  

Courses

Print and  Web   Competency  4:   Create  complex  electronic   illustrations  and  single   page  layouts  with  a  solid   understanding  of  the   complex  functions  of   Adobe  Illustrator.  

Print: CGD102  CGD103   CGD105  CGD106   CGD225  CGD235   Web:   CGD105  CGD110   CGD210  

Teaching Methodology  and   Course  Content   Lecture  

Grade textbook  exercises    

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Oral peer  critique  

Software demonstrations   Video/electronic  tutorials  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews    

Information literacy  

Graded creative  projects  

Textbook Exercises  

Library research     Design  and  layout  of   creative  projects   Print  Competency  5:   Print:   Have  a  solid  working   CGD109/CIS127   knowledge  of  the   CGD240  CGD241   fundamentals  of  building   websites  using  HTML,   XHTML,  CSS  and   Dreamweaver  in  code   view,  with  the  ability  to   design  structurally  as  well   as  aesthetically.   Web  Competency  5:   Plan  and  design  websites   utilizing  basic  and   advanced  web  authoring   techniques  while   exhibiting  proficiency  in   the  use  of  HTML,  XHTML,   CSS  layouts  and   techniques,  and   Dreamweaver  in  code   view,  with  the  ability  to   design  structurally  as  well   as  aesthetically.   Print  Competency  6:   Exhibit  the  ability  to  work   with  advanced  graphic   design  principles,  grids,   typography,  and   advanced  layout   techniques  while  utilizing   QuarkXPress  and  Adobe   InDesign.  

Web: CGD109/CIS127   CGD210  CGD240   CGD241  CGD242   CGD244  

Measurement Used  

Grade tutorials  

Presentation Grade—   visual  and  oral   Student  Surveys  

Lecture

Grade textbook  exercises  

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Written Quizzes  

Software demonstrations  

Grade tutorials  

Textbook Exercises  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews    

Video/electronic tutorials     Website  blog  

Oral peer  critique  

Plan, design  and  build  a   series  of  web  pages  using   hand-­‐coding  &  software  

Graded Discussion  Forums  

Web design  techniques  test  

Grade textbook  exercises   Discussion  of  articles   Practical  skills-­‐based  test   Navigation  link  checks   Web  site  validation  of  links   and  graphics,  naming,   formatting   Graded  creative  projects     Presentation  Grade—   visual  and  oral   Student  Surveys  

Print: CGD235  CGD102   CGD103  CGD106  

Lecture

Grade textbook  exercises    

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Written Quizzes  

Software demonstrations  

Grade tutorials  

Video/electronic tutorials  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews    

Textbook Exercises   Develop  Thumbnials,     Rough  Drafts   Use  of  style  sheets  in  design   Use  of  master  pages   Design  and  layout  of   creative  projects  

50

Oral peer  critique  

Evaluation of  the  use  of   style  sheets,  master  pages   and  grids  in  design   Graded  creative  projects   Presentation  Grade—   visual  and  oral.  


Program Outcomes   Web  Competency  6:   Exhibit  a  solid   understanding  of  the   principles  of  visual   communication  coupled   with  an  understanding  of   current  web  and   multimedia  tools,   concepts,  terminology,   and  techniques.  

Courses Web:   CGD112  CGD210   CGD240  CGD241   CGD242  CGD244  

Teaching Methodology  and   Course  Content  

Measurement Used  

Lecture

Grade textbook  exercises  

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Written Quizzes  

Library research  

Grade tutorials  

On-­‐line research  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews  

Software demonstrations   Textbook  Exercises   Video/electronic  tutorials   Develop   storyboards/flowcharts   Multimedia  demonstrations   Planning  websites,   animations,  and  multimedia   Communication  skills   workshops   Design  and  layout  of   creative  projects  

Oral peer  critique  

Grade flowcharts/   storyboards   Technical  document   analysis   Written  business   correspondence/   communication  pieces   Written  business  proposal   Written  web  based  copy   Graded  multimedia  projects     Presentation  Grade—   visual  and  oral   Student  Surveys  

Print Competency  8:   Possess  a  working   knowledge  of  print   capabilities,  the  printing   process,  and   understanding  pre-­‐press   techniques.  

Print: CGD103  

Lecture

Written exams  

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Oral peer  critique  

Textbook Exercises  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews  

Printing press  tours  

Written print  specification  

Print specifications  

Written press  quote  

Pre-­‐press flowchart  

Graded creative  projects  

Design and  layout  of   creative  projects  

Presentation Grade—   visual  and  oral  

Software demonstrations  

Student Surveys   Web  Competency  8:   Web:   Create  dynamic,   CGD110     animated  computer  art,   web  motion  graphics,  and   websites  through  the  use   of  Adobe  Flash.  

Lecture

Grade textbook  exercises    

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Oral peer  critique  

Software demonstrations  

Grade tutorials  

Video/electronic tutorials  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews  

Develop storyboards  

Graded storyboards  

Design and  layout  of   creative  projects  

Graded creative  projects  

Textbook Exercises  

Presentation Grade—   visual  and  oral   Student  Surveys  

51


Courses

Program Outcomes   Print  and  Web   Competency  9:   Prepare  for  the  job   market  with  career   planning,  skill   assessment,  resume   writing,  and  interviewing,   as  well  as  compile  a   professional-­‐quality   portfolio  for  entering  the   job  market  or  for   transferring  to  a  four-­‐year   program.  

Print and  Web   Competency  10:   Manage  and   development  client-­‐based   visual  communication   pieces  with  the  use  of   effective  design  and   layout  while  meeting   strict  deadlines.  

Print: CGD106   Web:   CGD210  

Teaching Methodology  and   Course  Content  

Measurement Used  

Lecture

Oral peer  critique  

Reading—Handouts, Users   Manuals  and  Textbooks  

Written research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews  

Software demonstrations  

Self Assessment  Seminars  

Resume writing  workshop   Interviewing  skills   video/workshops   Presentation/slideshow   demonstration  

Evaluation of     written  journal   Written  cover  letter     and  resume   Mock  interview   Graded  creative  projects    

Preparation/refinement of   previous  design  work  

Presentation Grade—     visual  and  oral  

Development of  a  print  and   web  portfolio  

Evaluation of  print  and     web  portfolios  

Design and  layout  of   creative  projects  

Student Surveys  

Print:   CGD102  CGD103   CGD106  

Lecture

Oral peer  critique  

Web: CGD240  CGD242   CGD244  CGD210  

Reading—Handouts and   Textbooks  

Written design  brief/   project  overview  

Guest Lecturers   Client  Interview  

Graded service  learning   projects    

Group critique  of     design  process  

Presentation Grade—     visual  and  oral  

Design and  layout  of   creative  projects—  

Client survey/   evaluation  of  work  

Service Learning  project  

Student surveys  

Results of measurements and improvements Client survey/evaluation of student work Starting in 2010, the CGD and CGW programs began formally surveying the non-profit clients our students were producing work for in their capstone/service-learning projects. The results of these surveys, managed through Survey Monkey, have enabled both the print and web design programs to develop clearer guidelines and expectations for the clients and the student designers before the start of the projects. In 2012, to aid in streamlining the project submission and student selection process, we worked directly with one of our web design majors, Luke Leblanc, to design and implement a service-learning database. Varying aspects, especially the terms of agreement, were driven by the measurements we collected from the client evaluations at the end of each semester’s service learning projects. A link to the database submission form and terms of agreement can be found at: http://cgdclass.com/service_learning/ A summary of the client survey results shows key indications of successes and areas that need improvement. Of greatest significance, and areas that scored low and received the most comments throughout the survey results, were the clients’ concerns over our students’ time management and their communication skills. Most clients felt their student

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designer could have communicated better and more frequently, and others suggested that once a week to bimonthly contact should be required throughout the semester. Upon review of the client surveys and project measurements completed in spring 2010, the capstone faculty implemented various and continued assessment measures throughout the project to ensure greater project management. These assessments included client contact guidelines, clear client data sheets, project logs, detailed time sheets, and weekly student/faculty check-ins. These quality control and assessment measures provide faculty with the initial tools necessary to evaluate the students’ performance and to clearly address whether students are meeting all of the major components of the client, servicelearning project. Please see Appendix J for the client surveys, 2010-2013 results, and samples of the tools used to assess students’ work and progress throughout the project.

Guest/Professional Lecturers As a result of continued lower student comprehension of the various grades of paper and how paper grades are utilized effectively in printing projects, Kristine Jordan, adjunct faculty member, worked to improve this weakness within her course. In spring 2012, Kristine invited Tim Carelli from Travers Printing to come into her CGD103 Print Production class and speak with the students about properly selecting papers for printing. He spent an hour and a half discussing papers and printing methods that affect paper in design. Tim’s in-depth knowledge of paper, printing, and sales was well received by the students and improved their knowledge of this essential design and production component. As recommended in Section 9.1.2, Professor Mac Cormack’s CGD Program Evaluation Report, he notes the importance of having artists and designers speak to our students to provide valuable insight into the creative process and the design industry. We will continue to invite guest lecturers to improve the quality of course content.

Portfolio Review and Assessment Since 2011, all students in CGD106 Portfolio Preparation are required to present their portfolios to Professor Leslie Cullen and two of their peers. In previous years, two faculty members reviewed and interviewed each student. However, indications from student measurements showed a need for greater peer assessment and review, particularly in the later stages of a student’s program of study. This improvement measure utilizes a comprehensive evaluation form to assess the interview and the portfolio presentation. The students being reviewed are then provided with the forms utilized by Professor Cullen and the other peer evaluators. The forms include notes, feedback and a full assessment of areas where each student needs to improve. These assessments help students with their interviewing skills, portfolio presentation skills, design work and overall portfolio layout. Moreover, it now gives other students the opportunity to review their classmates’ portfolios, and play the important role of not just the interviewee, but also the interviewer. Students’ feedback from this new approach has been very positive.

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GENERAL EDUCATION COMPETENCIES Competency Written  and  Oral   Communication     in  English  

Teaching Methodology     and  Course  Content  

Courses Print:   CGD101  CGD102     CGD103  CGD104     CGD105  CGD106   CGD109  CGD204     CGD235  CGD240   Web:   CGD101  CGD104     CGD105  CGD109     CGD110  CGD112     CGD204  CGD210     CGD240  CGD241     CGD242  CGD244  

Lectures Readings   Written  and  oral  analysis     of  ads  and  websites.   Oral  presentation  of  ads     and  websites   Written  research  report,     proposals  or  project  overviews   Written  website  content/blogs   Written  headlines,  subheads     and  body  copy  for  design  projects.   Develop  storyboards/  flowcharts   Design  and  layout  of  final   comprehensive  print  layouts     and  websites.   Oral  presentation  of  design  projects   Oral  peer  critique   Design  discussions  and  critique  

Measurement Used   Written  Examinations   and  quizzes   Evaluation  of  written   research  report,   proposals  or  project   overviews   Assessment  of  oral   presentations   Evaluation  of  copy  for     communication  pieces   Ongoing  assessment     of  drafts/work  in  progress   Evaluation  of  portfolios   Graded  resume  and  cover     Mock  interview   Individual  and     group  critique   Student  Surveys  

Exploration of  personal  ideas   Collective  Brainstorming   Personal  reflections   Written  resume  and  cover  letter   Quantitative   Reasoning  and   Scientific  Modes  of   Inquiry    

Print: CGD101  CGD102   CGD103  CGD104   CGD105  CGD106   CGD204  CGD240   Web:   CGD101  CGD104   CGD105  CGD110   CGD204  CGD210   CGD240  CGD241   CGD242  CGD244  

Calculation of  image  proportions  for   scaling/resizing  for  print  or  web   Determine  proper  image  resolution   (ppi)  based  on  press  line  screen  (lpi)  

Evaluation of  accuracy  of   projects—print,  web  or   animation     Written  examinations  

Determine the  decimal  equivalencies   Student  Surveys   for  measurements  in  layout  and   design   Determine  webpage  measurements   and  calculations  based  on  the  target   audience  and  their  anticipated   screen  size.     Determine  absolute  or  relative   measurements,  as  well  as   percentage  or  width  for  CSS   Calculate  frame  rates  and  determine   movie  dimensions  and  size  of  images   for  animations.    

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Information Literacy  

Print: CGD101  CGD102     CGD103  CGD104     CGD105  CGD106   CGD109  CGD204     CGD235  CGD240   Web:   CGD101  CGD104     CGD105  CGD109     CGD110  CGD112     CGD204  CGD210     CGD240  CGD241     CGD242  CGD244  

Internet Research  

Assessment of  resources  

Library Research  

Evaluation of  written   research  reports,   proposals  and/or     project  overviews  

Client Research   Library  staff  presentations  on  library   research  strategies   Written  research  report,  proposals   or  project  overviews   Analysis  of  existing  designs  and   websites,  especially  relating  to  the   content  and  information  contained   therein.   Oral  analysis  of  print     and  web  designs  

Individual and     group  critique   Evaluation  of  portfolios   Evaluation  of     oral  presentations   Grading  of     creative  projects   Student  Surveys  

Creative design  projects  for  both   print  and  web  which  are  the  final   culmination  of  student’s  research   and  information  assessment.   Understanding  Self   Print:   CGD103   CGD106   Web:   CGD109   CGD112   CGD210  

Personality and     Self  Assessment  Activities    

Evaluation of     written  self  assessments  

Skills assessment  activities   Resume  writing  workshop  

Written resumes  and   cover  letters  

Interviewing skills  video/workshops  

Mock interviews  

Myers Briggs  Type  Indicator     (MBTI)  test  

Analysis of  MBTI  results  

Personal Identity  and     Stationary  Design  

Graded logo  and   stationary  designs   Student  Surveys  

Gen Ed Measurements Recognizing the importance of the General Education competencies within our students work, the CGD faculty utilize the Capstone-level surveys as well as the Gen Ed assessment rubrics to define strengths and weaknesses. Two key areas are regularly assessed: Written and Oral Communication and Information Literacy. Faculty discuss the results of utilizing their own course embedded assessments and the survey results at Department meetings. CGD faculty are regularly sharing their concerns regarding indications of weaknesses in their students work, specifically in writing, and actions have been taken to improve the quality of writing and oral communication and information literacy within the CGD and CGW curriculums. Specific examples include: •

Gen Ed Competency Assessment Tools With the use of the Written and Oral Communication and Information Literacy tools utilized throughout various semesters, several faculty have implemented new writing and research projects. As well, many faculty have added the use of a research log in their classes for students to document their understanding and use of information literacy within their courses.

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Library of Congress Research Project Adjunct Instructor Rebecca Gerry added a Library of Congress research project to CGD240 Creative Web Design. The students had to choose a topic based on the images available from the Library of Congress, research their topic, design and code a website with the appropriate look and feel of their topic, and make a final presentation to the class covering the knowledge they learned and the website that was created. Creative Commons and Flickr Lecture/Demonstration Within various class sections of our web and print design curriculums, lectures and demonstrations were given on how to utilize Creative Commons, a non-profit website that provides access to a broad range of images and creative material while providing users access to this work within the “all rights reserved” copyright laws. It was a great way to demonstrate to our students the importance of following copyright laws while researching images and content for web and print media projects. During the demonstration and lecture, valuable information was provided on understanding the copyright attributes of images and how to utilize them correctly. Also demonstrated was the use of advanced Boolean search terms for narrowing the image search within Creative Commons and Flickr. Oral Presentations Added Professor Paul Swerzenski added oral presentation components into several web design courses, and included the use of various slide presentation software and presentation techniques in a newly piloted course. He also utilized online “cloud computing” and web apps to increase student utilization and understanding of electronic media and information literacy to tell compelling stories and to provide engaging presentations.

Interdisciplinary Courses Within the CGD and CGW curriculums students must take courses in other key disciplines in support of expanding their interdisciplinary knowledge and experiences. Courses that CGD and CGW majors are required to take are: •

ART263 Drawing I

ART251 Two-Dimensional Design

MKT142 Marketing

Additionally, within each curriculum students have one professional elective where they may choose from a variety of other disciplines. Most importantly, the nature of design projects within the CGD and CGW disciplines allow for implementation of designs that represent varying levels of interdisciplinary research. Students studying graphic and web design must be in tune with what they are learning in the arts, social and political sciences, history, literature, and an understanding of culture. The CGD and CGW curriculums encourage students to explore a vast range of ideas and subjects within their design solutions and their work is heavily influenced by the world around them. Their visual communications will help them to develop an awareness of interdisciplinary topics, and increases their exposure to a broad range of skills, experiences, and knowledge.

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WORK-BASED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES Service Learning Service learning is an integral and compulsory component to the CGD and CGW curriculums. 100% of CGD and CGW majors are engaged in a service learning design project with a local non-profit organization during their capstone course. Each fall semester, with the support and assistance of Fagan Forhan and the Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, the CGD department chair sends a request out to all non-profit agencies for project submissions. Requests come from directly within the college and as far away as Boston. Students are then given the opportunity to choose a client that they are most interested in serving and supporting with their design skills. Projects range from brochures, posters, logos, to magazines, websites, and more. Since spring 2008, 63 students have completed service learning projects for a total of 1732 reported hours of work. The tremendous benefits of this experiential learning are validated by the clients’ comments obtained through surveys at the conclusion of each project (see Appendix J): CGD Print Design •

Gardner 225th Committee Historic Gardner Booklet and Walking Tour Brochure “We gave Barbara two big projects and she handled them well!!! The benefits for Barbara are that she was able to produce quality, professional work; do a service for the community (the City of Gardner) and work with MWCC staff...There were no difficulties encountered. It was a positive, wonderful experience!!! Kudos to Barbara and thank you for the opportunity to work with this gifted and kind student!!”

Sterling-Lancaster Community Television Logos and Brochures “It gives the municipalities and non-profits with constrained budgets the ability to get invaluable design services at no cost. It is truly a win-win as the students can get the real world experience and better prepare themselves for their career search and helps to establish network connections.”

First Church Unitarian Universalist Marketing Brochure “I am a strong proponent of learning experiences. Working with real clients on real problems in real time demonstrates in ways that can never be duplicated in the classroom. It is a test of the maturity and job readiness of a student as they have to navigate the many subtleties of the world.”

Millers River Watershed Council Upper Millers Blue Trail map “Here both a local non-profit and a student benefited. The biggest difficulties are our schedules and the semester time line. But this was a very positive outcome. Thank you.”

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CGW Web Design •

Benefit Concert Website “Real world scenarios for students to experience; affordable (i.e., free :-) expert support to non-profits; extended benefits to the larger community (i.e., promoting our concert in this way will raise money for early childhood services). No difficulties encountered. Thank you so much for enabling students and the "real world" to work together in this way!

Cleghorn Neighborhood Center Website Benefit-students get real life experience and help build the organization's (in this case a non-profit with a small budget) capacity. Difficulties-students may not have enough experience and may not be aware of best practices (or best ways to achieve the desired outcome).

Loaves and Fishes Food Pantry, Inc. Website “I firmly believe in hands-on learning and welcome students to our operation. It's a mutually beneficial relationship - they receive real life experience and we receive much needed support. A challenge with this type of arrangement is the considerable effort it requires from the organization. As a non-profit operation, our time is already stretched.”

While we receive a lot of positive feedback from these learning experiences, of course not all the responses are favorable. Some of the difficulties and concerns with these experiences relate most commonly to a few key factors: students’ initiative to stay in close contact with the client and to remain proactive project managers; the balance between the faculty members involvement and allowing the student to truly manage a project from start to finish; and the time management and overall commitment of the client and the student. The CGD department is always looking for ways to improve the experiential learning process; nevertheless, the large majority of feedback is positive and the experience for both the client and student designer is most commonly enriching and successful.

Internships Internships are not common within our print and web programs, however, we do encourage them and are hoping to have more students fulfill semester long internships or cooperative education opportunities. In spring 2013, we placed a CGD major into a successful internship with the Marketing and Communications department at MWCC. In Section 6.1.1 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report, Professor Mac Cormack notes the importance of internships (experiential learning) as “a vital means to give [students] a real-world experience in the design field.” We will continue to seek these opportunities and foster greater relationships within the community and our broader service area.

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STUDENTS PREPAREDNESS Graphic design and web/interactive media are fast-paced, technically driven fields of study. The CGD department works diligently throughout the year to maintain the highest quality teaching and learning in these disciplines. We strongly believe, based upon student assessments, as well as focus groups, student surveys and our external program evaluation, that students are obtaining the necessary skills and knowledge within our curriculums as a whole. Students’ final web and print portfolios, and their comprehensive, service learning projects with non-profit organizations, are clear and evident proof of our students comprehension, skill level and design capabilities. However, there are areas that could use improvement, as noted in the CGD Program Evaluation Report (Appendix C) and from what can be determined from student survey results as indicated in Appendix D. Key courses that students need added preparation in, improved skills, and/or require improvements overall are: •

CGD235 Typography in Visual Communications— o Is in need of more Typography intensive course modules throughout, and not just a course in Adobe InDesign. As indicated by Mr. Mac Cormack and comments from students, this course needs to be taught as an on campus class, rather than the hybrid or online options we have been offering. Students feel strongly that they are not getting enough from this course in regards to the one on one, intensive study they expect from a course in “Typography.” CGD112 Communications in Multimedia Design— o Requires a full review based solely on low persistence rates and student survey results. CGD110 Introduction to Animation— o Based on information Professor Mac Cormack obtained in student focus groups and from his evaluation, and due to changes in industry standards, this course requires a full evaluation and redevelopment. o Ideas for redevelopment include eliminating Adobe Flash and utilizing Adobe Edge, Muse and After Effects as key tools to prepare students for interactive design.

As noted by Mr. Mac Cormack in his report, one key area in the CGW program that needs review and consideration is the immense workload, and smaller, unnecessary busy work that accompanies some of the classes. With careful consideration to student outcomes and the need to fully prepare them for professional web and interactive design, many of these concerns can be addressed with objectives-based project modules, curriculum mapping, and assessment rubrics that are provided to the students at the start of each project. These tools and concepts will be introduced and utilized in the Title III training and redevelopment. Key areas of skills deficiency within the CGD program that need improvement are as follows. These skills, specific to key software applications received with a rating of less than 4.0 in the Capstone-level competencies surveys (Appendix D): o o o o

QuarkXPress Adobe Dreamweaver HTML and CSS coding Adobe Acrobat Professional 59


Notable skills deficiencies as indicated in the CGW Capstone level surveys: o Adobe Flash o Adobe InDesign o Adobe Fireworks o Acrobat Acrobat Professional Consequently, the four software applications noted above from the CGW capstone surveys are the same software and skills taught within CGD112 and CGD110 (previously noted).

PEDAGOGICAL APPROACH Based upon ongoing program assessments, and the capstone level surveys, the faculty has continuously succeeded in maintaining students’ attainment of program objectives through enhanced and well-structured learning methodologies. In CGD classes, the lecture/demonstration teaching strategies are working well. Lecture materials are followed by a demonstration of new concepts matched with exercises or activities for students to reinforce these new concepts. In addition, frequent oral assessment of presented material has increased and is utilized to help students recognize if they are mastering instructor lessons. Group discussions and critique sessions within all CGD classes add an additional learning experience and help ascertain if students understand the lecture material, and provide students with peer and faculty feedback. To build on this model other methodologies used by CGD faculty include: small group discussion; collective brainstorming sessions, one-on-one personal instruction; use of Skype and other video conferencing/remote screen sharing tools; field trips and guest speakers. New means of assessment, utilizing new modalities and pedagogical approaches, and actions to improve student attainment of objectives is fluid and ongoing within the CGD and CGW programs.

NEW METHODOLOGIES The CGD department’s Title III/ASPIRE curriculum redevelopment planned for fall 2013 will yield new methodologies, improved active learning and student success strategies, and our knowledge of new or varying pedagogical approaches. All full and part-time faculty will be attending weekly meetings and training sessions aimed at improving our teaching and learning strategies. Additionally, as part of the Title III/ASPIRE strategy, Professor Leslie and English Professor Susan Goldstein, have developed a learning community that combines ENG102 English Composition II with CGD105 Electronic Illustration. The focus and goal of this learning community is to introduce the graphic novel as a source of literature, while the graphic design majors explore the design principles and illustrative techniques of the graphic novel style. The learning community is called Picture This: Words Meet Pictures—The Illustrator and the Graphic Novel and will be offered in spring 2014.

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SECTION IV: Instructional Support • Library Resources • Staffing Levels • Adjunct Faculty • Support Services • Program Facilities • Professional Development

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LIBRARY RESOURCES Library Instruction/Information Literacy The CGD and CGW programs utilize the LaChance Library at MWCC in countless ways as a resource to our students. As all graphic and web design projects are research driven, the library and its staff are instrumental to the success of our students’ visual communication projects. One of the key resources we rely upon is the information literacy instruction students’ get within our classrooms. In several Computer Graphic Design classes, various members of the library staff will demonstrate how to utilize the CWMARS database, as well as other key databases that will strengthen our students’ research and information literacy skills.

Subject Guides In addition to the library instruction, staff members provide class or project specific “subject guides”—individualized websites that students and faculty can access for more information and resources on a particular class assignment. An example of such a subject guide can be found at: http://subjectguides.mwcc.edu/cgd105

Academic Support/Tutoring With the complexity of the software and course content taught within the CGD and CGW programs, tutoring support remains a prevalent need. However, often times the current student population doesn’t fulfill the greater need. We often have a shortage of qualified tutors with only a single peer tutor per semester, or if we are fortunate two peer tutors. As noted in the 2013 Continuing Students survey (Appendix D), 33% of Print and Web design students chose Paraprofessional/Peer Tutoring as the greatest weakness, and consequently receives several comments from students. We will need to work closely with the library staff and Dean of Library Services to hire and maintain qualified tutors in the areas of graphic and web design.

STAFFING LEVELS Adjunct Faculty While we feel confident in the staffing levels for our students advising needs, the CGD and CGW programs have routinely been understaffed as it relates to adjunct faculty. For several semesters, due to a lack in “qualified adjunct,” the CGD department chair has had to teach an extra course each semester to maintain the enrollments of first year, mandatory courses. All too often, the success of our programs hinges on this resource. With a clear dependency on adjunct faculty, the administration must consider alternatives to hiring only adjunct faculty with an advanced degree (Master’s or MFA). Since the inception of the CGD and CGW programs, the adjunct faculty pool and subsequent adjunct faculty hired by MWCC, has predominantly been graphic and interactive/web designers who do not have an advanced degree, but who are active and highly qualified design practitioners. It wasn’t until recently that it was mandated that we only hire individuals with an advanced degree. This limits the adjunct pool to severely low, often nonexistent, levels. Professor Mac Cormack also notes this issue and our need for greater hiring considerations in Section 8.1 of the CGD Program Evaluation Report. He writes, “…it is not uncommon that many successful designers do not have advanced degrees but rather 63


many years of experience using technologies in the fast paced, ever-changing world…” He follows up by noting, “MWCC would be missing out on many opportunities if they did not consider designers who are also active in the design field.” We strongly agree with Mr. MacCormack’s assessment and hope the administration will reconsider this highly limiting decision. We need to seek greater opportunities to grow and strengthen our degree programs, and there is not a more valuable resource to our students than qualified, active adjunct faculty who can bring their current experiences in graphic and interactive design into the classroom. While the advanced degree is important, it is not the only standard that should be used to measure one’s capabilities, knowledge or skill set. We must be willing to seek alternatives.

Full-time vs. Adjunct Our CGD and CGW programs are heavily reliant on and driven by adjunct. According to data obtained from the Division of Life Long Learning and Workforce Development, adjunct faculty teach anywhere from 70-83% of all CGD courses per year. See Appendix K for this data. Many courses that our adjunct faculty teach are never taught by the two full-time faculty members in our department. As a result, the CGD adjuncts have a direct impact on the architecture of our courses, the course outcomes and assessments, and appropriate changes that are needed. While in most cases this would appear to be a difficult challenge for our department to maintain academic standards, the adjunct faculty in the CGD department are a proactive and responsive group of professionals who attend department meetings regularly and who are constantly in close contact with the CGD chair. Minutes from meetings are provided to the adjuncts via email. The CGD faculty are also enrolled in the CGD department blackboard course where all advising information, course schedules, and other department related materials and announcements are posted throughout the year. In fall 2013, all of the CGD adjunct faculty have agreed to participate in the Title III curriculum redevelopment initiative. Likewise, they are consistently involved in individual and group meetings aimed at improving the quality of teaching and learning in our classrooms. It goes without saying that the adjunct faculty of our program are truly integral to the success of our programs and one of our greatest strengths.

SUPPORT SERVICES Lab Technicians Due to college-wide budget cuts in 2008, the CGD department lost three part-time lab assistant positions accounting for 60 hours of computer lab coverage, tutoring and student support services. Due to the lack of personnel, we were forced to close the labs at various times when they would otherwise have remained open and available to students. Since then we have had a rather tumultuous recovery with various changes in personnel and staffing hours, as well as position changes between CGD and IT. Currently the CGD department chair supervises two Lab Tech positions per semester to maintain and support the labs for a total of 36 hours per week. The CGD lab staff provide tutoring and printing assistance to the students, work closely with CGD faculty and the Division Dean, and maintain close contact with the ISS staff to resolve computer and technical problems. We have been fortunate to have former CGD/CGW graduates in these support positions

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throughout the 2012-2013 academic year. We will continue to need this support staff to maintain the integrity and quality of our programs, as they are vital to the overall success of our programs.

ISS Department/Media Services Equipment problems or IT related concerns are inherent to our department. We rely heavily on technology and equipment including overhead projectors, Macintosh and Windows based computers, scanners, and laserjet printers. We are constantly maintaining a close partnership with the IT and Media Services staff. With their assistance, we are working to maintain the highest level of quality and technical efficiency for our graphic design students and faculty. While the current IT staff works closely with us to maintain our labs and equipment, one clear deficiency for our department continues to resonate; the lack of a qualified IT specialist who is properly trained and equipped to address all Apple Macintosh computing needs. This is not just an issue for the CGD department, but for BCT, Marketing and Communications and any other department, staff or faculty member utilizing Apple computers and tablets. It is our distinct hope, given all of the struggles their technicians have faced in the past, that this will be an investment the IT department will make.

Academic Advisors Vital to the success of our enrollments is proper student advising. In the past the CGD department chair worked closely with designated academic advisors from Enrollment Services and the Career and Counseling Center, and these advisors provided substantial and exceptional support to our programs, especially throughout the summer months. However, within the past two years the advising staff and procedures have changed substantially, as has the policy on departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such as ours having a dedicated advising liaison. We went from having a key, direct contact within advising to knowing very few advisors directly. We see this as a tremendous problem, and we will be seeking the support of the Director of Advising to assist us in reestablishing connections between the advising staff and our faculty. This will be a key point of discussion and development in our Title III initiatives.

Print Services The Print Services department regularly assists us with Xerox printing issues or questions, maintains our paper needs for our color laser printer, and works closely with our department on client-based print related business. This department and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be more accommodating and supportive of our needs and requests.

Academic Support and Tutoring As noted previously, students in the CGD and CGW programs often require assistance with the highly technical and complex software applications used in our degree programs. Students who are excelling in our courses are recommended to the Academic Support Center and these students often tutor other CGD students in our computer labs. However, over the past few years we have seen a decrease in qualified or available tutors and this is a need that must be evaluated carefully. This too will be part of our Title III redevelopment plans.

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Service Learning We maintain close contact with the Director of Experiential Learning Opportunities & Civic Engagement. Fagan Forhan has been instrumental in the success of our service learning initiatives and provides undivided support to our students and faculty.

Disabilities Counselors and Academic Counselors As with most programs at MWCC, the CGD faculty work closely with the Disabilities Counselors to assist us in addressing and handling student issues in and outside of the classroom. The counselors at MWCC have been outstanding at providing the necessary education, assistance and guidance to CGD faculty to improve student relations and build our understanding of complex disabilities.

The MWCC Library The MWCC Library staff has been pivotal in providing information, and professional literacy and library orientation workshops to our students.

PROGRAM FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT There are three Computer Graphic Design labs equipped with computers and peripherals necessary to complete the required classes in our program. Two labs are equipped with Macintosh computers and the third lab has PC/Windows-based computers that are used most often for our web design courses. The graphic design industry, like all other visual arts industries, utilizes the Macintosh computer platform as its primary tool. Within an industry that is 80% Macintosh based, it has often been the case that the department chairperson and CGD faculty members have needed to take on the additional task of researching, comparing, and studying various technologies, computer systems and software package plans. The most difficult task has not been the compilation of the resources and data, but the need to defend the use of Macintosh computers as the primary tool for training students for the graphic design industry.

Computers Our current Macintosh computer labs are in their first full year of a 3-year lease with Apple. In the summer of 2012, 39 new iMac computers were leased, imaged and installed in rooms 346, 350 and 352, and Professor Leslie Cullen obtained a MacBook Pro instead of a desktop computer through this lease. With the PC computers in room 354 aging and in there 4th year of use, we hope to fully maintain the utmost level of technology for our computing and design needs by upgrading all of our labs to Macintosh computers. The request for these new computers will be submitted to the Dean of School of Liberal Arts, Education, Humanities & Communications. These new systems will likely contain dual-boot capabilities allowing users to log in to the Windows operating system or the Mac OSX operating system on one single machine. This eliminates the need for separate Macintosh and PC computers within our labs, and allows for the same cross platform training that we currently utilize. Furthermore, in Section 7.0 in the CGD Program Evaluation Report, Professor Mac Cormack comments on the need to replace all of the PCs with Macintosh computers and install a windows emulator when a Windows environment is needed.

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Lastly, we will continue to petition that the IT department acquire or train one of their staff members in Apple technical support services for assistance with imaging, testing, deployment and in-house technical services for all Macintosh computers on campus.

Software Through various software maintenance agreements, The CGD department is very fortunate to be able to maintain and provide the most current, industry standard graphic and interactive design software to our students and faculty. In fall 2013, the Adobe Creative Suite will be transitioned to the newest cloud computing system by Adobe; Adobe Creative Cloud. This new system will provide our students with the highest and most professional level of design software available on the market, including software that is otherwise unavailable for purchase, such as Adobe Muse and Edge. At low maintenance agreement costs, other design software, such as QuarkXpress and Universal Type Server for font management, is also regularly upgraded free of charge when updates become available.

Printers In the summer of 2012, with the support and assistance of the IT department, the CGD department was provided with a new Xerox Phaser 7800 color laser printer that can accommodate all of our color printing needs. The new printer can print up to 13 x 19 and has duplexing capabilities, which now affords our students greater opportunities in developing multi-paged, multi-sided brochures and booklets. However, we will soon likely need to consider the purchase of a new black and white laser printer. This need will be assessed and reviewed with the IT department as the age of the current printer progresses.

Projectors The projectors in rooms 346, 352 and 354 are an integral part of our computer graphic design curriculum, and the efficacy of our teaching and learning would grind to a halt without them. Media Services has provided us with newer projectors over the past two years, but we are still having some difficulty with the clarity of the images on the screen. Most often the students are concerned with the size of the images and text as it is projected. It is often very small and grainy. We will continue to seek the professional support of Media Services to maintain the integrity of our projection systems.

Data Storage Server Following best practices for server based computing, the CGD department had been utilizing Apple Macintosh server storage since 2006. In spring 2011, due to the aging and failing server we had in place, the IT department purchased a 4 Terabyte, Apple Snow Leopard Server for use by the CGD department for our data storage and file sharing needs. This new server was to be constructed and tested during the summer of 2011, however, it never was. After multiple failed attempts, the IT staff abandoned the work on this newly purchased server, and since then it has remained unused and likely in storage since fall 2012. Consequently, IT did provide our department with a Windows-based server, Erida, which is still in use today and has been an efficient and usable solution. Nevertheless, a very costly server was purchased for our needs only to remain unused at the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expense. A spring 2012 evaluation of the current Erida server indicated an increasing number of deficiencies.

67


Space: The space available on Erida is limited and already more than half used. We audited the space of this server at the beginning of May 2012, and there was only 487 GB out of 801 available on drive D and only 13 GB available on drive C. The Apple server, or a newer option, would have a minimum of 4 terabytes of space, would be built to withstand 5 years of use, and intended to be mirrored so if a drive fails we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lose access to the data. Age: The Erida server was meant to be a temporary solution until the Apple server could be built. Although the functionality of Erida is currently capable of handling our data storage needs, how long will the server last? The Apple server still has 3 years warranty on parts and 1 year of Apple Care, all sitting completely unused in the IT department. Functionality: Erida has never been set to push updates to our computers. Right now all updates are being done manually station by station, per lab, by our lab technicians. A whole lab has to be shut down for several hours for these updates to be performed. Streamlining this process would be essential with the proper use of a fully functioning and dedicated Apple server. Compatibility: Obviously the key to all of the above is the crossover and compatibility between the newer iMacs, the Apple operating system in use and upgrades that are forthcoming, and the communication and functionality of the server. Based in best practices, we should be utilizing the Apple server to cohesively communicate with the iMacs. If the Apple Server is not constructed and built it is on every level a severe waste of college resources and a failure in proper and modern computing. The IT department and college administration needs to take a careful look at this issue and address it accordingly.

Lab Desks and Chairs As was noted in the 2008 program review and will be restated here, the computer lab desks, particularly in rooms 346 and 352 should be replaced with appropriate computer tables/desks. Currently these tables are constructed of wood and house a secondary stationary shelf for the keyboard and mouse. Other labs on campus have modern computer desks with appropriate slots available across the top of the tables for the computer cables and wires. In addition, the desks in our labs are often too low for the taller men in our classes, and they are forced to lower the computer chair as far as it will go to utilize the keyboard and mouse effectively and comfortably. The computer chairs in all three labs are in need of a thorough cleaning, and in some instances need to be replaced altogether. We would like to have Facilities and Maintenance clean all of the fabric chairs in rooms 346, 350, 352, and 354, but doing so may require an outside service provider if upholstery cleaning is not available on campus. We will need to work closely with our Dean and the Maintenance staff to determine the best solution and any cost associated with this project. Lastly, it has been a long-standing request of Professor Swerzenksi that the desks and arrangement in room 354 be adjusted to provide direct access to the first row of students. This will be reviewed and addressed with Maintenance and Facilities, along with the Dean of School of Liberal Arts, Education, Humanities & Communications.

68


Lab Temperatureâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Cooling and Heating As reported in the 2008 review and once again noted in the 2013 student surveys as one of our greatest weaknesses, is the inadequate temperature control in the CGD labs (see Appendix D). The CGD labs are often exposed to extremely high levels of heat in the transition months (October and April/May), or otherwise the classrooms are extremely cold. Moderate temperature control continuously eludes this institution. All indications are that this issue is largely prevalent campus wide, yet no resolution ever seems to be investigated thoroughly and the issue is never rectified. Of utmost concern are the students and faculty who are exposed to this heat and stagnant air, or extreme cold, in an environment that should be highly conducive to learning. We are finding that most students have a difficult time concentrating, and thus the productivity within our classrooms suffers. As well, students are often exposed to these conditions for over four hours at a time because of the length of our studio courses. A permanent solution needs to be instituted to provide comfortable levels of heat and cooling within our CGD labs.

Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Cleanliness General floor cleaning and overall cleanliness of the computer labs is currently well maintained by the facilities staff. Additionally, the CGD department chair, staff and faculty have welcomed the responsive and supportive relationship that continues to grow between our 3rd floor maintainers, as well as with John Bergeron, Building Maintenance Supervisor. We commend the work the facilities and maintenance staff is continually providing.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS While the opportunity is indeed there for CGD faculty to obtain funding for workshops, conferences, etc., doing so on several recent occasions has proven rather complicated and inefficient. For example, webinars or online workshops are frequently available at a fairly low cost, but faculty are not made aware of the opportunities until just a few days prior to them starting. The current protocol for obtaining funding for professional development requires that the faculty member submit a Travel Authorization form and approval must be obtained from the Professional Development committee before funding will be appropriated. These steps seem unnecessary in order to obtain access to 1-2 hour webinars costing merely $40-75. While the funding for professional development may be adequate, the acquisition of those funds in a simple, user friendly way is not.

69


It is the recommendation of the CGD faculty that the procedures and policies currently in place to obtain funding for e-seminars, webinars, and self-paced, online, skills-based classes (not linked to the Commonwealth’s tuition reimbursement) be fully reviewed and made more readily available to faculty. Such examples of immediate professional development for CGD faculty include: •

Skillshare: www.skillshare.com Self-paced 1-2 week courses—$20-$29

MyDesignShop: www.mydesignshop.com On Demand Design Tutorials (designcasts)—$49.99–$69.99

HOW Design University: www.howdesignuniversity.com/ Self-paced, Independent Study Courses—$149-$199

It is our hope that when a request for specialized training and development through the outlets listed above is sought, the request will be more easily and readily granted (as easy as filling out an IPR with the Division Dean), and all needs will be fulfilled in a timely and efficient manner.

70


SECTION IV: Program Evaluation Summary

• Major Program Strengths • Needs for Improvement • Plans for Improvements

72


MAJOR PROGRAM STRENGTHS Robust, Learner-Centric Curriculums The CGD department continues to offer robust curriculums that are student centered. Strong outcomes-based pedagogy is the central focus of the department as we continue to adjust and calibrate the curriculum to ensure content is current, relevant and appropriately sequenced. We have enriched and strengthened the learning process of our students through the development of new learning opportunities, courses, and instructional training options delivered in a variety of learning methodologies. The effective methodologies used by CGD faculty include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Lectures Computer/hands-on software demonstrations Textbook and video tutorials Faculty developed training videos Real-world, client-driven projects Individual and group critique sessions Exploratory group brainstorming In-class studio and project development time Verbal and written quizzes/examinations Small group discussions One-on-one personal instruction Field trips Guest speakers Online learning modules, podcasts, and videocasts

Additionally, our faculty work to ensure that the CGD and CGW courses cover the in-depth use of the general education competencies in Written and Oral Communication and Information Literacy. Our courses are also designed to include critical thinking, problem solving, effective communication, information literacy, and the use of modern technology.

Real-World Pedagogy The CGD and CGW Degree Programs have been designed with a strong work-based, real-world pedagogy. Industry-wide competencies are used to develop and enhance programs, and capstone courses have been designed and developed to focus on practical design experiences for every student that completes the Print or Web Degree Program. Most class assignments are built around hypothetical, everyday scenarios or use real, client-based projects to teach students how to solve contemporary design problems.

Campus and Community-Wide Design Services Service Learning continues to be one of our greatest contributions to the college and community as a whole. Through service learning we continue to answer an increasing community need and strengthen the visibility of the college and CGD department by offering “pro bono” design services. These opportunities have a two-fold benefit. First, the students strengthen their understanding of business communication, effective time management, prioritizing, and balancing multiple project components. Second, the client agency is able to add a new means of communicating with their customer base through the development of printed visual communication pieces such as brochures, advertisements, flyers, and posters, or via the deployment of a new or enhanced website. 73


Equipment and Technology—Hardware, Software, Computers and Printers As the graphic design industry advances and continues to shift paradigms swiftly, we maintain the highest level of technology, software and training to match this ever-changing industry. Our labs are equipped with state of the art Macintosh computers; this is directly inline with all other local colleges and universities and match’s industry standards. The graphic and interactive design software is continually maintained at current industry standards to ensure that students have the skills and capabilities to work in any design environment. Exhibits The annual CGD Spring Exhibit is an impressive, juried showcase of our students’ print and web design work and demonstrates the skills our students have achieved. This large exhibit creates a distinct and unforgettable impression on visitors to the college, as we showcase our students’ talents just outside the doors of the Admissions office. Our annual Open House coupled with an Awards Presentation continues to grow exponentially every year drawing nearly 100 friends and family to our gallery each spring in April. Our smaller exhibits, particularly our service learning exhibit, is another valuable way for people visiting MWCC to see the work our students do, as well as the CGD department’s valuable connection to the community as a whole.

Alumni and Advisory Board Support Strong, dedicated and diverse Advisory Boards continue to support our endeavors and enhance our curriculums. Our alumni are active, supportive and vocal, and are able to measure our programs’ strengths and weaknesses through their own personal experiences.

Adjunct Faculty The CGD department is largely supported and driven by the experience and overwhelming dedication of our adjunct faculty. Our students gain valuable classroom experiences through the professional, high quality instruction provided by the faculty. Our adjunct members contribute to the overall success of the CGD and CGW programs with their contributions to curriculum development, outcomes assessment, and effective teaching and learning strategies.

74


NEEDS FOR IMPROVEMENT Upon review of the information provided within this review, the CGD department is in need of: • Increasing enrollments and raising persistence and first-year completion rates • Direct marketing and recruitment efforts • Balancing students’ workload and maintaining course organization • Fostering relationships and clearer communication channels with advising • Recruiting qualified adjunct faculty • Improved quality and availability of tutoring services • Increasing professional development • Updating the current program name and overall structure • Updating various course curriculums • Developing and maintaining greater alumni connections • Enhancing and updating the technology standards in our PC Lab • Improving the quality of printers, scanners and server

PLANS FOR IMPROVEMENT The Title III curriculum redevelopment and ASPIRE training scheduled for fall 2013 will be our department’s greatest asset to ensuring improvements in many of the areas listed above. Improvements in all areas of our curriculum will be sought during our Title III redevelopment, but particularly in our efforts to: •

Increase enrollments through direct marketing and enhanced recruitment efforts within the department and with the direct support of the Marketing Communications Department and Admissions. Peer to peer recruitment will continue to be utilized with visits to local high schools, as well as developing strong recruitment and marketing materials such as posters, brochures and interactive and social media strategies.

By engaging students through new teaching and learning strategies—such as improved and consistent pedagogical approaches and methodologies; a heightened focus on curriculum mapping; and objectives-based learning modules and assessments—we expect to see improved persistence and completion rates.

Equally important to our marketing, recruitment and overall curriculum redevelopment is the proper advising of our students. Improved communication and maintaining closer connections with the advising staff will ensure seamless registration, and ultimately support our persistence and retention efforts. We will continue to foster relationships amongst the advising and admissions staff. These are the first connections our prospective students make, and the individuals responsible for helping students tailor their interests and choose a program of study. Informed and knowledgeable advising is essential. Part of our redevelopment plan will be to map out areas where our program can be more closely and readily tied to the advising process. We will work closely with the advising staff to offer information sessions and continue to provide easy to understand advising materials.

75


Improving the availability of skilled tutors also helps to improve our students’ persistence and first year completion rates. The CGD department will work closely to connect all areas of our curriculum redevelopment to this valuable asset. The academic support team will be consulted on strategies for obtaining and sustaining qualified and easily accessible tutoring services for our students.

Other plans for improvement that will continue to help sustain and grow our programs: •

The recruitment of qualified adjunct is imperative to sustaining enrollments and maintaining quality course offerings. The CGD department chair will continue to work closely with the administration, the Division of Lifelong Learning, as well as Human Resources, to fulfill our adjunct faculty needs. This will be ongoing and the need will increase as our enrollments improve.

Remaining adaptable to the fluid changes of this industry and keeping abreast of the technology, industry trends, and standards is important to the success of our curriculum. With highly accessible professional development options online—via webinars, self-paced learning and digital tutorials—the CGD faculty should continue to seek out professional development opportunities on a regular basis.

Our alumni are an underutilized resource for our department. They would be instrumental in providing feedback and assessment in department generated surveys, and in assisting our students with the development of much needed design networks. Several meetings were held in fall 2012 and spring 2013 with Sarah McMaster, Director of New Media, to address our need for a CGD Alumni FaceBook page. We plan to implement this idea and begin to populate the page in fall 2013.

Given the age of the current computers, enhancing and updating the technology standards in our PC Lab, room 354, is a priority. Professor Mac Cormack expressed a need for us to eliminate the Windows-based PCs and improve the technology in those labs by adding new Macintosh computers. To remain competitive with FSU and QCC, whose graphic and interactive design labs are all Macintosh-based, we must install new iMac computers that will match the computers already in place in rooms 346 and 352. Leslie Cullen will work closely with the Division Dean and the IT department to implement this improved technology.

Improving the quality of the printers, scanners and server is also a priority. The scanners will need to be replaced soon, as they are a minimum of 6 years old and are lacking the scanning quality that our department needs. Additionally, while not an immediate and pressing need, the black and white printer must be evaluated and newer printing technology should be implemented within the next year or two. As previously noted, the Erida server is likely not capable of sustaining our data storage needs for much longer. The CGD department and IT must review new strategies, including options in cloud-based storage. At the very minimum, the examination for the use of the Apple server—that was purchased in spring 2011—should take place to mitigate the waste of this expensive equipment.

In conclusion, of utmost importance to the growth, vitality and sustainability of our department is continuing to strengthen and improve our programs so they are a true testament to our mission: to engage the creative spirit of life-long learners through a challenging, supportive learning environment and professional, caring faculty.

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77


APPENDIX Table of Contents Section I: Data Appendix A–D

p. 80–239

Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population Appendix E–I

p. 240–363

Section III: Curriculum Appendix J

p. 364–422

Section IV: Instructional Support Appendix K

p. 424–430

78


79


Section I: Data APPENDIX A: Enrollment Persistence Course Completion Rates Graduate Survey Response Rates Employment Transfer

80


81


Appendix A: Enrollment

82


83

Computer Graphic  Design  Certificate

Computer Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree

CGDC

CGW

-­‐40.0%

-­‐30.0%

-­‐20.0%

-­‐10.0%

0.0%

10.0%

20.0%

FY2004

FY2005

FY2006

-­‐3.5%

-­‐17.5%

-­‐7.7%

-­‐7.0%

NA

-­‐32.9%

5,571

132

12

66

3

51

FY2005

-­‐1.5%

5,710

139

CGD

FY2007

0.3%

-­‐3.8%

8.3%

-­‐31.8%

FY2009 Mt.  WachuseP  Community  College  

FY2008

15

53

5

66

5,882

140

7

63

8

62

3.0%

0.7%

-­‐53.3%

18.9%

60.0%

-­‐6.1%

FY2010

2.2%

9.4%

15.4%

17.8%

-­‐33.3% 150.0%

31.4%

5,587

127

13

45

2

67

21.0%

66.7%

-­‐11.4%

6,790

169

17

75

15

62

FY2011

6.8%

4.3%

8.1%

15.8%

-­‐28.6% 240.0%

-­‐1.6%

12.5%

12.9%

6,282

146

5

62

9

70

FY2012

2.0%

-­‐6.5%

-­‐41.2%

1.3%

-­‐20.0%

-­‐3.2%

6,923

158

10

76

12

60

-­‐4.5%

-­‐31.0%

0.0%

-­‐39.5%

-­‐66.7%

-­‐18.3%

6,613

109

10

46

4

49

FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012

Year Over  Year  Percent  Change  

6.9%

-­‐18.8%

TOTAL

-­‐23.7%

NA

Mt. Wachusett  Community  College

Computer Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree

CGW

5,774 -­‐11.6%

TTL

Computer Graphic  Design  Certificate

CGDC

5,399

TTL

Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree

CGD

160

13

71

0

76

FY2004

-­‐27.8%

Mt. Wachusett  Community  College

TTL

197

18

93

0

86

FY2003

CGWC Computer Graphic  Web  Certificate

TOTAL

TTL

CGWC Computer Graphic  Web  Certificate

Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree

Major Description

CGD

Major

Enrollment Summary   10  years:  2003–2012


84

Notes:

26 36 62 1 7 8 13 50 63 3 4 7 43 97 140

19 51 70 1 8 9 13 49 62 2 3 5 35 111 146

-­‐27 42 13 0 14 13 0 -­‐2 -­‐2 -­‐33 -­‐25 -­‐29 -­‐19 14 4

24 38 62 1 14 15 22 53 75 1 16 17 48 121 169

26 -­‐25 -­‐11 0 75 67 69 8 21 -­‐50 433 240 37 9 16

22 38 60 3 9 12 19 57 76 1 9 10 45 113 158

-­‐8 0 -­‐3 200 -­‐36 -­‐20 -­‐14 8 1 0 -­‐44 -­‐41 -­‐6 -­‐7 -­‐7

14 35 49 0 4 4 10 36 46 1 9 10 25 84 109

-­‐36 -­‐8 -­‐18 -­‐100 -­‐56 -­‐67 -­‐47 -­‐37 -­‐39 0 0 0 -­‐44 -­‐26 -­‐31

FY2008 FY2009 % CHG FY2010 %  CHG FY2011 %  CHG FY2012 %  CHG

% CHG   Fall  2012 Spring  2013 FY08-­‐12 -­‐46 FT 23 20 -­‐3 PT 11 13 -­‐21 -­‐100 FT 2 1 -­‐43 PT 3 3 -­‐50 -­‐23 FT 18 10 -­‐28 PT 6 14 -­‐27 -­‐67 FT 5 4 125 PT 8 3 43 -­‐42 FT 48 35 -­‐13 PT 28 33 -­‐22 TOTAL 76 68

Defining full-­‐time  versus  part-­‐time For  annual  counts,  students  enrolling  in  a  minimum  of  24  credits  during  a  fiscal  year  are  considered  full-­‐time  and  under  24  are  considered  part-­‐time This  is  true  for  students  who  may  have  been  enrolled  full-­‐time  in  one  semester  and  part-­‐time  in  another For  term  counts,  students  enrolling  in  a  minimum  of  12  credits  during  a  term  are  considered  full-­‐time  and  under  12  are  considered  part-­‐time Important  consideration  for  Fall  2012  and  Spring  2013  terms Because  a  student  can  be  full-­‐time  in  one  term  and  part-­‐time  in  another,  the  results  reported  will  not  necessarily  translate  to  an  annual  total  -­‐  in  other  words,  just  because  CGWC  reports  5  FT   students  in  Fall  2012  and  4  FT  students  in  Spring  2013  does  not  mean  that  there  will  be  9  FT  students  reported  for  FY  2013 The  methodology  for  counting  students  on  an  annual  basis  and  by  term  basis  differ:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               The  annual  data  counts  a  student  once  per  fiscal  year  and  the  term  by  term  data  counts  a  student  once  per  term                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Accordingly,  some  students  will  be  counted  in  both  Fall  2012  and  Spring  2013  terms When  the  FY  2013  data  is  available  in  late  July,  the  winter  intersession  and  summer  terms  will  also  be  included

Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Degree

Major Description

FT PT TOTAL CGDC Computer Graphic  Design  Certificate FT CGDC Computer  Graphic  Design  Certificate PT TOTAL CGW Computer  Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree FT CGW Computer  Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree PT TOTAL CGWC Computer  Graphic  Web  Certificate FT CGWC Computer  Graphic  Web  Certificate PT TOTAL TTL TOTAL FT TTL TOTAL PT TTL TOTAL TOTAL  STUDENTS

CGD CGD

Major

Annual Enrollment  -­‐  CGD  -­‐  FY2008-­‐FY2012                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Full  Time  Versus  Part  Time


85

Total Enrollments  

0

10

20

30

40

50

70

80

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

FY2008

62

FY2008

43

FY2010

62

FY2011

60

FY2012

49

FY2009

35

FY2010

48

FY2011

45

FY2012

25

FT

Computer Graphic  Design/Print   Degree  

Total Annual  Enrollments—Full-­‐=me    

FY2009

70

Computer Graphic  Design   Print  Degree  Total  Enrollments  

Total Enrollments   Total  Enrollments  

Total Enrollments  

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

FY2008

97

FY2008

63

FY2010

FY2011

76

FY2012

46

FY2009

111

FY2010

121

FY2011

113

FY2012

84

Computer Graphic  Design/ Web/MulE-­‐Media  Degree  

Total Annual  Enrollments—Part-­‐=me    

FY2009

62

75

Computer Graphic  Design   Web  Degree  Total  Enrollments  

PT


86

Computer Graphic  Design  Certificate

Computer Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree

CGDC

CGW

TTL

TOTAL

CGWC Computer Graphic  Web  Certificate

Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree

Major Description

CGD

Major

140

7

63

8

62

146

5

62

9

70

4

-­‐29

-­‐2

13

13

169

17

75

15

62

16

240

21

67

-­‐11

158

10

76

12

60

-­‐7

-­‐41

1

-­‐20

-­‐3

109

10

46

4

49

-­‐31

0

-­‐39

-­‐67

-­‐18

FY2008 FY2009 % Change FY2010 %  Change FY2011 %  Change FY2012 %  Change

Annual Enrollment  -­‐  CGD  -­‐  FY2008-­‐FY2012

-­‐22

43

-­‐27

-­‐50

-­‐21

% chg             FY08-­‐FY12


87


Appendix A: Persistence

88


89

Major CGD CGDC CGW CGWC TTL TTL

Major CGD CGDC CGW CGWC TTL TTL

Major CGD CGDC CGW CGWC TTL TTL

Major_Desc Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design  Certificate Computer  Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree Computer  Graphic  Web  Certificate TOTAL Mt.  Wachusett  Community  College

Fall2007-­‐Fall2008 59% 67% 57% 25% 57% 48%

Fall2008-­‐Fall2009 58% 80% 52% 75% 57% 49%

Fall to  Fall  Persistence  -­‐  CGD Fall2009-­‐Fall2010 50% 60% 58% 55% 55% 50%

Fall2010-­‐Fall2011 67% 43% 44% 50% 52% 48%

Fall2011-­‐Fall2012 61% 25% 40% 56% 51% 50%

Major_Desc Spring2008-­‐Fall2008 Spring2009-­‐Fall2009 Spring2010-­‐Fall2010 Spring2011-­‐Fall2011 Spring2012-­‐Fall2012 Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree 72% 68% 56% 66% 66% Computer  Graphic  Design  Certificate 75% 88% 89% 60% 100% Computer  Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree 76% 61% 65% 50% 60% Computer  Graphic  Web  Certificate 67% 67% 63% 100% 100% TOTAL 73% 67% 64% 59% 66% Mt.  Wachusett  Community  College 58% 59% 58% 57% 58%

Spring to  Fall  Persistence  -­‐  CGD

Major_Desc Fall2007-­‐Spring2008 Fall2008-­‐Spring2009 Fall2009-­‐Spring2010 Fall2010-­‐Spring2011 Fall2011-­‐Spring2012 Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree 81% 85% 85% 90% 84% Computer  Graphic  Design  Certificate 71% 100% 73% 56% 25% Computer  Graphic  Design/Web/Multi-­‐Media  Degree 69% 78% 85% 78% 76% Computer  Graphic  Web  Certificate 80% 100% 64% 56% 44% TOTAL 75% 83% 82% 79% 73% Mt.  Wachusett  Community  College 67% 68% 71% 68% 71%

Fall to  Spring  Persistence  -­‐  CGD

Persistence


Appendix A: CGD Printâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Course Completion Rates

90


CGD PRINT—Course  Section  Enrollment,  Completions  and  Grade  Distribution    FY2008-­‐FY2012 Course   Number CGD101

CGD102

CGD103

Trend Averages

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

55 40 29 7 8

57 44 42 3 10

68 47 46 8 13

61 48 44 4 9

29 20 19 5 4

54 39.8 36 5.4 8.8

11

2

1

4

1

3.8

73% 53% 13% 15%

77% 74% 5% 18%

69% 68% 12% 19%

79% 72% 7% 15%

69% 66% 17% 14%

73% 66% 11% 16%

20%

4%

1%

7%

3%

7%

18 16 16 1 1

8 7 7 1

14 14 14

16 14 14 1 1

10 10 9

13.2 12.2 12 1 1

1

1

88% 100% 88% 90% 6% 6%

93% 91% 8% 6%

10%

10%

9 9 8

13.2 12.4 11.4

89% 89% 6% 6%

88% 100% 88% 100% 13%

16 15 14

10 9 9

15 14 14

16 15 12

1

1

1

1

1 94% 88%

90% 90%

93% 93%

6%

10%

7%

6%

91

3

1 1

1.67

94% 100% 75% 89%

94% 87%

6% 19%

7% 11%

12%


CGD104

CGD105

CGD106

CGD109

Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

67 48 45 3 16

57 52 52 1 4

77 62 62 6 9

3 72% 67% 4% 24%

91% 91% 2% 7%

81% 81% 8% 12%

4%

74 61 54 6 7

41 27 26 6 8

63.2 50 47.8 4.4 8.8

7

1

3.67

82% 73% 8% 9%

66% 63% 15% 20%

78% 75% 7% 14%

9%

2%

5%

12 9 9 2 1

31.6 24 22.2 2.8 4.8

28 22 21 1 5

39 27 23 8 4

43 36 33 1 6

36 26 25 2 8

1

4

3

1

79% 4% 18%

69% 59% 21% 10%

84% 77% 2% 14%

72% 69% 6% 22%

4%

10%

7%

3%

15 14 13

9 9 8

8 8 7

18 18 16

1

1

2

2.25 75% 75% 17% 8%

6% 10 9 9 1

1 1

93% 100% 100% 100% 87% 89% 88% 89%

12 11.6 10.6 1 1 1.25

90% 90% 10%

7%

92

76% 71% 10% 15%

97% 88% 10% 7%

7%

11%

13%

11%

10%

44 35 33 9

42 35 30 2 5

61 43 42 4 14

62 50 39 1 11

21 12 11 5 4

46 35 31 3 8.6

2

5

1

11

1

4

80% 75% 20%

83% 71% 5% 12%

70% 69% 7% 23%

81% 63% 2% 18%

57% 52% 24% 19%

74% 66% 9% 18%

5%

12%

2%

18%

5%

8%


CGD204

CGD205

CGD225

CGD235

Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

28 25 23 1 2

28 23 21

2

2

89% 82% 4% 7%

82% 75%

7%

7%

8 5 4

22 16 16 4 2

3

5

18%

29 26 26 1 2

90% 90% 3% 7%

10 8 8 2

1 63% 50% 38%

26 20 18 2 4

18 16 15 2

25.8 22 20.6 1.33 3

2

1

1.75

77%

89% 83%

8% 15%

11%

85% 80% 5% 12%

8%

6%

7%

14 8 7 1 5

8 2 2 4 2

12.4 7.8 7.4 2.75 3

1 73% 73% 18% 9%

80% 80% 20%

13%

57% 50% 7% 36%

10

57% 57% 43%

93

25% 25% 50% 25%

7% 5 5 5

23 13 13

1 59% 56% 24% 27% 10% 4 4 4

4.5 4.5 4.5

100% 100% 100% 100%

100% 100%

29 20 18 5 4

23 19 18 2 2

26 20 19 3 3

13 10 9 3

22.8 16.4 15.4 3.25 4.75

2

1

1

1

1.25

69% 62% 17% 14%

83% 78% 9% 9%

77% 73% 12% 12%

77% 69% 23%

72% 68% 15% 19%

7%

4%

4%

8%

6%


CGD240

PRINT

Total Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  Course  Enrollment Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  #  Completed:  Earned  Credit Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  #  Failed Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  #  Withdrew Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  #  Grade  <  76 Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  %  Completed:  Earned  Credit Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  %  Failed Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  %  Withdrew Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT  Total  %  Grade  <  76

94

33 24 20 4 5

30 26 19 1 3

38 32 29 2 4

39 28 25 3 8

10 9 9

4

7

3

3

73% 61% 12% 15%

87% 63% 3% 10%

84% 76% 5% 11%

72% 64% 8% 21%

12%

23%

8%

8%

335 257 231 17 61 26

331 268 245 25 38 23

386 309 299 26 51 10

393 313 278 23 57 35

185 137 130 26 22 7

326 257 237 23 46 20

77% 69% 5% 18% 8%

81% 74% 8% 11% 7%

80% 77% 7% 13% 3%

80% 71% 6% 15% 9%

74% 70% 14% 12% 4%

78% 72% 8% 14% 6%

1

30 23.8 20.4 2.5 4.2 4.25

90% 90% 10%

81% 71% 7% 13% 13%


CGD PRINT—Course  Section  Completion  Rates—Trend  Averages    FY2008-­‐FY2012 Course   Number

Trend Averages

Course Number

73% 66% 11% 16%

CGD105

1  ST  SEMESTER CGD101

CGD104

CGD109

% Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

2ND  SEMESTER

7% 78% 75% 7% 14%

CGD235

5% 74% 66% 9% 18%

CGD240

8%

3RD SEMESTER CGD102

CGD204

% Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76 %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

Trend Averages %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

76% 71% 10% 15% 6% 72% 68% 15% 19% 6% 81% 71% 7% 13% 13%

4TH SEMESTER 93% 91% 8% 6%

CGD103

10% 85% 80% 5% 12%

CGD106

7%

95

% Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76 %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

94% 87% 7% 12% 97% 88% 10% 7% 10%


Appendix A: CGW Webâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Course Completion Rates

96


Computer Graphic  Design  WEB—Course  Section  Enrollment,  Completions  and  Grade  Distribution    FY2008-­‐FY2012

Course Number CGD101

CGD104

CGD105

Trend Averages

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76

55 40 29 7 8

57 44 42 3 10

68 47 46 8 13

61 48 44 4 9

29 20 19 5 4

54 39.8 36 5.4 8.8

11

2

1

4

1

3.8

73% 53% 13% 15%

77% 74% 5% 18%

69% 68% 12% 19%

79% 72% 7% 15%

69% 66% 17% 14%

73% 66% 11% 16%

20%

4%

1%

7%

3%

7%

67 48 45 3 16

57 52 52 1 4

77 62 62 6 9

74 61 54 6 7

41 27 26 6 8

63.2 50 47.8 4.4 8.8

7

1

3.67

82% 73% 8% 9%

66% 63% 15% 20%

78% 75% 7% 14%

9%

2%

5%

12 9 9 2 1

31.6 24 22.2 2.8 4.8

3

%  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

72% 67% 4% 24%

91% 91% 2% 7%

81% 81% 8% 12%

4%

97

28 22 21 1 5

39 27 23 8 4

43 36 33 1 6

36 26 25 2 8

1

4

3

1

79% 75% 4% 18%

69% 59% 21% 10%

84% 77% 2% 14%

72% 69% 6% 22%

4%

10%

7%

3%

2.25 75% 75% 17% 8%

76% 71% 10% 15% 6%


CGD109

CGD110

CGD112

CGD204

Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

44 35 33 9

42 35 30 2 5

61 43 42 4 14

62 50 39 1 11

21 12 11 5 4

46 35 31 3 8.6

2

5

1

11

1

4

80% 75% 20%

83% 71% 5% 12%

70% 69% 7% 23%

81% 63% 2% 18%

57% 52% 24% 19%

74% 66% 9% 18%

5%

12%

2%

18%

5%

8%

29 24 21 1 4

26 20 14 2 4

30 26 21 4

30 25 24 2 3

25 17 15 3 5

28 22.4 19 2 4

3

6

5

1

2

3.4

83% 72% 3% 14%

77% 54% 8% 15%

87% 70% 13%

83% 80% 7% 10%

68% 60% 12% 20%

80% 67% 7% 15%

10%

23%

17%

3%

8%

12%

22 16 13 5 1

30 19 19 4 7

27 19 16 3 5

26.33 18 16 4 4.33

3

3

70% 59% 11% 19%

69% 61% 16% 15%

11%

12%

3 73% 59% 23% 5%

63% 63% 13% 23%

14%

98

28 25 23 1 2

28 23 21

2

2

89% 82% 4% 7%

82% 75%

7%

7%

5

18%

29 26 26 1 2

90% 90% 3% 7%

26 20 18 2 4

18 16 15 2

25.8 22 20.6 1.33 3

2

1

1.75

77% 69% 8% 15%

89% 83% 11%

85% 80% 5% 12%

8%

6%

7%


CGD205

CGD210

CGD225

CGD240

Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

8 5 4 3

22 16 16 4 2

10 8 8 2

1 63% 50% 38%

73% 73% 18% 9%

4 2

80% 80% 20%

57% 50% 7% 36%

6 6 6

11 9 8

12.4 7.8 7.4 2.75 3 1

25% 25% 50% 25%

7%

100% 100% 100% 100%

99

8 2

1

13% 9 9 9

14 8 7 1 5

59% 56% 24% 27% 10%

2

10 7 5 2 1

12 8 5 2 2

9.6 7.8 6.6 2 1.67

1

2

3

2

82% 73% 18%

70% 50% 20% 10%

67% 42% 17% 17%

84% 73% 18% 15%

9%

20%

25%

18%

5 5 5

4 4 4

4.5 4.5 4.5

100% 100% 100% 100%

100% 100%

33 24 20 4 5

30 26 19 1 3

38 32 29 2 4

39 28 25 3 8

4

7

3

3

73% 61% 12% 15%

87% 63% 3% 10%

84% 76% 5% 11%

72% 64% 8% 21%

12%

23%

8%

8%

10 9 9 1

30 23.8 20.4 2.5 4.2 4.25

90% 90% 10%

81% 71% 7% 13% 13%


CGD241

CGD242

CGD244

WEB

Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Total  Course  Enrollment #  Completed:  Earned  Credit #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher #  Failed #  Withdrew #  Incomplete #  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  Course  Enrollment Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  #  Completed:  Earned  Credit Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  #  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  #  Failed Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  #  Withdrew Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  #  Grade  <  76 Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  %  Completed:  Earned  Credit Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  %  Failed Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  %  Withdrew Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB  Total  %  Grade  <  76

100

12 11 9 1

14 10 10 1 3

2 92% 75% 8%

71% 71% 7% 21%

17% 8 8 8

100% 100%

6 5 5

15 11 10 3 1

17 13 8 4

1

5

73% 67% 20% 7%

76% 47% 24%

7%

29%

8 6 6 1 1

12 9 8 3

10 9 7 1

9.5 8 7.25 1.67 1

1

2

1.5

75% 67% 25%

90% 70% 10%

85% 78% 16% 13%

8%

20%

14%

10 10 10

9 9 9

8.5 8.25 8.25

75% 75% 13% 13%

9 9 9

15 14 14 1

14.6 11.8 10.2 2.67 1.5 2.67

93% 93% 7%

81% 71% 17% 11% 18%

1

1

83% 100% 100% 100% 83% 100% 100% 100%

96% 96%

17%

17%

313 243 214 17 53 29

357 288 259 27 42 29

429 334 319 32 63 15

423 329 288 33 61 41

214 156 145 28 30 11

347 270 245 27 50 25

78% 68% 5% 17% 9%

81% 73% 8% 12% 8%

78% 74% 7% 15% 3%

78% 68% 8% 14% 10%

73% 68% 13% 14% 5%

78% 71% 8% 14% 7%


CGW WEB—Course  Section  Completion  Rates—Trend  Averages    FY2008-­‐FY2012

Course Number

Trend Averages

Course Number

73% 66% 11% 16%

CGD105

1  ST  SEMESTER CGD101

CGD104

CGD109

% Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

2ND  SEMESTER

7% 78% 75% 7% 14%

CGD112

5% 74% 66% 9% 18%

CGD240

8%

3RD SEMESTER CGD110

CGD241

CGD242

% Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76 %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76 %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

Trend Averages %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76   %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

76% 71% 10% 15% 6% 69% 61% 16% 15% 12% 81% 71% 7% 13% 13%

4TH SEMESTER 80% 67% 7% 15%

CGD210

12% 81% 71% 17% 11%

CGD244

18% 85% 78% 16% 13% 14%

101

% Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76 %  Completed:  Earned  Credit %  Completed:  Grade  C  or  Higher %  Failed %  Withdrew %  Incomplete %  Grade  <  76

84% 73% 18% 15% 18% 96% 96% 17%


Appendix A: Employment & Transfer

102


103

2011

2010

2009

2008

Year

26 121

FOUR  YEAR  TOTAL

11 3 7 5

31

7 9 4 11

39

11 11 5 12

25

Computer Graphic  Design/Print  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Certificate Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Certificate 2008  TOTALS Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Certificate Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Certificate 2009  TOTALS Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Certificate Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Certificate 2010  TOTALS Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Print  Certificate Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Degree Computer  Graphic  Design/Web  Certificate 2011  TOTALS

9 2 9 5

42

3 0 7 1 11 4 3 0 3 10 4 4 2 5 15 3 1 1 1 6 16

2 0 1 0 3 2 1 0 2 5 1 0 1 3 5 1 0 1 1 3 38%

67% 0% 14% 0% 27% 50% 33% 0% 67% 50% 25% 0% 50% 60% 33% 33% 0% 100% 100% 50%

% of   #  of  Graduates #  Respondents #  Employed Respondents   Employed  

16

2 0 4 0 6 1 1 0 0 2 1 2 1 1 5 3 0 0 0 3

# Transfer

42

3 0 7 1 11 4 3 0 3 10 4 4 2 5 15 3 1 1 1 6

38%

67% 0% 57% 0% 55% 25% 33% 0% 0% 20% 25% 50% 50% 20% 33% 100% 0% 0% 0% 50%

76%

100%

67%

70%

82%

Total %   Respondents   #  Respondents Transferred Employed  and   Transferred

Employed in  the  Graphic  Design  Field-­‐                                                                                              Transfer                                  A      fter               Graduation-­‐                                                                                                                   By  Year  Per  Degree By  Year  Per  Degree

Employment and  Transfer  By  Year  Per  Degree


104

25 39 31 26

FOUR   YEAR  TOTAL 121 Percentage   of  Graduates   Responded

2008 TOTALS 2009  TOTALS 2010  TOTALS 2011  TOTALS 42 35%

11 10 15 6

# of  Graduates #  Respondents

16

3 5 5 3

# Employed

38%

% of   Respondents   Employed   27% 50% 33% 50%

Employed in  the  Graphic  Design  Field  By  Year  Per  Degree

42

11 10 15 6

# Respondents

16

6 2 5 3

# Transfer

38%

55% 20% 33% 50%

% Transferred

76%

82% 70% 67% 100%

Total Respondents   Employed  and  Transferred

Transfer After  Graduation  By  Year  Per  Degree

Employment and Transfer Summary


105


Section I: Data APPENDIX B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: Understanding Graphic Design Advising Handout Advising Materials: Advising Information Fall 2012 Advising Packet—CGD Spring 2013 Advising Packet—CGW Spring 2013 Marketing—Career Focus Article CGD Website Redesign CGD Recruitment Flyer

106


107


Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: Understanding Graphic Design Advising Handout

108


U N  D  E  R  S  T  A  N  D  I  N  G  

GRAPHIC DESIGN What is  graphic  design?   Graphic Design can be thought of as a visual language that is used to convey a message to an audience; a creative process that combines art and technology to communicate ideas. A graphic design is a visual representation of an idea that relies on the creation, selection, and organization of visual elements (text and images) to communicate a message from a client to a particular audience.

Who are  the  clients?   They are organizations, corporations, businesses, and individuals with a message they want to communicate to a particular audience.

How much  is  Graphic  Design  part  of  your  daily  life?   From the simple things like gum wrappers to huge things like billboards to the T-shirts you’re wearing, graphic design can: •

Persuade

Enhance

Locate

Inform

Organize

Engage

Identify

Brand

Motivate

Rouse

Carry/convey many levels of meaning.

Maps, charts, graphs

Web sites and web graphics

Film and video graphic

Graphic Designers  design/create:   •

Advertisements

Booklets

Newspapers

Annual reports

Magazines

Posters

Newsletters

Logos

Books Brochures

Invitations

Book covers

CD packages

Catalogs

Product packages

Stationery—letterheads, business cards, and envelopes

Environmental signage—helps people find their way through streets, subways and buildings

109


Exhibition & display—museum exhibits, food and product displays in stores, trade show exhibits

Educational resources—CDs, textbooks, workbooks, etc.

Digital Images—Photo manipulation, montages, and collages

Illustrations—Computer generated or through traditional mediums

What are  the  types  of  jobs  within  the  graphic  design  profession?   •

Advertising

Branding

Identity design

Corporate communication

Environmental design

Information design

Package design Publication design

Interactive/ experience design

Motion graphics

Typographic design.

Promotional design

Marketing firms

Advertising agencies

Integrated communication firms

Self-employment, as well as freelance work

Where are  graphic  designers  employed?   •

Design studios

Branding firms

Companies, corporations and organizations with in-house design departments Publishers

Interactive agencies

Printing Presses

Newspapers

Magazines

TV and Film Studios

Who do  graphic  designers  collaborate  with?   Almost all visual communications professionals collaborate with clients. Often, they collaborate with other professionals, such as creative directors, design directors, associate creative directors, production experts, photographers, illustrators, copywriters, art directors and specialists (interactive / type/lettering / architects / film directors / producers / casting directors / talent (actors, musicians, and models) / music houses / IT professionals / psychologists / social anthropologists/market researchers), and with printers’ sales representatives and printers.

110


Description of  Work  Activities   Understanding Design Problem: Understand type of design needed; understand marketing objective and target audience of product or service; consider limitations: budget, time schedule, etc. Presenting Plan and Costs: Estimate costs of project; considering use of freelancers, outside services, printing and/or production processes; present design proposal: budget, design fee and time schedule; secure signed contract before starting work for client. Developing Design: Research project and explore design alternatives; may review designs used by competition in same industry; draw thumbnail sketch of ideas; make preliminary rough drawings (layouts) for approval; use computer graphics to design layout, select photographs, illustrations, colors, typefaces, size, etc for project; make comp and show to client for approval; may have to modify design or redo work if problem/objective is not solved. Producing Design Project: Coordinate design process to produce finished project; select paper and printing method; proofread any copy for errors; check print and color quality of artwork; get final approval before going into print production; deliver finished project to client/supervisor. Special Problems/Satisfactions Often work under pressure to meet deadlines; must maintain high level of creativity; may have to deal with designer’s block occasionally; satisfaction in growing creatively throughout career; sense of pride from creating visually exciting designs and seeing them used in the marketplace. Educational Requirements Employers generally prefer 2 to 4 year degree in graphic design (may also be called communications design, commercial art, advertising design or commercial design). Job market is very competitive. Personal Qualifications Creativity, imagination and artistic talent; strong sense of color, line, design and form; ability to understand and resolve design problems and communicate with clients, design team members and those involved with design process. Must be able to accept criticism and/or rejection of design concepts. Discipline to follow directions and work under pressure.

111


Skills Required Coordinating well with others; following written and/or oral instructions; making presentations; gathering information; conducting research, planning, making decisions; attention to detail; developing ideas; working with computers, creating art and drawing (a plus!). Advancement May begin as a production artist, become a designer, then junior/senior art director, creative director. May freelance throughout career, or establish a reputation while employed and then freelance. May open own design studio.

Â

FOR YOUR INFORMATION... Graphic Design Organizations National Graphic Artists Guild - www.gag.org American Institute of Graphic Art - www.aiga.com Graphic Design Magazines HOW Magazine - www.howdesign.com Graphic Design USA - FREE! - www.gdusa.com Communication Arts - www.commarts.com Digital Artist - www.digitalartistdaily.com Digital Arts - www.digitalartsonline.co.uk Help Wanted/Freelance www.monster.com www.boston.com http://aquent.us/ * www.elance.com/ * www.99desiigns.com * http://vitamintalent.com/ * http://www.ifreelance.com/ *

*Specialize in graphic design.

112


113


Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: Advising Materials Advising Information Fall 2012

114


Advising Information Fall 2012 CGD

Computer Graphic Design—Print

CGW

Computer Graphic Design—Web

CGDC

Computer Graphic Design—Print Certificate

CGWC Computer Graphic Design—Web Certificate

If you have any questions please contact Leslie Cullen at ext. 347 or home: 978-353-6964

115


Important Information to Note for CGD/CGW/CGDC/CGWC 

All CGD/CGW/CGDC/CGWC incoming freshman for Fall 2012 will need to be enrolled in predefined course tracks—Track A or Track B—consisting of CGD101 Design Theory, CGD104 Digital Imaging and CIS127 Computer Technologies with All 16 seats in track A have been reserved for CGD/CGDC/CGW/CGWC majors only. 8 seats in track B have been reserved for CGD/CGDC/CGW/CGWC majors only. The remaining 8 seats in track B are open to all majors.

Track C will be used as our overflow track; to be opened and filled once tracks A and B are filled. Currently CGD101, CGD104 and ART263 in this track are closed.

CIS127 CRN 91014 with Paul Swerzenski (in track C) is an active class and open to all majors. Students with an interest in graphic or web design, such as ART, BCT, GS, LAS Communications, etc. are recommended to enroll in this course.

Students may not mix courses between the tracks. If they choose track A, the student must take all of the courses within track A.

Pre or Co-requisites: Students in CGD/CGW/CGDC/CGWC are required to take CGD104 prior to or with CGD101. If a student can only take one course, they must take CGD104 first. Do not enroll students in CGD101 without CGD104. It is IMPORTANT TO NOTE that these three courses are prerequisites for spring semester courses, and missing any one of these could adversely effect students’ enrollment options in the following semester—CGD101 and CGD104 are prerequisites for all spring CGD courses, and CIS127 is a prerequisite for CGD240 Creative Web Design. o If a student can only take one course, enroll them in CIS127 Track B or C o If a student can only take 2 courses, enroll them in CGD104 and CIS127 in Track B o We do offer off cycle, spring semester sections of CGD101, CGD104 and CIS127 if a student misses any one of these.

Students who still only need 1 or 2 of the three freshman level courses: If a student has taken one or more of the three courses—CGD101, CGD104 or CGD109—but still needs one or two of these courses, they must be registered in the 8 seats held in Track B for non-majors, or those who do not need all 3 courses.

Please review the new 2011-2012 catalog carefully. Please check the course descriptions and prerequisites before registering a student for any of our courses. 116


Track A

CGD101

Design Theory

90073

MW

11:00–12:45

CGD104

Digital imaging

90229

TR

11:00–12:45

CIS127

Computer Technologies

91013

MW

9:30–10:45

ART263 Drawing I

MW

1:45-3:45

ENG101 English Comp I

Open selection

Additional courses:

Track B 8 Seats are reserved for CGD/CGDC/CGW/CGWC; 8 seats are open to all majors (specifically students who need only one or two of the three cohort classes) Subject

Title

CRN#

Days

Time

CGD101

Design Theory

90265

TR

11:00–12:45

CGD104

Digital imaging

90266

MW

1:15-3:00

CIS127

Computer Technologies

90974

MW

8:00–9:15

ART263 Drawing I

MW

10:30-12:30

ENG101 English Comp I

Open selection

Additional courses:

Track C CIS 127 is available for all majors in this track as well. CGD101 and CGD104 in track C will remain closed until Track A and B are filled. Subject CGD101 CGD104 CIS127

Title Design Theory Digital Imaging Computer Technologies

CRN# 90968 90540 91014

Days TR R MW

Time 9:00–10:45 6:00–9:30 pm 11:00–12:15

If there is any questions please contact Leslie Cullen at x. 347, or at home: 978-353-6964 (summer)

117


Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: Advising Materials Advising Packetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CGD Spring 2013

118


Computer Graphic Design Procedures for Online Registration

Spring 2013

Print Degree (CGD) & Print Certificate (CGDC) Freshmen and Sophomore

Go to www.mwcc.mass.edu > select iConnect > Log in and select > WebConnect â&#x2014;&#x2020; Registration begins on Monday, November 5th Plan your course selections and register early. Please see a CGD instructor or your advisor with any questions.

119


Computer Graphic Design Program—Procedures for Online Registration—PRINT—Page 2

CGD FRESHMEN ONLY (DAY CLASSES): REGISTER on Web Connect for the following CGD courses: IMPORTANT: Please see your advisor if you still need to take CGD101, CGD104 or CIS127. DO NOT register for spring semester courses without consultation from an advisor if you still need any of these courses. These three courses are prerequisites for spring courses and may affect your enrollment and registration. For all CGD PRINT majors—Use the CGD/CGDC—PRINT MAJORS schedule provided in this handout. Required courses for Print Degree—FRESHMEN—Spring 2013 NOTE: BOLD courses denote required CERTIFICATE courses Course Number CGD 105 CGD 235 CGD 240 ENG 102 ART 251

Course Title Electronic Illustration Typography in Visual Communication Creative Web Design English Composition II Two Dimensional Design

Credits 3 3 3 3 3

❏ Register for the following: CRN: 14295 CGD235 HYBRID* Typography in Visual Comm. T* *Course is a hybrid with scheduled lab sessions and an online component.

1:15-4:45*

CRN: 14291

CGD105

E

Electronic Illustration

MW

11:00–12:45

CRN: 14296

CGD240

SGI

Creative Web Design

MW

1:45–3:30

CRN: 13927

ART 251

BD

Two Dimensional Design

TR

8:30-10:30

IMPORTANT: If you have a time conflict with any of the courses listed above or these sections are full, please see Leslie Cullen immediately to make an appointment for advising. You may also contact her via phone at 978-630-9347 or via email at l_cullen@mwcc.mass.edu. ❏ Choose an appropriate section and time for: ENG102 English Comp II

120


Computer Graphic Design Program—Procedures for Online Registration—PRINT—Page 3

CGD SOPHOMORE ONLY (DAY CLASSES): REGISTER on Web Connect for the following CGD courses: For all CGD PRINT majors—Use the CGD/CGDC—SOPHOMORE PRINT schedule provided in this handout. Required courses for Print Degree—SOPHOMORE—Spring 2013 NOTE: BOLD courses denote required CERTIFICATE courses Course Number CGD 103 CGD 106

Course Title Print Production for Designers Portfolio Preparation CGD Professional Elective Social Science Elective Science Elective

Credits 3 3 3 3 3/4

❏ You must register for the following sections and times for CGD103 and CGD106. CRN: 13250 CRN: 13091

CGD103 CGD106

SFG SHJ

Print Production Portfolio Preparation

R T

11:00–2:30 1:30–5:00

❏ Choose an appropriate section and time for: CGD Professional Elective, if still needed Humanities Elective, if still needed Science Elective, if still needed You may need a variety of other Gen Ed courses. Please review the attached curriculum sheets and review your unofficial transcripts to see what you have taken and may still need to take. Review the list of required Electives and General Education courses below and on page 4.

For all required Electives and General Education courses: PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES: ❏ Choose your CGD Professional Electives (if still needed):

ART*** CGD205 CGD244 PHO115 PHO215 PHO225 PHO226 PHO240 BUS125 MGT110 MKT142 THE113

Any higher level Art Course Digital Photo Art (Hybrid course—Adobe Photoshop) Designing for E-Commerce (Prerequisite: CGD241) Digital Photography Advanced Digital Photography (Prerequisite: BCT115) Intro to Photography Advanced Photography (Prerequisite: BCT225) Portrait Photography Communication for Business and Industry Small Business Management Marketing Speech

121


Computer Graphic Design Program—Procedures for Online Registration—PRINT—Page 4

GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES ❏ Check with your advisor to find your math test scores

Register for the appropriate MATH course based on these scores (if still needed).

TEST &  SCORE  

PLACEMENT

ARITHMETIC (PR  11)   0-­‐35   36-­‐80   81+   ELEM  ALGEBRA  (PR  12)   55-­‐82   83+   COLLEGE  LEVEL  MATH  (PR  13)   31-­‐86   87-­‐103   104+  

MAT  090   MAT  092   MAT  096     MAT  096   MAT  126/140/143     MAT  128/160   MAT  161   MAT  211  

❏ Choose your Science Elective (if still needed):

(**4 credit science courses are recommended if you plan to transfer to a 4-year college.) BIO103 BIO104 BIO109 BIO115 BIO116 BIO120

Human Health and Disease BIO205 **Microbiology **Introduction to Natural Resource Conservation **Biology I BIO209 Human Sexuality **Human Biology CHE107 **General Chemistry I **Ecology EAS125 ** The Dynamic Earth **Horticulture NUT101 Intro to Nutrition

❏ Choose your Social Science Elective (if still needed):

(** indicates courses that are recommended if you plan to transfer to a 4-year college.) PSY101 Psychology of Self PSY105 **Introduction to Psychology PSY143 Group Dynamics PSY244 Children with Special Needs Other Social Science electives include: ANT, DSI, GEO, HIS, POL, ECO

PSY280 SOC103 SOC125 SOC206

Psychology of Death and Dying **Introduction to Sociology Gender Issues Marriage and Family

❏ Choose your Humanities electives (if still needed):

HUM260 MUS*** THE113 ENG*** ART***

Art of Being Human ASL101 Basic American Sign Language Any first level Music SPA109 Beginning Spanish Speech Any higher level English beyond ENG 102 Any higher level Art beyond ART 251 or ART 263

122


123


Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: Advising Materials Advising Packetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CGW Spring 2013

124


Computer Graphic Design Procedures for Online Registration

Spring 2013

Web Degree (CGW) & Web Certificate (CGWC) Freshmen and Sophomore

Go to www.mwcc.mass.edu > select iConnect > Log in and select > WebConnect â&#x2014;&#x2020; Registration begins on Monday, November 5th Plan your course selections and register early. Please see a CGD instructor or your advisor with any questions.

125


Computer Graphic Design Program—Procedures for Online Registration—WEB—Page 2

CGW FRESHMEN ONLY (DAY CLASSES): REGISTER on Web Connect for the following CGD courses: IMPORTANT: Please see your advisor if you still need to take CGD101, CGD104 or CIS127. DO NOT register for spring semester courses without consultation from an advisor if you still need any of these courses. These three courses are prerequisites for spring courses and may affect your enrollment and registration. For all CGW Web majors—Use the CGW/CGWC—WEB MAJORS schedule provided in this handout. Required courses for Web Degree—FRESHMEN—Spring 2013 NOTE: BOLD courses denote required CERTIFICATE courses Course Number CGD 105 CGD 112 CGD 240 ENG 102 ART 251

Course Title Electronic Illustration Communication in Multimedia Design Creative Web Design English Composition II Two Dimensional Design

Credits 3 3 3 3 3

❏ Register for the following: CRN: 14293 CGD112 Cycle 1 Comm. in Multimedia Design MW* 1:15-4:45* *Course is a 7 week cycle course. Meets 7 hours per week for the first 7 weeks of the semester. CRN:  13194

CGD105

F

Electronic Illustration

TR

11:00–12:45

CRN: 14297

CGD240

SE

Creative Web Design

MW

11:00–12:45

CRN: 13927

ART 251

BD

Two Dimensional Design

TR

8:30-10:30

IMPORTANT: If you have a time conflict with any of the courses listed above or these sections are full, please see Leslie Cullen immediately to make an appointment for advising. You may also contact her via phone at 978-630-9347 or via email at l_cullen@mwcc.mass.edu. ❏ Choose an appropriate section and time for: ENG102 English Comp II

126


Computer Graphic Design Program—Procedures for Online Registration—WEB—Page 3

CGW SOPHOMORE ONLY (DAY CLASSES): REGISTER on Web Connect for the following CGW courses: For all CGW Web majors—Use the CGW/CGWC—SOPHOMORE WEB schedule provided in this handout. Required courses for Web Degree—SOPHOMORE —Spring 2013 NOTE: BOLD courses denote required CERTIFICATE courses— please see the back of this packet for all of the courses required in the CGW certificate. Course Number *CGD 210 CGD244

Course Title Advanced Website Portfolio Designing for E-Commerce Business Elective Humanities Elective Science Elective

Credits 3 3 3 3 3/4

❏ You must register for the following sections and times for CGD210 and CGD242. *Due to low enrollments CGD210 is being substituted with CGD106 CRN: 13091 CGD106 SHJ Portfolio Preparation T 1:30–5:00 CRN:  14299 CGD244 SH* Designing for E-Commerce T 11:00–12:45 *CGD244 is a Hybrid Course. Lab sessions will be required on Tuesdays and some Thursdays. ❏ Choose an appropriate section and time for: Business Elective, if still needed Humanities Elective, if still needed Science Elective, if still needed Review the list of required Electives and General Education courses below and on page 4.

For all required Electives and General Education courses: GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES: ❏ Check with your advisor to find your math test scores Register for the appropriate MATH course based on these scores (if still needed).

TEST &  SCORE  

PLACEMENT

ARITHMETIC (PR  11)   0-­‐35   36-­‐80   81+   ELEM  ALGEBRA  (PR  12)   55-­‐82   83+   COLLEGE  LEVEL  MATH  (PR  13)   31-­‐86   87-­‐103   104+  

MAT  090   MAT  092   MAT  096     MAT  096   MAT  126/140/143     MAT  128/160   MAT  161   MAT  211  

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Computer Graphic Design Program—Procedures for Online Registration—WEB—Page 4

❏ Choose your Business Elective (if still needed): (**Indicates courses that are highly recommended) ACC101 BUS105 BUS113 BUS125 CIS120 MGT110 MKT142 MKT241

Principles of Accounting I Business Ethics Business Etiquette and Protocol Communication for Business or Industry **Microcomputer Applications (Excel and databases) **Small Business Management Advertising **Marketing

❏ Choose your Science Elective (if still needed):

(**4 credit science courses are recommended if you plan to transfer to a 4-year college.) BIO103 BIO104 BIO109 BIO115 BIO116 BIO120

Human Health and Disease BIO205 **Microbiology **Introduction to Natural Resource Conservation **Biology I BIO209 Human Sexuality **Human Biology CHE107 **General Chemistry I **Ecology EAS125 ** The Dynamic Earth **Horticulture NUT101 Intro to Nutrition

❏ Choose your Social Science Elective (if still needed):

(** indicates courses that are recommended if you plan to transfer to a 4-year college.) PSY101 Psychology of Self PSY105 **Introduction to Psychology PSY143 Group Dynamics PSY244 Children with Special Needs Other Social Science electives include: ANT, DSI, GEO, HIS, POL, ECO

PSY280 SOC103 SOC125 SOC206

Psychology of Death and Dying **Introduction to Sociology Gender Issues Marriage and Family

❏ Choose your Humanities electives (if still needed):

HUM260 MUS*** THE113 ENG*** ART***

Art of Being Human ASL101 Basic American Sign Language Any first level Music SPA109 Beginning Spanish Speech Any higher level English beyond ENG 102 Any higher level Art beyond ART 251 or ART 263

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Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: Marketingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Career Focus Article Cluster Brochure

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CareerFocus

Feature

Create Your Future Through Visual Art & Design Forget your ideas of the “starving artist.” Creative careers are on the rise!

W By Kim Anderson

ho says you can’t have a creative career? At MWCC several degree and certificate programs allow students to pursue careers in the creative industries. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, careers in the creative industries are expected to grow 12 percent through 2018. From art, theatre and design to photography, careers in the field are continuing to grow. At MWCC students can pursue:

Art There are many areas of the field where those with an art degree may find work including fine arts, design and teaching. Students routinely earn associate degrees in MWCC’s Art program and transfer to prominent four-year colleges and universities including Massachusetts College of Art and Design; School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; UMass, Amherst; UMass, Dartmouth; and Maine College of Art in Portland. Graduates have also transferred to Smith College, Williams College, Pratt Institute, Rhode Island School of Design, and the School of Visual Arts in New York. What makes MWCC’s art department unique from other programs is that it provides students

her B.F.A. from Illinois State University and her M.F.A. in sculpture from UMass, Amherst and has exhibited sculpture, ceramics and mixed media drawings in galleries throughout the U.S.

the opportunity to experience a wellrounded curriculum of drawing, painting, sculpture and ceramics, while experiencing small class sizes. The department, which recently won a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts, offers an associate degree program for students interested in entering the art field or transfering to a four-year college. MWCC’s Art program is housed in the Raymond M. LaFontaine Fine Arts Center along side the East Wing Gallery and it includes three fully-equipped studios and a full range of art classes, from drawing to portfolio preparation. Did you know that MWCC is one of the only community colleges in Massachusetts that offers a bronze sculpture class? According to Joyce Miller, chair of the art department at MWCC, “The advanced sculpture course offers students the opportunity to create small-scale bronze sculptures, using the lost wax technique.”

The college also offers courses in ceramics using hand-building methods and the potter’s wheel; sculpture using wood, stone, clay, bronze and other materials; painting in watercolors, acrylics and oils; and two-dimensional and threedimensional design. MWCC’s East Wing Gallery, directed by Professor John Pacheco, displays work created by students, MWCC alumni, and professional artists. Pacheco received his bachelor’s degree from Yale University, studying under William Bailey, and his MFA in painting from Boston University, studying under James Weeks. The program offers opportunities for students to gain experience outside of the classroom through service learning projects that include teaching assistantships, workshops and volunteering in local communities.

Computer Graphic Design Graphic designers are responsible for the creative concept, design, layout and execution of printed and digital materials such as ads, brochures, logos, annual reports,

catalogs, signage, kiosks, websites, packaging and posters. MWCC offers both associate and certificate computer graphic design programs that provide students with the visual design, communication, and computer graphic skills necessary to obtain an entry-level position in the field or to continue their education at a fouryear college or university. For the associate program, students can choose a print or web media concentration. In the print concentration, students learn page layout software, design theory and techniques, and preparing design work for print. Students also learn advanced computer skills such as digital imaging, electronic illustration and web design. In the web concentration, students learn basic and advanced techniques of creating effective, well-designed, interactive web sites. Students are taught basic design theory, digital imaging and electronic illustration skills and techniques. In addition, students learn basic hypertext markup languages and top level authoring software using what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) technology.

Also, Thomas Matsuda, associate professor of art, recently incorporated stone and wood carving into the sculpture curriculum. “What makes our program unique is it’s a solid foundation art program which is equal to a fouryear program. We offer classes in all the traditional media and also have access to both gas and electric kilns,” says Miller, who received

4

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I 877-324-6815


Creative Faculty...

Graphic design students also develop professional portfolios and take part in service learning projects in the community and college. Some of the projects include poster design, web site creation, signage and identity creation.

Photography According to MWCC’s photography instructor Bob Mayer, who has spent many years working professionally as a photographer himself, photography is a growing field. With credentials or training in photography, students can pursue careers as photojournalists or event, restaurant, product and portrait photographers. MWCC provides a well-rounded education and training in portrait, commercial, product, wedding and stock photography. Students gain hands-on experience in studio, outdoor and window light. With photography growing in the self-employment sector, the program takes a practical focus by incorporating a curriculum that not only teaches photography, but also focuses on business management and marketing to prepare students for small business operation. Advantages of the program include a digital approach, as well as the affordability factor when compared to other photography schools. “It gives the student expertise at a fraction of the cost of other photography schools,” says Mayer. This program concentrates on the necessary skills for students to enter the field of professional digital photography. Today’s photographer is artistic, technically and technologically skilled, as well as business savvy.

Theatre According to Professor Gail Steele, director of MWCC’s Theatre at the Mount, a theatre degree allows students to pursue careers both on and off stage. Steele says that students who are creative and

East Meets West in MWCC’s Art Wing possess some sort of talent and organization can have successful careers in the field, and not just acting careers. “There are other kinds of jobs besides acting that you can attain with a degree in theatre,” Steele says. For example, students can enter the field in a number of different roles including acting, directing, marketing, education and playwriting. A concentration in theatre through MWCC’s Liberal Arts degree program provides students the opportunity to transfer to a four-year college or university. Those concentrating in theatre have transferred to UMass, Amherst, Bridgewater State and Salem State Universities, along with Emerson College and Lesley University’s ART Institute in Cambridge. There are also opportunities to gain experience through productions with MWCC’s Theatre at the Mount, which provides more year-round productions than most four-year colleges and universities.

Tap into your creative side. Be a star! One of MWCC’s stars is Emma Roberts. She became involved in Theatre at the Mount and has since gone on to the American Repertory Theatre Institute in Cambridge, becoming the youngest actor accepted by the institute at age 17.

I

877-324-6815 Mount Wachusett Community College I www.mwcc.edu/cf

Thomas Matsuda Through his artistic pursuits, MWCC associate professor of art, Thomas Matsuda collaborates with fellow artists throughout the world, then brings the experiences and perspectives back to his students at Mount Wachusett Community College. Most recently, the noted artist of traditional Buddhist sculptures, stone lanterns, contemporary sculpture and abstract drawings traveled to Qatar, taking part in “2 x 2,” a four-person exhibition designed to inspire culture and dialogue by uniting two artists from the West and two from the Middle East. Prior to that, he has participated in exhibitions and symposiums throughout the U.S., Japan, England, Egypt, Romania and other countries. Matsuda earned his BFA in drawing and painting from Pratt Institute, and his MFA in sculpture from UMass, Amherst. He started his art career as a lithographic printer in New York, creating abstract drawings, paintings, and prints influenced by Eastern philosophy. His interests led him to accompany a group of Japanese Buddhist monks on a peace pilgrimage that involved walking across America for six months. He then spent six months in Arizona with the Navajo. Following these experiences, he traveled to Japan in 1983, where he apprenticed under the renowned sculptor Koukei Eri for two years, before moving to a remote mountain village for 10 years. There, he carved sculptures from wood he hauled out of the mountain forests and from stones he selected from riverbeds. Matsuda carved over 200 sculptures in Japan for various temples, shrines, villages, businesses and individual patrons, and exhibited his work in many major cities. Major commissions include a seven-ton marble Buddha for the Grafton Peace Pagoda in Grafton, NY. In 2009, Matsuda, who teaches drawing, design and sculpture at MWCC, organized “Prayer Flags Around the World,” a traveling exhibit featuring pieces by international artists that continues to make its way around the globe. These varied experiences influence his work and are used in the classroom to provide students with a worldly perspective on art and culture. Matsuda explains, “I share my experiences with my students and believe they serve as an inspiration of the possibilities of what can be done in art and how exciting it can be.” – Janice O’Connor

CareerFocus I Fall 2011

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133

978-630-9110 978-630-9554 admissions@mwcc.edu mwcc.edu/admissions

institution

= can prepare students for transfer to a four-year

online 978-630-9386 978-630-9459 bursar@mwcc.mass.edu mwcc.edu/student-accounts

AA/EEO Institution

MC098A-03 Rev:Jul12

275 Nichols Road Fitchburg, MA 01420 978-630-9413

Fitchburg

100 Erdman Way Leominster, MA 01453 978-630-9810

Leominster

One Jackson Place 27 Jackson Rd. Devens, MA 01434 978-630-9569

Devens

444 Green Street Gardner, MA 01440 978-630-9110

Gardner

Tel: Fax: Email: Web:

mwcc.edu/programs

We generate. Creativity.

Start near. Go far.

have something that is just right for you.

certificate programs offered, we are sure to

Design, and more. With over 45 degree and

Media, Theatre Arts, Computer Graphic

certificates in Art, Broadcasting & Electronic

and Media. Learn more about our degrees and

concentration options in Art, Design, Theatre,

In this booklet, explore our degree and

who are experienced in the fields they teach.

curriculum, taught by top-notch faculty

In our programs, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll study a challenging

cost you can afford.

you deserve and the support you need, all at a

rigor. At MWCC, you will get the education

professionals to ensure quality, relevance and

help you. Our programs are designed in

to continue your education, MWCC can

you are a first time student or you are seeking

Community College can offer you. Whether

collaboration with academic and industry

Student Accounts Office

978-630-9169 978-630-9459 financialaid@mwcc.mass.edu mwcc.edu/financial

opportunities that Mount Wachusett

Come discover the many educational

Art, Design, Theatre & Media

= most of the classes for this program are offered

Tel: Fax: Email: Web:

Financial Aid Office

Tel: Fax: Email: Web:

Office of Admissions

Contact & Campuses

= can be completed entirely at Gardner

in the evening

= most classes for this program can be completed

= can be completed during the day

* The designation of class times, campus location and options are subject to change. Please note, coursework may require attendance at multiple campus locations and may include an online component.

t

g o

d e

Legend*

Apply today! mwcc.edu/apply

Ready to Get Started?


134

Associate degree in Art

-Alyssa Fishenden, alumna

were incredible and introduced me to a variety of art techniques

My “professors

Become exposed to the field of communications and a variety of mass media subject areas. The LAC curriculum provides an excellent overview of the communications field and a solid foundation for transfer to more specialized communications programs at four-year colleges and universities.

This program covers a range of academic and studio art courses which provide a strong foundation in visual arts. This program best prepares students to transfer to a four-year institution in order to study architecture or art history. Students can study drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, and more.

Print Certificate Web Design Certificate

Print Degree Web Design Degree

Computer Graphic Design Options:

degot

for entry-level design positions creating these types of materials.

Graphic design is a dynamic form of visual communication. It’s everywhere you look – advertising, magazines and newspapers, and the Internet. Develop skills

Computer Graphic Design

production training, and on-air experience.

Prepare for careers in television, radio, recording, multimedia, and cable industries. Acquire technical and communications skills through coursework,

Degree d g t

Broadcasting & Electronic Media

Courses in the MWCC Audio Engineering concentration focus on skills necessary to pursue positions in professional sound engineering. Through hands-on training, specialized classroom study, and research, students receive extensive training in all aspects of the industry. Graduates can explore careers in music, radio, television, cinema, gaming, and theatre.

Concentration (BCT) d g

Audio Engineering

This program covers a range of academic and studio art courses which provide a strong foundation in visual arts. This program concentrates student learning in studio art in preparation for a bachelor’s degree in fine arts. This program includes opportunities to study drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, and printmaking. Art professors assist with portfolio development, transfer applications and service learning placement and are committed to individual student success.

employment information, please visit mwcc.edu/programs.

To learn more about all of MWCC’s academic programs and gainful

Students specifically interested in careers in video, television, filmmaking, or related industries may elect to complete this course of study. Video/film concentration degree students experience all aspects of preproduction, studio and location recording, and postproduction editing. Instruction includes extensive hands-on experience.

Concentration (BCT) d g

Video/Film

This program provides a solid liberal arts education with a comprehensive introduction to theatre, music, and dance, and is an excellent foundation for transfer to theatre and music programs at fouryear colleges and universities. Students in this program also benefit from opportunities to perform in award-winning Theatre at the Mount productions, to gain hands-on experience working in Theatre at the Mount’s fully equipped scene shop, which includes state-of-the-art lighting and sound equipment

Degree (LAT) g t

Theatre Arts

photojournalism, and digital imaging.

This program concentrates on the necessary skills for students to enter the field of professional digital photography. Today’s photographer is artistic, technically and technologically skilled,w and business savvy. Photography concentration degree holders can explore careers in studio/portrait photography, commercial photography,

Concentration (BCT) d e g o

Photography

Degree (LAC) g t

Degree - Traditional Track d g t

Degree - Professional Track d g t

Communications

Art


135


Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: CGD Website Redesign

136


Contact Gallery Print

Web

Comp

ute

unt W r Graphic achus ett Co Design mmun ity Co lleg

At Mo

e

Welcome The Mount Wachusett Community College Computer Graphic Design department’s aim is to engage the creative spirit of skill-based learners, through a challenging, supportive learning environment, and professional caring faculty, ensuring that they are prepared to enter the highly competitive areas of graphic and web design or transfer to advanced degree programs. The educational focus of the department is on developing each student’s capacity for critical thinking, xcellence in technique, creative expression, integration of state-of-the-art applications, and development of outstanding portfolios. Web • Print • Gallery • Contact

Employment | Directions | Acceptable Use | Public Disclosure | Site Index | Directory | Privacy Policy | Accreditation | Feedback 444 Green St., Gardner, MA 01440 | 978-632-6600 | Admissions: 978-630-9110 ©2012 MWCC

Contact Gallery Print

Web

Gallery Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi. Web • Print • Gallery • Contact

could “A PullgoQuote in this area

Employment | Directions | Acceptable Use | Public Disclosure | Site Index | Directory | Privacy Policy | Accreditation | Feedback 444 Green St., Gardner, MA 01440 | 978-632-6600 | Admissions: 978-630-9110 ©2012 MWCC

137


Contact Gallery Print

Web

Print

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi. Nam liber tempor cum soluta nobis eleifend option congue nihil imperdiet doming id quod mazim placerat facer possim assum. consuetudium lectorum. Web • Print • Gallery • Contact

Print Degree Typi non habent claritatem insitam; est usus legentis in iis qui facit eorum claritatem. Investigationes demonstraverunt lectores legere me lius quod ii legunt saepius. Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum.

“That was amazing”

Employment | Directions | Acceptable Use | Public Disclosure | Site Index | Directory | Privacy Policy | Accreditation | Feedback 444 Green St., Gardner, MA 01440 | 978-632-6600 | Admissions: 978-630-9110 ©2012 MWCC

Contact Gallery Print

Web

Web

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi. Nam liber tempor cum soluta nobis eleifend option congue nihil imperdiet doming id quod mazim placerat facer possim assum. Web • Print • Gallery • Contact

Web Degree Typi non habent claritatem insitam; est usus legentis in iis qui facit eorum claritatem. Investigationes demonstraverunt lectores legere me lius quod ii legunt saepius. Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum.

“OutStanding”

Employment | Directions | Acceptable Use | Public Disclosure | Site Index | Directory | Privacy Policy | Accreditation | Feedback 444 Green St., Gardner, MA 01440 | 978-632-6600 | Admissions: 978-630-9110 ©2012 MWCC

138


Contact Gallery Print

Web

Contam ct

• Dolo ipsug elit, sed Loreetuemr adip diam nonummy iscin na r sit amet,

consect re mag idunt ut laoreet dolo nibh euismod tinc tpat. aliquam erat volu • Ex ea eum iriure at. Duis autem vel commodo consequ esse molestie velit e utat vulp in it dolor in hendrer dolore eu feugia. consequat, vel illum • claritatem facit eorum clarlegentis in iis qui insitam; est usus raverunt lectores onst dem nes atio itatem. Investig d ii legunt saepius. legere me lius quo

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Web • Print • Gall

“I did it!” Employment | Directions | Acceptable Use | Public Disclosure | Site Index | Directory | Privacy Policy | Accreditation | Feedback 444 Green St., Gardner, MA 01440 | 978-632-6600 | Admissions: 978-630-9110 ©2012 MWCC

139


Appendix B: Plans for Improving Enrollment: CGD Recruitment Flyer

140


141 Contact the Office of Admissions at 978-630-9110 or email admissions@mwcc.mass.edu

Print or Web computer graphic design programs. For more information, please visit: http://www.mwcc.edu/programs/cgd/print.html http://www.mwcc.edu/programs/cgd/web.html

in Computer Graphic Design— specializing in print or web design.

Enroll today

LIVE. LIFE. ILLUSTRATED.


142 Earn a Certiicate in: CGDC–Computer Graphic Design Print CGWC–Computer Graphic Design Web

Earn an Associates Degree in: CGD–Computer Graphic Design Print CGW–Computer Graphic Design Web

Call the Admissions office to learn more today!

The world around you relies on graphic design... enroll now and LIVE. LIFE. ILLUSTRATED.

With a degree in print or web design from Mount Wachusett Community College, you will learn to visually communicate, and push your creativity to new limits. Learn to develop professional high quality digital and traditional visual communcations with courses in design theory, typography, illustration, digital imaging, multimedia, publication design, web design, and animation.

Graphic Design is nearly everywhere you look. From magazines and books, to the packages of your favorite products, to advertisements and billboards, to the websites you visit daily. Even your favorite t-shirt was likely designed by a graphic designer.

Mount Wachusett Community College

Computer Graphic Design— print & web design programs


143


Section I: Data APPENDIX C: CGD Program Evaluation Report Submitted by: Dylan Mac Cormack Associate Professor Graphic & Interactive Design Tyler School of Art, Temple University

144


Computer Graphic Design Program Evaluation Report Prepared by Dermot Mac Cormack Associate Professor Graphic & Interactive Design Tyler School of Art | Temple University dermot@temple.edu 610-653-8227 4/26/13

The following document is an evaluation report for the graphic design program at MWCC. This evaluation was conducted on Monday, March 25th, with a preliminary summation, exit interview held on Tuesday March 26th, 2013. The visit included interviews with members of the administration, full-time and adjunct faculty members, current students enrolled in the design program, graphic design alumni as well as several in-class observations. If you have any questions, comments or need any additional information on the material in this document please let me know. Attached to this document are also two syllabi, pertaining to sections 4.0 and 2.2 respectively, for your consideration: 1) A Foundation design course (foundation_F08_full.pdf) and 2) Digital Narrative (narrative_F12.pdf) 1.0 Structure. 1.1 MWCC appears to have lots of great resources: graphic design, broadcast design, music, CIS, photography, drawing that could operate under an overall umbrella, or work collaboratively (for example with the business studies department). A newly formed

145


overall structure could operate under the name of “MWCC School of the Arts & Design,” or the “MWCC School of Media Arts & Design.” 1.1.2 I realize that the inclusion of Drawing, for example, might be problematic, and they may wish to remain autonomous within the Fine Arts Program. However, I do have another suggestion for that arrangement, which I will address later on in this report. 1.2 Change the name of the current design program. Within this new overall umbrella (whatever the new title may be) the design program could operate as the newly named “Graphic & Interactive Design.” The final choice of naming for the newly structured design program will obviously be up to MWCC but I would recommend something like “Graphic & Interactive Design,” or “Visual Design Communications.” 1.2.1 It is critical to title the restructured program in a clear fashion, something that prospective students can clearly understand and put the emphasis back to graphic design and secondly about the technology. Prospective students should know that they are about to embark on a possible career in graphic design that is supported by technology, not the other way around. 1.3 Change the current structure of the program and drop the two tracks of Computer Graphic Design for Print Degree and Computer Graphic Design for Web Design Degree in favor of combing them into a single entity, newly titled Graphic & Interactive Design program. 1.3.1 Within this newly created Graphic & Interactive Design program students should be able to determine how much print and how much interactive work (for the remainder of the document I will use the terminology of the more inclusive “interactive” and not the more limited term of “web”) ends up in their portfolio will be up to them. However, if at all possible, no student should graduate from MWCC without some interactive work in his or her portfolio. In today’s competitive job economy, students without any interactive

146


work are at a distinct disadvantage and MWCC needs to make it possible that all students have the resources and classes available to accomplish that goal. This is especially true for those students wishing to remain local to the area, where potential employers may not have the resources to hire multiple people and would much prefer to hire someone who can do both print and interactive. 1.3.2 Newly created course structure and course offerings. Combining the Computer and Graphic Design â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Print Design with Computer and Graphic Design â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Web Design, would obviously mean eliminating some current course offerings and possibly adding other classes within the current 62/64-credit curriculum. The following is a recommendation for a possible structure and course offerings for a newly created two-year combined degree in Graphic & Interactive Design. 1) Foundation Design course (not currently offered) 2) Design Theory (currently CGD 101) 3) Drawing 1 (currently ART 263) 4) Type 1 (currently CGD235. This would need a component added to the current syllabus to cover typography for the screen, web fonts, typography for the screen, using fontkit.com as an example) 5) Digital Imaging (currently CGD104) 6) Introduction to Web Design (currently CGD109) 7) Creative Web Design 1 (currently CGD240) 8) Type 2 (not currently offered but could possibly be CGD102, Publication Design, renamed and restructured to focus on more advanced typography while using InDesign. Eliminate using Quark Express. Could incorporate some of the print assignments suggested in item 4.3 and could also include an online component, such as an mobile app prototype, or a simple iPad app) 9) Creative Web Design 2 (currently CGD241, and could incorporate some aspects of CGD242, namely the use of Adobe Edge, the use and fundamentals of Wordpress as suggested in this document)

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10) Advanced Digital Imaging (currently CGD204, to include advanced Photoshop techniques for both print and interactive, and also how to create files for mobile technologies such as using InDesignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Digital Publishing Suite for iPad app development) 11) Design for Mobile (not currently offered but could replace CGD244 Design for E-Commerce, as e-commerce is such a specific niche of web design, that is really beyond the scope of a two-year program and I believe students would be better served learning how to design for mobile devices, rather than learning ecommerce design) 12) Digital Animation. (Not currently offered but could replace CGD110 Introduction to Animation) 13) Portfolio Preparation (Currently CGD106 and CGD210, to be combined to create a student portfolio that contains: a minimal print portfolio (3-4 pieces); an iPad app portfolio (8-10 pieces); and an online web portfolio (the same 8-10 pieces)

2.0 In relation to the interactive component there are some issues that need to be addressed quickly as well as opportunities that should be availed of in the near future. 2.1 Opportunities within the current interactive component. One area of the broader design for interactivity (essentially design for the screen) that is not currently been offered by MWCC is the design and development for mobile devices. According to research (1) mobile app development will grow to $100bn by 2015. More and more, design for the mobile environment is becoming an essential part of the designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vocabulary. Luckily for students, there are now various software tools available that enable them to design and produce mobile apps in a relatively easy fashion. One such tool is Adobe InDesignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Digital Publishing Suite(2) which lets students design for iPads, iPhones and other mobile slate devices, such as the Samsung device. At Tyler School of Art we have had tremendous success with this software and students have become energized about designing for interactivity in a remarkable way. It allows them to

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focus on design, and worry less about the technology running in the background. Introducing InDesign’s DPS will be a critical addition to the student’s portfolio. 2.1.1 In addition to the above, students should have a strong online presence. There are many available resources for students to avail from. Some of the better online portfolio opportunities are also portfolio communities. These online opportunities would be incorporated in the updated Portfolio Preparation course. I would recommend the following online services: http://www.cargocollective.com http://www.squarespace.com/templates/ http://www.behance.net/prosite At Tyler we have had great success with these sites with our students, most notably with the Squarespace site; it just looks the best I think, but there are also some free alternatives to be found here: http://designinstruct.com/roundups/free-online-portfolio/ 2.2 Another opportunity, in terms of technology and its influence on classes within the current structure is the introduction of AfterEffects. This industry standard animation tool is used to create animations and video that are deployed across the spectrum of interactive design. Students can create dynamic animations and incorporate them into websites and mobile apps, for example. 2.2.1 Another opportunity is to introduce Adobe’s Muse(3) and Edge(4) software to the curriculum. The former is Adobe’s new application for web design, and is essentially InDesign for the web. Students can design and implement functional websites, without writing code and is especially suited to those students who are initially intimidated with web design. The latter software, Adobe Edge, essentially replaces Flash in the creation of animation content for the web. This simple-to-use software, creates animations that can be easily added to websites created with Muse, Dreamweaver, or sites coded in HTML & CSS by hand.

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By offering these four pieces of software, and incorporating them into projects that encompass the design for mobile devices, MWCC would be offering its students a distinct advantage in the design world, and keep them current with the ever-changing nature of the graphic design.

3.0 Issues within the current interactive component: There was a general consensus amongst the students of too great a workload within the interactive component of the program. While it appeared that the intent of so many exercises was to possibly give the students a sense of the “real” world, far too many exercises only diluted the quality of the student’s work, not to mention increasing their stress levels. One student related that they had 30 assignments in 8 weeks. Ultimately, a solid portfolio need only have 8 – 10 finished pieces in their portfolio. The question is quality, not quantity. By adding so much work, students may never fully realize their projects, or be able to pay close attention to all the necessary details of their work. 3.1 One class in particular, the Flash design class, appeared to trouble both current and alum students by creating work that they felt was ultimately of no real use in their portfolio. Many voiced the wish that their time could have been better spent on learning more useful applications of Flash, or else learning some new software that they could actually apply in the working world. 3.2 Students expressed other major concerns with the interactive program. One was a noted lack of organization in terms of the day-to-day running of some of the interactive classes, specifically the Flash classes. Many students complained, for example, of getting extremely late notices of work that was due the following morning. Others complained of an uncomfortable atmosphere in interactive class, specifically the Flash course. One student even went so far as to say that they purposely avoided the interactive program because of their apprehensions with the teaching methods and atmosphere of this class.

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3.3 It should be noted that all the students had nothing but high praise for Beckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teaching methods and how she ran her classes. All the students admired her dedication and appreciated her patience in dealing with all levels of students and their different rates of learning. 3.4 Students discussed disconcerting issues whereby one interactive faculty was undermining another faculty member, undermining their teaching process and methods. Needless to say this is not very professional, nor does it look good to the students. It also points to an underlying conflict between two members of the interactive faculty (one fulltime, the other adjunct) and it would be in advisable to have this situation brought out in the open and resolved for the benefit of the faculty members involved, and the program at large. 3.5 Other class offering issues: Type One. Type One class is currently being taught remotely, online, for half the semester. The study of typography is quite possibly the most essential area of study for a graphic designer and such an essential class cannot realistically be taught successfully online and needs one-on-one training to successfully teach such a critical skill. Regardless of whether the students end up designing for print or interactive, they all need a solid foundation in typography to be successful in the design field. Many of the students wished that the class was taught in person, and many felt frustrated by this arrangement. 3.5.1 Designing Business Graphics. Strongly recommend that this class be primarily about using InDesign to design and build various business components. Currently the class appears to teach Photoshop exclusively. While learning Photoshop for business majors and non-designers is certainly useful, learning how to use InDesign to create various business components would be far more useful to the business major, in terms of creating real-world marketing materials. A stronger emphasis should also be made in this class about the role of good design in business, and how it has become an integral part to

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any business. Maybe visiting speakers, from the world of business, could be brought into visit MWCC who could speak to the marriage of good design and business? Another possibility might be to offer a project in developing an app, for example, where the design process in seen as part of a greater objective, and could include business majors who develop a business plan, and then work to create a working prototype of a mobile app, using software such as: http://fieldtestapp.com/ http://www.justinmind.com/ Both of these tools are very easy to use and require a working knowledge of Photoshop. 4.0 2-D Foundation Class Recommend the introduction of a 2-D design Foundation class that could be taught by both design faculty and faculty from the fine arts program, specifically drawing. This class will cover the fundamentals of graphic design and will be more of a hands-on class that would involve minimal use of computers. Instead, it would introduce the students to the fundamentals of design in its most basic and common forms. Drawing, along with typography, is a fundamental skill of graphic design, and teaching students to think by drawing is a critical skill for all successful designers. Part of this course could be devoted the history of graphic design, which many students mentioned as being a topic that wished they had studied. This could be an introduction to this important subject and hopefully would encourage students to continue studying both contemporary and historical designers and design movements. 4.1 Consider establishing a perquisite for students to enter into the design course. Maybe prospective students could have some kind of minimal portfolio requirement in order to study in the design program. Requiring some kind of minimal portfolio requirement might enable the department to attract students who are better adept at continuing a course in design.

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4.2 Consider introducing the use of www.lynda.com within all the design courses. It would be best if MWCC offered this invaluable online resource to its design students as part of the curriculum. Having access to Lynda.com for the students would be extremely useful tool to aid in their learning of the software materials, and give them the ability to learn at their own speed (at MWCC or at home) and also augment their learning in the classroom. 4.3 Project proposals for the curriculum. As well as the student projects included in the two syllabi I have included with this document the design department might also consider incorporating some of the following projects into its curriculum: - Designing a tri-fold brochure for a national expo. Faculty would supply list of expos. - Designing a poster series (3) for a socially aware, or non-profit organization, such as Amnesty International. This would encourage students to become socially aware designers. Students could also submit posters to competitions, so that they learn how to organize and prepare for submitting to design competitions. - Designing a catalog for a well-designed product or exhibition based on a single artist. Products can be found in Dwell magazine, for example. Products and artist lists would be supplied. - Design a catalog based on a minimal artist or architecture. (This encourages them to learn how to design in a minimalist manner, and learn how to work with white space, as well as designing by subtraction). - Create a hybrid project that contains both print and interactive materials. For example, it could be a book and a website. Or a mobile app design and accompanying catalog. This could be for an exhibition for a local museum, or a publishing company hosting an exhibition on a particularly famous book or author, such as 1984, by George Orwell. 5.0 Alumni recommendations Many alumni commented that they felt they were well prepared to transfer to other colleges and referred to their experiences in very positive terms. However, some also

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voiced concerns for some areas for improvement as outlined previously in this document. Overall they all felt that their time was well spent at MWCC. 5.1 – Alumni voiced universal high praise for the print component of the design program and specifically for the teaching methods and organizational skills and of both Leslie and Christine. All the students interviewed had very positive things to say about the portfolio class and they said the portfolio class was productive, informative, and teaches students useful skills such as communication in an interview and the critical preparation of the final work. They also felt that 8 – 10 pieces seemed like an appropriate amount of work to have in a portfolio. 5.2 – Universal praise for Bob Myers teaching style from both current students and alumni. Students commented on his energetic and enthusiastic approach to teaching. 6.0 – Student evaluation forms It appears there are inconsistent student evaluation forms handed out to students. For example in one class (Flash design class) students were not able to add comments to their forms and they felt strongly that they should have been able to do so. 6.1 – Strongly recommend that at the very minimum the Dean of the design department along with the chair of the design department be privy to the completed student evaluation forms. Ideally, all faculty members (including adjuncts) should have access to their own student evaluations. Having access to evaluations enables faculty to improve their classes, and modify and tweak courses as needed. Evaluations also give much needed insight to Chairs and Deans about full-time faculty and adjunct performance and how best to help them improve course offerings. 6.1.1 Strongly recommend that MWCC initiate internships for their students as a vital means to give them a real-world experience in the design field. Incidentally, I would also strongly recommend that MWCC pursue a policy of only recommending paid internships to their students. It takes time to build relationships with local design studios to offer

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internships but this would be an invaluable service to offer the students at MWCC and it also help to foster goodwill within the community, as well as in the broader design field. Another option might be to approach a studio, perhaps in Boston, to offer a paid â&#x20AC;&#x153;apprenticeshipâ&#x20AC;? which would offer a fixed stipend, and allow the student designer to working under a designer in a mentorship capacity. Perhaps the design department could initiate a student design group as part the AIGA and begin to reach to the design community in that way? 7.0 Facilities While it did appear that the facilities were definitely adequate for the students, one particular lab seemed redundant, the lab that contains only PCs. The computer of choice in graphic design is still universally the Mac. PCs are used for testing and certainly backend development but the bulk of design work is still done on a Mac. All the PCs should be replaced with Macs and instead install a Windows Emulator software(5) on the Macs to use when it is required to run Windows software. 8.0 Recommendations for faculty Currently, no design faculty at MWCC (at least none that I could readily find) has any kind of web presence. Recommend that each faculty member has some kind of online presence, whether it is a simple blog, or a more complete website that outlines their current interests or any kind of design related work they may be currently involved with. It could even be a pintrest account that showcases their interests. Whatever the final form of the online presence is, it is important both for the faculty as well as their students (and prospective students) to see what faculty is doing in the field of graphic design. 8.1 In terms of hiring new faculty, I would highly recommend that as well as hiring new faculty with advanced degrees, that MWCC should also consider, and actively recruit, designers who are very active in the design field but who may not have advanced degrees. Especially in the field of interactive design, it is not uncommon that many successful designers do not have advanced degrees but rather many years of experience using technologies in the fast paced, ever-changing world of interactive design. MWCC

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would be missing out on many opportunities if they did not consider designers who are also active in the design field. 8.2 Adjunct faculty training. Adjunct faculty urgently needs some kind of induction and training to assist them to teach at MWCC. In terms of working with students with disabilities, for example, some adjuncts wished that they had some kind of assistance in teaching these students and had known strategies and procedures that they could use in order to help, encourage and work with such students. Adjuncts also need some kind of avenue for having their voices heard within the department. Some adjuncts said it was sometimes difficult for them to voice their concerns and to be heard adequately during busy semesters. Maybe this is something that Michelle Paranto could be directly involved with and work with the adjuncts. One other suggestion might be to organize social meetings with adjuncts (maybe at a location outside of MWCC, over dinner for example) at least once a semester to help foster a community, as well as give them an outlet for any concerns or valuable suggestions they may have. 8.2.1- Hiring new and qualified interactive/web design faculty. Recommend hiring more qualified interactive/web design faculty. One important area, in which these new faculty could greatly assist the current program, is to hire qualified faculty who are expert in designing websites using a CMS (Content Management Systems) such as Wordpress. The current market has little room for static website design, and instead most businesses require, or desire, the design and development of sites that use CMS systems like Wordpress. Giving the students a good solid introduction to designing for Wordpress, would give them a definite advantage in the design field and would also enable them to find freelance work since designing with Wordpress is a much sought after ability. Another possibility for a CMS is Drupal, but I think considering the two-year program, that the learning curve for Drupal would simply be too great.

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9.0 Marketing and recruiting As mentioned above, faculty having an online presence will definitely help with marketing and recruiting of new students. Under the current MWCC website, I also recommend that a list of the previous year’s alumni and their accompanying websites are posted on the site. This will give prospective students the opportunity to view work of the graduating class, as well as building up a reputation for design excellence. 9.1 MWCC should actively seek out designers who are active in the field (or even recent MFA graduates, who might welcome the opportunity) to come to MWCC and give talks, presentations, and one-week or two-week workshops to the students, with a small physical (or virtual) exhibition of the final student work. MWCC could also offer summer workshops to the students with visiting designers and artists. These workshops could be a workshop, for example, on how to be more creative with exercises and different methods to jumpstart the student’s creative abilities. For example Professor Robin Landa(6) runs creative workshops that help students (and faculty) improve their creativity. 9.1.2 - It is also important to have artists speak to the students who may not be specifically related to graphic design, but who may have wonderful things to say about the creative process and what it means to live a creative life. While it may be difficult for MWCC to attract big name designers and artists to its campus, there are still many incredible designers, artists, and recent MFA graduates who would only be too willing to speak and share their thoughts, especially if they could be reasonably reimbursed for their time and travel, and featured on the MWCC website. 9.1.3 – Recommend that recruitment be expanded to include some national recruitment, or at the very least, recruitment along the East coast and even, possibly, internationally. I recounted a story during my visit about one of my top students at Tyler who transferred from a local community college, who is now a design director at Nickelodeon. She originally came from Sweden and was actively recruited by recruiters from the local community college here in Pennsylvania. Especially in today’s world economy many

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international students might find the entry into an American educational institution such as MWCC a very exciting proposition. 10.0 Conclusion Overall, my short, intensive experience at MWCC was very informative, and it was a pleasure to meet faculty, administration and especially members of the student body. The students were clearly self-motivated, hard working and dedicated to the study of graphic design, and there appears to be a lot of engagement between students and faculty. All the goals and suggestions set forth in this document are dedicated to those students, to improve their current studies, as well as prepare them as future designers. MWCC has a number of issues that need to be addressed, as outlined above, but by working on solutions to these issues, they are all opportunities to help improve the design department, both for the faculty, administration and the students. The field of graphic design is a demanding and competitive one. Students should be giving all the tools necessary to be successful in design, and I believe that MWCC is certainly on the right track to accomplish this but it also equally important to keep as current as possible, as current as the profession demands, in order for the students to be given the opportunity to excel. The ideas outlined in this document could help MWCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graphic design department achieve that goal. (1)

http://www.research2guidance.com/the-application-development-market-willgrow-to-us100bn-in-2015/

(2)

http://www.adobe.com/products/digital-publishing-suite-family.html

(3)

http://www.adobe.com/products/muse.html

(4)

http://html.adobe.com/edge/animate/?promoid=KANXM

(5)

http://windows-emulator-software-review.toptenreviews.com/vmware-fusionreview.html

(6)

https://twitter.com/rlanda

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dedicated to  those  students,  to  improve  their  current  studies,  as  well  as  prepare   them  as  future  designers.       MWCC  has  a  number  of  issues  that  need  to  be  addressed,  as  outlined  above,  but  by   working  on  solutions  to  these  issues,  they  are  all  opportunities  to  help  improve  the   design  department,  both  for  the  faculty,  administration  and  the  students.       The  field  of  graphic  design  is  a  demanding  and  competitive  one.  Students  should  be   giving  all  the  tools  necessary  to  be  successful  in  design,  and  I  believe  that  MWCC  is   certainly  on  the  right  track  to  accomplish  this  but  it  also  equally  important  to  keep   as  current  as  possible,  as  current  as  the  profession  demands,  in  order  for  the   students  to  be  given  the  opportunity  to  excel.  The  ideas  outlined  in  this  document   could  help  MWCC’s  graphic  design  department  achieve  that  goal.         (1)

http://www.research2guidance.com/the-­‐application-­‐development-­‐ market-­‐will-­‐grow-­‐to-­‐us100bn-­‐in-­‐2015/

(2)

http://www.adobe.com/products/digital-­‐publishing-­‐suite-­‐family.html

(3)

http://www.adobe.com/products/muse.html

(4)

http://html.adobe.com/edge/animate/?promoid=KANXM

(5)

http://windows-­‐emulator-­‐software-­‐review.toptenreviews.com/vmware-­‐ fusion-­‐review.html

(6)

https://twitter.com/rlanda  

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Section I: Data APPENDIX D: Student Surveys: CGD Continuing Students Survey CGD & CGW Continuing Students Survey Results CGD Print Capstone Survey Questions CGD Print Capstone Survey Results CGW Web Capstone Survey Questions CGW Web Capstone Survey Results

160


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Appendix D: CGD Continuing Students Survey Questions (CGW Continuing Student Survey Questions are the same; therefore it has not been included)

162


2013 Computer Graphic Design Print Survey, Continuing Students

1. Program

1. How many MWCC Print Degree studio courses have you completed at this time? (Courses with a CGD prefix, ie. CGD101, CGD104, etc.) j 0 – 3 k l m n j 4 – 6 k l m n j 6 – 9 k l m n

   

j 9 or more k l m n

2013 Computer Graphic Design Print Survey, Continuing Students 2. Expectations

*2. To what extent is the MWCC Print Degree Program meeting your expectations? j 90 – 100% k l m n j 80 – 90% k l m n j 70 – 80% k l m n

 

j 69% or below k l m n

*3. Please explain your answer. 5 6

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2013 Computer Graphic Design Print Survey, Continuing Students 3. Strengths

*4. Based on the classes you have taken, what are the GREATEST STRENGTHS of the

CGD Print Degree Program? Please check ONLY those you feel are true STRENGTHS. Check all that apply. c Computers d e f g c Monitors d e f g c Printers d e f g

c Scanners d e f g

c Overhead Projection Systems d e f g c Most Current Software d e f g c Faculty Expertise d e f g

c Quality of Instruction d e f g c Faculty Attendance d e f g

c Faculty Assistance with Advising/Registration d e f g c Faculty Availability (Outside of class) d e f g c Paraprofessional Support (Tutoring) d e f g c Career Counseling d e f g

c Lab Assistant Support d e f g

c Open Lab Time­­During class d e f g

c Open Lab Time­­Outside of class d e f g

c Lab/Classroom Environment­­Temperature d e f g

c Lab/Classroom Environment­­Cleanliness of the floors, etc. d e f g

c Lab/Classroom Environment­­Chairs and Desks d e f g c Other (please specify) d e f g

5

6

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2013 Computer Graphic Design Print Survey, Continuing Students

4. Weaknesses

5. Based on the classes you have taken, what are the WEAKNESSES of the CGD Print Degree Program? (Please keep in mind, if you chose an option as a strength it can not also be a weakness.) Check all that apply. c Computers d e f g c Monitors d e f g c Printers d e f g

c Scanners d e f g

c Overhead Projection Systems d e f g c Most Current Software d e f g c Faculty Expertise d e f g

c Quality of Instruction d e f g c Faculty Attendance d e f g

c Faculty Assistance with Advising/Registration d e f g c Faculty Availability (Outside of class) d e f g c Paraprofessional Support (Tutoring) d e f g c Career Counseling d e f g

c Lab Assistant Support d e f g

c Open Lab Time­­During class d e f g

c Open Lab Time­­Outside of class d e f g

c Lab/Classroom Environment­­Temperature d e f g

c Lab/Classroom Environment­­Cleanliness of the floors, etc. d e f g

c Lab/Classroom Environment­­Chairs and Desks d e f g c Other (please specify) d e f g

5

6

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2013 Computer Graphic Design Print Survey, Continuing Students 5. Recommendations

*6. Based on the weaknesses you have chosen and any other concerns you may have,

what recommendations would you make to improve the quality of the CGD Print Degree Program? 5 6

2013 Computer Graphic Design Print Survey, Continuing Students 7. THANK YOU!

Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey.   Your responses will help us improve the CGD Print Degree Program. 

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Appendix D: CGD & CGW Continuing Students Survey Results

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Computer Graphic Design—Print and Web 2013 Continuing Students Survey Question 1 How many MWCC Pint/Web studio courses have you completed at this time? (Courses with a CGD prefix, ie. CGD101, CGD104, etc.)

CGD

CGW

Totals

Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count

Answer Options

Total Count

Total

0–3

22.2%

4

29.4%

5

25.7%

9

4–6

50.0%

9

35.3%

6

42.9%

15

6–9

11.1%

2

29.4%

5

20.0%

7

9 or more

16.7%

3

5.9%

1

11.4%

4

answered question

18

17

skipped question

0

0

35

Question 2 To what extent is the MWCC CGD/CGW Degree Program meeting your expectations?

CGD

CGW

Totals

Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count

Answer Options

Total

Total Count

90 – 100%

66.7%

10

38.5%

5

53.6%

15

80 – 90%

20.0%

3

38.5%

5

28.6%

8

70 – 80%

13.3%

2

15.4%

2

14.3%

4

0

7.7%

1

3.6%

69% or below

0.0%

1

answered question

15

13

28

skipped question

3

4

7

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Computer Graphic Designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Print and Web 2013 Continuing Students Survey Please explain your answer (to Question 2) Question 3 CGD 2013 The teacher was very insightful. Projects were relevant and fun. Some teachers have no idea what they are teaching. Not talking about leslie or bob. The teachers are amazing. They have real world experience that they have learned from. They then extend this knowledge as best they can to their students. Understanding, while at the same time having high expectations of their students, most the professors in the CGD department are fantastic. I feel I now have a solid foundation in Adobe CS6 and in the principles of design. The MWCC Print Degree Program so far is amazing! I am learning so much about this major, and I look forward to taking more classes! The program at MWCC has been great. I have learned a lot from all my professors and feel as though I am prepared to start a new career in graphic design. I feel there could be more within the course. There should be a history course where we learn from inspirational Graphics Designers who made an impact in society or the evolution of design. I love my teachers and have learned so much from them. nothing is ever 100% what you expect I enjoyed the course in electronic illustration much more than I expected to. I am not sure It's been a well-rounded experience of learning hard and soft graphic design skills. It gives me all the information that I need to know or refresh my memory on, so far the classes have given me all of what i would want to know I'm not doing as well as I had expected. I'm disappointed with myself. I entered the print program with great expectations, but I don't feel that way now. Meets expectations. CGW 2013 I am really learning alot and love the program. I haven't taken many web course yet Well the expections can be confusing from teacher to teacher one teacher will teach you one way another will teach you a completely different way It was very in depth I didn't put in as much as I wanted to, it is a slow process for me to pick up and understand. I'm doing a lot of preliminary courses first. I'll get to my first Web class next year. I'm taking things slower than a fulltime student. I have great teachers and I have learn a lot from them It got me a job in the field that I went to school for. I am here again to further my education. I think the program has an extreme amount of detailed information that is very valuable. I wish every professor for the program taught around the same. Ex: This is what we are doing, I will show you how to do it, now you try, any questions, you will be doing homework on what we just learned.I know that might sound like your holding our hands, but it will make me a better designer if I can learn and understand everything that is being taught. struggling with my ability to grasp all of the concepts I am very satisfied with I have learned thus far. The professors are highly qualified, extremely helpful and genuinely care about the success of each student. The hands-on training makes it easy to understand new materials and various Adobe desktop applications. I'm learning about aspects of Graphic Design I didn't even know existed. I would like there to be more work with websites. I feel like I have created a lot of print work but not enough web work.

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Computer Graphic Designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Print and Web 2013 Continuing Students Survey Question 4 Based on the classes you have taken, what are the GREATEST STRENGTHS of the CGD/CGW Degree Program? Please check ONLY those you feel are true STRENGTHS. Check all that apply.

CGD

CGW

Totals

Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count

Answer Options

Total Percent

Total Count

Computers

66.7%

10

100.0%

13

82.1%

23

Monitors

60.0%

9

69.2%

9

64.3%

18

Printers

33.3%

5

92.3%

12

60.7%

17

Scanners

20.0%

3

46.2%

6

32.1%

9

Overhead Projection Systems

26.7%

4

61.5%

8

42.9%

12

Most Current Software

86.7%

13

84.6%

11

85.7%

24

Faculty Expertise

86.7%

13

92.3%

12

89.3%

25

Quality of Instruction

73.3%

11

76.9%

10

75.0%

21

Faculty Attendance

66.7%

10

76.9%

10

71.4%

20

Faculty Assistance with Advising/Registration

33.3%

5

69.2%

9

50.0%

14

Faculty Availability (Outside of class)

40.0%

6

61.5%

8

50.0%

14

Paraprofessional Support (Tutoring)

6.7%

1

23.1%

3

14.3%

4

Career Counseling

13.3%

2

46.2%

6

28.6%

8

Lab Assistant Support

66.7%

10

76.9%

10

71.4%

20

Open Lab Time--During class

66.7%

10

76.9%

10

71.4%

20

Open Lab Time--Outside of class

73.3%

11

69.2%

9

71.4%

20

Lab/Classroom Environment--Temperature

20.0%

3

46.2%

6

32.1%

9

Lab/Classroom Environment--Cleanliness of the floors, etc.

26.7%

4

61.5%

8

42.9%

12

Lab/Classroom Environment--Chairs and Desks

20.0%

3

61.5%

8

39.3%

11

Other (please specify)

0.0%

0

7.7%

1

3.6%

1

answered question

15

13

28

skipped question

3

4

7

Other (please specify) Faculty expertise is big.

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Computer Graphic Designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Print and Web 2013 Continuing Students Survey Question 5 Based on the classes you have taken, what are the WEAKNESSES of the CGW Web Degree Program? (Please keep in mind, if you chose an option as a strength it can not also be a weakness.) Check all that apply.

CGD

CGW

Totals

Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count

Answer Options

Total Percent

Total Count 0

Computers

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

Monitors

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Printers

20.0%

3

0.0%

0

14.3%

3

Scanners

6.7%

1

16.7%

2

14.3%

3

Overhead Projection Systems

20.0%

3

8.3%

1

19.0%

4

Most Current Software

6.7%

1

0.0%

0

4.8%

1

Faculty Expertise

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Quality of Instruction

13.3%

2

0.0%

0

9.5%

2

Faculty Attendance

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

0

Faculty Assistance with Advising/Registration

6.7%

1

0.0%

0

4.8%

1

Faculty Availability (Outside of class)

20.0%

3

8.3%

1

19.0%

4

Paraprofessional Support (Tutoring)

26.7%

4

25.0%

3

33.3%

7

Career Counseling

6.7%

1

8.3%

1

9.5%

2

Lab Assistant Support

0.0%

0

8.3%

1

4.8%

1

Open Lab Time--During class

0.0%

0

16.7%

2

9.5%

2

Open Lab Time--Outside of class

13.3%

2

0.0%

0

9.5%

2

Lab/Classroom Environment--Temperature

33.3%

5

8.3%

1

28.6%

6

Lab/Classroom Environment--Cleanliness of the floors, etc.

6.7%

1

8.3%

1

9.5%

2

Lab/Classroom Environment--Chairs and Desks

26.7%

4

8.3%

1

23.8%

5

Other (please specify)

26.7%

4

33.3%

4

38.1%

8

answered question

9

12

21

skipped question

7

5

12

Other (please specify) CGD 2013 There is one professor that seems to be lacking, but pretty much all of the others are amazing. I wouldn't really say there are any weaknesses, but at the same token, not everything can be a strength. None hybrid classes CGW 2013 none I have no complaints No program weakness thus far. Some of the walls in the labs are dirty like someone sprayed soda on them and nobody bothered to clean them up.

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Computer Graphic Designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Print and Web 2013 Continuing Students Survey Based on the weaknesses you have chosen and any other concerns you may have, what recommendations would you make to improve the quality of the CGD/CGW Degree Program? Question 6 CGD 2013 None! Get some new teachers that are like leslie and bob Well, since you're asking... I have heard several of the other students' issues with Paul. When it comes to the teachers' evaluations... Listen to what those students have to say... I sometimes have a hard time seeing what's projected on the overhead screens, but it's a minor complaint. I would only recommend that the Professors check and/or respond to student's e-mail's more frequently corresponding to the timely manner an e-mail is sent. Honestly I can think of any. I feel that we students should have the opportunity to use Wacomb tablets and open a whole other world of designing. There needs to be a tutor for some of the students in the CGD program. There are certain people who need way more attention than any of the teachers can provide. I would be willing to be a tutor next year. more frequently cleaning key boards and mice please I would appreciate the ability to make ergonomic adjustments to the position of the mouse, especially in the tween room, which doesn't even have mouse pads to serve as wrist cushions. I would like more personal tutoring and extended open lab times, (possibly evenings or weekends?) I also think class time should be lengthened or used more appropriately. EVEN better quality printers Even though the technology is up to date it won't help much because most employers don't have the most up to date software. Make sute the heaters/ AC's work. Tutors are essential. Chairs in classrooms need replacing. Unsure. CGW 2013 To be honest , I really don't have much to complain about. The scanners were a little hard to use, but it was not a big deal. I would like more in class lab time. Fix the coloration of the overhead! none Overall, I think this program is strong. It drives me nuts to work on PCs in Paul's classroom, though. I guess we need to be proficient in both. For those of us not big on PCs, it would be helpful to have a page or two of keyboard commands and quickeys to help us navigate more proficiently. (I certainly can navigate on a PC but not efficiently.) No, to me every thing is great Perhaps touching upon wordpress and other sites of that nature. The sites are out there and we might come across a client that wants that, and as web designers we won't sound very smart if we say we don't know how to use that site or others like it I would like the staff of the program to really get together and have a similar teaching structure to prevent anxiety and being overwhelmed or confused on what we are doing. The end result is taking all of our classes and combing those skills to achieve our goals. If the teaching between the staff is extremely different, that can be an issue trying to combine those skills. A tutor program for the CGD program would be very beneficial. My only recommendation: Every professor must distribute a detailed course syllabus detailing all weekly assignments and projects with due dates at the start of the semester, which must be adhered to. Any revisions to the course curriculum and/or timeline should be done only when needed. This has been a challenge with one professor to date, making it very difficult to balance the workload along with other classes. To address the current heating and cooling systems of the labs/class rooms Combine Web and Print together and make it a three year program. Get rid of the 1 year certificate program. More work with making websites maybe if web majors didn't have to take advanced photoshop and took another web course instead. The cgd112 course that I took this spring we did a lot of print work. I thought it was going to be more about E-publishing

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Computer Graphic Designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Print and Web 2013 Continuing Students Survey Question 7 Please feel free to comment on anything that has not been addressed previously in this survey. CGD 2013 I think Meg Gillis is a great person, but everything i learned in her classes i had to tech myself I am very happy with the program in general. I feel we get a lot of great real world advice from the instructors. I had a great semester and a great year, looking forward for the next one. Paul Swerzenksi is a terrible teacher and should be forced to change the way he teaches or fired. I do not think that it should be necessary for print majors to take two courses in web design. I feel the professional experience of the faculty is a key plus in this program. CGW 2013 Wish there were more CGD classes during the summer. I think that the computers in the animation class should be upgreaded. I think Becky is a really nice person and maybe her classes get better - but as a first year web student I don't feel I learned a lot from her. I like Christine & Leslie's style of teaching much better I do feel that the CGD staff is very approachable, knowledgeable, compassionate to your issues outside of school, and very guiding when it comes to our future and the direction we might want to go in. Overall it has been an extreme pleasure to have signed up for something that I love and enjoy coming to school to work hard for my goal. The small class sizes are ideal. They provide more individual attention and better communication between the instructor and students. It also gives students the opportunity to work together and learn from each other.

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Appendix D: CGD Print Capstone Survey Questions

176


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 1. Major/Program

*1. What is your program of study? j CGD­Print degree (Associates Degree) k l m n

j CGD­Print degree and CGWC­Web certificate (Major and minor) k l m n j CGD­Print degree and CGW­Web Degree (Dual major) k l m n j CGDC­Print certificate (One Year Certificate) k l m n

2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

2. Experience

*2. Prior to your print design coursework at MWCC, what experience or prior education

did you have in graphic design or with related graphic design software? c High School graphic arts classes d e f g

c Attended college graphic design classes prior to transfer to MWCC d e f g c Self Taught/Hobby d e f g

c No Prior Experience or Education d e f g

If you took design classes prior to MWCC, what high school or college did you attend? 

5 6

*3. How prepared or competent in graphic design do you feel you were PRIOR to taking

classes at MWCC?

c 5—Highly Prepared­Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of graphic design; Have no questions about this subject/skill. d e f g

c 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of graphic design; Have few, if any, questions about this  d e f g subject/skill. 

c 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of graphic design; Have only a few questions about this subject/skill. d e f g

c 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of graphic design; Have several to a moderate  d e f g amount of questions about this subject/skill. 

c 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of graphic design; Still have a great deal of questions  d e f g about this subject/skill.  Please comment on your answer. 

5

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177


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 3. Design Work

4. What type of design work have you done while attending MWCC? (Check all that apply) c Coursework and design projects only through my classes at MWCC d e f g c Designed for a friend or family member d e f g c Freelance for print (paid) d e f g c Freelance for web (paid) d e f g

c Service Learning through my classes d e f g

 

c Volunteer design (non­course related/non­friend or family/non­paid) d e f g c Work for a printing company (paid) d e f g c Work in a design studio (paid) d e f g

Other (please specify) 

5

6

178


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 5. Competencies­Skills Assessment

This survey will help us to accurately assess our effectiveness of teaching and whether you have gained the appropriate  skills and competencies in our curriculum. Please review and rank each section carefully based on your personal  competency level (your level of skill, talent, ability, expertise, know­how.)    To move forward in the survey you must rank every skill/competency. 

*6. Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared­Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

1. Exhibit a solid  understanding of the 

3­Moderately

2­Minimally

1­Insufficiently

Not Required or 

Prepared

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fundamentals of design and  visual literacy, including the  elements and principles of  design and typography as  they are applied to the  development of effective  communication pieces for  both print and web design. 1A. Students will have an  understanding of the  concepts of copyrights and  intellectual property. 2. Possess a working  knowledge of the design 

179


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE process especially how it  relates to: audience  definition, research,  analysis, and concept  development; the  production of thumbnail  sketches, rough drafts, and  the preparation of final  comprehensive print layouts  and websites. 3. Exhibit measurable skills 

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Adobe InDesign

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Adobe Acrobat Professional

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4. Transform digital images 

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and working knowledge in  the industry standard  graphic design software.

into new pieces of art  through the use of Adobe  Photoshop with emphasis  on the creation of high­ quality graphics for print  and the web. 4A. Employ file  manipulation techniques  using filters, blending  modes, layers, masks,  channels, and layer effects  with emphasis on the  creation of high quality  graphics for print. 4B. Create, optimize, and  save graphics for the web. 5. Create complex  electronic illustrations and  single page layouts with a  solid understanding of the  complex functions of Adobe  Illustrator. 5A. Possess a working  knowledge of the tools,  palettes, menus and  functions of Adobe  Illustrator. 5B. Utilize the Bezier pen  tool, as well as make use of  specialized techniques for  creating line­art and color 

180


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE illustrations. 6. Have a solid working  knowledge of the 

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fundamentals of building  websites using HTML,  XHTML, CSS and  Dreamweaver with the  ability to design structurally  as well as aesthetically. 6A. Use & understand  online/web/ Blackboard  courses, as well as the  Internet, World Wide Web,  and Information Literacy  resources. 6B. Use media tools such  as: e­mail, search engines,  newsgroups, blogs, image  viewers, web games and  PDF documents. 6C. View and test web  designs using new  generation web browsers:  Opera, Firefox and Safari. 6D. Create engaging web  pages and websites using  Adobe Dreamweaver in  Code view and Design view. 6E. Produce single and  multiple page websites  while applying the  Principles of Web Design  and accessibility to each  project. 6F. Use hand coding; create  interactive pages; use CSS  navigation and page  layout; use forms; add Flash  and other multimedia;  integrate between  Photoshop and Bridge. 6G. Publish multi­page  websites utilizing  Dreamweaver's FTP upload  capabilities. 7. Exhibit the ability to work  with advanced graphic  design principles, grids,  typography, and advanced  layout techniques while  utilizing QuarkXPress and  Adobe InDesign. 7A. Exhibit a solid  understanding of 

181


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE typography. 7B. Produce sophisticated, 

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Compile a professional­

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multi­faceted projects with  an emphasis on publication  design while utilizing  QuarkXPress, InDesign,  Adobe Photoshop and  Adobe Illustrator. 7C. Exhibit the ability to  work with advanced graphic  design principles, grids,  typography, and layout  techniques, such as master  pages and style sheets. 8. Possess a working  knowledge of print  capabilities, the printing  process, and understanding  pre­press techniques. 8A. Possess a working  knowledge of how to obtain  printing quotes. 8B. Possess a working  knowledge of how to  prepare files for high  resolution output. 8C. Understand special  issues, such as handling  photography and artwork for  premium reproduction  quality 8D. Use process and  Pantone inks 8E. Understand how to  create PDFs for final output. 9. Possess the ability to  prepare for the job market  and/or transfer.

quality portfolio 10. Manage and  development client­based  visual communication  pieces with the use of  effective design and layout  while meeting strict  deadlines.

182


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE If you rated any of the above with a 2­Minimally Prepared or a 1­Insufficiently Prepared—please explain your answer. 

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2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE typography. 7B. Produce sophisticated, 

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multi­faceted projects with  an emphasis on publication  design while utilizing  QuarkXPress, InDesign,  Adobe Photoshop and  Adobe Illustrator. 7C. Exhibit the ability to  work with advanced graphic  design principles, grids,  typography, and layout  techniques, such as master  pages and style sheets. 8. Possess a working  knowledge of print  capabilities, the printing  process, and understanding  pre­press techniques. 8A. Possess a working  knowledge of how to obtain  printing quotes. 8B. Possess a working  knowledge of how to  prepare files for high  resolution output. 8C. Understand special  issues, such as handling  photography and artwork for  premium reproduction  quality 8D. Use process and  Pantone inks 8E. Understand how to  create PDFs for final output. 9. Possess the ability to  prepare for the job market  and/or transfer.

quality portfolio 10. Manage and  development client­based  visual communication  pieces with the use of  effective design and layout  while meeting strict  deadlines.

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2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE If you rated any of the above with a 2­Minimally Prepared or a 1­Insufficiently Prepared—please explain your answer. 

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185


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 6. General Education Competencies

*7. Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared­Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

1. Written and Oral  Communication in English: 

Moderately

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Insufficiently

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j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Highly Prepared

Well Prepared

j k l m n

N/A

You (the student)  demonstrate the ability to  write and speak effectively  for a variety of occasions,  audiences and purposes. 1A. Establishes a main  idea: You assert a central  idea or thesis when  writing/presenting. 1B. Develops support: You  develop unified support for  that thesis (i.e. include  examples, details,  evidence). 1C. Organizes effectively:  You arrange parts  (sentences and paragraphs)  coherently to support the  thesis. 1D. Establishes purpose:  You establish clear purpose 

186


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE to the audience. 1E. Uses credible research  material effectively and 

j k l m n

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j k l m n

ethically: You synthesize  and incorporate appropriate  information from research  material to support the  thesis, and you document it  correctly (use of in­text  citation that correlates to a  bibliography page). 1F. Uses appropriate  diction, grammar, and  punctuation: You choose  language reasonably  appropriate for intended  purpose, and generally you  use sentences that are  grammatically sound and  correctly punctuated. 1G. Audience: You meet  the needs of the audience  when writing/speaking. 2. Information Literacy:  Through electronic and  traditional modes, you (the  student) demonstrate the  ability to identify, access,  evaluate and use  information effectively,  ethically and legally. 2A. Identify Information  Need: You are able to  select a focused topic  appropriate for the  assignment. 2B. Access Information:  Your search strategy  includes the use of  advanced search  techniques (and, or, not,  truncation, parentheses)  when searching. 2C. Access Information: You  are able to judge the value  of the search results and  demonstrate re­strategizing  when necessary. 2D. Access Information: You  are able to locate and  access information from a  variety of sources. 2E. Evaluate Information:  You are able to consider 

187


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE the authoritativeness,  currency and  content/coverage to  determine information  quality. 2F. Evaluate Information:  You can demonstrate the 

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

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j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

appropriateness of scholarly  vs. popular  literature/information. 2G. Use Information: You  are able to integrate  information from several  sources and formulate a  conclusion. 2H. Use Information: You  are able to paraphrase and  quote correctly. 2I. Use Information: You are  able to cite information  using appropriate style  correctly. Please indicate (provide an estimate of) how many research reports and oral presentations you have completed, while at MWCC, in which you  have utilized the majority of the above skills. 

188


2013—Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 7. Final Comments

*8. What do you believe your MWCC Print design classes MOST prepared you for or you

feel you are most skilled at as a result of your training/coursework? 5 6

*9. What do you believe your MWCC Print design classes prepared you for the least or

you feel you are the weakest in?

5 6

10. What would you suggest we could improve upon in the CGD program at MWCC? What topics, software, technical skills should we offer more of? Less of? Please take the time to offer your input and explanations so that we may improve the CGD program. Also, please include contact information: a phone number, mailing address (if you have no plans of moving within the next year), and an email address (not your mwcc email, please use one that we can reach you at within in the next 1­3 years). We would like to be able to contact you for future graduate surveys, as well as invite you to participate in various events and activities in the future. 5 6

189


Appendix D: CGD Print Capstone Survey Results

190


191 0.0% 62.5% 12.5%

Attended college graphic design classes prior to transfer to MWCC

Self Taught/Hobby

No Prior Experience or Education

2010

8

7 0 0 1

Question 2

58.3% 0.0% 41.7% 0.0%

I attended Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical School.

2011

12

7 0 5 0

For 4 semesters I attended The New England Institute of Art in brookline.

Narragansett High School, UMass Lowell

2012

100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

36.4%

27.3%

27.3%

18.2%

12

4

3

3

2

10.0%

50.0%

0.0%

70.0%

2010

2011

Dixie Hollins High School Graphic Arts Academy. This school focused on traditional design, we did not work on computers.

Natick High School class of 1975

2012

10

10 0 0 0

10

1

5

0

7

If you took design classes prior to MWCC, what high school or college did you attend?

8

1

5

0

4

Took some art and design classes many years ago at UMass and Mass College of Art (evening).

Wachusett Regional High School

2011

2013

66.7% 0.0% 33.3% 0.0%

2013

3

2 0 1 0

0.0%

33.3%

0.0%

66.7%

3

0

1

0

2

Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

87.5% 0.0% 0.0% 12.5%

50.0%

answered question

2010 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

High School graphic arts classes

Answer Options

Prior to your print design coursework at MWCC, what experience or prior education did you have in graphic design or with related graphic design software?

answered question

CGD-Print degree (Associates Degree) CGD-Print degree and CGWC-Web certificate (Major and minor) CGD-Print degree and CGW-Web Degree (Dual major) CGDC-Print certificate (One Year Certificate)

Answer Options

What is your program of study?

Question 1

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

26 0 6 1 33

Total Count

18.2%

42.4%

9.1%

45.5%

4 Year Total

33

6

14

3

15

Total Count

2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013

78.8% 0.0% 18.2% 3.0%

4 Year Total

2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013


192

Monty Tech

Ayer Highschool

Oakmont Regional High school

2013

I took one week of graphic design class in our tech high school and it tied between that program and the CAD program, since i ended up not being able to do that well enough to suit i tried this when i got to college.

North Middlesex Regional Highschool- 2 levels of photoshop classes

Oakmont Regional High school

2012


193

25.0%

37.5%

12.5%

4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of graphic design; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill.

3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of graphic design; Have only a few questions about this subject/skill.

2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of graphic design; Have several to a moderate amount of questions about this subject/skill.

2011

2012

2013

18.2%

45.5%

9.1%

27.3%

9.1%

12

2

5

1

3

1

2010

Please comment on your answer.

8

2

1

3

2

0

10.0%

50.0%

30.0%

10.0%

0.0%

10

1

5

3

1

0

0.0%

33.3%

33.3%

33.3%

0.0%

3

0

1

1

1

0

I had taken the traditional design classes at Dixie Hollins, but I had never used the computer programs before I came to this school.

As a hobby, I learned by trial and error, and because it was a hobby, all of my work was pro bono for charity.

In High School, I learned in both the design and print areas of the trade.

The graphic design classes that I took at MWCC were the very first graphic design classes that I have ever taken.

Previous to going to MWCC I had merely dabbled in the basics of design theory. I had no working knowledge of any programs or concepts of design.

I've always had a strong interest in Graphic arts and design. Though I had never had any formal training. I had done some work as a hobby, prior to classes.

Although I had prior knowledge in high school about graphic design, coming to MWCC, I was able to shift my skills to a more professional and realistic level. Not only are all the professors and faculty very one on one, but they create an environment of self creativity. I have been thoroughly taught all Adobe brand applications as well as QuarkXPress. I had the expereience of working with an actual client for a design which gave me and idea of what it's really like in career of graphic design. I have now completed roughly fifteen pieces, ten of which I have finalized to portfolio level. It's nice to leave having a portfolio, digital and print, as well as having the confidence in my skills in this field. I think it's amazing how much you learn in this program here at the Mount in just two years.

I did not know the Adobe Creative Suite software, but did have a working knowledge of design concepts and other software (Publisher, PowerPoint, Word).

answered question

25.0%

0.0%

1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of graphic design; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

2010 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

5—Highly Prepared-Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of graphic design; Have no questions about this subject/skill.

Answer Options

How prepared or competent in graphic design do you feel you were PRIOR to taking classes at MWCC?

Question 3

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

15.2%

36.4%

24.2%

21.2%

3.0%

4 Year Total

33

5

12

8

7

1

Total Count

2010–2013


194

No responses

I frequently use the programs to create things in my spare time. 2013

I was able to help create a logo for my step dad and create my own logo for my own cleaning company. Along with those I did the brochure for a service learning project through class.

2012

Completed foundation design courses at UMass Lowell that left me with a great understanding of basic elements of design.

I thought I knew what I was doing, but I didn't.

When I started at MWCC I had allready completed intro classes in the adobe programs and had taken mutiple other design classes.

I had some understanding of composition, and new what I though looked good, in terms of CD covers, DVD covers, posters, etc...

2011


195

4 0

0.0% 75.0%

Freelance for web (paid)

Designed for a friend or family member

Volunteer design (non-course related/non-friend or family/non50.0% paid)

Work in a design studio (paid) 0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

30.0%

90.0%

20.0%

20.0%

90.0%

100.0%

12

2

0

0

3

9

2

2

9

10

2012

2013

2012

2011

0.0%

0.0%

40.0%

100.0%

20.0%

40.0%

90.0%

90.0%

10

2

0

0

4

10

2

4

9

9

0.0%

0.0%

33.3%

100.0%

33.3%

66.7%

100.0%

100.0%

3

0

0

0

1

3

1

2

3

3

No responses

2013

I was able to help create a logo for my step dad and create my own logo for my own cleaning company. Along with those I did the brochure for a service learning project through class. I frequently use the programs to create things in my spare time.

Cartoons. Paid.

Trade School

Worked on contracts through The UPS Store as an independent contractor.

With full time student status and a part time job on days not in school, freelance work was not an option.

2010

Other (please specify)

8

3

0

0

I did some freelance of creating a business card for a client but I was not paid for it.

Other (please specify)

answered question

6

37.5%

Freelance for print (paid)

0.0%

8

100.0%

Service Learning through my classes 3

6

75.0%

Work for a printing company (paid)

2011

Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

2010

Coursework and design projects only through my classes at MWCC

Answer Options

What type of design work have you done while attending MWCC? (Check all that apply)

Question 4

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

0.0%

0.0%

36.4%

84.8%

15.2%

33.3%

87.9%

84.8%

4 Year Total

33

7

0

0

12

28

5

11

29

28

Total Count

2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013


196

0.0% 0.0%

4 Year Program

2 Year Program (Web Degree at MWCC/or other school)

3

8

0

0

5

2012

2013

0.0%

9.1%

45.5%

54.5%

12

0

1

5

6

10.0%

20.0%

70.0%

30.0%

10

1

2

7

3

0.0%

100.0%

33.3%

0.0%

3.0%

18.2%

54.5%

36.4%

4 Year Total

33

1

6

18

12

Total Count

2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013

I plan to look for a job for a year and if I can't find one, or make enough money freelancing, I will attend Fitchburg State University. School is very hard for me. I get so depressed, more so than when I have a job. I am not looking forward to continuing with the status quo.

I have successfully been accepted into Becker College, in Worcester, MA. To work on a Bachelor's degree in Interactive Entertainment, Game Design. I feel confident that my maturity and knowledge gained, at Mount Wachusett Community College, has prepared me for whatever adventure, and to pursue my dream career, lies ahead at Becker College.

I'm not sure yet, and I'm debating whether I want to get a higher degree in Graphic Design, or go into teaching.

2011

I would like to find an entry level job, but would like to return to school part time to get my bachelors degree. I am very prepared for any job in print design or any school program.

I am planning on transferring to Worcester State College and continuing my education in Computer Graphic Design.

I am transferring to Simmons College for my Bachelor Degree. I feel like a confident prepared to transfer in because I feel I was taught well in the information that I need to know to succeed.

I have several things to work on as regards the interview process but as far as working design knowledge (theory and programs) I feel very confident approaching the field.

I am transferring to Fitchburg State College. I am enrolled for the Fall 2010 semester in Communication Media Graphic Design. I feel very prepared for this transfer. From what I have read and heard from professors, I may actually go into Fitchburg knowing more about certain applications than some students all ready there. Even knowing that, I myself know that I have a full understanding in the field of Graphic Design. I have created many pieces in which I am proud. I have been able to teach myself new things in the process of designing as well as learn from everyone else around me in this field. I feel as though I can present myself to be very proficient in my field.

2010

3

0

3

1

0

Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

2011

If yes, what school and program are your transferring to? How prepared do you feel you are for transfer or employment?

answered question

37.5% 62.5%

Yes, I plan to continue my education.

Response Count

2010 Response Percent

No, I plan to obtain a job.

Answer Options

Do you plan to transfer to a 2 or 4 year program after graduating from MWCC?

Question 5

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


197

Mass Art

2013

I will either continue my education at another school or I will obtain my certificate for creating graphic novels.

Web. kind of.

I plan to be a freelancer as my ultimate goal and plan to finish up my web degree before leaving mount wachusets i haven't given it thought as to where exactly i want to go for my four year course work.

I am going to further my education just not sure when i will go on.

I am transferring to the graphic design degree at Cedarville University in Ohio.

Umass lowell

2012


198

2010

2011

4.00

4.38

4.50 4.25 4.50 4.13 3.50 3.38 3.25 4.38

4.38 4.38

2. Possess a working knowledge of the design process especially how it relates to: audience definition, research, analysis, and concept development; the production of thumbnail sketches, rough drafts, and the preparation of final comprehensive print layouts and websites.

3. Exhibit measurable skills and working knowledge in the industry standard graphic design software.

Adobe InDesign

Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Illustrator

QuarkXpress

Adobe Dreamweaver

Adobe Acrobat Professional

4. Transform digital images into new pieces of art through the use of Adobe Photoshop with emphasis on the creation of high-quality graphics for print and the web.

4A. Employ file manipulation techniques using filters, blending modes, layers, masks, channels, and layer effects with emphasis on the creation of high quality graphics for print.

4B. Create, optimize, and save graphics for the web.

4.25

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

4.73

4.45

4.64

3.73

3.64

3.45

4.27

4.64

4.36

4.36

4.45

4.36

4.27

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

Rating Response Rating Response Average Count Average Count

1A. Students will have an understanding of the concepts of copyrights and intellectual property.

1. Exhibit a solid understanding of the fundamentals of design and visual literacy, including the elements and principles of design and typography as they are applied to the development of effective communication pieces for both print and web design.

Answer Options

Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared-Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

Question 6

4.50

4.30

4.30

3.40

3.60

4.10

4.67

4.40

4.40

4.10

4.10

4.20

4.20

2013

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

5.00

5.00

5.00

3.67

4.33

4.33

4.67

4.67

5.00

4.67

4.67

5.00

4.33

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Response Rating Response Count Average Count

2012

Rating Average

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

4.65

4.53

4.58

3.51

3.74

3.85

4.44

4.55

4.50

4.41

4.40

4.39

4.26

4 Year Average

2010–2013


199

4.13 4.00 4.38 3.50 4.50 4.75 4.13 3.63 3.75

3.25 3.63 4.13 4.25 4.38

4.25 4.00 4.25 4.38 4.13 4.63 4.38

5. Create complex electronic illustrations and single page layouts with a solid understanding of the complex functions of Adobe Illustrator.

5A. Possess a working knowledge of the tools, palettes, menus and functions of Adobe Illustrator.

5B. Utilize the Bezier pen tool, as well as make use of specialized techniques for creating line-art and color illustrations.

6. Have a solid working knowledge of the fundamentals of building websites using HTML, XHTML, CSS and Dreamweaver with the ability to design structurally as well as aesthetically.

6A. Use & understand online/web/ Blackboard courses, as well as the Internet, World Wide Web, and Information Literacy resources.

6B. Use media tools such as: e-mail, search engines, newsgroups, blogs, image viewers, web games and PDF documents.

6C. View and test web designs using new generation web browsers: Opera, Firefox and Safari.

6D. Create engaging web pages and websites using Adobe Dreamweaver in Code view and Design view.

6E. Produce single and multiple page websites while applying the Principles of Web Design and accessibility to each project.

6F. Use hand coding; create interactive pages; use CSS navigation and page layout; use forms; add Flash and other multimedia; integrate between Photoshop and Bridge.

6G. Publish multi-page websites utilizing Dreamweaver's FTP upload capabilities.

7. Exhibit the ability to work with advanced graphic design principles, grids, typography, and advanced layout techniques while utilizing QuarkXPress and Adobe InDesign.

7A. Exhibit a solid understanding of typography.

7B. Produce sophisticated, multi-faceted projects with an emphasis on publication design while utilizing QuarkXPress, InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.

7C. Exhibit the ability to work with advanced graphic design principles, grids, typography, and layout techniques, such as master pages and style sheets.

8. Possess a working knowledge of print capabilities, the printing process, and understanding pre-press techniques.

8A. Possess a working knowledge of how to obtain printing quotes.

8B. Possess a working knowledge of how to prepare files for high resolution output.

8C. Understand special issues, such as handling photography and artwork for premium reproduction quality

8D. Use process and Pantone inks

8E. Understand how to create PDFs for final output.

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

4.73

4.73

4.55

4.64

4.27

4.27

4.09

4.36

4.45

4.45

4.09

3.82

4.00

3.91

4.55

4.55

4.45

3.82

4.36

4.55

4.45

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

4.40

4.20

4.00

4.40

3.90

3.90

4.40

4.30

4.10

4.10

3.80

3.33

3.60

3.60

4.30

4.40

4.10

3.60

4.70

4.30

4.60

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

5.00

5.00

5.00

4.00

4.33

4.67

4.67

4.33

4.67

4.67

5.00

4.33

5.00

4.67

5.00

5.00

5.00

4.33

5.00

4.67

5.00

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

4.63

4.64

4.42

4.36

4.19

4.21

4.35

4.34

4.37

4.34

4.13

3.68

4.09

3.95

4.50

4.68

4.51

3.81

4.61

4.38

4.55


200

4.25 4.38 4.00 4.25 4.13

Skill assessment

Resume writing

Interviewing

Compile a professional-quality portfolio

10. Manage and development client-based visual communication pieces with the use of effective design and layout while meeting strict deadlines. 5

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

4.37

4.45

4.55

4.27

4.27

4.18

4.09

4.27

1

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

4.13

4.10

4.40

4.00

3.80

4.20

4.10

4.30

2

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

4.74

5.00

5.00

4.67

4.67

5.00

5.00

4.67

0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

4.37

8

4.42

4.55

4.24

4.28

4.41

4.33

4.41

No responses

2013

I have a knowing about the web but i dont have a complete understanding on everything to set up a website.

Using Adobe Acrobat Professional: I've hardly used this in any of my courses. Aside from using InDesign to create a PDF portfolio, then finish it in Acrobat, I've never been taught anything about the application

2012

QuarkXpress - I took a single class in Quark, and that was 3 or 4 years ago. I have used InDesign for all things page layout and such since, and therefore I am not very knowledgeable about the ins and outs of QuarkXpress.

2011

Since I was a Print Major, I was not fully prepared in web design. The classes in web design merely scraped the surface of basic HTML, XHTML, and a few weeks working on Dreamweaver. There was no advanced training in this program like with Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and Quark. I do not feel fully prepared for the web design field, and do not feel confident applying for a job in that field.

The use of quark express. I had never used the program before the class and only used it for one project. As large as the project was I still don't have as much working knowledge of the program as InDesign.

9. Interviewing - This is not the result of any insufficiencies in my knowledge of design. I merely have a nervous personality and do not do well with the interview process.

I have not taken a course based on flash animation. Also, I took thee web courses, but I do not feel that I know everything there is to know about Dreaweaver.

Adobe Dreamweaver - did not really learn enough about the features in Dreamweaver. The focus was on hand-coding and not using Dreamweaver until later. I never took 112, so really didn't get any training in Adobe Acrobat Pro. This would have been useful in another course.

2010

If you rated any of the above with a 2-Minimally Prepared or a 1-Insufficiently Preparedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;please explain your answer.

Total Average Rank for all Skills/Compentencies 4.22

4.13

Career planning

If you rated any of the above with a 2-Minimally Prepared or a 1Insufficiently Preparedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;please explain your answer.

4.38

9. Possess the ability to prepare for the job market and/or transfer.


201 4.63 4.38 4.50 4.50 4.25

4.63

4.50

4.38

4.25

4.13

1B. Develops support: You develop unified support for that thesis (i.e. include examples, details, evidence).

1C. Organizes effectively: You arrange parts (sentences and paragraphs) coherently to support the thesis.

1D. Establishes purpose: You establish clear purpose to the audience.

1E. Uses credible research material effectively and ethically: You synthesize and incorporate appropriate information from research material to support the thesis, and you document it correctly (use of intext citation that correlates to a bibliography page).

1F. Uses appropriate diction, grammar, and punctuation: You choose language reasonably appropriate for intended purpose, and generally you use sentences that are grammatically sound and correctly punctuated.

1G. Audience: You meet the needs of the audience when writing/speaking.

2. Information Literacy: Through electronic and traditional modes, you (the student) demonstrate the ability to identify, access, evaluate and use information effectively, ethically and legally.

2A. Identify Information Need: You are able to select a focused topic appropriate for the assignment.

2B. Access Information: Your search strategy includes the use of advanced search techniques (and, or, not, truncation, parentheses) when searching.

4.38

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

Response Count

2010

Rating Average

1A. Establishes a main idea: You assert a central idea or thesis when writing/presenting.

1. Written and Oral Communication in English: You (the student) demonstrate the ability to write and speak effectively for a variety of occasions, audiences and purposes.

Answer Options

Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared-Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

4.50

4.50

4.60

4.50

4.50

4.30

4.33

4.40

4.20

4.60

4.60

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

Response Count

2011

Rating Average

Question 7

3.90

3.90

3.70

3.50

3.40

3.70

3.80

3.70

3.50

3.70

3.80

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

Response Count

2012

Rating Average

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

4.67

5.00

4.67

4.67

5.00

4.67

5.00

5.00

4.67

5.00

4.33

Rating Average

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Response Count

2013

4.30

4.41

4.34

4.29

4.38

4.23

4.41

4.40

4.19

4.48

4.28

4 Year Average

2010-–2013


202

4.38 4.43 4.63 4.38 4.25

2E. Evaluate Information: You are able to consider the authoritativeness, currency and content/coverage to determine information quality.

2F. Evaluate Information: You can demonstrate the appropriateness of scholarly vs. popular literature/information.

2G. Use Information: You are able to integrate information from several sources and formulate a conclusion.

2H. Use Information: You are able to paraphrase and quote correctly.

2I. Use Information: You are able to cite information using appropriate style correctly.

Total Average Rank for all Skills/Compentencies 4.41

4.50

2D. Access Information: You are able to locate and access information from a variety of sources.

answered question

4.25

2C. Access Information: You are able to judge the value of the search results and demonstrate re-strategizing when necessary.

8

8

8

8

7

8

8

8

4.49

4.50

4.60

4.60

4.60

4.50

4.50

4.50

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

3.76

3.89

3.70

4.00

3.70

3.90

3.60

4.33

10

9

10

10

10

10

10

10

4.76

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

5.00

4.67

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

4.36

33

4.33

4.34

4.48

4.35

4.36

4.40

4.44


203

15

10

7

at least 10-20 maybe more

Six

9

12

10

about 3

10

12

somwhere around 10 to 15

5

15

twelve

Between 5-10.

Research reports 4 oral presentations 8

35 - 45

10

8

5?

2013

2012

2011

2010

Please indicate (provide an estimate of) how many research reports and oral presentations you have completed, while at MWCC, in which you have utilized the majority of the above skills.

Question 7

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


204 2011

Freelance work

The real world.

I have a very thorough understanding of how the Design Software works.

MWCC Print design classes taught, me how in each design, legibility rated as the top priority, that less is more, and that plagiarism is wrong, when it comes to creativity, be original.

Principles of design, the design process, Adobe Creative Suite

The Print program prepared me for preparing for prepress and the effect of color in a printed design.

I got preperation in using the computer programs for many different style projects.

I feel like I'm very good at preparing for Interviews and putting together a professional portfolio.

They really helped develop the skill needed to effectively used the programs, while making sure you were ready and prepared for the real world.

I think Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign are the three classes that I have learned the most from. I am very comfortable to use those three programs.

The instance of getting a theme piece completed in a short period of time.

I am completely prepared to be a print designer. I could work at any job that utilizes the Creative Suite programs. I know the entire design process from concept to print and could easily make use of this at a job or in a future school.

I believe that my MWCC Print design classes have prepared me for how the business runs in the real world. They have also prepared me to work in a time efficient manner.

How to prepare everything for the printing press. To make sure that the layout is readable and the audience can understand what you are trying to advertise.

I believe that I am most prepared in most the Adobe applications. Also, I have a full understanding of all Principals and Elements of Design. I feel that I am prepared to be able to present myself as a graphic designer in a professional manner.

Before I took the Print design classes I was only proficient in Photoshop. Now I am proficient in InDesign, Dreamweaver, and getting quite adept at Illustrator. I also have a much stronger understanding of the principles of good design and how to employ them effectively.

What I am taking away from MWCC is a working knowledge of the principles of design theory. Also, thanks to the sometimes intense schedule, I am great with file organization and multitasking.

Use of the Adobe CS4 software. The design process (research, thumbnails, comps, drafts, final). Publication design.

2010

What do you believe your MWCC Print design classes MOST prepared you for or you feel you are most skilled at as a result of your training/coursework?

Question 8

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


205

As a result I feel that the courses prepared or taught me the most about using software programs and how to develop workflows + the thought processes needed to develop designs inside the programs.

I feel that I am more skilled as a result of training/coursework.

I have a greater understanding of the hierarchy of elements in a design as well as the core elements of a design including contrast repetition alignment and proximity.

2013

I feel like it most prepared me for working with real world clients. How to setup documents to print correctly before sending them out to print, and how to use all of the programs efficiently.

I feel that my print classes gave me a solid working basis in which i can succeed and do very well for my self provided i continue to work on the technical side of it.

I think the Print degree lead me to something I really love and show my creativity to everyone. I learned all diffrent programs and qualitys along the way.

Advanced Illustration, Publication Design, and Advanced Photoshop, I think prepared me for the technical aspects of design. But Portfolio Prep and Print Production were also helpful in preparing me for the business aspects of the field.

Photoshop and Illustrator programs. Designing a brochure for clients

Client work.

I feel like I am the most prepared for creating multi-page layouts.

real world jobs and clients

I believe the classes most prepared me for the real world by teaching me how to utilize the Adobe programs making my work professional.

2012


206 2011

Thumbnails and mock-ups

WEB

I don't find this question applicable.

MWCC Print design classes have prepared me to the best of the abilities of the staff and curriculum. Nothing teaches students better than real world experience and no amount of prep at a College or University will change that.

I wish I knew more about specific jobs within the field of graphic design

I still need to work more with prepress prepararion before I will be completely confident in it.

N/A, I dont have anything to compare it too.

I do feel like they could have prepared us more for the service learning client projects. Perhaps having one other service learning project earlier in the year would have helped with the process.

How much I should charge and freelancing in general.

I feel I am weakest in Fireworks. There was only one class that related to Fireworks.

Rejection of my artistic efforts.

I was prepared the least in the web design field. I am weak with HTML, XHTML, CSS, and Dreamweaver.

My main weakness is that I procrastinate too much.

I feel I am weakest in Photoshop. I feel I had to teach myself that program.

I feel that I have a weakness in the Adobe Illustrator Application. Although I have taken a course in this program, I feel there are many things I still don't know yet. I don't blame this on the classes at all, I just think it's a kind of program I have to practice in because I have never been an artist on paper and that seems to cause me difficulty when drawing on the computer.

I still have little actual working knowledge of Flash, Fireworks, or Acrobat.

I have the least confidence in my ability to work solo as a freelance designer. It was touched on several times during some of the courses but I feel it is something that more time should be spent on.

I still have some gaps in Photoshop, but I don't think it's due to the classes necessarily.

2010

What do you believe your MWCC Print design classes prepared you for the LEAST or you feel you are the weakest in?

Question 9

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


207

I think they could have covered design history a bit more. I realize that there's so much you can teach in a few classes though.

I still feel like there is so much more for me to learn.

Typography, our typography class did not in anyway actually teach us something about typography.

2013

All of the CGD instructors were effective in making sure that they covered everything that we needed to know.

I feel that my area of weakness would be my technical writing skills and business writing skills.

I feel I am the weakest in the Web aspect.

I think the required web design classes for print majors are okay for getting a base knowledge in web design, but I don't feel properly prepared to create a fully-functional website that is up to par with my print design skills.

Web Design- but its not part of my major

Actual printing.

I really don't feel like I am weak in any specific skill.

printing

I could have learned more about Quark Xpress but I know InDesign well.

2012


208

I was not a web major, but teaching PHP would be VERY valuable.

MWCC's CGD program is first-rate! Leslie Cullen sets a tone of professionalism and high standards. Every teacher I had was knowledgeable, helpful, and caring. I believe I got an excellent education at a great price.

I think that when there is a textbook for a class, on top of the major semester projects, there should be smaller assignments utilizing certaint tools in the program but the student should have full creative control over the subject matter. So that when work is done on major projects, these techniques could be used.

I feel there should be more InDesign taught on campus. The only course dedicated to the program is online only.

2011

To enable the CGD student to work at their work station on the program being demonstrated is a huge plus, rather than simply sitting and trying to follow along.

There was no clearly laid out teaching on how to convert designs into websites. I have no idea how to do this, and it would have been very helpful to me. I am weak with coding and I wish that I knew how to cut up my designs and easily make them into a website.

Keep up what you're doing!

More topics on photoshop.

I don't think there is anything that the CGD program at MWCC can improve on.

Flash, Fireworks, and Acrobat.

In general I think the print part of the program is really very good. It's well organized, great instructors, logical progression of courses, good projects. The portfolio course and Print Production really pull it all together nicely too. I do not think having CGD235, Typography, online is a very good idea though. I think students really would be much better served by having a real class with live critique and seeing each other's work. It also went at a pretty slow pace, and many students didn't really take it very seriously. It's good perhaps, to know how to take a course online, but not in this major. Online courses should just be for electives, like Digital Photo Art, not requirements. It should not be offered online just because the instructor does not live locally. The web side of the program is not as well established or run. I know the field is changing rapidly, but the quality of the instruction is lacking. Feedback and evaluation can be very sketchy on this side of things. You are often left to learn things on your own. CGD109 was a real waste of time. Outdated and annoying. Needs to come into the 21st century - more on social media (Twitter, blogging, etc., getting into making web pages immediately, and less on old slides of computers back in the day. The day we had a quiz on the syllabus was truly remarkable (and not in a good way). I can't think of anything to add to the print side - it's pretty perfect ... just would like a bit more of it!

2010

What would you suggest we could improve upon in the CGD program at MWCC? What topics, software, technical skills should we offer more of? Less of? Please take the time to offer your input and explanations so that we may improve the CGD program.

Question 10

Print Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


209


Appendix D: CGW Web Capstone Survey Questions

210


2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 1. Major/Program

*1. What is your program of study? j CGW­Web degree (Associates Degree) k l m n

j CGW­Web degree and CGDC­Print certificate (Major and minor) k l m n j CGW­Web Degree and CGD­Print degree (Dual major) k l m n j CGWC­Web certificate (One Year Certificate) k l m n

2. Experience

*2. Prior to your web design coursework at MWCC, what experience or prior education did you have in graphic design, web design or with related graphic design software? c High School graphic arts classes d e f g

c Attended college graphic design classes prior to transfer to MWCC d e f g c Self Taught/Hobby d e f g

c No Prior Experience or Education d e f g

If you took design classes prior to MWCC, what high school or college did you attend? 

5 6

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

*3. How prepared or competent in web/graphic design do you feel you were PRIOR to taking classes at MWCC? c 5—Highly Prepared­Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of graphic design; Have no questions about this subject/skill. d e f g

c 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of graphic design; Have few, if any, questions about this  d e f g subject/skill. 

c 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of graphic design; Have only a few questions about this subject/skill. d e f g

c 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of graphic design; Have several to a moderate  d e f g amount of questions about this subject/skill. 

c 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of graphic design; Still have a great deal of questions  d e f g about this subject/skill.  Please comment on your answer. 

5

6

3. Design Work

4. What type of design work have you done while attending MWCC? (Check all that apply) c Coursework and design projects only through my classes at MWCC d e f g c Designed for a friend or family member d e f g c Freelance for print (paid) d e f g c Freelance for web (paid) d e f g

c Service Learning through my classes d e f g

 

c Volunteer design (non­course related/non­friend or family/non­paid) d e f g c Work for a printing company (paid) d e f g c Work in a design studio (paid) d e f g

Other (please specify) 

5

6

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

4. Transfer/Employment

*5. Do you plan to transfer to a 2 or 4 year program after graduating from MWCC? c No, I plan to obtain a job. d e f g

c Yes, I plan to continue my education. d e f g c 4 Year Program d e f g

c 2 Year Program (Print Degree at MWCC/or other school) d e f g

If yes, what school and program are your transferring to? How prepared do you feel you are for transfer or employment? 

5

6

5. Competencies­Skills Assessment

This survey will help us to accurately assess our effectiveness of teaching and whether you have gained the appropriate  skills and competencies in our curriculum. Please review and rank each section carefully based on your personal  competency level (your level of skill, talent, ability, expertise, know­how.)    To move forward in the survey you must rank every skill/competency. 

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

*6. Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared­Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

1. Exhibit a solid  understanding of the 

3­Moderately

2­Minimally

1­Insufficiently

Not Required or 

Prepared

Prepared

Prepared

Taught

j k l m n

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5­Highly Prepared

4­Well Prepared

j k l m n

fundamentals of design and  visual literacy, including the  elements and principles of  design and typography as  they are applied to the  development of effective  communication pieces for  both print and web design. 1A. Students will have an  understanding of the  concepts of copyrights and  intellectual property. 2. Possess a working  knowledge of the design  process especially how it  relates to: audience  definition, research,  analysis, and concept  development; the  production of thumbnail  sketches, rough drafts, and  the preparation of final 

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE comprehensive print layouts  and websites. 3. Exhibit a solid 

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4A. Adobe Photoshop

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4B. Adobe Illustrator

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4C. Adobe Dreamweaver

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4D. Adobe Flash

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4E. Adobe InDesign

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4F. Adobe Acrobat 

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4G. Adobe Fireworks

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5. Transform digital images 

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understanding of the  principles of visual  communication coupled  with an understanding of  current web and multimedia  tools, concepts,  terminology, and  techniques. 3A. Possess a working  knowledge of digital media  and presentation software  programs such as Fireworks,  Acrobat and InDesign. 3B. Apply communications  principles (analysis,  prototyping, flowcharting,  storyboarding, image  editing) to professional  business correspondence,  presentations, multimedia,  and communication pieces. 4. Exhibit measurable skills  and working knowledge in  the industry standard  graphic design software.

Professional

into new pieces of art  through the use of Adobe  Photoshop and/or Fireworks  with emphasis on the  creation of high­quality  graphics for print and the  web. 5A. Employ file  manipulation techniques  using filters, blending  modes, layers, masks,  channels, and layer effects  with emphasis on the 

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE creation of high quality  graphics for print. 5B. Create, optimize, and  save graphics for the web. 6. Create complex  electronic illustrations and 

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single page layouts with a  solid understanding of the  complex functions of Adobe  Illustrator. 6A. Possess a working  knowledge of the tools,  palettes, menus and  functions of Adobe  Illustrator. 6B. Utilize the Bezier pen  tool, as well as make use of  specialized techniques for  creating line­art and color  illustrations. 7. Plan and design websites  utilizing basic and  advanced web authoring  techniques while exhibiting  proficiency in the use of  HTML, XHTML, CSS  layouts and techniques,  Adobe Photoshop, and  Dreamweaver. 7A. Possess the ability to:  plan projects; use  templates; use hand  coding; use forms; utilize  multimedia including  podcasts and videocasts;  understand and utilize  behaviors, images, and  advanced CSS techniques;  design CSS layouts. 7B. Use & understand  online/web/Blackboard  courses, as well as the  Internet, World Wide Web,  and Information Literacy  resources. 7C. Use media tools such  as: e­mail, search engines,  newsgroups, blogs, image  viewers, web games and  PDF documents. 7D. View and test web  designs using new 

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE generation web standard  browsers: Opera, Chrome,  Firefox and Safari. 7E. Create engaging web 

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9A. Career planning

j k l m n

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9B. Skill assessment

j k l m n

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9C. Resume writing

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

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9D. Interviewing

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

9E. Compile a professional­

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

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pages and websites using  Adobe Dreamweaver in  Code view and Design view. 7F. Produce single and  multiple page websites  while applying the  Principles of Web Design  and accessibility to each  project. 7G. Publish multi­page  websites utilizing  Dreamweaver's FTP upload  capabilities. 8. Create dynamic,  animated computer art, web  motion graphics, and  websites through the use of  animation and web  interactive programs. 8A. Employ techniques  such as motion guides, key  frames, and shape/motion  tweening to create dynamic  animated computer art. 9. Possess the ability to  prepare for the job market  and/or transfer.

quality portfolio 10. Manage and develop  client­based visual  communication pieces with  the use of effective design  and layout while meeting  strict deadlines.

If you rated any of the above with a 2­Minimally Prepared or a 1­Insufficiently Prepared—please explain your answer. 

5

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

6

6. General Education Competencies

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

*7. Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared­Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

1. Written and Oral  Communication in English: 

Moderately

Minimally

Insufficiently

Prepared

Prepared

Prepared

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Highly Prepared

Well Prepared

j k l m n

N/A

You (the student)  demonstrate the ability to  write and speak effectively  for a variety of occasions,  audiences and purposes. 1A. Establishes a main  idea: You assert a central  idea or thesis when  writing/presenting. 1B. Develops support: You  develop unified support for  that thesis (i.e. include  examples, details,  evidence). 1C. Organizes effectively:  You arrange parts  (sentences and paragraphs)  coherently to support the  thesis. 1D. Establishes purpose:  You establish clear purpose  to the audience.

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE the authoritativeness,  currency and  content/coverage to  determine information  quality. 2F. Evaluate Information:  You can demonstrate the 

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appropriateness of scholarly  vs. popular  literature/information. 2G. Use Information: You  are able to integrate  information from several  sources and formulate a  conclusion. 2H. Use Information: You  are able to paraphrase and  quote correctly. 2I. Use Information: You are  able to cite information  using appropriate style  correctly. Please indicate (provide an estimate of) how many research reports and oral presentations you have completed, while at MWCC, in which you  have utilized the majority of the above skills. 

7. Final Comments

*8. What do you believe your MWCC Web design classes MOST prepared you for or you

feel you are most skilled at as a result of your training/coursework? 5 6

*9. What do you believe your MWCC Web design classes prepared you for the LEAST or

you feel you are the weakest in?

5 6

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2013—Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE 10. What would you suggest we could improve upon in the CGW program at MWCC? What topics, software, technical skills should we offer more of? Less of? Please take the time to offer your input and explanations so that we may improve the CGW program. Also, please include contact information: a phone number, mailing address (if you have no plans of moving within the next year), and an email address (not your mwcc email, please use one that we can reach you at within in the next 1­3 years). We would like to be able to contact you for future graduate surveys, as well as invite you to participate in various events and activities in the future. 5 6

8. Thank you!

Thank you for completing this valuable survey.     If you wish to contact the CGD Department at anytime please feel free to call or email Leslie Cullen at 978­630­9347 or  l_cullen@mwcc.mass.edu 

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Appendix D: CGW Web Capstone Survey Results

222


223

2011

2012

2013

2010

9

5 0 4 0

Question 2

71.4% 0.0% 28.6% 0.0%

2011

7

5 0 2 0

85.7% 0.0% 14.3% 0.0%

2012

7

6 0 1 0

66.7% 0.0% 33.3% 0.0%

2013

3

2 0 1 0

22.2% 44.4% 33.3%

Attended college graphic design classes prior to transfer to MWCC

Self Taught/Hobby

No Prior Experience or Education 9

3

4

2

4

28.6%

57.1%

14.3%

28.6%

7

2

4

1

2

28.6%

42.9%

14.3%

28.6%

7

2

3

1

2

0.0%

66.7%

0.0%

33.3%

3

0

2

0

1

Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

55.6% 0.0% 44.4% 0.0%

44.4%

answered question

2010 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

High School graphic arts classes

Answer Options

Prior to your web design coursework at MWCC, what experience or prior education did you have in graphic design, web design or with related graphic design software?

answered question

CGD-Print degree (Associates Degree) CGD-Print degree and CGWC-Web certificate (Major and minor) CGD-Print degree and CGW-Web Degree (Dual major) CGDC-Print certificate (One Year Certificate)

Answer Options

What is your program of study?

Question 1

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

18 0 8 0 26

Total Count

26.9%

50.0%

15.4%

34.6%

4 Year Total

26

7

13

4

9

Total Count

2010–2013

69.2% 0.0% 30.8% 0.0%

4 Year Total

2010–2013


224

2011

Monty Tech

Monty Tech

I attended Money Tech and was in the graphics art program

Photoshop, QuarkExpress, Freehand, Photography (black and white)

2013

2012

The only course I took was desktop publishing aka making business cards, a calendar, etc. I first got interested in this by modifying my own layouts for social networking websites.

North Middlesex (NMRHS)

Montserrat College of Art

Murdock Middle High School, Winchendon, MA

I took the intro class while still enrolled in high school, but I ended up having to drop it and retake it when I started here full time.

2010

If you took design classes prior to MWCC, what high school or college did you attend?


225

0.0%

33.3%

44.4%

4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of graphic design; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill.

3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of graphic design; Have only a few questions about this subject/skill.

2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of graphic design; Have several to a moderate amount of questions about this subject/skill.

2012

2013

0.0%

57.1%

28.6%

14.3%

0.0%

7

0

4

2

1

0

2010

0.0%

28.6%

28.6%

42.9%

0.0%

7

0

2

2

3

0

0.0%

33.3%

0.0%

66.7%

0.0%

3

0

1

0

2

0

7.7%

42.3%

26.9%

23.1%

0.0%

4 Year Total

26

2

11

7

6

0

Total Count

2010–2013

I took a photoshop class in high school. I did good in the class but didn't know that much about web design.

I had absolutely no experience with Graphic Design. Despite having no experience, I did not have very many questions to ask about the programs/subject/skill. It was simply just dive into the subject, and work it out as I went along. Go with the flow.

I knew nothing about the web/HTML/CSS.

2011

Please comment on your answer.

9

2

4

3

0

0

Only hade one class and the rest was personaly learned from viewing source codes.

answered question

22.2%

0.0%

1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of graphic design; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

2010 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

5—Highly Prepared-Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of graphic design; Have no questions about this subject/skill.

Answer Options

How prepared or competent in web/graphic design do you feel you were PRIOR to taking classes at MWCC?

Question 3

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


226

No responses

2013

I knew old HTML but not CSS and I didn't know how to use Adobe Creative Suite very well.

There are still questions I might have to ask myself or someone else because new things come out everyday in the web. So I would educate myself further than just my degree.

I am more of a coder and programmer than a graphic designer, but still had a decent amount of knowledge of the field.

2012

I had a good knowledge of some of the programs like Photoshop a really want to learn and use Dreamweaver and to web stuff

Took a web design class at Monachusett Technicial Regional High School (Adult Education) and played around myself.

I took a certificate in Web design however Photoshop is the only class that really taught me a little. The others were superficial, I didn't have any live interaction with clients and didn't do a website from start to finish.

2011


227

3 0

Volunteer design (non-course related/non-friend or family/non33.3% paid) 0.0% 0.0%

Work in a design studio (paid)

Work for a printing company (paid) 0.0%

0.0%

42.9%

71.4%

14.3%

28.6%

100.0%

85.7%

7

2

0

0

3

5

1

2

7

6

No responses

I customize memoribilia products

Cartoons. Paid.

No responses

Worked on contracts through The UPS Store as an independent contractor.

2013

2012

2011

With full time student status and a part time job on days not in school, freelance work was not an option.

2010

Other (please specify)

9

3

0

I did some freelance of creating a business card for a client but I was not paid for it.

answered question

8

88.9%

Designed for a friend or family member

3

33.3%

Freelance for web (paid)

9 0

0.0%

100.0%

Service Learning through my classes

Freelance for print (paid)

7

77.8%

Other (please specify)

2011

2012

2013

0.0%

0.0%

42.9%

71.4%

14.3%

28.6%

100.0%

85.7%

7

2

0

0

3

5

1

2

7

6

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

33.3%

0.0%

33.3%

100.0%

100.0%

3

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

3

3

Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

2010

Coursework and design projects only through my classes at MWCC

Answer Options

What type of design work have you done while attending MWCC? (Check all that apply)

Question 4

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

0.0%

0.0%

34.6%

73.1%

19.2%

19.2%

100.0%

84.6%

4 Year Total

26

7

0

0

9

19

5

5

26

22

Total Count

2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013


228

44.4% 0.0%

4 Year Program

2 Year Program (Print Degree at MWCC/or other school)

4

9

0

4

3

2012

2013

0.0%

28.6%

42.9%

42.9%

7

0

2

3

3

0.0%

42.9%

42.9%

42.9%

7

0

3

3

3

33.3%

66.7%

33.3%

33.3%

3.8%

42.3%

38.5%

42.3%

4 Year Total

26

1

11

10

11

Total Count

2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013

2013

I plan to go to Massachusetts College for Art and Design in Boston for the Animation degree.

Mass Art

I feel that I am prepared for self-employment as a freelance designer. I have been working in this capacity for over a year now and have been able to do whatever my clients needed.

I want to start CIS and Business Administration.

2012

I feel prepared to work for a real client because I already had 2 of them through service learning and I also designed for a friend.

Fitchburg State University

2011

I don't know what school I will transfer to yet. I think I am ready for a next challenge in other school.

I'd like to attend UMass Lowell.

I plan on moving on to a four year college, so I can continue on with my education. Either that or join the Military. I plan on going to Becker College or any other four year college that hosts video game design, to pursue a Bachelor's degree in Video game design. While I am attending, a four year college, I will work part time at a corporation/business with my Print Design degree.

Franklin Pierce or Keen State college.

2010

3

1

2

1

1

Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count

2011

If yes, what school and program are your transferring to? How prepared do you feel you are for transfer or employment?

answered question

44.4% 33.3%

Yes, I plan to continue my education.

Response Count

2010 Response Percent

No, I plan to obtain a job.

Answer Options

Do you plan to transfer to a 2 or 4 year program after graduating from MWCC?

Question 5

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


229

2010

2011

4.56

4.33

4. Exhibit measurable skills and working knowledge in the industry standard graphic design software.

4C. Adobe Dreamweaver

4.11

3B. Apply communications principles (analysis, prototyping, flowcharting, storyboarding, image editing) to professional business correspondence, presentations, multimedia, and communication pieces.

4.56

3.78

3A. Possess a working knowledge of digital media and presentation software programs such as Fireworks, Acrobat and InDesign.

4.00

4.22

3. Exhibit a solid understanding of the principles of visual communication coupled with an understanding of current web and multimedia tools, concepts, terminology, and techniques.

4B. Adobe Illustrator

4.11

2. Possess a working knowledge of the design process especially how it relates to: audience definition, research, analysis, and concept development; the production of thumbnail sketches, rough drafts, and the preparation of final comprehensive print layouts and websites.

4A. Adobe Photoshop

4.22

4.00

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

4.43

3.71

4.57

4.57

4.57

4.14

4.14

4.57

4.14

4.29

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

Rating Response Rating Response Average Count Average Count

1A. Students will have an understanding of the concepts of copyrights and intellectual property.

1. Exhibit a solid understanding of the fundamentals of design and visual literacy, including the elements and principles of design and typography as they are applied to the development of effective communication pieces for both print and web design.

Answer Options

Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared-Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

Question 6

4.71

4.50

4.86

4.57

4.29

4.43

4.29

4.57

4.14

4.43

2013

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

4.67

4.33

5.00

3.67

3.00

3.67

4.00

4.00

3.67

4.00

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Response Rating Response Count Average Count

2012

Rating Average

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

4.59

4.14

4.75

4.29

3.99

4.01

4.16

4.31

4.04

4.18

4 Year Average

2010–2013


230

3.38 3.67 3.75 3.89 4.33

4.33 4.33 4.00 4.11 4.22

4.44

4.22

4.33 4.33 4.22 4.22 4.11 4.11 3.89

4D. Adobe Flash

4E. Adobe InDesign

4F. Adobe Acrobat Professional

4G. Adobe Fireworks

5. Transform digital images into new pieces of art through the use of Adobe Photoshop and Fireworks with emphasis on the creation of highquality graphics for print and the web.

5A. Employ file manipulation techniques using filters, blending modes, layers, masks, channels, and layer effects with emphasis on the creation of high quality graphics for print.

5B. Create, optimize, and save graphics for the web.

6. Create complex electronic illustrations and single page layouts with a solid understanding of the complex functions of Adobe Illustrator.

6A. Possess a working knowledge of the tools, palettes, menus and functions of Adobe Illustrator.

6B. Utilize the Bezier pen tool, as well as make use of specialized techniques for creating line-art and color illustrations.

7. Plan and design websites utilizing basic and advanced web authoring techniques while exhibiting proficiency in the use of HTML, XHTML, CSS layouts and techniques, Adobe Photoshop, and Dreamweaver.

7A. Possess the ability to: plan projects; use templates; use hand coding; use forms; utilize multimedia including podcasts and Flash Video; understand and utilize behaviors, images, and advanced CSS techniques; design CSS layouts.

7B. Use & understand online/web/Blackboard courses, as well as the Internet, World Wide Web, and Information Literacy resources.

7C. Use media tools such as: e-mail, search engines, newsgroups, blogs, image viewers, web games and PDF documents.

7D. View and test web designs using new generation web browsers: Opera, Firefox and Safari.

7E. Create engaging web pages and websites using Adobe Dreamweaver in Code view and Design view.

7F. Produce single and multiple page websites while applying the Principles of Web Design and accessibility to each project.

7G. Publish multi-page websites utilizing Dreamweaver's FTP upload capabilities.

8. Create dynamic, animated computer art, web motion graphics, and websites through the use of Adobe Flash.

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

3.43

4.86

4.43

4.71

4.71

4.71

4.71

4.29

4.43

4.14

4.14

4.14

4.71

4.29

4.57

3.17

3.57

3.57

3.29

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

4.43

4.29

4.71

4.71

4.86

4.57

4.43

4.57

4.71

4.50

4.67

4.50

4.57

4.57

4.71

4.00

4.00

3.83

4.50

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

4.00

5.00

4.67

5.00

5.00

5.00

5.00

4.00

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.67

5.00

5.00

4.67

3.33

4.33

4.33

4.00

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3.94

4.57

4.48

4.66

4.70

4.65

4.62

4.27

4.48

4.30

4.31

4.33

4.65

4.55

4.57

3.60

3.91

3.85

3.79


231

4.00 4.11 4.00 3.89 4.00 4.00

9A. Career planning

9B. Skill assessment

9C. Resume writing

9D. Interviewing

9E. Compile a professional-quality portfolio

10. Manage and development client-based visual communication pieces with the use of effective design and layout while meeting strict deadlines. 2

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

4.35

4.43

4.57

4.29

4.14

4.29

4.14

4.00

4.00

2

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

4.52

4.57

4.43

4.57

4.29

4.43

4.57

4.43

4.33

1

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

4.33

4.33

4.00

3.67

3.67

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

4.33

5

4.33

4.25

4.11

4.03

4.21

4.18

4.11

4.06

2011

No responses

2013

I have some knowledge of Acrobat and Fireworks, but I hardly use them. I've been focused on my client's website so much, I've been thrown off of keeping up with blackboard.

2012

I took a flash class in 2006 I have not had a use for it since, hence I and not proficient in it. Many of the things I learned in FLASH are outdated, and can now be done with JQuery.

I am not very good at illustrator. it is not a strong point for me

I do not have a solid understanding of ActionScript 3.0 or 2.0.

For the two that I had rated above, it is simply because I have not taken any classes, to learn those programs. I will be continuing with my education at the Mount to acquire my two Associate's degrees in both Print and Web design.

2010

If you rated any of the above with a 2-Minimally Prepared or a 1-Insufficiently Preparedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;please explain your answer.

Total Average Rank for all Skills/Compentencies 4.11

4.00

9. Possess the ability to prepare for the job market and/or transfer.

If you rated any of the above with a 2-Minimally Prepared or a 1Insufficiently Preparedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;please explain your answer.

3.89

8A. Employ techniques such as motion guides, key frames, and shape/motion tweening to create dynamic animated computer art.


232 4.11 4.11 4.33 4.11 4.00

3.89

4.00

4.11

3.89

1B. Develops support: You develop unified support for that thesis (i.e. include examples, details, evidence).

1C. Organizes effectively: You arrange parts (sentences and paragraphs) coherently to support the thesis.

1D. Establishes purpose: You establish clear purpose to the audience.

1E. Uses credible research material effectively and ethically: You synthesize and incorporate appropriate information from research material to support the thesis, and you document it correctly (use of intext citation that correlates to a bibliography page).

1F. Uses appropriate diction, grammar, and punctuation: You choose language reasonably appropriate for intended purpose, and generally you use sentences that are grammatically sound and correctly punctuated.

1G. Audience: You meet the needs of the audience when writing/speaking.

2. Information Literacy: Through electronic and traditional modes, you (the student) demonstrate the ability to identify, access, evaluate and use information effectively, ethically and legally.

2A. Identify Information Need: You are able to select a focused topic appropriate for the assignment.

4.33

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

Response Count

2010

Rating Average

1A. Establishes a main idea: You assert a central idea or thesis when writing/presenting.

1. Written and Oral Communication in English: You (the student) demonstrate the ability to write and speak effectively for a variety of occasions, audiences and purposes.

Answer Options

Please rank your ability/competence/skill level on the following scale: 5—Highly Prepared-Proficient; Fully competent; Have full mastery of this skill; Have no questions about this subject/skill. 4—Well Prepared; Above average competence; Advanced working knowledge of this skill; Have few, if any, questions about this subject/skill. 3 — Moderately Prepared; Average competence; Working knowledge of this skill; Have some questions about this subject/skill. 2 — Minimally Prepared; Below average competence; basic to little working knowledge of this skill; Have moderate to several questions about this subject/skill. 1 — Insufficiently Prepared; Little to no competence; little to no working knowledge of this skill; Still have a great deal of questions about this subject/skill.

4.57

4.43

4.57

4.43

4.43

4.43

4.33

4.57

4.29

4.29

7

7

7

7

7

7

6

7

7

7

Response Count

2011

Rating Average

Question 7

4.57

4.14

4.43

4.57

4.29

4.43

4.57

4.29

4.57

4.57

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

Response Count

2012

Rating Average

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.00

4.00

4.33

4.33

4.00

4.00

3.67

Rating Average

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Response Count

2013

4.34

4.25

4.33

4.22

4.18

4.33

4.39

4.24

4.24

4.22

4 Year Average

2010-–2013


233

4.22

4.11 4.00 4.00 4.11 4.11

2D. Access Information: You are able to locate and access information from a variety of sources.

2E. Evaluate Information: You are able to consider the authoritativeness, currency and content/coverage to determine information quality.

2F. Evaluate Information: You can demonstrate the appropriateness of scholarly vs. popular literature/information.

2G. Use Information: You are able to integrate information from several sources and formulate a conclusion.

2H. Use Information: You are able to paraphrase and quote correctly.

2I. Use Information: You are able to cite information using appropriate style correctly.

Total Average Rank for all Skills/Compentencies 4.22

3.89

2C. Access Information: You are able to judge the value of the search results and demonstrate re-strategizing when necessary.

answered question

4.00

2B. Access Information: Your search strategy includes the use of advanced search techniques (and, or, not, truncation, parentheses) when searching.

2

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

4.37

4.14

4.43

4.43

4.43

4.57

4.29

4.29

4.43

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

5 4.13

4.29

4.29

4.43

4.43

4.57

4.67

4.29

4.43

7

7

7

7

7

6

7

7

5 4.74

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.33

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

2

4.37

14

4.22

4.29

4.30

4.30

4.40

4.38

4.20

4.30


234

50

10

About Two

At least 10 actual reports, papers, or speeches, probably more.

more than 5

Estimate: 7 reports and oral presentations

15

6

27

I probably did about 6-8

6

2 or 3

CGD210, Book Presentation; ENG102 Book report.

10

2013

2012

2011

2010

Please indicate (provide an estimate of) how many research reports and oral presentations you have completed, while at MWCC, in which you have utilized the majority of the above skills.

Question 7

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


235

2010

2011

I would say I feel most skilled and Photoshop but I learned a lot in Dreamweaver for my classes

The process and actual designing web sites and all the necessary steps involved including hand-coding

Real client interaction. I had worked with clients on my own, and found myself employing the skills I learned in classes, IE, client, contacts, organization, dealing with the client, to be done as second nature because of my training.

I feel best prepared in design techniques and usage of Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, InDesign, and Quark.

they prepared me in all areas of the web process

Dealing with a real client, communicating with them and delivering the product.

they prepared me to do real world work and work with a real client. I have learned many things about design and the adobe programs. also xhtml. it has also made me want to better myself as a designer and learn/teach myself more things.

Prepared me for the real world working field.

prepairing myself to be in the working field.

I believe that I have become very skilled in all of the design programs.

I am much more understanding of HTML/CSS and the web/print design job market.

css, xhtml, photoshop, illustrator

My classes in Web Design prepared me in that it taught me the skills to not only design, and it helped broaden my artistic skills, and understand the world of Website's and Design.

Definitely most skilled in Photoshop and Dreamweaver.

dreamweaver and photoshop are my best skills that i have developed from MWCC

I believe I am most skilled at Eletronic Illustrator.

What do you believe your MWCC Web design classes MOST prepared you for or you feel you are most skilled at as a result of your training/coursework?

Question 8

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


236

2012

yes

I believe my classes most prepared me for work with real life clients.

I feel that I am most skilled at the results of my training/coursework.

knowing you can achieve your clients goals

My experience with photoshop and dreamweaver 2013

I believe MWCC prepared me in all design aspects of web design and some in print design.

My classes gave me a great understanding of the Adobe Creative Suite. I would never have been able to use the pen tool properly without taking that Illustrator class. I have a much better understanding of design, layout, and typography than when I started.

They prepared me for the challenges of the workforce

Yes.

Getting a strong grip on the design aspect of programming and web development.


237

2011

I feel I am the weakest in fireworks

InDesign, Fireworks, ActionScript, and PHP

Cutting edge web design. We are a bit behind the times in coding, also I feel there should be more emphasis on the variety of languages taught. I keep seeing adds for Javascrpt, and PHP and other higher level coding, and find it becoming more and more a requirement to keep up in the field.

I feel my weakest asset is my usage of Flash.

javascript, wordpress. Wordpress would have been a great tool to really explore. No offense to any instructors what so ever but I feel like if someone new wordpress top to bottom, maybe we'd be better versed in wordpress because really it is a huge industry standard to know now a days

Using JavaScript or other languages to give my websites this little extra functionality. I did get taught to make them pretty but not how to make them super efficient.

the things I am bad at I want to spend more time on and learn more about so I can be a better designer.

I think the my flash skills are not really that great.

i am the weakest in indesign.

I feel that I am the weakest in some of the web design areas.

I did not learn very much about ActionScript in Flash.

indesign

N/A

I really need more practice in Illustrator. It's been a few years since I took that class and my skills could use some brushing up.

adobe media encoder, and adobe device central.

Design for E-commerce is the class that I feel I am weak at. I did not learn how shopping cart and credit card actually work. Everything was on text book, but I really wanted to test it myself

2010

What do you believe your MWCC Web design classes prepared you for the LEAST or you feel you are the weakest in?

Question 9

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


238

2012

yes

I am still weak in conversing with strangers.

I still struggle with understanding/memorizing the codes.

animation

english class requirements 2013

Being nervous in front of an audience. Self taught Advanced ActionScript in Flash is still difficult for me. I would have also liked to get a better understanding of how PHP, JavaScript and other coding languages beyond HTML and CSS work within web pages. Despite the availability of swatch books in the classroom, I find it hard choose colors on the screen that look the same when they go to print. This is probably because I am a web student, not a print student. Nothing.

The ability to market myself to potential clients for freelance work.

How to prepare legal documents for clients like contracts and sub contracts.


239

2011

2012

2013

More in depth on indesign

I think there should be more time to break down the coding so that it will be easier to understand and have a better chance of understanding/memorizing more.

More animation like autodesk

I think you should offer more online classes, especially for the web side of things. Keeping around a list of service learning clients for regular class projects could help students out. During CGD112 when we had to do a flyer, mockup, etc. I chose to use a real life client for the assignment. That client is now giving me a ton of paid work. So, I would encourage voluntary service learning through the whole program, instead of just at the end.

More on the business ethics of doing freelance work.

As a student taking my time in being at the college for 4 years technically 5 instead of the 2 year have the courses planned a little different I felt a little thrown around. Just the way we learn stuff there was times when we were supposed to know stuff but we never really got taught it, then they would go into teaching it and then this schedule and everything would get messed up and thrown around. So maybe a structured differently. We also have more hands-on demonstrations from a teacher then have the students implement what they just showed us into something on the spot. But over all I feel I have learned a lot from this program and did enjoy it very much.

I think ActionScript and PHP should be taught from the beginning with the basic courses so it becomes second nature along with the hand-coding.

PHP, Java Script, J-Query, HTML5, we don't need to get into the higher echelons of these languages but a good basis is needed, if at least a familiarity.

I can't really think of any improvements at this time.

Honestly I think you you had a split between designing for web and coding for web, you'd really have an exceptional program. I know its tough to sell design students coding but if they really were sat down and shown all of the different possibilites and taught that code is nothing more then another brush, any student coming out of here would be exceptional becasue there really does not exist a program like the one I just oulined

We need to add Javascript to the curriculum or at least have it as an elective. For the e-commerce class there should be a way of creating a live shopping cart. We also need some CMS overview included in at least 1 of the classes being taught, maybe the E-commerce one as well.

Dreamweaver and Photoshop

I dont suggest anything I think everything is great

A course in ActionScript.

More in class working hands on

N/A

Wordpress, Social Networking, and rendering photos and graphics for a particular project or client.

More technical information on programs you do not teach/dont go enough into.

Everything has run very well. I only wish to go more details on Design for E-commerce class.

2010

What would you suggest we could improve upon in the CGW program at MWCC? What topics, software, technical skills should we offer more of? Less of? Please take the time to offer your input and explanations so that we may improve the CGD program.

Question 10

Web Competencies Survey-CAPSTONE


Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population APPENDIX E:

College Comparisons: Quinsigamond Community College, Worcester, MA Fitchburg State University, Fitchburg, MA UMass Lowell, Lowell, MA Becker College, Worcester, MA Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, NH Keene State College, Keene, NH

240


241


Appendix E: Quinsigamond Community College, Worcester, MA

242


MWCC Computer  Graphic  Design  PRINT

Quisagamond Community  College—Applied  Arts

DIFFERENT THAN  MWCC

Course # Description

Course # Description

Description

CGD 101 CGD  104 CGD109 CIS127 ART263 CGD105 CGD235 CGD240 ART251 CGD102 CGD204 MKT142 CGD241 CGD103 CGD106

APA121 GRAPHIC DESIGN  I APA154 DIGITAL  IMAGING  AND  MEDIA

DIGITAL DESIGN  CONCEPTS GRAPHIC  DESIGN  II MOTION  GRAPHICS

DESIGN THEORY DIGITAL  IMAGING INTRO  TO  WEB  MEDIA  or COMPUTER  TECHNOLOGIES DRAWING  I ELECTRONIC  ILLUSTRATION TYPOGRAPHY  IN  VISUAL  COMMUNICATION CREATIVE  WEB  DESIGN  I TWO-­‐DIMENSIONAL  DESIGN PUBLICATION  DESIGN ADVANCED  DIGITAL  IMAGING MARKETING CREATIVE  WEB  DESIGN  II PRINT  PRODUCTION  FOR  DESIGNERS PORTFOLIO  PREPERATION

MWCC Computer  Graphic  Design  WEB

ART131 APA155 APA271 APA181 ART-­‐-­‐-­‐ APA222

INTRO TO  DRAWING DIGITAL  ILLUSTRATION  AND  ANIMATION TYPOGRAPHY ART  THEORY  ELECTIVE PUBLICATION  DESIGN

MRK201 PRINCIPLES OF  MARKETING APA282 WEBSITE  DESIGN  II APA286 INTERACTIVE  MEDIA  PROC  PORTFOLIO APA287 GRAPHIC  DESIGN  PROC  PORTFOLIO

Quisagamond Community  College—Applied  Arts

DIFFERENT THAN  MWCC

Course # Description

Course # Description

Description

CGD 101 CGD  104 CGD109 CIS127 ART263 CGD105 CGD235 CGD240 ART251 CGD242 CGD204 CGD110 CGD241 CGD244 CGD210

APA121 GRAPHIC DESIGN  I APA154 DIGITAL  IMAGING  AND  MEDIA

DIGITAL DESIGN  CONCEPTS GRAPHIC  DESIGN  II

DESIGN THEORY DIGITAL  IMAGING INTRO  TO  WEB  MEDIA  or COMPUTER  TECHNOLOGIES DRAWING  I ELECTRONIC  ILLUSTRATION COMMUNICATION  IN  MULTIMEDIA  DESIGN CREATIVE  WEB  DESIGN  I TWO-­‐DIMENSIONAL  DESIGN INTERACTIVE  WEB  DESIGN ADVANCED  DIGITAL  IMAGING INTRODUCTION  TO  ANIMATION CREATIVE  WEB  DESIGN  II DESIGNING  FOR  E-­‐COMMERCE ADVANCED  WEBSITE  PORTFOLIO

ART131 APA155 APA271 APA181 ART-­‐-­‐-­‐ APA222

INTRO TO  DRAWING DIGITAL  ILLUSTRATION  AND  ANIMATION TYPOGRAPHY WEBSITE  DESIGN  I ART  THEORY  ELECTIVE PUBLICATION  DESIGN

APA275 MOTION GRAPHICS APA282 WEBSITE  DESIGN  II APA286 INTERACTIVE  MEDIA  PROC  PORTFOLIO APA287 GRAPHIC  DESIGN  PROC  PORTFOLIO

243


Applied Arts | Quinsigamond Community College (QCC)

What would you like to find? Search

Home » Technology » Applied Arts

Applied Arts Program Goals: The Applied Arts Program Associate in Science degree with a major in ”New Media Design for Graphic Communications” is a multi-faceted computer based program designated for students seeking a design career in digital media in the Global marketplace. Students produce designs, symbols, typography, illustrations, photography, video, multimedia, motion graphics, sound, and animation for use in print, web and interactive media. Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the program graduates will be able to: Achieve graphic art computer competencies to communicate ideas for promotion and sales of products for newspapers, magazines, web publications, multimedia and video content providers, ad agencies and manufacturers. Achieve graphic art computer competencies in electronic and digital design technologies for career opportunities in the industry. Achieve graphic art computer competencies in electronic and digital design technologies for career opportunities in the print and prepress industry. Achieve graphic art computer competencies in electronic and digital design technologies for career opportunities in Internet publishing industries as content providers using multimedia, video and animation. Produce a print, PDF, and interactive DVD portfolio of student work for presentation to future employers or for transfer to institutions of higher learning. Transfer to bachelor degree programs at colleges and universities with related fields of study. Complete a progressive framework of courses that increase student computer hardware and software competencies to meet general education core curriculum goals for measurable proficiencies in Technology Applications and Electronic Resources. Provide a progressive framework of courses that use weekly critiques and peer review of design projects that meet general education core curriculum goals for measurable proficiencies in Oral Communication and Teamwork. Admissions Process: Admissions inquiries should be directed to admissions@qcc.mass.edu .Prospective students may apply to the program of their choice by following the enrollment steps at the following link: http://www.qcc.edu/pages/Enrollment_Steps.html CORI, SORI, Finger Printing & Drug Testing: A Criminal Offenders Record Information (CORI) and Sexual Offenders Record Information (SORI) are not required. Finger printing and drug testing are not required. Additional Cost: Students enrolled in the APA program are required to purchase a high quality digital camera for APA 161 http://www.qcc.edu/programs-study/applied-arts[6/6/13 6:04:29 PM]

244


Applied Arts | Quinsigamond Community College (QCC)

Digital Photography. Students are encouraged to purchase a computer (preferably Mac) with related software. Technical Performance Standards: See page 17 in the catalog or the Technical Performance Standards page. Credit for Prior Learning: Students enrolled in this program may be able to earn academic credit for prior learning. Please contact the office of Career Placement Services at careerservices@qcc.mass.edu , 508.854.4439, Room 272 A Career Outlook: Please consult The Massachusetts Career Information System at http://masscis.intocareers.com/ or The Occupational Outlook Handbook at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ for specific occupational information. The CIP code for this program is 11.0803. Transfer Articulations & Opportunities: Prospective students may learn more about transfer articulation agreements at the following link: http://www.qcc.mass.edu/transfer/ArticPathways.html. More information regarding transfer opportunities is available at: http://www.qcc.mass.edu/transfer. Additional Program Information: The APA Program teaches sophisticated design software packages. Course content is kept current with software upgrades in each new academic year. There is a three-year time limit for students to take sequential courses that are prerequisites in the program curriculum. Students who stop out for any reason will then be required to pass software proficiency tests to advance in program course offerings. Department: Programs of Study Curriculum: Course Title

Course Offered #

Plan to Take

Grade Credits

Prerequisites Semester 1

Digital Design Concepts I

APA 114

F/SU

3

ENG 100 or approp place score

Graphic Design I

APA 121

F

3

ENG 100 or approp place score

Digital Imaging and Media

APA 154

F/SU

3

ENG 100 or approp place score

Digital Photography

APA 161

F/S/SU

3

ENG 100 or approp place score

English Composition & Literature I

ENG 101

F/S/SU

3

ENG 100 or approp place score

Digital Design Concepts II

APA 115

S/SU

3

APA 114

Graphic Design II

APA 122

S

3

APA 121

Digital Illustration and Animation

APA 155

S/SU

3

APA 154, APA 161

Website Design I or

APA 181

S

Semester 2

APA 161

http://www.qcc.edu/programs-study/applied-arts[6/6/13 6:04:29 PM]

245


Applied Arts | Quinsigamond Community College (QCC)

Fundamentals of 3D Digital Design

APA 171

Art Theory Elective*

ART --- F/S/SU

3

English Composition & Literature II

ENG 102

3

S

3

F/S/SU

APA 154, APA 161

ENG 101 Semester 3

Publication Design

APA 222

F

3

APA 115, APA 122

Typography

APA 271

F/S

3

APA 115, APA 122

Motion Graphics

APA 275

F

3

APA 154, APA 155

Website Design II or

APA 282

F

Digital Video Fundamentals

APA 263

F

Art Theory Elective*

ART --- F/S/SU

APA 181 3

APA 161

3 Semester 4

Interactive Media Processes Portfolio

APA 286

S

4

APA 275, APA 282

Graphic Production Processes Portfolio

APA 287

S

4

APA 222, APA 271

Liberal Arts Elective**

---

F/S/SU

3

Liberal Arts Elective**

---

F/S/SU

3

Mathematics Elective

---

F/S/SU

3

Total credits required:

65

Program Notes: * ART 101 Art Appreciation, ART 111 History of Art I, ART 112 History of Art II, ART 121 Contemporary Art, ART 211 History of Graphic Design. ** May not have an ART designation. The APA Program is a high demand program and restricts day class offerings to 40 accepted full-time day students per academic year, beginning in the fall semester. Accepted students must register simultaneously for all 4 APA courses required in Semesters 1-3, and for both APA courses required in Semester 4. Early application is recommended. The APA Program teaches sophisticated design software packages. Course content is kept current with software upgrades in each new academic year. There is a three-year time limit for students to take sequential courses that are prerequisites in the program curriculum. Students will then be required to pass software proficiency tests to advance in program course offerings. APA students are strongly encouraged, but not required, to have access to a computer (preferably Mac) with related software. Students enrolled in APA 161 will be required to purchase a digital camera

http://www.qcc.edu/programs-study/applied-arts[6/6/13 6:04:29 PM]

246


Semester Breakdown

Semester 1 Digital Design Concepts I Graphic Design I Digital Imaging and Media Digital Photography English Composition & Literature I

Semester 2 Digital Design Concepts II Graphic Design II Digital Illustration and Animation Website Design I Art Theory Elective English Composition & Literature II

Semester 3 Publication Design Motion Graphics Typography Website Design II Art Theory Elective

Semester 4 Interactive Media Processes Portfolio Graphic Production Processes Portfolio Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective Mathematics Elective

247


Quinsigamond Community College

Applied Arts Course Descriptions Digital Design Concepts I

Course Number: APA 114 This course explores the fundamentals of digital design and its application in two-dimensional space. Students learn the principals and elements of design and color theory to create vector drawing and graphics associated with digital media. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Graphic Design I

Course Number: APA 121 This course introduces fundamentals of design and use of design principles to create forms of graphic communication. It emphasizes problem solving by design, visualization of problems and their solutions, and correlation between forms and their content, function, and context. Students study advertising and related commercial print media and create solutions to design problems. Digital Imaging and Media

Course Number: APA 154 This course introduces the observational and perceptional skills necessary to construct complex and detailed drawings, illustrations, montages, and collages using digital media. Students experiment with line, space, form, volume and color to manipulate and create effects associated with electronic imaging. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Digital Imaging and Media

Course Number: APA 154 This course introduces the observational and perceptional skills necessary to construct complex and detailed drawings, illustrations, montages, and collages using digital media. Students experiment with line, space, form, volume and color to manipulate and create effects associated with electronic imaging. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Digital Design Concepts II

Course Number: APA 115 This course builds on the foundations of Digital Media Design Concepts I. Students expand their knowledge of design, color and light theory relevant to the application of two-dimensional space. They investigate the use of form, line, volume and void using complex concepts in vector drawing and graphics. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware.

248


Graphic Design II

Course Number: APA 122 This course builds on the foundation of APA 121. Topics include using typography effectively in design; visualizing communication problems and solutions; and, the correlation between type forms and content, function, and context. Students expand their understanding of the relationship between formal design and typography and the components of layout, photography, and illustration using InDesign software on the Macintosh operating system. Digital Illustration and Animation

Course Number: APA 155 This course explores illustrative and animation based design processes to create original compositions and narrative styles for digital media production. It introduces cell and timeline computer animation applications to explore concepts of space, motion, and perspective. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Graphic Design II

Course Number: APA 122 This course builds on the foundation of APA 121. Topics include using typography effectively in design; visualizing communication problems and solutions; and, the correlation between type forms and content, function, and context. Students expand their understanding of the relationship between formal design and typography and the components of layout, photography, and illustration using InDesign software on the Macintosh operating system. Website Design I

Course Number: APA 181 This course covers the aspects of a well-designed Web site. Students plan, design, launch, and maintain a Web site using creative interfaces, text formatting, graphic images, functional site organization, and navigation links using Adobe GoLive software on the Macintosh operating system. Fundamentals of 3D Digital Design

Course Number: APA 171 Restriction: All Applied Arts course sections offered before 4:00PM in Spring and Fall semesters are restricted to Applied Arts Majors. Publication Design

Course Number: APA 222 This course examines the fundamentals of publication design with multi-page design concepts. It covers the research, development, organization, and visual presentation of complex printed documents. Comprehensive aspects of design, content and image are addressed. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware.

249


Typography

Course Number: APA 271 This course introduces typographic form and design. It covers fundamental concepts from theoretical, historical, and technological contexts. It emphasizes principles of composition, spacing, and effective typographic expression as it applies to page layout with particular focus on basic letterform design, typesetting, and construction. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Motion Graphics

Course Number: APA 275 This course introduces the theory and practice of motion graphic production by integrating digital animation and interactive multimedia. Students explore creative and narrative aspects of digital imaging, sound, animation, and motion editing effects to produce innovative digital spaces and experiences for web and video presentation. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Website Design II

Course Number: APA 282 This course builds on APA 181. Students plan, design, launch, and maintain a complete Web site with creative interfaces using frames, forms, style sheets, text formatting, and animated graphics with functional site organization and navigation links using Flash MX and Adobe GoLive programming software on the Macintosh operating system. Digital Video Fundamentals

Course Number: APA 263 This course gives students an overview of the theoretical, aesthetic, and practical elements of digital video pre-production, production, and post-production. Through a series of creative exercises, lectures, and classroom critiques, students gain and understanding of the fundamental skills required in storyboarding, scripting, directing, shooting, lighting, and editing digital video productions for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Interactive Media Processes Portfolio

Course Number: APA 286 This capstone course prepares the student to develop a presentation portfolio utilizing the media design processes of an interactive portfolio website and DVD. It covers digital animation, motion graphics, and multimedia for interactive portfolio preparation. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between technical, creative and critical thinking skills as students plan, design, launch and maintain a complete interactive media environment for final portfolio evaluation. Students complete assignments using industry-standard software and hardware. Graphic Production Processes Portfolio APA 286 No course description available.

250


251


Appendix E: Fitchburg State University, Fitchburg, MA

252


SUGGESTED FOUR-YEAR PLAN OF STUDY**

C O M M

INTERACTIVE MEDIA CONCENTRATION *** 2012-2013 COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA DEPARTMENT

Fall Semester COMM 1105 COMM 1120 SOC 1100 ENGL 1100 BIOL 1000 EXSS 1000

Spring Semester Intro to Com & Media Studies OR Message Design Introduction to Sociology Writing I Intro to Life Science Health & Fitness Total Credits

COMM 1105 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

COMM 1120 COMM 3304 ENGL 1200 HIST ART or MUSC

Intro to Com & Media Studies OR Message Design Inter. Media Proj. Design Writing II History An Art OR Music course Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester* COMM 3305 COMM 1xxx MATH 2000 ENGL 2xxx LA&S ELECTIVE

Spring Semester Interactive Media I Phase III Elective Informal Geometry A Literature course A CTW course Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (18)

COMM 3309 COMM 2xxx LA&S LA&S MUSC 2000

Interface Design Phase III Elective An SMT Elective An ARTS Elective Comm.. of the Arts or non-western Global Div. Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester COMM 3306 COMM 4xxx LA&S LA&S COMM xxxx

Spring Semester Interactive Media II Phase IV Elective OR Jr. Writing Requirement Advanced Option Advanced Option Phase III Elective Total Credits

(3) (3)

COMM 3307 COMM 4xxx

(3) (3) (3) (15)

LA&S LA&S ELECTIVE

Interactive Media III Phase IV Elective OR Jr. Writing Requirement Advanced Option Advanced Option Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester COMM 4200 COMM 3380 ELECTIVE ELECTIVE ELECTIVE

Spring Semester Human Communication Game Design Free Elective Free Elective Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

COMM 4880

Internship

(12)

Total Credits

(12)

*

Students should take one 18-credit semester in the first 3½ years as senior spring semester Internship is only 12 credits. An example of an 18-credit semester is shown above in the fall semester, sophomore year.

**

Students need to take LA&S Elective and Free Elective courses to have the required number of credits for graduation 120. For information on the LA & S portion of the degree, see your advisor or please contact Dr. Randy Howe, Department Chairperson Office: Conlon Arts Room 237A, phone: (978) 665-3544, email: rhowe@fitchburgstate.edu

*** Completion of 54 credits of Communication Media courses is required.

253


INTERACTIVE MEDIAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. The course provides an introduction to the history, theory and practice of designing communications for interactive/multimedia environments. Special attention is paid to flowcharting, branching, hierarchy structures, screen design, storyboards, scripting and all aspects of user interface design. Students also consider the roles of learning theory and instructional design as they create design documents for course projects.

COMM 3305 - Interactive Media I 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring. Also offered evenings. Tools and techniques for designing Web-based interactive projects are introduced. Students learn fundamental concepts of Web design, hypertext, digital imaging, animation, and interactivity while building a working knowledge of scripting languages and software, including HTML, CSS, Photoshop, Flash, and ActionScript, to create, edit and author creative multimedia work.

COMM 3306 - Interactive Media II 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring. Students will learn the programming logics of object-oriented scripting, including properties, methods, variables, event listeners, preloaders, and controlling audio & video. Using industry-standard tools such as Adobe Flash & ActionScript, students will draw upon and challenge their previously learned technical and design skills to create projects that focus on different modes of user interactivity. The course is run as a workshop, featuring software/scripting demos, inclass exercises, discussions and rigorous critique of work in-progress.

COMM 3307 - Interactive Media III 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. A study of advanced techniques of authoring, design and production that students apply in sponsored projects. Working in groups of three or four, students simulate a professional design teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production regimen in order to complete an advanced interactive media production of professional portfolio quality. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3304, COMM 3505 and COMM 3306.

COMM 3309 - Interface Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings. This course investigates the design of interactive interfaces for multimedia and World Wide Web presentation. Students explore how the conceptual and aesthetic aspects of graphic design apply specifically to non-linear interactive digital environments. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810, COMM 3880 and COMM 3890.

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ELECTIVES COMM 3308 - Interactive Media Seminar 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. This seminar provides an opportunity to study advanced topics of interactive media design and development. Subjects covered in the seminar may include design and application of game theory, dynamic animation, virtual reality, and programming for an iPhone. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3304, COMM 3305 and COMM 3306.

COMM 3350 - DVD Authoring 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring. DVD-Video is the distribution medium of choice for film/video content, addressing project management, video compression, menu design, interactive authoring, and mastering for the DVD-Video platform. Students will learn and apply skills used by DVD industry professionals in the production of significant DVD projects. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3520, COMM 3521 or COMM 3710.

COMM 3380 - Game Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. Students are introduced to the process of planning and designing the interactive experience of gameplay. Students will develop a critical understanding of the formal, dramatic, and systems elements of games across a wide range of game styles, from board games to video games. Students will build and fine-tune several physical and digital game prototypes, and complete several written assignments, culminating with a design document and prototypes for an original game. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3305

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SUGGESTED FOUR-YEAR PLAN OF STUDY**

C O M M

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCENTRATION *** 2012-2013 COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA DEPARTMENT FRESHMAN YEAR

Fall Semester COMM 1105 COMM 1120 SOC 1100 ENGL 1100 BIOL 1000 EXSS 1000

Spring Semester Intro to Com & Media Studies OR Message Design Introduction to Sociology Writing I Intro to Life Science Health & Fitness Total Credits

COMM 1105 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

COMM 1120 COMM 3810 ENGL 1200 HIST ART or MUSC

Intro to Com & Media Studies OR Message Design Intro to Graphic Design Writing II History An Art OR Music course Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fall Semester* COMM 3890 COMM 1xxx MATH 2000 ENGL 2xxx LA&S ELECTIVE

Spring Semester Computer Graphic Des. Phase III Elective Informal Geometry A Literature course A CTW course Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (18)

COMM 3880 COMM 2xxx LA&S LA&S MUSC 2000

Typography Phase III Elective An SMT Elective An ARTS Elective Comm.. of the Arts or non-western Global Div. Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

JUNIOR YEAR

Fall Semester COMM 3820 COMM 4xxx LA&S LA&S ELECTIVE

Spring Semester Int. Graphic Design Phase IV Elective OR Jr. Writing Requirement Advanced Option Advanced Option Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3)

COMM 3xxx COMM 4xxx

(3) (3) (3) (15)

LA&S LA&S ELECTIVE

Phase III Elective Phase IV Elective OR Jr. Writing Requirement Advanced Option Advanced Option Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

SENIOR YEAR

Fall Semester COMM 4200 COMM 3950 COMM 3xxx ELECTIVE ELECTIVE

Spring Semester Human Communication Adv. Graphic Design Phase III Elective Free Elective Free Elective Total Credits

(3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (15)

COMM 4880

Internship

(12)

Total Credits

(12)

*

Students should take one 18-credit semester in the first 3½ years as senior spring semester Internship is only 12 credits. An example of an 18-credit semester is shown above in the fall semester, sophomore year.

**

Students need to take LA&S Elective and Free Elective courses to have the required number of credits for graduation 120. For information on the LA & S portion of the degree, see your advisor or please contact Dr. Randy Howe, Department Chairperson Office: Conlon Arts Room 237A, phone: (978) 665-3544, email: rhowe@fitchburgstate.edu

*** Completion of 54 credits of Communication Media courses is required.

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GRAPHIC DESIGNâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;COURSE DESCRIPTIONS REQUIRED COURSES COMM 3810 - Introduction to Graphic Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings. The course introduces students to the language of graphic design and develops an understanding of visual literacy and the foundations of design aesthetics. Students become exposed to fundamental design principles including form, tone, color, texture, image and composition. Students are introduced to typography, identity design, sequencing and narrative in design to develop skills with layout and conceptual messages. (Credit is not given for both COMM 3810 and ITEC 2520.)

COMM 3820 - Intermediate Graphic Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings. The process of conceptualization is emphasized through focusing on visual relationships between typography and images. By using a problem solving approach to design, students apply advanced solutions to print and digital design through preparing highly comprehensive layouts. Students explore illustration by combining traditional and digital media and investigate the role of motion and interactivity in graphic design. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810, COMM 3810, COMM 3880 and COMM 3890.COMM 3890 - Computer Graphic Design COMM 3820 - Intermediate Graphic Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings. The process of conceptualization is emphasized through focusing on visual relationships between typography and images. By using a problem solving approach to design, students apply advanced solutions to print and digital design through preparing highly comprehensive layouts. Students explore illustration by combining traditional and digital media and investigate the role of motion and interactivity in graphic design. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810, COMM 3810, COMM 3880 and COMM 3890.

COMM 3890 - Computer Graphic Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. This course educates students in developing a beginning to intermediate-level proficiency with vector-based, raster-based, and page layout applications that are integral to todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s professional design environment. Students will also be exposed to the fields of motion graphics, illustration, and interactive design and learn how to prepare their work for both print and digital output. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810.

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COMM 3950 - Advanced Graphic Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. A range of design problems in both print and digital media will be explored. Projects will realistically reflect the range of work and professional practices designers encounter in their studio, agency or corporate design environment. Issues in pre-press production, professional design practices and ethics are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3820 and COMM 3890.

ELECTIVES COMM 3309 - Interface Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings. This course investigates the design of interactive interfaces for multimedia and World Wide Web presentation. Students explore how the conceptual and aesthetic aspects of graphic design apply specifically to non-linear interactive digital environments. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810, COMM 3880 and COMM 3890.

COMM 3830 - Illustration 3 cr. 3 hr. By concentrating on technical and creative illustration, students have an opportunity for advanced study in graphic design. Students work in various media, including pen and ink, water color, marker and colored pencil. Students are responsible for illustration supplies. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810 and COMM 3890, COMM 3880 and COMM 3890.

COMM 3840 - Graphic Design Portfolio and Practice 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. The course studies the practices of advertising, sales and marketing management in business, industry, and education. Emphasis is placed on the graphic designer in the role of creative art director, production manager and design illustrator. Topics of study include careers in graphic design and portfolio design and preparation. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3820.

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COMM 3850 - Publication Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. The course examines all aspects of publication design focusing on designing with type and combining photography and illustration with text in editorial design, brochures, books, posters and Web page design. Grid design as an organizing and creative principle contrasted with asymmetric design will be emphasized in assignments. Techniques for print production processes will be examined. Portfolio quality pieces are produced in this advanced level course. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3820 and COMM 3890.

COMM 3900 - Graphic Design Photography 3 cr. 3 hr. This course may be offered less than once every two years. The course covers the commercial applications of photography, including product presentation, advertising, illustration, promotion and publication photography. Students learn the role of the designer as a photographer who solves assigned problems using various techniques, including digital photo and image manipulation. Students are responsible for all graphic supplies. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3600 and COMM 3820. COM3910

Graphic Arts Production窶年o longer Available

COMM3920 Digital Imaging窶年o longer Available

COMM 3940 - Motion Graphic Design 3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. Choreography of the movement and transition of images and typography over time and across space is investigated. Students explore a variety of techniques including frame-by-frame animation, keyframe interpolation, and compositing using Adobe AfterEffects and Photoshop. Assignments include storyboarding, kinetic typography, vector-based animation, rotoscoping, and live-action images. Students will explore how these techniques are applied to motion graphics productions in the film, television, and interactive media industries. Prerequisite(s): COMM 3810 and COMM 3890.

259


Appendix E: UMass Lowell, Lowell, MA

260


Fine Arts

Art/Design General Requirements (For students entering Fall 2012)

Freshman Year/Fall Semester 42.101 College Writing I ___ __.__ Gen. Ed. (Mathematics) 70.101 Art Concepts I Studio 70.113 Digital Foundations 70.255 Drawing I

Sophomore Year/Fall Semester 58.203 Survey of Art I (AH, D) __. __ Gen. Ed. (Social Science) __. __ Gen. Ed. Science w/Lab 70.___ Art Concentration 70.___ Art Concentration

Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15

Cr. 3 3 3/4 3 3 15/16

Freshman Year/Spring Semester ___ 42.102 College Writing II ___ __.___ Gen.Ed. (Social Science ___ 70.102 Art Concepts II Studio 70.201 Form and Content 70.355 Drawing II

Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15

Sophomore Year/Spring Semester _58.204 Survey of Art II __. __ Gen. Ed. (Social Science) __.__ Gen. Ed. Science (non-lab) _70.___ Art Concentration _70.___ Art Concentration

Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15

Junior Year/Fall Semester 79.352 Cr.St.-Contemp.Art&Cult ___ __.___ Gen.Ed. (Arts/Humanities) 70.___ Art Concentration 70.___ Art Concentration 70.___ Art Concentration

Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15

Junior Year/Spring Semester ___ 79.361 Cr. St. New Media ___ __.___ Gen. Ed. Science w/Lab ___70.___ Art Concentration ___70.___ Art Concentration ___70.___ Art Concentration

Cr. 3 3/4 3 3 3 15/16

Senior Year/Fall Semester __.___ Gen. Ed. (Arts/Humanities) 70.___ Art Concentration 70.___ Art Concentration ___70.496 Internship ___79.___ Discipl-specific Crit. Studies

Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15

Senior Year/Spring Semester ___70.___ Art Concentration ___70.___ Art Concentration ___79.___ Elective in Critical Studies ___70.497 Senior Studio

Cr. 3 3 3 6 15

Total Minimum Credits = 120 Consult the yellow pages of the Registrarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site regarding General Education (Gen. Ed.) requirements. Please see reverse side for additional information.

Centers for Learning

Advising Center

261

Revised 04/12


Fine Arts

Art/Design

University General Education requirements: 33 credits Required Studio Foundation courses: 6 courses/18 credit hours Freshman Year:

Fall

Spring

70.101 Art Concepts I Studio 70.113 Digital Foundations 70.255 Drawing I

70.102 Art Concepts II Studio 70.201 Form and Content 70.355 Drawing II

Concentration: 15 courses / 45 credit hours Art: 70.259 70.261 70.266 70.267 70.269 70.271 70.273 70.275 70.281 70.298 70.345 70.359 70.361 70.369 70.370 70.371 70.373 70.375 70.461 70.471 70.475 70.492 70.494 70.495 70.496

Papermaking Photography I Alternative Photo Processes Printmaking Color Painting I Water Media Sculpture I Ceramics Book Art Sonic Arts Sculpture II Photography II Monotypes Figure Drawing Painting II Professional Studio Photography The Language of Video Photography III Painting III Sculpture III Advanced Studio Directed Studies Advanced Tutorial Internship (Required in Senior year)

Design: 70.230 70.231 70.262 70.265 70.291 70.365 70.372 70.376 70.377 70.378 70.379 70.381 70.384 70.385 70. 389 70.390 70.391 70.395 70.397 70.490 70.491 70.494 70.495 70.496

Typography I Typography II Digital Imaging and Photography Computer Art I Graphic Design I Computer Art II 2D Animation 3D Animation I 3D Animation II Interactive Media I Web Design I Interactive Media II Web Design II Streaming Media for Web Web Design III Illustration Graphic Design II Advertising Design Art and Copy Graphic Design III Advanced Studio Directed Studies Advanced Tutorial Internship (Required in Senior year)

Art History, Aesthetics and Critical Studies requirement: 6 courses/18 credit hours 58.203 Survey of Art I, Prehistoric to Medieval 58.204 Survey of Art II, Renaissance to Modern 79.352 Aesthetics and Critical Studies of Contemporary Art & Culture 79.361 Aesthetics and Critical Studies of New Media 79.___ Discipline specific Aesthetics and Critical Studies course 79.___ Elective Aesthetics and Critical Studies course Senior Studio requirements: 6 credit hours 70.497 Senior Studio: 6 credit hours (second semester of Senior year – final semester, exhibition required) Senior Studio must be taken with the advice and consent of the student’s academic advisor and of the Senior Studio Review Committee. Students must earn at least a “BC” (2.5 GPA) in Senior Studio. Senior Studio requires an exhibition of work at the completion of the Senior year.

Centers for Learning

Advising Center

262

Revised 04/12


70.230 Typography Credits: 3 The study of lettering concepts and techniques, including the history of letters, styles and families of type, letter design, hand drawn to computer-based lettering approaches and their effect and uses in communication. Emphasis will be on creative and aesthetic communication. Fall, alternate years. 70.231 Typography II Continuation of 70.230

Credits: 3

70.255 Drawing Form and Space Credits: 3 Provides a foundation in basic drawing concepts using a variety of media and approaches. The emphasis is on building visual literacy and its application to the realm of ideas. A wide range of assignments are given to develop graphic expression. 70.262 Digital Imaging and Photography: Photoshop Credits: 3 This course will offer the student a transition between traditional photographic imaging and digital photographic imaging. The course will cover the fundamentals of digital scanning, digital capture and image manipulation. Image preparation for other media will also be explored. Basic familiarity with the Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required. 6 Contact Hours required for Day School students. 70.265 Computer Art I Credits: 3 An aesthetics and communications course using the computer as the primary tool for translating art ideas into physical form. The emphasis will be on practical usages of existing Macintosh software as a means of creation. 70.291 Graphic Design I Credits: 3 Exercises, lectures and projects will introduce students to graphic design principles and techniques. Course will begin with a fundamental study of image, form, and space relations, then cover such topics as working with grids, typography basics, page layout, the introduction of color, rendering techniques, history, and more. Students will be assigned a series of projects to enhance their visual communication skills. 70.365 Computer Art II Credits: 3 Designed to focus on advanced projects using the Macintosh platform. Focus is on design, layout, animation and video. 70.378 Interactive Media Credits: 3 This course will introduce the student to the processes of game conceptualization and game prototyping. Immersive and interactive media will be explored. Interactive, engaging game design will be emphasized. Conceptual drawings, storyboarding, 3D modeling and multimedia authoring will be employed. Proficiency in 3D model building and familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required. 70.379 Website Design Credits: 3 This course will focus on the creation of visual content for the web and will explore what constitutes a visually exciting and engaging site. Other topics that will be covered are: file formats, compression, web color strategies, and platform standards. Basic familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required. 70.381 Advanced Game Design Credits: 3 This advanced level course is designed for students who have completed Interactive Game Design and who are interested in exploring interactive game strategies and multilevel game design. Basic familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required. 70.384 Advanced Web Design Credits: 3 This advanced level course is designed for students who have completed Website Development (90.238) and Website Design (70.379). The course will cover advanced topics such as user-centered design, information architecture, testing, and usage analysis. Students will have the opportunity to further develop their design, development, and conceptualization skills.

263


70.385 Streaming Media for the Web Credits: 3 This is an advanced course for those with intermediate or advanced ability in World Wide Web technology who want to explore the use of continuous feed, streaming audio, video, and 3D virtual worlds. The course will examine current technologies with special attention to emerging protocols and standards for audio and video publishing. Basic familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required. 70.389 Web Design III No description available

Credits: 3

70.390 Illustration Studio Credits: 3 This course provides students with a variety of experiences involving skills and techniques including computer use related to the execution of illustrations for children's books, fashion drawings, record albums, book jackets, folders, posters, and magazines. Field trips, discussions related to job opportunities and preparation of portfolios are integral parts of the instruction. Fall. 70.391 Graphic Design II Credits: 3 Students will be assigned a variety of advanced-level projects dealing with areas such as logo design, publication design, interactive screen design, direct mail projects, corporate identity systems, poster design, and more. Projects in this class are designed to better develop the students' ability to take a project to its final stage and render it as a professional portfolio piece. 70.395 Advertising Design Studio Credits: 3 Instruction in lettering, layout of commercial media as well as in the creative aspects of advertising is an integral part of the course. Practical problems, field trips, and technical guidance from preliminary layouts to finished work will help prepare students for the commercial art field. Spring. 70.397 Art and Copy Credits: 3 The real world of advertising incorporates selling words and memorable images in a dynamic visual/verbal design unit. As copywriters and art directors, students learn to think pictures and see words as they prepare advertising campaign concepts for a variety of products and media, including print and television. Spring, alternate years. 70.490 Graphic Design III No description available

Credits: 3

70.491 Advanced Studio Credits: 3 In order to enable students to expand expression in areas of their choice, they may repeat any studio course that is the most advanced offered in that given subject. They will be given more freedom within assignments and be expected to perform on a more advanced level. 70.494 Directed Study Credits: 3 A special problem in studio art is investigated through conferences and studio work. 70.495 Advanced Tutorial Credits: 3 A program of directed studies which affords the advanced students an opportunity to pursue a previously explored problem in greater depth. The purpose is to sharpen and refine skill, content and presentation. 70.496 Practicum/Internship Credits: 3 The Practicum/Internship is an on-campus or off-campus learning experience. Specific requirements will vary depending on department policies and the nature of the program undertaken by the student. The practicum experience is to provide an occasion for practical experience in an area of particular interest to the student.

264


265


Appendix E: Becker College, Worcester, MA

266


69

Division of Undergraduate Studies Design Programs - Bachelor of Arts The Design Programs offer the Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Arts in Design with concentrations in Interior Design and Graphic Design, and a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Arts in Interactive Entertainment with concentrations in Game Design and Game Development and Programming. Each concentration equips students with a broad range of marketable skills and a strong general education foundation upon which a lifelong, successful career can be built. Whichever concentration a student chooses in the Design degree programs, students can be assured of small classes with attentive, knowledgeable faculty, up-to-date equipment, and plenty of room to explore personal visions. Upon graduation, students will have the right technical skills, a firm theoretical base, opportunities for career internships, and a strong portfolio as solid evidence of their abilities.

Bachelors of Arts in Design The Bachelor of Arts in Design degree offers two areas of concentration: Graphic Design and Interior Design. Each concentration which comprises the Bachelor of Arts in Design degree equips students with a broad range of marketable skills and a strong general education foundation upon which a lifelong, successful career can be built. Course selections in the Interior and Graphic Design concentrations include both a solid grounding in the fine and visual arts, and hands-on practical core courses which stress the understanding of the underlying design processes and concept development. Students will learn firsthand how to create effective visual communication; how to develop and communicate design solutions; and how to create, capture and manipulate both traditional and new media design elements. All this is offered in a clear manner in keeping with the professional standards of their chosen field of study.

Graphic Design Concentration In this 4 year undergraduate program which results in the awarding of a Bachelor of Arts in Design with a concentration in Graphic Design, students complete a core of required art foundation and graphic design coursework. As upperclassmen, they may then pursue a block of coursework in advanced studies that is customizable to their individual interests and career goals. In addition, all students complete coursework in the liberal arts, the social sciences, and the laboratory sciences in keeping with the long-standing traditions of a liberal arts-based college degree. Students can further customize their curricula through internships, general elective coursework and free electives. The program seeks to impart to its students strong technical competence in fundamental arts principles along with specialized competence in the tools needed to be successful in the graphic design field. At the same time the program seeks to nourish a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative talents through opportunities for internships, electives and special projects, developing in the student a personal aesthetic as well as a high standard of individual excellence and professionalism.

267


70

Freshman Year

ARTS2300 Color Theory ARTS1003 Art History I ARTS1301 Principles of Design ACAD1001 First Year Experience ENGL1001 English Composition I INFO1001 Technology and Society

Credit Hours 3 3 3 2 3 3 17

Spring Semester ARTS1004 Art History II ARTS1100 Principles of Drawing ENGL1003 Writing about Literature MATH Math Elective GRPH 2110 Typography

Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 15

Sophomore Year Fall Semester PSYC1001 Introduction to Psychology GRPH2140 Graphic Design I GRPH2120 Techniques of Vector Imaging GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging Elective (Science/lab)

Credit Spring Semester Hours 3 MKTG2101 Advertising

Credit Hours 3

3 3

ENGL2003 Public Speaking GRPH2150 Graphic Design II

3 3

3

GRPH2170 Principles of Digital Imaging Elective (Science/lab)

3

4 16

4 16

Junior Year Fall Semester GRPH2180 Flash Animation GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design SOCI1001 Introduction to Sociology GRPH3120 Publication Design GRPH3130 Advertising Design

Credit Spring Semester Hours 3 GRPH3110 Advanced Web Design 3 GRPH3140 Package Design 3 3 3 15

Math Elective (2000+) Humanities/SS Elective Open Elective

268

Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 15


71

Senior Year

GRPH4520 Senior Team Project GRPH4530 Professional Practices in Design GRPH4400 Advanced Topics in Design Humanities Elective Open Elective

Credit Spring Semester Hours 3 GRPH4510 Design Portfolio 3 GRPH4210 Special Projects in Design or 3 Open Elective 3 3

GRPH4300 Career Internship or GRPH Elective Humanities Elective (Non-Western) Humanities Elective

15 Total Credits:

Credit Hours 3 3

3 3 3 15 124

Graphic Design Electives include:   

GRPH4215 Corporate Design GRPH4220 Advanced Digital Photography GRPH3702 Advanced Advertising Design

Interior Design Concentration In this 4 year undergraduate program which results in the awarding of a Bachelor of Arts in Design with a concentration in Interior Design, the classic building blocks of traditional design are paired with contemporary ideas and applications. The program is unique, comprehensive, and academically supportive, featuring a strong creative liberal arts focus combined with business and professional courses. Students acquire the necessary tools to succeed in a profession which combines aesthetics, space planning, and business acumen. Other areas studied include the global history and development of architecture, interiors and furnishings. Students become proficient in areas such as: Principles of Interior Design, Drafting, Building Systems, Residential Design, Contract Design, Decorative Arts, CAD, Lighting, and Textiles. Freshman Year Fall Semester ARTS1003 Art History I ARTS1301 Principles of Design ACAD1001 First Year Experience ENGL1001 English Composition I INFO1001 Technology and Society Math 1000 Level

Credit Hours 3 3 2 3 3 3 17

Spring Semester ARTS1004 GRPH1900 INDS1306 ARTS1100 ARTS1401

269

Art History II Digital Presentation Drafting Principles of Drawing 3D Design

Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 15


170 GOVT1109 State and Local Government 3 cr. An analysis of state and local government institutions in the United States with emphasis on structure, function, policies, and recurrent political problems of these institutions. GOVT3001 Political Theory 3 cr. This course analyzes political thought throughout history and its impact on government and society. Students will be exposed to the work of theorists such as Plato, Socrates, Machiavelli, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Locke, Jefferson, and others who have influenced political thought. GOVT4100 American Constitutional Law 3 cr. An introduction to the complex processes involved with the development of constitutional doctrine in the United States. Students will study the major cases and Supreme Court decisions that serve as the principle vehicle for constitutional elaboration, adaptation and change. Prerequisite: GOVT1108. GRPH1900 Digital Presentation 3 cr. This course will be a combination of several applications, such as Photoshop, In Design, and Illustrator, to help the interior design students improve their font choices, layout skills, and photo manipulation for presentation purposes. GRPH2104 Graphic Design I - see GRPH2140 Graphic Design I GRPH2105 Graphic Design II - see GRPH2150 Graphic Design II GRPH2110 Typography 3 cr. (Previously GRPH 3400 Typography) This course is an exploration of typography, both the history of type and the importance of typography in the design process. Students will learn the history of typography from the origin of the alphabet and the invention of movable type, to the new and modern computer generated fonts. Students will create a variety of projects ranging from the abstract, using basic letter forms, shapes and structures, to the practical designing posters, logos, typographic grids, structures and more! Students will brainstorm ideas through discussion and thumbnail sketches. Most projects will be completed using Adobe Illustrator. GRPH2120 Techniques of Vector Imaging 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2205 Electronic Illustration) This course introduces the student to vector imaging using Adobe Illustrator to create digital illustrations. The course content will focus on drawing in the vector format using the pen and brush, making paths, masks and gradients to use as illustrations for design projects. The course will also emphasize typography as an illustrative device as well as various techniques and tools used in the creation of line art and color illustrations. GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2600 Electronic Graphic Design) This course introduces the student to the process of creating and designing with Raster images using Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn the scanning process and the importance of file sizes and resolution. The course focus will be on preparing photographic images for print and web applications and the different needs of each medium. Students will learn to adjust color, work in layers, create masks, use brushes and filters and appropriate color management for print (CMYK) and web (RGB).

270


171 GRPH2140 Graphic Design I 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2104 Graphic Design I) The Graphic Design core sequence consists of two courses which introduce the student to concepts and facets of the design process from inception to finished product. Each course presents a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills that will prepare the student to enter and succeed in the professional Graphic Design field. Graphic Design I introduces the student to the history of the graphic arts. The student will learn the art, craft and skill sets needed for design, layout and production in the ever-changing world of graphic design. Manual techniques will be the foundation of the study of graphic design. Problem solving exercises using visual expression will teach the students to communicate on the graphic level. Prerequisites: GRPH 2110; GRPH 2120 or concurrent. GRPH2150 Graphic Design II 3 cr. (Previously GRPH2105 Graphic Design II) Graphic Design II is a continuation of GRPH2140 Graphic Design I. This course is a combination of the theoretical knowledge and practical skills which introduces the student to concepts and facets of the design process from inception to finished product using Adobe InDesign. The course will teach students problem-solving exercises and the understanding of exactly how to communicate ideas graphically. This course develops the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s understanding of language and terminology in electronic image assembly and electronic prepress. The student will learn how to prepare fonts, images, and documents for printing, including bleeds, trapping, and the usage of spot (Pantone, Toyo, etc.) colors. Prerequisites: GRPH 2130 & GRPH2140. GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design 3cr. (Previously COMM3300 Introduction to Web Design) In this course, students learn Dreamweaver, the industry standard program for web site design and production. The course will emphasize the design process from need analysis and concept creation to creating a full web site. The course covers the design and construction of Web pages and sites, with an emphasis on the design, content, storyboarding, communication and navigation processes. GRPH2170 Principles of Digital Imaging 3 cr. (Previously ARTS2500) This course introduces students to the basics of image acquisition, photographic techniques, and digital processes. Through shooting assignments and hands-on computer lab work, the students concentrate on taking the image while learning creative control and visual skills, preparing project files and outputting them to print. The students will produce a wide range of work to be used in a professional presentation. Students are required to own or have access to a camera. Prerequisite: none GRPH2180 Flash Animation 3 cr. (Previously COMM3503) This course will focus on the cross-over of the basic principles of animation, motion perception, and design for the digital medium. An introduction to the techniques used in traditional animation, including conceptualization, planning, sketching, and cell creation will provide the necessary backbone for this courseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emphasis on digital 2D animation for internet communication. Students will learn how to create computer based graphics for use within digital animation software. Prerequisites: GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging. GRPH2205 Electronic Illustration - see GRPH2130 Techniques of Vector Imaging GRPH2600 Electronic Graphic Design 3 cr. This course introduces the student to the process of bringing graphic design onto the computer platform. It briefly reviews the traditional layout and mechanical processes to familiarize the student with the basic procedure and terminology used in the printing process.

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172 A review and further exploration of page layout program, Quark XPress, will combine with advanced instruction on the other design standard software applications, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. How they work together and individually to produce finished files for printed material including stationery, product fact sheets, newsletters and multiple page brochures will be emphasized. Additionally, the student will be introduced to Adobe Acrobat and its Portable Document Format (PDF), used to create high-quality, low-memory emailable files from final Quark/Illustrator/Photoshop files for client review and approval. Final files will be prepared for printing. (Students who need this course should take GRPH2130 Techniques of Raster Imaging). GRPH3104 Graphic Design III - see GRPH3120 Publication Design GRPH3110 Advanced Web Design 3cr. (Previously COMM3305 Advanced Web Design) This course is a continuation of GRPH2160 Introduction to Web Design. The students will construct XHTML pages and use CSS to format and build the pages using the new template engine in DMX. The student will also learn how to incorporate audio and video files, JavaScript rollovers, and libraries and create dynamic interactive web pages. The dynamic integration between Dreamweaver and Fireworks will also be covered. Prerequisites: GRPH2160. GRPH3120 Publication Design 3 cr. (Previously GRPH3104 Graphic Design III) Advanced production of multi-page documents, such as: books, newsletters, annual reports and magazines. This course will teach students to solve problems dealing with page flow, multi-page layouts and advanced techniques of the page layout software, Adobe InDesign. This course will also emphasize advanced pre-press skills to pre-flight and package their finished designs for commercial print. Prerequisite: GRPH 2150 GRPH3130 Advertising Design 3 cr. (Previously GRPH3700 Advertising Design) This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of advertising design and demonstrates the creative usage of words and images in effective print communications as created by an advertising agency art director. The course focuses on the creative process, on problem solving, concept development, and on the relationship between the designer, the art director, the client, and the consumer. The student will learn audience definition, client relationships, product positioning, creative strategy, and presentation skills. Emphasis will be placed on print media such as: newspaper, magazine, billboard, d/mail and P.O.P. In-class discussions will include the principles of design, and how they are applied as a driving force in designing and executing advertising concepts. Prerequisite: GRPH2150 GRPH3140 Package Design 3cr. (Previously GRPH3502 Electronic Pre-Press)) This advanced design course examines the field of package design. Students will work from concept to finished product, combining their pre-press and production knowledge to create folds, tabs and die cut designs for packaging. This course will focus on the unique problems of package design by working with students hands-on to create concepts and package designs for products. They will construct 3-D facsimiles of their designs, focusing on function and innovation. Prerequisite: GRPH 3120 GRPH3400 Typography - see GRPH2110 Typography GRPH3502 Electronic Pre-Press 3cr. This course further develops the students understanding of language and terminology in electronic image assembly and electronic pre-press. The student will learn how to prepare fonts, images, and documents for printing, including bleeds, trapping, and the usage of spot

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173 (Pantone, Toyo, etc.) colors. Particular emphasis will be placed on file preparation, preflighting, and compiling a single folder to be compressed and sent to print. Students will learn these skills using professional-level software including Quark XPress outputting module, Adobe InDesign, Acrobat, Illustrator, and Photoshop. Prerequisites: GRPH2105. (Students who need this course should take GRPH3140 Package Design). GRPH3700 Advertising Design - see GRPH3130 Advertising Design GRPH3702 Advanced Advertising Design 3cr. This advanced course will continue to develop the basic skills learned in GRPH3130 Advertising Design I. Emphasis will be placed on individual project research, creative interpretation, conceptual development, and final project production. This course is offered as an GRPH elective for those students who wish to expand their focus in designing for the advertising industry offering the student the opportunity to learn TV storyboarding as he/she designs TV campaigns as part of the overall advertising mix. Prerequisite: GRPH3130 GRPH4100 Information Design 3 cr. This course is a hands-on study of the graphic organization and the clear and effective presentation of information as used in the corporate environment. Corporate Design involves a multi-and inter-disciplinary approach to graphic communications, combining skills and knowledge from graphic design, art history, psychology, communication theory and cultural studies. In this course, specific emphasis will be placed on the research, analysis, creation, and roll-out of a corporate identity system that includes the design and production of the corporate logo, stationary, packaging, web, signage and various collateral materials. Prerequisite: GRPH3104, GRPH3502. (Students who need this course should take GRPH4215 or GRPH4400). GRPH4210 Special Projects in Design 3cr. This course allows students who wish to pursue in-depth various graphic design topics such as: theoretical, experimental or practical studies in cutting edge subjects. An advanced course for students to tackle modern or advanced ideas in design that are beyond the scope of the course offerings to create finished designs in the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s professional interests. Course will emphasize critical thinking and originality. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design GRPH4215 Corporate Design 3cr. This course is a hands-on study of the graphic organization and the clear and effective presentation of information as used in the corporate environment. Corporate Design involves a multi-and inter-disciplinary approach to graphic communications, combining skills and knowledge from graphic design, art history, psychology, communication theory and cultural studies. In this course, specific emphasis will be placed on the research, analysis, creation, and roll-out of a corporate identity system that includes the design and production of the corporate logo, stationary, packaging, web, signage and various collateral materials. Prerequisite: GRPH 3130

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174 GRPH4300 Career Internship 3 cr. The junior or senior student is required to pursue an internship with a local professional design firm in which the student can apply his/her academic experience to the professional working environment. The student intern works under the supervision and guidance of a faculty member in partnership with the student business supervisor. Bi-weekly, on-campus meetings between the student and design advisor will assure that the student is fulfilling his/her course and business obligations. A Career Internship form is required and is available at the Registrar’s office, to be filled out for approval. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design GRPH4220 Advanced Digital Photography 3 cr. This course will offer students interested in photography and Adobe Photoshop the opportunity to advance their skills in these areas. The course will focus on the expanding field of digital photography where students will learn skills in Photoshop to create brushes, work with channels, layers, color management, filters and image retouching and manipulation. Students will create work for fine art and commercial applications. Prerequisite: GRPH2170. GRPH4400 Advanced Topics in Design 3 cr. Courses offered under the designation Special Topics may represent emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the curriculum. Each special topics course has a course description which is archived at http://www.becker.edu/pages/1193/.asp. Student may take course multiple times to earn credit for a different topic. GRPH4510 Design Portfolio 3 cr. In this course the student, working with a design faculty member, creates and produces his/her own individual portfolio which highlights the student‘s competence, knowledge, and proficiency in his/her individual chosen field or area of interest. In addition, the student will work with Becker College‘s Career Services office in the development of his/her job search strategy including creating a PPT presentation of their portfolio, using a portfolio as a marketing tool, preparing resumes and cover letters, developing interviewing skills and professional presentation techniques. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design GRPH 4520 Senior Team Project 3 cr. The STP course involves students working together as teams with local area clients on realworld projects. Student teams will work closely and interact with their assigned client to provide graphic design, web-site design and more. Supervised by design program faculty; the teams will be responsible for the design and production of the work requested by the client. The course will focus on the skills of team management and cooperation which are essential for working on a design team. Prerequisite: Jr. Status in Graphic Design GRPH4530 Professional Practices in Graphic Design 3cr. This course is specifically focused on the student’s ability to manage their design work flow and prepare them for real business practices. Students will learn to create job tickets, calculate and prepare job estimates, fill out copyright forms, compile contracts and prepare final design bills. The class emphasizes skills necessary for working with design firms or as a self-employed graphic designer. Students will also prepare self-promotional materials, portfolio presentations and sales pitches to further prepare them for their professional careers.

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Appendix E: Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, NH

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Graphic Communications

The Franklin Pierce Difference Graphic designers use visual media to convey a message, most often for business applications such as advertising, brand identity and internet messaging. The Graphic Communications curriculum at FPU combines a liberal arts education with specialized preparation for careers in the graphic communication field. The curriculum starts with a foundation in the elements and principles of design, and then focuses on production and the practical application of design in a corporate environment. Students gain proficiency with the Adobe Creative Suite on Macintosh computers in a new lab that includes a digital CMYK printer. This major maintains strong ties with the University’s Fine Arts, Marketing & Advertising programs. Faculty help students become well-rounded designers who can create a strong concept and carry it through to production. Graduates are employed in fields such as product packaging, marketing and advertising.

Course Details Coursework includes such topics as graphic design, production for the printing processes, drawing, typography, photography, illustration and web design. Each student must also complete an internship. A course in portfolio development is also offered; skills such as this benefit our students as they seek employment after graduation and begin to promote their work throughout their careers.

What can I do with a major in Graphic Communications? Graphic designers use images to inform, educate or influence audiences, customers and consumers. Graduates have a range of skills that blend creativity with technical skills. Graphic designers can work in large companies, in multimedia firms or as in-house professionals. More than 25% of graphic designers are self-employed. Designers are skilled at understanding the impact of a strong visual message and are able to translate the wishes of their client into a concrete product. Typical skills, interests and values • Familiarity with field specific technologies and software • Attention to detail and organization skills • Artistic and creative skills • Ability to work in groups or independently • Problem-solving and collaboration skills • Ability to work under tight deadlines and with frequent changes • Strong business acumen and customer service skills • Experience or interest in illustration, photography or interactive media • Interest in learning new techniques to stay cutting edge

of the scale. Art Director: $51,000–$102,000, Graphic Designer: $35,000–$57,000, Photographer: $17,000–$63,000, Scientific Artist: $38,000–$47,000, Web Designer: $54,000– $72,000 Significant points • Employment is expected to grow about as fast as the average, with many new jobs associated with interactive media • Jobseekers are expected to face keen competition; individuals with web site design and animation experience will have the best opportunities Strategies for success • Earn good grades • Assemble an impressive portfolio • Create an on-line portfolio • Complete an internship • Join professional associations as a student member. • Volunteer to create brochures, newsletters or other publications for campus organizations • Develop skills in areas such as writing, mass communication, photography, video, web design, business, marketing and/or public speaking

Typical salary ranges Entry level salaries are typically at the lower end

An education that matters.

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Career options (may require additional education) Advertising Artist, Animator, Architectural Graphic Artist, Art Director, Book Illustrator, Branding Developer, Calligrapher, Cartoonist, Catalog Illustrator, Communications Specialist, Computer Technician, Consumer Products Designer, Copywriter, Corporate Image Designer,Design Manager, Design Researcher, Digital Media Designer, Exhibition Designer, Film Special Effects Artist, Flash Designer, Furniture Designer, Graphic Designer, Identity Designer, Illustrator, Industrial Designer, Interactive Media Designer, Magazine Designer, Marketing Specialist, Multimedia Designer, Newspaper Designer, Packaging Designer, Photographer, Professor, Storyboard Artist, Television Graphics Designer, Textile Designer, Trademark Designer, TV Graphic Designer, Video Game Designer, Web Designer, Web Administrator Sources of additional information: FPU Career Services Office, American Institute of Graphic Art (AIGA), Animation Guild, Freelance Graphic Design, Graphic Artist Guild, Graphic Design Resource Center, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Professional Photographers of America, Society for Publications Designers


Graphic Communications

Major Requirements In addition to the general education curriculum, Graphic Communications majors are required to complete the following 16 courses: CIT232 Web Design and Development FA101 Two-Dimensional Design FA201 Drawing I FA211 Creative Photography I FA286 Modern and Contemporary Art & Design GC201 Graphic Design I GC272 Computer Graphic Design I GC302 Graphic Design II GC303 Graphic Design III GC321 Typography GC341 Illustration or GC/MC376 Animation Fundamentals GC350 Graphic Production GC367 Commercial Photography I GC404 Graphic Design IV GC491 Introduction to Internship GC492 Internship Capstone Recommended electives: CIT102 Intro. to Information Technology FA102 Three-Dimensional Design FA302 Drawing II FA303 Drawing III FA304 Drawing IV FA312 Creative Photography II FA313 Creative Photography III FA314 Creative Photography IV FA___ Art Studio Course FA___ Art History Period Course GC227 Calligraphy I GC261 Color Photography Workshop I GC230 Photo Manipulation GC320 Book Design GC328 Calligraphy II GC362 Color Photography Workshop II GC368 Commercial Photography II GC472 Computer Graphic Design II MC100 Communication, Media and Society MK201 Principles of Marketing

Faculty Richard Block B.A., Harpur College of the State University of New York at Binghamton, M.F.A., Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts, Bard College Robert E. Diercks B.F.A., Maryland Institute College of Art, M.A., University of New Mexico, M.F.A., Pennsylvania State University Jay Hill B.F.A., M.F.A., University of Utah Affiliated Faculty: Heather Tullio B.A., Wesleyan University, M.A., University of Iowa, M.F.A., University of Massachusetts at Amherst Senior Lecturer: Katherine Coker-Cronin A.A., Foothill College, B.A., San Francisco State University, M.F.A., Norwich University Lecturers: Al Karevy, Coni Porter The academic catalog is viewable at franklinpierce.edu/ catalog. For more information or to arrange a campus visit, please contact the Admissions Office at (800) 437-0048.

40 University Drive, Rindge, NH 03461 • franklinpierce.edu

Co-curricular Opportunities • The Graphic Design Club works closely with the Graphic Communications Department in designing advertisements for various clubs and departments on campus. Club members work closely with their clients, learning to meet deadlines and achieve results, and gaining experience to succeed in the work force. • Students experience field trips to industry related businesses such as printing presses and the Monadnock paper mill in nearby Bennington, N.H. (one of the most eco-friendly mills in the world). A studio tour of major design firms and ad agencies is a part of the internship sequence.

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Student Success • Franklin Pierce currently has students running successful freelance businesses as well as working for companies such as ESPN, Red Tettemer and Marketing Drive, LLC among others. • Students have completed internships at places like Madison Square Garden, the Tampa Bay Rays baseball franchise, Graphic Design USA magazine, Toth Brand Imaging and others. These have provided students with valuable professional experiences and resume building opportunities.


T H E C O L L E G E AT R I N D G E HS229 HS233 BI235 ES240 IEC261 EN270 AN311 AN314 ET323 AN323 HS326 IEC330 SO340 MC341 ET357 HS362 PO362 HS364 IB364 MK365 AN412 BA420 AN423

19th & 20th Century Europe Modern Middle East Human Health & Nutrition Creating Sustainable Communities Twentieth Century Greece Women Writers Museum Studies Peoples and Cultures of Oceania Comparative Economic Systems Anthropology of Religion The Soviet Union Comparative Global Media Systems Religion and Society Media and Culture Economic Development China and the Modern World Nuclear Weapons and World Modern Japan The Global Economy International Marketing Peoples and Cultures of Europe World Business and Finance Anthropology of Public Health

Graphic Communications (GC) PROFESSORS: Richard Block, Robert E. Diercks LECTURER: Al Karevy, Coni Porter

A Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in Graphic Communications. A major and a minor are offered in Graphic Communications. The mission of the Graphic Communications Department is to graduate students who are visual communicators educated within the context of the liberal arts. The program pro-‐ vides the opportunity to study the visual, historical, conceptual and technical aspects of the discipline including the philosophies, theories, and terminology of design. Students develop analytical and problem solving skills that enable unique, innovative, and effective solutions to contemporary design problems. The department seeks to create life-‐long learners and leaders who aspire to the highest standards of personal and social responsibility within their societies. In order to fulfill graduation requirements, students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00, a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in an academic major, and complete 120 credits. In addition, in order to complete minor or certificate programs, students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in those programs. The major in Graphic Communications combines a basic liberal arts education with specialized preparation for a career in the field. Emphasis is placed on fine arts, graphicde-‐ sign, and production throughout the four-‐year program, areas necessary for entry into the profession of graphic communications. Departmental Honors in Graphic Communications are awarded students achieving a 3.25 grade point average in required major courses. High Honors are awarded those achiev-‐ ing a grade point average of 3.50 or above in required major courses.

Major Requirements The following 16 courses are required for a major in Graphic Communications (in addi-‐ tion to the General and Liberal Education Curriculum): 131

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T H E C O L L E G E AT R I N D G E CIT232 Web Design and Development FA101 Two-‐Dimensional Design FA201 Drawing I FA211 Creative Photography I FA286 Modern and Contemporary Art & Design GC201 Graphic Design I GC272 Computer Graphic Design I GC302 Graphic Design II

GC303 Graphic Design III GC321 Typography GC341 Illustration or GC/MC376 Animation Fundamentals GC350 Graphic Production GC367 Commercial Photography I GC404 Graphic Design IV GC491 Introduction to Internship GC492 Internship Capstone

Recommended Electives: CIT102 FA102 FA302 FA303 FA304 FA312 FA313 FA314 FA____ FA____

Intro. to Information Technology Three-‐Dimensional Design Drawing II Drawing III Drawing IV Creative Photography II Creative Photography III Creative Photography IV Art Studio Course Art History Period Course

Calligraphy I Calligraphy II Book Design Color Photo Color Photo Commercial Photography II Computer Graphic Design II Communication, Media and Society MK201 Principles of Marketing GC227 GC328 GC320 GC261 GC362 GC368 GC472 MC100

Required for Graduation:

120 semester hours, including the General and Liberal Education Curriculum. The normal course load is 15–16 credits per semester. Transfer students should refer to the residency requirement section of the catalog.

Recommended Curriculum Guide

For further details regarding general education requirements specified below, refer to the “Recommended General Education Curriculum Guide,” p. 124. First Year Fall Semester GLE101 First Year Inquiry Seminar GLE110 First Year Composition I MT___ General Education Mathematics or _____General Education FA101 Two-‐Dimensional Design GC201 Graphic Design I

Spring Semester GLE120 First Year Composition II _____ Elective MT___ General Education Mathematics or _____General Education Elective FA201 Drawing I GC272 Computer Graphic Design I

Sophomore Year Fall Semester FA211 Creative Photography GC302 Graphic Design II** _____ General Education Lab Science I _____ General Education Elective _____ General Education Elective **May be taken in the fall or the spring semester

Spring Semester FA286 Modern & Contemporary Art & Design GC321 Typography** _____ General Education Lab Science II _____ General Education Elective _____ General Education Elective

Note: By University policy, students must make a minimum standard of progress toward the completion of general education requirements by the end of the Sophomore Year, in order to achieve Junior Standing for course registration purposes. See “Recommended General Education Curriculum Guide,” p. 124.

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T H E C O L L E G E AT R I N D G E Junior Year Fall Semester GC341 Illustration or GC/MC376 Animation I GC491 Introduction to Internship _____ General Education Elective _____ Elective* _____ Elective

Spring Semester GC350 Graphic Production GC367 Commercial Photography I GC303 Graphic Design III _____ General Education Elective _____ Elective*

Senior Year Spring Semester Fall Semester GC404 Graphic Design IV CIT232 Web Design & Development _____ Elective GC492 Internship Capstone _____ Elective* _____ Elective _____ Elective _____ Elective _____ Elective _____ Elective *One or more additional electives may be needed to fulfill general education requirements. See “Guide,” p. 124.

Minor Requirements A minimum of seven courses is required for the minor. Two Fine Arts courses FA101 Two-‐Dimensional Design and either: FA201 Drawing I or FA211 Creative Photography I Four Graphic Communications courses GC201 Graphic Design I GC321 Typography GC302 Graphic Design II GC350 Graphic Production At least one additional Graphic Communications elective: GC227 Calligraphy I GC320 Book Design GC261 Color Photography Workshop I GC341 Illustration GC272 Computer Graphics I GC367 Commercial Photography I GC303 Graphic Design III GC376 Animation Fundamentals

Graphic Communications Curriculum GC201 Graphic Design I 3 credits An introduction to the basic concepts of graphic communications, with emphasis on the creative process and use of tools and techniques. GC227 Calligraphy I 3 credits An introductory study of the history and practice of letters. Four basic styles: Roman Capitals, Carolingian, Gothic Manuscript, and Italic are covered. The emphasis is on well drawn, well proportioned letters, page design, and proper spacing. GC230 Basic Digital Photo Manipulation 3 credits This course is Adobe Photoshop specific. The goal is to introduce the student to the basics of digital manipulation using Photoshop. The course will clarify the concepts of resolution and pixels as well as the effects of scaling and manipulating digital images, then introduce to the student some of the techniques that the pros use when altering images digitally. GC261 Color Photography Workshop I 3 credits Students learn to expose color film in the field, develop it in the darkroom, and make contact and enlargement prints. Color negative and color reversal processes. Prerequisite: FA211 suggested. GC272 Computer Graphic Design I 3 credits The application and use of microcomputers for the creation and manipulation of graphic 133

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T H E C O L L E G E AT R I N D G E images. Emphasis will be on industry-‐standard Adobe Creative Suite software (Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign) along with additional study of other application possibilities for computers in the graphic arts field. Prerequisite: Suggested GC201 or permission of instructor. GC302 Graphic Design II 3 credits Development of students planning to be designers. Application of design principles to reflect the range of assignments in a studio, agency, or in-‐house design situation. Students will start on the creation of an ongoing portfolio. Work created in this class as well as in other classes will be analyzed for inclusion. Prerequisite: GC201 and GC272 or permission of instructor. GC303 Graphic Design III 3 credits Advanced development for design majors. Course includes critical analysis of scholarly writ-‐ ings, design history and current industry trends. Projects draw from industry segments such as environmental design, exhibit design, point of purchase, information design and green design (sustainability, soy ink, recycled paper, reused items), etc. Development of work for final portfolio ongoing. Prerequisite: GC302, GC321 or permission of instructor. FA211 suggested. GC320 Book Design 3 credits A studio seminar and lecture course to investigate the history, cultural differences, writing, designing, and production of books. Students will create books using a variety of bindings. At least one book will be entirely the student’s own creation, including written text. GC321 Typography 3 credits Enables students to understand, recognize, and use typography as an effective communication tool. The main emphases will be the study of the development of typographic technology, the acquisition and practicing of basic skills, and the refining of a design sense for the printed word. Prerequisite: GC201 and GC272 or permission of instructor. GC328 Calligraphy II 3 credits This is a wider study of the history and practice of letters in Western culture. The four basic styles from Calligraphy I will be built upon allowing the student to go in greater depth, his-‐ tory and practice with at least one of the styles studied in Calligraphy I. In addition, students will learn at least one additional style. The emphasis will be on the creation of a portfolio of finished pieces. Prerequisite: GC 227. GC341 Illustration 3 credits The emphasis is on idea and skill development in basic black and white illustration. Some color illustration is done at the end of the course. Prerequisite: FA201 GC350 Graphic Production 3 credits GC350 introduces students to all steps of the production process, from initial design concept through the printed page. Macintosh-‐based software is used in preparing art for reproduc-‐ tion and students will gain hands-‐on experience in color, file, and font management. Course looks at issues in traditional print methods as well as new and emerging technologies. Paper varieties and various methods of print reproduction are examined along with their char-‐ acteristics and requirements. On-‐site visits to print shops and a paper mill give students an in-‐depth look at the entire process. Prerequisites: GC201, GC302. GC362 Color Photography Workshop II 3 credits Students go beyond the technical aspects of color photography and begin to explore the creative potential of the medium and the image. Prerequisite: GC261. GC367 Commercial Photography I 3 credits Explores what a good commercial photo image is and how to design and light an image in a studio setting. Covers three main areas: portrait, product, architecture. Uses mainly digital cameras with an introduction to large format film cameras. Prerequisite: FA211; FA312 or GC261 suggested. Spring only

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T H E C O L L E G E AT R I N D G E GC368 Commercial Photography II 3 credits A continuation of Commercial Photography I with the opportunity to more deeply explore students’ particular interests. Students will finish semester with a portfolio of commercial quality images and a deeper understanding of photography’s place in graphic design. Pre-‐ requisite: GC367. Spring only GC/MC376 Animation Fundamentals 3 credits This intermediate course is designed to introduce students to the field of animation.Will focus on the creation of 3-‐D computer animations and students will create traditional animations as well. Course will provide an overview of animation history from traditional animators in the silent era to modern-‐day computer animators. Students will experience all stages of the animation process from pre-‐production (storyboarding, creating a soundtrack) to produc-‐ tion (modeling, skeletons, keyframing) and post-‐production (lighting, rendering, editing). Prerequisites: MC230 or GC272 or permission of instructor. GC404 Graphic Design IV 3 credits The preparation of a portfolio reflecting a range of graphic design applications based on the student’s strengths and interests, professional standards, and post-‐graduate goals. Work completed in all courses taken at Franklin Pierce will be considered as to its relevance and appropriateness in a professionally valuable portfolio. Adherence to deadlines and high quality results are strongly emphasized. Prerequisites: GC303, GC492, and senior standing. Spring only GC472 Computer Graphics II 3 credits Continues the studies begun in Computer Graphics I. Along with further work in highresolu-‐ tion paint and draw programs and desktop publishing, students will work on the manipula-‐ tion of scanned images and photographs and advanced color projects. Prerequisites: GC272 or permission of instructor. Spring only GC491 Introduction to Internship 3 credits This course is taken during the fall semester of the junior year. It provides the tools and skills needed for seeking and securing internship employment such as resumé and cover let-‐ ter writing, job searching, and interviewing skills. The student’s portfolio will be extensively developed considering work created in all Franklin Pierce courses, with an eye toward its impact on prospective employers. To this end, critical analysis and thinking skills will be utilized in the examination of writings, trade articles, and blogs by active professionals from the graphic design field. Electronic alternatives to a physical portfolio will be explored. Prerequisites: Graphic Communications major and junior class standing or permission of instructor. GC492 Internship Capstone 3 credits Most students will complete a minimum of 240 hours of employment during the summer between their junior and senior years. This course, GC492, taken during the fall semester of the senior year, is intended to provide a means for students’ self-‐evaluation, assessment of the internship employment, and the opportunity to revise and update their resumés to reflect their work experience and prepare for post-‐graduation career goals. Prerequisites: GC491 and senior class standing or permission of instructor. GC299, 399, 499 Independent Study in Graphic Communications 2–6 credits each Offers an opportunity to explore an area of study not included in the catalog listing of approved courses. The topic of an Independent Study should be selected and carefully designed by the student and faculty sponsor, and must meet with the approval of the Divi-‐ sion Chair. Normally, the student will be expected to have a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 and possess the appropriate background and interest to pursue the proposed area of study. A “Proposal for Independent Study” form may be obtained from the Registrar or from the office of the Division Chair. Independent Study courses are assigned numbers of 299, 399 or 499, depending on the level of the course. 135

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Appendix E: Keene State College, Keene, NH

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KEENE STATE COLLEGE • CATALOG OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 2013-14 • keene.edu/catalog

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ELECTIVES Students are encouraged to take ARCH 494 Advanced Cooperative Education.

MINOR/ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES Select additional courses of your choice to bring total number of credits earned to 120. Students are encouraged to complete a minor or an organized cluster of courses related to their career interests.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 120 credits

Art Bachelor of Fine Arts School of Arts and Humanities The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program is designed to provide students with an intensely comprehensive course of study consisting of a minimum of 72 credits in visual arts courses. The B.F.A. degree can lead directly to graduate study (M.F.A.) or to professional careers in the Graphic Design field. To be eligible for the B.F.A. degree, students must first be accepted into the B.A. program in Art. The B.F.A. degree is organized into the following three options:

• Graphic Design • Studio Art • Studio Art and Graphic Design (Dual Option) Graphic Design Following acceptance into the Art Department, students are encouraged to select the B.F.A. option in Graphic Design. Students will consult with their advisor when submitting their Declaration of Major form. Studio Art or Graphic Design and Studio Art (Dual Option) The Studio Art option and the Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option are highly selective programs. Accepted students will have the opportunity to have an individual studio space and work one on one with an Art professor mentor. All accepted candidates will mount a B.F.A. Solo Thesis Exhibition as a graduation requirement. Students may apply to the Studio Art option or the Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option after completion of a minimum of 6 courses (24 credits) that must include the Foundation Core. Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option applicants must take ART 250 Graphic Design I and ART 258 Typography I as part of the 24-credit minimum. Students are expected to have maintained a 1 minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in those 6 courses. Acceptance to the program is based on an assessment of a portfolio of artwork from these courses. The portfolio, a written statement of personal educational goals, and an official transcript must be submitted to the B.F.A. Studio Options Committee. Portfolio reviews for acceptance are conducted each spring prior to the course selection and registration period. Transfer students are also eligible to apply for the B.F.A. Studio Art option or the B.F.A. Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option provided they meet the admissions standards for the B.A. degree in Art as well as those for the B.F.A. Studio Art degree or the Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option degree. This must include a review by the Art faculty of a completed transfer course evaluation of all previously taken art courses. Once accepted, all B.F.A. candidates must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the major (Art courses). The B.F.A. Studio Options Committee will also conduct mid-level reviews of accepted students during the fall semester. The purpose of the review is to assess the candidate's progress toward the completion of the degree as well as the development of their artwork. Individuals whose GPA falls below the minimum standard or whose artwork is not at the appropriate level for the B.F.A. Studio Art option or the Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option will no longer be eligible for the options and will be returned to the B.A. in Studio Art or B.F.A. in Graphic Design. Students who have not maintained B.F.A. standards in the Studio Art option or the Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option will be allowed to reapply provided the deficiencies have been corrected. B.F.A. candidates in the Studio Art option or the Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option will also meet with the B.F.A. Studio Options Committee after their completion of their B.F.A. Senior Exhibition. The committee will conduct an oral review in which the candidate will outline the rationale followed for their exhibition. 1

Portfolio Criteria for B.F.A. in Studio Art or Studio Art and Graphic Design Dual Options 1. 2.

Portfolios must consist of no fewer than 20 pieces of college-level artwork. All work must be properly labeled with the following information: A. Name B. Medium C. Size (slide and digital portfolios only) D. Course title and date of execution

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LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT Each student must demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English as specified by the Language Requirement for Students with Majors in the School of Arts and Humanities.

INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 40 credits minimum

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 74 credits – Graphic Design 72 credits – Studio Art 74 credits – Studio Art and Graphic Design (dual option) Foundation Core 12 credits ART 101 Foundations of Design or IAART 100 ART 111 Introduction to Art History or IAART 110 ART 125 Drawing I or IAART 120

Graphic Design Option 62 credits 100-level course 2 credits ART 151 Technology Workshop 200-level courses 12 credits ART 250 Graphic Design I ART 253 Digital Imaging ART 258 Typography I 200 or 300 level courses 8 credits One 200- or 300-level Art History course One 200- or 300-level Studio Art course 300-level courses 24 credits ART 333 Printmaking I ART 350 Graphic Design II ART 351 History of Graphic Design ART 354 Web-Based Media I ART 356 Time-Based Media I One 300-level Graphic Design course 400-level courses 16 credits ART 450 Graphic Design III ART 459 Graphic Design Portfolio Select a total of 8 credits from the following:

• ART 455 Topics in Graphic Design • ART 497 Graphic Design/Studio Internship

NOTE: Students may take 8 credits of either ART 455 Topics in Graphic Design (different topics) or 8 credits of ART 497 Graphic Design/Studio Internship or a combination of ART 455 and ART 497 for 8 credits total in order to meet this requirement.

Studio Art Option 60 credits 200-level courses 18 credits

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ART 208 Ceramics I ART 224 Photography I or ART 226 Painting I ART 225 Drawing II ART 244 Sculpture I ART 295 Sophomore Studio/Exhibit Practice (2 credits) Art History courses 8 credits Select two from the following:

• • • • • • • •

ART 211 Ancient Art ART 212 Medieval Art ART 213 Renaissance Art ART 214 Modern Art ART 315 Contemporary Art ART 290 Topics in Art History ART 492 Art History Seminar IAART 391 Global Perspectives

300-level courses 16 credits ART 308 Ceramics II or ART 344 Sculpture II ART 333 Printmaking I Select two from the following:

• • • • • •

ART 308 Ceramics II ART 324 Photography II ART 325 Drawing III ART 326 Painting II ART 334 Printmaking II ART 344 Sculpture II

400-level courses 18 credits ART 495 Senior Studio/Exhibit Practice (2 credits) ART 496 BFA Senior Studio (2 semesters) Select two from the following:

• • • • • •

ART 408 Ceramics III ART 424 Photography III ART 426 Painting III ART 434 Printmaking III ART 444 Sculpture III ART 490 Advance Studio Topics

It is strongly recommended that BFA Studio Art students repeat either ART 225 Drawing II or ART 325 Drawing III.

Studio Art and Graphic Design Dual Option 62 credits 100-level courses 2 credits ART 151 Technology Workshop 200-level courses 26 credits ART 250 Graphic Design I ART 253 Digital Imaging I ART 258 Typography I ART 295 Sophomore Studio/Exhibit Practice (2 credits) Select three from the following:

• • • •

ART 208 Ceramics I ART 224 Photography I or ART 226 Painting I ART 225 Drawing II ART 244 Sculpture I

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Art History Course 4 credits Select one from the following:

• • • • • • • •

ART 211 Ancient Art ART 212 Medieval Art ART 213 Renaissance Art ART 214 Modern Art ART 290 Topics in Art History ART 315 Contemporary Art ART 492 Art History Seminar IAART 391 Global Perspectives

300-level courses 20 credits ART 333 Printmaking I ART 350 Graphic Design II ART 354 Web-Based Media I ART 356 Time-Based Media I Select one from the following:

• • • • • •

ART 308 Ceramics II ART 324 Photography II ART 325 Drawing III ART 326 Painting II ART 334 Printmaking II ART 344 Sculpture II

400-level courses 10 credits ART 495 Senior Studio/Exhibit Practice (2 credits) ART 496 B.F.A. Senior Studio ART 459 Graphic Design Portfolio It is strongly recommended B.F.A. Studio Art and Graphic Design dual option students take a second semester of ART 496 Senior Studio.

ELECTIVES Select courses to reach a total of 120 credits for the degree.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 120 credits

Art Bachelor of Arts School of Arts and Humanities The Bachelor of Arts degree in Art is designed to meet a variety of student needs through courses in art history, painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, drawing, photography, and graphic design. Through the program's flexibility and rich variety, students are encouraged to develop their skills and broaden their knowledge in courses that can lead to graduate school or a variety of careers in visual art and graphic design. The Studio Art option introduces and fosters the individual development of four major areas of study: Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Photography, and Ceramics. Throughout introductory, intermediate, and advanced courses, a balance of theoretical and technical knowledge is emphasized. The Studio Art option is designed to enable each student to focus on one of these areas. The Graphic Design option provides students with a foundation in the theory and practice of graphic design. Graphic designers convert concepts into visual language. Graduates from the Graphic Design option are prepared for design-related careers such as publishing, advertising, web design, and multimedia graphics. Admissions Criteria Entrance into the Art major is highly competitive. To become an Art major (Graphic Design and Studio Art options), a portfolio of 10 to 20 pieces of artwork in Graphic Design or Studio Art must be submitted and accepted (see below). Upon acceptance, students will be assigned an Art faculty

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advisor and within their first year must officially declare their major. Due to the selective nature of the Art program, the number of available openings is limited. All students are accepted to the Art major through the portfolio approval process. It is anticipated that most students who enter the Art major do so directly from high school and will submit a portfolio of work before they begin classes at Keene State College. Transfer students are also required to submit a portfolio to the Art Department as part of the application process. Based on a favorable assessment of their artwork produced at other accredited institutions, transfer students may request a waiver of some requirements. Students who are already enrolled at Keene State College with another major or who have not declared a major must also submit a portfolio to be accepted into the Art major. The portfolio for enrolled students must include work from a minimum of two Keene State College art courses. The portfolio acceptance process for enrolled students is conducted at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. It is highly recommended that enrolled students submit their portfolios by the beginning of their sophomore year at Keene State College. Portfolio Requirements 1. Ten to 20 pieces of original artwork, including drawings, in Graphic Design, Studio Art, or both. 2. Criteria used in evaluation include skill with design, drawing, materials, and creativity. 3. The portfolio should include original artwork in 35mm slide or digital format compatible with Macintosh operating system (jpeg preferred). 4. All slides or discs must be clearly labeled with your name and be numbered. 5. A sheet numbered with each work's title, medium, dimensions, and level of completion (freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior). If the work was completed independently, be sure to clearly state your concept. 6. Please include your name, address, telephone number, and e-mail address. 7. Please include the following information: a. Indicate your area of interest with regard to Graphic Design, Studio Art, or both, in relation to your career goals. b. List the number and description of all art courses taken on the high school or college level. c. List extracurricular activities and interests. 8. Please send portfolio to: Art Department Portfolio Review Committee Art Department Office Keene State College 229 Main St Keene NH 03435-2405 9.

Application deadline is April 1. Portfolios without the above information will be automatically placed on a waiting list while all other portfolios are reviewed. After this time, if there are any remaining openings, incomplete portfolios will then be considered. All portfolios will be accepted, refused, or put on a waiting list. With regard to portfolios on the waiting list, all decisions will be made by May 1.

Art 350 Graphic Design II Portfolio Review At the end of ART 350 Graphic Design II students will submit a portfolio of work completed during the core Graphic Design courses (ART 151, ART 250, ART 258, and ART 350). A panel of three Graphic Design faculty will review the portfolio and a written evaluation will be supplied to each student. This portfolio review is a graduation requirement for all students in the Graphic Design Option. Graphic Design Transfer Students Graphic Design transfer students must take ART 151, ART 250, ART 258, and ART 350. ART 151 and/or ART 250 may be substituted for equivalent courses from an accredited institution; however, ART 258 and ART 350 must be taken at Keene State College. Transfer students will be required to submit a portfolio of quality work from these classes at the completion of ART 350 (see ART 350 Graphic Design II Portfolio Review). Art Department Fellowships The Art Department offers five fellowships for outstanding junior and senior Art majors. The stipend is for one academic year and requires some service to the Art Department on a weekly basis. The application process is conducted annually during the spring semester. Use and Return of Student Artwork Due to space limitations, 2-D student artwork left behind will be held for one semester and then disposed of; 3-D student artwork must be removed at the end of the semester in which it was completed or it will be disposed of (unless arrangements have been made between the individual instructor and the student).

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT Each student must demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English as specified by the Language Requirement for Students with Majors in the School of Arts and Humanities.

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INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 40 credits minimum

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 48 credits – Studio Art Option 50 credits – Graphic Design Option Foundation Core 12 credits ART 101 Foundations of Design or IAART 100 ART 111 Introduction to Art History or IAART 110 ART 125 Drawing I or IAART 120 An Art major must select one of the following options:

Graphic Design Option 38 credits 100-level course 2 credits ART 151 Technology Workshop 200-level courses 12 credits ART 250 Graphic Design I ART 253 Digital Imaging ART 258 Typography I 300-level courses 12 credits ART 350 Graphic Design II ART 354 Web-Based Media I ART 356 Time-Based Media I 400-level courses 12 credits ART 450 Graphic Design III ART 455 Topics in Graphic Design ART 459 Graphic Design Portfolio

Studio Art Option 36 credits 200-level courses 18 credits

• • • • •

ART 208 Ceramics I ART 224 Photography I or ART 226 Painting I ART 225 Drawing II ART 244 Sculpture I ART 295 Sophomore Studio/Exhibit Practice (2 credits)

Art History Course Select one from the following:

• • • • • • • •

ART 211 Ancient Art ART 212 Medieval Art ART 213 Renaissance Art ART 214 Modern Art ART 290 Topics in Art History ART 315 Contemporary Art ART 492 Art History Seminar IAART 391 Global Perspectives

290

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KEENE STATE COLLEGE • CATALOG OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 2013-14 • keene.edu/catalog

16 300-level courses 8 credits ART 333 Printmaking I Select one from the following:

• • • • • •

ART 308 Ceramics II ART 324 Photography II ART 325 Drawing III ART 326 Painting II ART 334 Printmaking II ART 344 Sculpture II

400-level courses 6 credits ART 495 Senior Studio/Exhibit Practice (2 credits) Select one from the following:

• • • • • •

ART 408 Ceramics III ART 424 Photography III ART 426 Painting III ART 434 Printmaking III ART 444 Sculpture III ART 490 Advanced Studio Topics

ELECTIVES Select courses to reach a total of 120 credits for the degree. It is recommended that students in the B.A. program in Studio Art take additional studio art courses at the 300- and 400-level as well as additional Art History courses. It is recommended that students in the B.A. program in Graphic Design take ART 333 Printmaking I, ART 226 Painting I, and additional 300- and 400-level Graphic Design courses. Students who plan to apply to graduate programs in the visual arts should consider the B.F.A. program.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 120 credits

Athletic Training Bachelor of Science School of Professional and Graduate Studies Keene State College offers a CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education) accredited undergraduate athletic training education program designed for those students who wish to pursue certification as an athletic trainer. Students who graduate with a degree in Athletic Training are eligible to take the BOC (Board of Certification) Athletic Training Certification Examination. The program prepares students for athletic training positions in educational, professional sport, military/law enforcement training, performing arts and clinical settings, as well as for graduate programs in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training, Exercise Physiology and Biomechanics or other Medical and Allied Health fields. The Athletic Training major is a competitive program, with enrollments limited to sixteen per academic year. Because of the professional nature of Athletic Training and its responsibility to the public, the Program has established admissions, progression, and graduation standards for student selection and graduation. As such a formal application is REQUIRED. COMPETENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATHLETIC TRAINING All students majoring in Athletic Training are required to be certified in Standard First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer. Proof of a current 1 certification card must be provided for the application and maintained for courses marked with a . Once admitted, all students majoring in athletic training are required to be certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. Proof of certification must be provided and maintained for courses marked 2 with a . Students may enter Keene State College with these competencies or choose to enroll in course electives at Keene State College to complete the required competencies. These courses include PE 191 First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer; PE 240 Emergency Medical 1 1 Technician ; PE 242 EMT Practicum (2 credit) .

FEES Additional expenses associated with the athletic training education program include maintaining Standard First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer, maintaining EMT Certification, Hepatitis B immunizations, differential fees for clinical courses, travel expenses to and from off-campus clinical assignments, uniforms or professional attire, professional memberships, and occasional conferences and workshops.

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Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population APPENDIX F:

CGD/CGDC/CGW/CGWC Curriculum Sheets

292


293

Electronic Illustration

Creative Web Design I

CGD105

CGD240 3

3

Grade Prerequisites/Notes Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement; CGD 104 (or co-requisite) Note: CGD101 should be taken in the fall Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: CGD104 should be taken in the fall CGD Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; FYE101, RDG098, or placement CIS Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: See Professional Electives listed below Prerequisites: CGD101, 104, or permission of division dean Note: CGD235 should be taken in the spring Prerequisites: CGD101 or permission of division dean Note: CGD105 should be taken in the spring Prerequisites: CGD109 or CIS127 (grade C or better) or permission of division dean Note: CGD240 should be taken in the spring Prerequisites or co-requisites: CGD101, 104, 105, 235 Note: CGD103 should be taken in the spring

95 MWCC 2012-2013 College Catalog & Student Handbook

*CGD Professional Electives (Please consult with your advisor) ART251 Two-Dimensional Design CGD205 Digital Photo Art ART263 Drawing I CGD225 Advanced Electronic Illustration BCT235 DVD Authoring CGD241 Creative Web Design BUS125 Communication for Business and Industry MGT110 Small Business Management CGD102 Publication Design MKT142 Marketing CGD110 Introduction to Animation MKT241 Advertising CGD112 Communication in Multimedia Design PHO115 Digital Photography CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging THE113 Speech

See page 99 of the college catalog for technical standards.

Total: 24 credits

Print Production for Designers

3 3

CGD Professional Elective * Typography in Visual Communication

CGD235

CGD103

3

CGD109 Introduction to Web Media or or CIS 127 Computer Technologies

3

3

Digital Imaging

CGD104

Cr Semester 3

Suggested Course Order Design Theory

Number CGD101

This certificate is for students with prior computer knowledge, business experience, or a degree in a computer-related field who wish to upgrade their skills for personal or professional use. You will learn basic techniques for creating effective promotional pieces such as advertisements, brochures, flyers, logos, and digital artwork through the use of state-of-the-art computer technology and the latest graphic design software. In addition to learning page layout software, design theory and techniques, and preparing design work for print, you’ll learn advanced computer skills such as digital imaging and electronic illustration.

Computer Graphic Design—Print Certificate (CGDC)

Go to the academic program page at www.mwcc.edu to view gainful employment disclosure information.

Earning potential: $30,600 to $53,310.

Career options: Graphic designers may be employed by advertising agencies, design firms, marketing departments, commercial art, reproduction firms, or printing and publishing companies. Also, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, many graphic designers are selfemployed.

Special requirements: CGDC students should either have a computer at home with Internet access and the Adobe Creative Suite or be able to spend time outside of class in the graphic design computer labs where Internet access and the Creative Adobe Suite are provided. A grade of C or better is recommended for students taking CGD courses. Students should follow suggested course sequence since most courses are not offered out of sequence. Some courses in the CGDC Print Certificate may be applied to the CGD Print Degree. Technical standards must be met with or without accommodations.

Transfer options: Courses in this program can be applied to MWCC’s Computer Graphic Design– Print Degree.

Campus/format: A majority of this program can be completed during the day at the Gardner Campus.


294

3 3 3 3

CGD109 or Introduction to Web Media Computer Technologies CIS 127

Drawing I English Composition I Electronic Illustration

Typography in Visual Communication

Creative Web Design I

ART263 ENG101 CGD105

CGD235

CGD240

3 3 3/4

Marketing Health Elective

Creative Web Design II Topics in Mathematics (or higher) Print Production for Designers

Portfolio Preparation

CGD Professional Elective** Social Science Elective Science Elective

CGD204

MKT142

CGD241 MAT126 CGD103

CGD106

3 3 3

3 2/3

3

Prerequisites: CGD109 or CIS127 (grade C or better) or permission of division dean Note: CGD240 should be taken in the spring ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement; ART263 (strongly recommended) ENG101 Prerequisites: CGD101, 104, 105, 235 Note: CGD102 should be taken in the fall Prerequisite: CGD104 or permission of division dean Note: CGD204 should be taken in the fall ENG098, FYE101, MAT092, RDG098, or placement Electives: BIO101, BIO103, BIO112, BIO230, CHC101, CHC102, CHC108, CHC220, EXS102, EXS201, PER126, PER127, PER130 CGD240 (grade C or better) or permission of division dean MAT096 or placement Prerequisites: CGD101, 104, 105, 235 Note: CGD103 should be taken in the spring. Prerequisites: CGD101, 102, 104, 105, 204, 235, 240 Co-requisite: CGD103 Note: CGD106 should be taken in the spring Electives: See Professional Electives listed to the right Electives: ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, PSY, SOC, SSC Electives: BIO, BTC, CHE, EAS, EGM, NRD, PHY

Grade Prerequisites/Notes Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement; CGD104 (or co-requisite) Note: CGD101 should be taken in the fall Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: CGD104 should be taken in the fall CGD Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; FYE101, RDG098, or placement CIS Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Prerequisite: CGD101 or permission of division dean Note: CGD105 should be taken in the spring Prerequisites: CGD101, 104, or permission of division dean Note: CGD235 should be taken in the spring

MWCC 2012-2013 College Catalog & Student Handbook

See page 99 of the college catalog for program competencies and technical standards.

Total: 62/64 credits

3

Advanced Digital Imaging

ENG102 CGD102

3 3

Two-Dimensional Design

English Composition II Publication Design

ART251

3

3

3

3

Digital Imaging

CGD104

Cr Semester 3

Suggested Course Order Design Theory

Number CGD101

This program provides students with the visual design, communication, and computer graphic skills necessary to obtain an entry-level position in this field or to continue their education at a four-year college or university. For those already employed, they can enroll in this career program to upgrade their skills for potential advancement. You will learn basic and advanced techniques for creating effective promotional and collateral pieces, publications, packaging design, corporate identity and digital artwork through the use of state-of-the-art computer technology and the latest graphic design software. In addition to learning page layout software, design theory and techniques, and preparing design work for print, you'll learn advanced computer skills, such as digital imaging, electronic illustration, and web design. The most current graphic and web design software is used in the CGD program. This includes: the Adobe Creative Suite 4 (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Acrobat, Dreamweaver and Flash), QuarkXPress 8.0, and the latest web browsers (Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox, and Opera).

Computer Graphic Design—Print Degree (CGD) completed during the day at the Gardner Campus.

96

**CGD Professional Electives for Print Majors: ART*** Any higher level ART beyond ART251 & 263 BUS125 Communication for Business and Industry CIS109 Programming in Basic CIS120 Microcomputer Applications CGD110 Introduction to Animation CGD112 Communication in Multimedia Design CGD205 Digital Photo Art CGD225 Advanced Electronic Illustration CGD242 Interactive Web Design CGD244 Designing for E-Commerce MGT110 Small Business Management MKT241 Advertising PHO115 Digital Photography THE113 Speech

Earning potential: $30,600 to $53,310.

Career options: Graphic designers may be employed by advertising agencies, design firms, marketing departments, commercial art, reproduction firms, or printing and publishing companies. Also, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, many graphic designers are self-employed.

have a computer at home with Internet access and the Adobe Creative Suite or be able to spend time outside of class in the Graphic Design computer labs where Internet access and the Creative Adobe Suite are provided. A grade of C or better is recommended for students taking CGD courses. Students should follow suggested course sequence since most courses are not offered out of sequence. Technical standards must be met with or without accommodations.

Special requirements: CGD students should either

3 Plus ONE eligible–go to: www.mwcc.edu/3PlusONE.

Visit MWCC’s transfer services website: http://transfer.mwcc.edu.

Charter Oak State College and the University of Phoenix. Students are encouraged to continue their education in areas such as electronic media, marketing, or communications.

Transfer options: Transfer agreements exist with

Campus/format: A majority of this program can be


295

3

3

CGD109 or Introduction to Web Media Computer Technologies CIS 127

Introduction to Animation

Communication in Multimedia Design Creative Web Design I

Advanced Digital Imaging or Digital Photography

Electronic Illustration 3 CGW Professional Elective* 3 Total: 27 credits

CGD110

CGD112 CGD240

CGD204/ PHO115

CGD105

CGD242 Interactive Web Design Designing for E-Commerce S109 Programming in Basic CIS120 Microcomputer Applications MGT110 Small Business Management Marketing MKT241 Advertising PHO115 Digital Photography (if not previously taken)

Grade Prerequisites/Notes Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement; CGD104 (or co-requisite) Note: CGD101 should be taken in the fall Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: CGD104 should be taken in the fall CGD Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; FYE101, RDG098, or placement CIS Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: CGD110 should be taken in the fall CGD109 or CIS127 or beginning HTML and CSS Prerequisites: CGD109 or CIS127 or permission of division dean Note: CGD240 should be taken in the spring CGD Prerequisites: CGD104 or permission of division dean PHO Prerequisites: Basic computer skills CGD101 or permission of division dean Electives: See Professional Electives listed below

MWCC 2012-2013 College Catalog & Student Handbook

Campus/format: A majority of this program can be completed during the day at the Gardner Campus.

*CGW Professional Electives (Please consult with an advisor) ART251 Two-Dimensional Design ART263 Drawing I CGD244 BCT235 DVD Authoring CI BUS125 Communication for Business and Industry CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging (if not previously taken) CGD205 Digital Photo Art MKT142 CGD225 Advanced Electronic Illustration CGD235 Typography in Visual Communication CGD241 Creative Web Design II

See page 99 of the college catalog for technical standards.

3

3 3

3

Digital Imaging

CGD104

Cr Semester 3

Suggested Course Order Design Theory

Number CGD101

This certificate is for students with prior computer knowledge, business experience, or a degree in a computer-related field who wish to upgrade their skills designing interactive websites for personal or professional use. You will learn how to create well-designed websites using state-of-the-art multimedia labs and the most powerful web production tools including: HTML, DHTML, XML, PhotoShop, Flash, Fireworks, and Dreamweaver.

Computer Graphic Design—Web Design Certificate (CGWC) 

Go to the academic program page at www.mwcc.edu to view gainful employment disclosure information.

Earning potential: $30,600 to $53,310.

97

Career options: Web designers may be employed by advertising agencies, design firms, marketing departments, commercial art, reproduction firms, and other businesses that maintain websites. Also, many web designers are self-employed.

Special requirements: CGWC students should either have a computer at home with Internet access and the Adobe Creative Suite or be able to spend time outside of class in the graphic design computer labs where Internet access and the Creative Adobe Suite are provided. A grade of C or better is recommended for students taking CGD courses. Students should follow suggested course sequence since most courses are not offered out of sequence. Technical standards must be met with or without accommodations.

Transfer options: Courses in this program may be applied to MWCC’s Computer Graphic Design – Web Design Degree.


296 3 2/3

Interactive Web Design

Health Elective

CGD242

ENG101 Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: CGD110 should be taken in the fall Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; CGD104 or permission of division dean Prerequisites: CGD240 (grade C or better) or permission of division dean Note: CGD241 should be taken in the fall Prerequisite: CGD240 Co-requisites: CGD110, 241, or permission of division dean Note: CGD242 should be taken in the fall Electives: BIO101, BIO103, BIO112, BIO230, CHC101, CHC102, CHC108, CHC220, EXS102, EXS201, PER126, PER127, PER130 MAT096 or placement Prerequisites: CGD101, CGD104, CGD110, CGD112, CGD204, CGD240, CGD241, CGD242; CGD 109 or CIS127, or permission of division dean Co-requisite: CGD244 Note: CGD210 should be taken in the spring CGD240, 241 Electives: See Professional Electives listed to the right Electives: ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, PSY, SOC, SSC Electives: BIO, BTC, CHE, EAS, EGM, NRD, PHY

MWCC 2012-2013 College Catalog & Student Handbook

See page 99 of the college catalog for program competencies and technical standards.

Designing for E-Commerce 3 Professional Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 Science Elective 3/4 Total: 62/64 credits

CGD244

3 3

Topics in Mathematics (or higher) Advanced Website Portfolio

MAT126 CGD210

3

3

3 3

Creative Web Design II

Two-Dimensional Design

ART251

CGD241

Communication in Multimedia Design Creative Web Design I

CGD112 CGD240

Advanced Digital Imaging

Drawing I English Composition I Electronic Illustration

ART263 ENG101 CGD105

CGD204

Introduction to Web Media or Computer Technologies

CGD109 or CIS127

English Composition II Introduction to Animation

Digital Imaging

CGD104

Cr Semester Grade Prerequisites/Notes 3 Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement; CGD104 (or co-requisite) Note: CGD101 should be taken in the fall 3 Prerequisites: Basic computer skills; ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement Note: CGD104 should be taken in the fall 3 CGD Prerequisites: Basic computer skills, FYE101, RDG098, or placement CIS Prerequisites: ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement 3 ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement 3 ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement 3 Prerequisite: CGD101 or permission of division dean Note: CGD105 should be taken in the spring 3 CGD109 or CIS127 or beginning HTML and CSS 3 Prerequisites: CGD109 or CIS127 (grade C or better) or permission of division dean Note: CGD240 should be taken in the spring 3 ENG098, FYE101, RDG098, or placement; ART263 (strongly recommended)

ENG102 CGD110

Suggested Course Order Design Theory

Number CGD101

This program provides students with the visual design, communication, and computer graphic skills necessary to obtain an entry-level position in this field or to continue their education at a four-year college or university. For those already employed, they can enroll in this career program to upgrade their skills for potential advancement. Students learn basic and advanced techniques for creating effective, well-designed, and interactive websites. Students are taught basic design theory, digital imaging and electronic illustration skills and techniques, in addition to learning basic hypertext markup languages and top level authoring software using what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) technology. The most current graphic and web design software is used in the CGW program. This includes: the Adobe Creative Suite 4 (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Acrobat, Fireworks, Dreamweaver and Flash), QuarkXPress 8.0, and the latest web browsers (Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox, Opera).

Computer Graphic Designâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Web Design Degree (CGW)

ART*** BUS125 CIS109 CIS120 CGD102 CGD103 CGD205 CGD225 CGD235 MGT110 MKT142 MKT241 PHO115 THE113

98

Any higher level ART beyond ART251& 263 Communication for Business and Industry Programming in Basic Microcomputer Applications Publication Design Print Production Digital Photo Art Advanced Electronic Illustration Typography in Visual Communication Small Business Management Marketing Advertising Digital Photography Speech

**Professional Electives for Web Majors:

Earning potential: $30,600 to $53,310.

Career options: Web designers may be employed by advertising agencies, design firms, marketing departments, commercial art, reproduction firms, and other businesses that maintain websites. Also, many web designers/coordinators are self-employed.

Special requirements: CGW students should either have a computer at home with Internet access and the Adobe Creative Suite, or be able to spend time outside of class in the graphic design computer labs where Internet access and the Creative Adobe Suite are provided. A grade of C is recommended for students taking CGD courses. Students should follow suggested course sequence since most courses are not offered out of sequence. Technical standards must be met with or without accommodations.

Visit MWCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transfer services website: http://transfer.mwcc.edu.

Transfer options: Transfer agreements exist with Charter Oak State College, and the University of Phoenix. Students are encouraged to continue their education in areas such as electronic media, marketing, or communications.

Campus Format: A majority of this program can be completed during the day at the Gardner campus.


297 MWCC 2012-2013 College Catalog & Student Handbook

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Prepare for the job market with career planning, skill assessment, resume writing, and interviewing, as well as compile a professional-quality portfolio for entering the job market or for transferring to a four-year program.

Create dynamic, animated computer art, web motion graphics, and websites through the use of Adobe Flash.

Exhibit a solid understanding of the principles of visual communication coupled with an understanding of current web and multimedia tools, concepts, terminology, and techniques.

Plan and design websites utilizing basic and advanced web authoring techniques while exhibiting proficiency in the use of HTML, XHTML, CSS layouts and techniques, and Dreamweaver in code view, with the ability to design structurally as well as aesthetically.

Create complex electronic illustrations and single page layouts while exhibiting a solid understanding of the complex functions of Adobe Illustrator.

Transform digital images into new pieces of art through the use of Adobe Photoshop and Fireworks with emphasis on the creation of high-quality graphics for print and the web.

Possess a working knowledge of the design process especially how it relates to: audience definition, research, analysis, and concept development; the production of thumbnail sketches and rough drafts; and the preparation of final comprehensive print layouts and websites.

Upon graduation from this program, students shall have demonstrated the ability to: Exhibit a solid understanding of the fundamentals of design, including the elements and principles of design and typography as they are applied to the development of effective communication pieces for both print and web design. Students will have an understanding of the concepts of copyrights and intellectual property.

Upon graduation from this program, students shall have demonstrated the ability to:

Exhibit a solid understanding of the fundamentals of design, including the elements and principles of design and typography as they are applied to the development of effective communication pieces for both print and web design. Students will have an understanding of the concepts of copyrights and intellectual property. Possess a working knowledge of the design process especially how it relates to: audience definition, research, analysis, and concept development; the production of thumbnail sketches, rough drafts, and the preparation of final comprehensive print layouts and websites. Transform digital images into new pieces of art through the use of Adobe Photoshop with emphasis on the creation of high-quality graphics for print and the web. Create complex electronic illustrations and single page layouts with a solid understanding of the complex functions of Adobe Illustrator. Have a solid working knowledge of the fundamentals of building websites using HTML, XHTML, CSS and Dreamweaver in code view, with the ability to design structurally as well as aesthetically. Exhibit the ability to work with advanced graphic design principles, grids, typography, and advanced layout techniques while utilizing QuarkXPress and Adobe InDesign. Possess a working knowledge of print capabilities, the printing process, and understanding pre-press techniques. Prepare for the job market with career planning, skill assessment, resume writing, and interviewing, as well as compile a professional-quality portfolio for entering the job market or for transferring to a four-year program. Manage and development client-based visual communication pieces with the use of effective design and layout while meeting strict deadlines.

Program Competencies for CGW, CGWC

Program Competencies for CGD, CGDC

Computer Graphic Design Print Certificate (CGDC), Print Degree (CGD), Web Design Certificate (CGWC), and Web Design Degree (CGW)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; continued


Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population APPENDIX G:

Advisory Board: 2010 Agenda, Questions, and Minutes 2011 Agenda, Questions, and Minutes 2012 Agenda, Questions, and Minutes Program Assessmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Spring Exhibit: Assessment Sample Assessment Results

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Appendix G: Advisory Board 2010 Agenda, Questions, and Minutes

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Web Design  Advisory  Board—Spring  2010   April  6,  2010—MWCC  Boardroom   6:00-­‐8:00  pm  (Dinner  will  be  served)    

Computer Graphic  Design  Web  —  CGW   Computer  Graphic  Design  Certificate  —  CGWC   Sequence  of  web  design  curriculum  (Associates  Degree)   Bold  titles  denote  Certificate  courses  

Fall:  

CGD101 Design  Theory   CGD104  Digital  Imaging   CGD109  Introduction  to  Web  Media  

Spring:  

CGD105 Electronic  Illustration   CGD112  Communication  in  Multimedia  Design   CGD240  Creative  Web  Design  

Fall:

CGD204 Advanced  Digital  Imaging     or  PHO115  Digital  Photography   CGD241  Integrated  Website  Design   CGD110  Introduction  to  Animation   CGD244  Designing  for  E-­‐commerce  

Spring:

CGD210 Advanced  Website  Portfolio     CGD242  Advanced  Website  Animation  

Attachments for  review:   • • • •

Advisory Board  Questions   Curriculum/program  sheets   Outline  of  course  sequence:  CGD109  to  CGD240  to  CGD241   Individual  course  outlines  and  descriptions:   o CGD109  Introduction  to  Web  Media   o CGD112  Communication  in  Multimedia  Design   o CGD240  Creative  Web  Design   o CGD241  Integrated  Website  Design   o CGD110  Introduction  to  Animation   o CGD244  Designing  for  E-­‐commerce   o CGD210  Advanced  Website  Portfolio   o CGD242  Advanced  Website  Animation  

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Advisory Board  Questions  

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Advisory Board Questions: 1.

What is your primary development tool for designing web pages?

2.

What program do you use to create a mock-up page to show a client?

3.

How do you set your fees? For a single web page? For a (small/medium/large) web site?

4.

What are contributing factors to web page/site production costs? e.g. client needs photos taken; content not fully written; content is in hard to use format; photos not optimized; photos need release forms; content needs copyright release; many change orders, etc.

5.

What coding/programming do you know or use?

6.

What would you recommend students have a minimal knowledge of for web design?

7.

Do you focus just on front-end design or do you also work on backend code and programming?

8.

Do you use outside programming resources? What type? Which groups?

9.

Can you make a list of recommended professional web designers (Boston area / Central Mass)?

10.

What are some of the new tools or technologies you are using in developing web sites?

11.

What are good resources that you have found helpful in the areas of CSS and XHTML?

12.

For a two year program, should our focus be: ___Design Techniques ___Coding ___Both are very important

13.

Define the scope of topics and software you feel should be included in our web degree curriculum. • The Planning Process • XHTML (hand-coding) • CSS (hand-coding) • CSS3 (http://www.westciv.com/iphonetests/) • JQuery (full course needed or how to use scripts) • Javascript (full course needed or how to use scripts) • DOM • PHP (full course or needed or how to use scripts) • CMS (wordpress, joomla, drupal)

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• • • • •

Flash (animation, websites, Actionscript 3, Air, Flex) HTML5 for Video on hand-held devices Adobe: Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Flash, Photoshop, llustrator, InDesign, Acrobat Microsoft: Power Point, Word, Access, Excel, ASP Capstone course including service learning client website design, resume writing, and portfolio site.

14.

Which topics above or additional topics should we encourage the students to pursue after completing our program? Are there other software/skill sets that would increase their job opportunities in this economy?

15.

Will earning both web and print degrees, or a web degree with a print certificate significantly improve job placement opportunities for our students?

16.

For other than small size e-commerce websites I am advising our students to use a solution such as Volusion, BigCommerce, etc. Is this appropriate or should I strongly recommend a course in PHP/MySQL for building all e-commerce sites. (Currently Big Commerce is offering us free use of their product for 45 days.)

17.

Do you recommend a specific e-commerce solution?

18.

Educationally, should the students’ next step be a Bachelor’s Degree? Interactive Design or suggestions for specific colleges/ programs? How does having or not having a BS degree impact a student’s future job opportunities and earning potential?

19.

When should we add in-depth study of HTML5 to our topic list?

20.

How profoundly will Apple’s push for HTML 5 video, especially on hand-held devices, affect the future of Flash?

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Outline of  Course  Sequence:     CGD109  to  CGD240  to  CGD241  

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CGD 109,  240,  241  •  Course  Outlines      

CGD 109 — Introduction  to  Web  Media   Introduction  to  web  design  basics   • • • • • •

How the  web  works   History  of  the  web   Browsers,  Servers,  URLs,  Domain  Names   Web  Hosting  Companies   FTP  and  the  Control  Panel  etc.   HTML  &  XHTML    

Focus:  One  column  layouts  with  introduction  to  CSS             Books:     Head  First  Book,  Chp  1-­‐8   Stylin  with  CSS,  2nd  Edition,  Selected  topics  from  Chp.  1-­‐3   Assorted  tutorials  and  handouts     Projects:   1. Info  Literacy  Assignment:  Three  page  research  topic  website   2. Creative  project  1  Website,  must  include  use  of  the  skills  studied  up  to  the  due  date.   3. Creative  project  2  Website,  must  include  use  of  the  skills  studied  up  to  the  due  date.     Assignments:   Individual  web  page  assignments  are  given  to  reinforce  the  various  techniques  being  presented  in   the  classroom.      

CGD 240 — Creative  Web  Design   CSS  properties  and  Layouts   • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Text and  Font  styling   CSS  and  Images,  CSS  basic  Image  gallery,  Fireworks  gallery   Tables,  Calendar   Forms,  php  script  to  process/send  form  data   CSS  Positioning  and  Layout   Print  Style  Sheet   HTML  email   Validation   Accessibility   SEO   Students  develop  a  solid  understanding  of  the  CSS  properties   Students  learn  7  to  10  two-­‐column  and  three-­‐column  layouts   Students  learn  5  to  7    CSS  Navigation  bar  techniques    

Focus:  Two-­‐column  and  three-­‐column  layouts,  a  solid  understanding  of  the  CSS  properties,   Navigation  techniques     Books:     Head  First  Book,  Chp  8-­‐14  (keep  book  from  109)   Stylin  with  CSS,  2nd  Edition,  Selected  topics  from  Chp  2-­‐6  (keep  book  from  109)   The  CSS  Anthology,  3rd  Edition,  Selections  throughout  the  book     Getting  Started  with  CSS,  Selections  throughout  the  book   Assorted  tutorials  and  handouts  

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CGD 109,  240,  241  •  Course  Outlines           Projects:   1. Creative  project  1  Website,  must  include  use  of  the  skills  studied  up  to  the  due  date.     2. Creative  project  2  Students  build  the  site  based  on  their  website  comps  built  in  CGD  112     and  Digital  Imaging   3. Creative  project  3  Website,  must  include  use  of  the  skills  studied  up  to  the  due  date.     Assignments:   Individual  web  page  assignments  are  given  to  reinforce  the  various  techniques  being  presented  in   the  classroom.       CGD  241 — Integrated  Website  Design :     Advanced  Topics  and  Techniques   (This  is  the  list  of  topics  under  consideration  for  CGD  241  in  fall  2010)   Advanced  layouts  inspired  from  a  variety  of  sources:       Transcending  CSS,  Web  Standards  Creativity,  Bulletproof  Web  Design,  Mastering     CSS  with  Dreamweaver  CS4   • Handheld  style  sheets   • Image  Galleries:  Lightbox,  Simpleviewer  &  a  survey  of  commercial  solutions     &  Javascript  libraries     • Flickr  style  image  maps,  Remote  Rollovers   • Javascript  pop-­‐up  window   • Navigation:  Sprites,  CSS  You-­‐are-­‐here     • Image  replacement,  Fonts  discussion  (Cufon,  @font-­‐face)   • Drop  Shadows   • Rounded  Corner  Techniques   • CSS  3   • HTML  5   • Adding  Social  Media   • Discussion  -­‐  CMS  systems  and  strategies  for  clients  who  want  to  maintain-­‐it-­‐  themselves  -­‐   Wordpress,  Joomla,  Drupal                   Focus:  Advanced  layouts,  topics  and  techniques     Books:   CSS  Mastery  Advanced  Web  Standards  Solutions,  2nd  Edition  (under  consideration)     Projects:   1. Creative  Project  1,  will  include  use  of  the  skills  studied  up  to  the  due  date.   2. Creative  Project  2,  will  include  use  of  the  skills  studied  up  to  the  due  date.     Assignments:   Individual  web  page  assignments  will  be  given  to  reinforce  the  various  techniques  being  presented   in  the  classroom.    

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Computer Graphic Design Web Advisory Board Meeting—MINUTES April 6, 2010 6:00-8:00pm MWCC Boardroom Attendees: Brian Lucier Matt Gronowicz Leslie Cullen Janice Barney Dana Armstrong Paul Swerzenski Dennis Cormier Cynda Joyce Becky Gerry Melissa Fama Ken Wilson

1. Introductions Each board member provided a short introduction. 2. Dinner and Q & A (See Advisory Board Questions) What is your primary development tool for designing web pages? What program do you use to create a mock-up page to show a client? • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Brian felt we were well ahead of most colleges 80% use Explorer Paul discussed browsers JQuery was discussed – very positive and important use of JQuery. Becky Gerry noted it was used/introduced in CGD241 Becky requires wire framing Dom Document Oject was discussed Ken: Photoshop primary – Eclipse, CSS Brian: Illustrator/Photoshop – designing tools – DW & Flash Ken: Both are very important – CSS & design Becky: Strict HTML & CSS being taught now; PHP, MayaSQL? How imp – make sure it is introduced Paul: Thought balance between visual designers and the code Brian: If they don’t know the backend the website won’t function. Necessary. Cynda: Students need to see examples of everything that can be done or use subcontractors, networking

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• • • • • • •

Matt: Illustrator/Photoshop for mockups; Database – PHP & Toad; Microsoft .net; CSS – the way to go; search engine/navigation; blueprints – good frameworks to pick apart; cool techniques Becky: Need a night course in PHP and AJAX Cynda: Where does it become more IT stuff – The big question! Matt: Knowing a little is important Ken: Shouldn’t be taught until they have worked in the field a few years Melissa: Non-credit training Dennis: Certificate in web programming Dennis: a market for this. (I’d like to add that I use DW & Photoshop for all of my web designing)

How do you set your fees? For a single web page? For a (small/medium/large) web site? What are contributing factors to web page/site production costs?e.g. client needs photos taken; content not fully written; content is in hard to use format; photos not optimized; photos need release forms; content needs copyright release; many change orders, etc. Ken: $1,000 for first page, $500 for second page Based on difficulty of design; complex pricing structure; quadruple the quote. Dennis: (I’d like to add that I charge by the project, not by the page. This number is usually calculated based on an estimated amount of hours it will take to complete the project Cynda: Per project quote - $100/page. Does not include photography & content Matt: One time design fee price in specifics. Learned to scope a project lower cost to bill/fit in full project details Brian: Bids a range; $100/page to $500/page, then an average. Most outrageousdouble and ask for half up-front. GAG pricing guide. If the client knows what’s coming and what the expectations are that is important Cynda: Works by the hour. Make a PDF – smallest file size. InDesign to mockup; font choice specific – made as PDF The group discussed core – 101, 104, 109 – mockups in Photoshop. Spring: 105, 112, 240 described this core Ken: Cost: no photos, content, video Becky: Clients want maintenance training; put a unit in 241 w/Wordpress; Joomla – content management; CMS; 3 weeks – Brian/Matt/Cynda – Wordpress. Brian sees this as brother/sister – for learning a social blog

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Becky: HTML5: Video w/HTML5 on handheld; safari and chrome are HTML5 compliant Brian: Mass Art doesn’t come close Ken: E-commerce – Paypal Brian: 101 Ways to Motivate People – E-book; Audio books: client centric focus 3. Review of CGW Curriculum and Courses • • • • • • • •

CGD109 CGD110 CGD112 CGD210 CGD240 CGD241 CGD242 CGD244

CGD109 – HTML w/basic CSS w/one column layouts. Headfirst w/supplements; backgrounds, floating images; XHTML – all hand coded; No DW; “Green Themed” really enjoyed; amazing topic options; Paul lets them pick their own topic/subject Brian: Suggested we incorporate Lynda.com CGD240 — Fundamentals of CSS properties and the layouts; 2 column layouts finish Head Start; hand code a variety of layouts; volunteered for real clients; Should know all of the CSS properties CGD241 — Keeps changing. Keep taking them further. Pushing basics back to 109 & 240. CSS Mastery exploring on their own CGD242 — Flash websites (name change) – should be a segment in HTML5; Need a 3+1 CGD244 — E-Commerce – teaches advising of storefront; “Webstores for Dummies”Books look good, but then the steps are missing Brian: Recommended a Blogspot to post student works. Mass Arts masters program doesn’t touch this stuff. Mass Art offered its 1st Flash class this year. MWCC has been teaching Flash for 10 years. 4. Other Business or Discussion

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Appendix G: Advisory Board 2011 Agenda, Questions, and Minutes

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COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN    

Advisory Board Meeting April 4,  2011   MWCC  Boardroom   6:00PM–8:00PM  

 

AGENDA Introductions   Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs—Dr.  Melissa  Fama   Dean  of  Business,  Science  and  Technology—Janice  Barney   CGD  Faculty:   Department  Chair—Leslie  Cullen   Professor  Paul  Swerzenski   Adjunct  Faculty  and  Computer  Lab  Aide—Sonya  Shelton   Board  Members:   Alan  Bernard—Prepress,  Travers  Printing   James  Concannon—James  Design   Caitlin  Donahue—MWCC  Alumni     &  Senior  Design  Student,  UMASS  Lowell   Jason  Taylor—Jason  Taylor  Design   Tiffany  Wrobel—Barbanel  Design       Computer  Graphic  Design  Update   New  Technologies   • Leased  40  20”  iMac  computers  in  October  2008.  Lease  expires  June  2012.     • PC  computer  lab  (web  development  and  design  labs)—computers  were   upgraded  fall  2009.   • 4-­‐terabyte  Mac  Snow  Leopard  server.  To  be  installed  this  Friday.   • Remain  current  with  all  Adobe  software.  Will  be  installing  CS5  this  summer.   Run  Quark  Xpress  8.0.     Service  Learning   • Require  Service  Learning  in  our  Portfolio  Preparation  Capstone  course.  17   current  students  with  ongoing  projects.   • Email  is  sent  each  December  to  local  non-­‐profits,  students  select  a  client   project  based  on  interest/skills.    

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Including the  web  curriculum,  both  programs  complete  an  average  of  20–30   Service  Learning  projects  each  year.  

Articulation Agreements   • Currently  working  to  finalize  agreements  with  UMass  Lowell  and  Fitchburg   State  University   • High  school  Tech-­‐Prep  is  changing  and  we  plan  to  meet  with  area  high   school  faculty  to  formulate  agreements.  Met  with  Fitchburg  HS  March  23rd.   Current  Curriculum  and  Curriculum  Changes   • Current  Certificate  and  Degree  Programs   • New  Course:  Advanced  Electronic  Illustration  (fall  2010).     • Changes  to  curriculum:  First  level  page  layout  course:  CGD235  Typography   in  Visual  Communication  with  InDesign.  Second  level:  CGD102  Publication   Design  with  Quark  8  and  InDesign.  

Q  and  A  Session  with  Board  Members   • Questions  provided   Closing  Statements  

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Advisory Board  Meeting     April  4,  2011  

Discussion Questions    

Our degree  program  is  developed  and  shaped  in  conjunction  with  an  advisory  board  of   industry  professionals.  By  working  closely  with  our  board  members,  we  are  able  to   constantly  adapt  and  revise  our  curriculum  to  make  sure  we're  giving  students  the  optimal   educational  experience  to  help  propel  them  into  their  careers.       To  help  us  cover  the  wide  range  of  topics  which  incorporate  print  design  skills  we  have  put   together  a  list  of  specific  questions  for  this  advisory  board  meeting.     Fees     1. How  do  you  set  your  design  fees—per  hour  or  per  project/job?       2. Students  often  ask  what  they  should  charge,  do  you  have  a  recommended  per  hour   rate  for  a  new  designer  doing  freelance  work?     3. What  would  you  say  is  a  reasonable  starting  salary  for  a  junior  designer/design   assistant  in  today’s  market?     Skills                               4. Are  there  any  topics  we  should  encourage  our  students  to  pursue  after  completing   our  program?       5. Are  there  any  particular  software  or  skill  sets  that  would  increase  their  job   opportunities  in  this  economy?     6. In  today’s  market,  do  graphic  designers  need  to  know  web  design?     Why?     7. Do  you  think  students  should  learn  design  on  Macintosh  only,  PC  only  or  both?         8. What  is  the  industry  standard  in  studios,  agencies,  and/or  printers?     9. Based  on  your  experience,  what  programs  do  you  see  as  most  important  for   students  concentrating  in  print  design?       10. What  new  software,  tools  or  technology  do  you  see  as  developing  for  print  design   students?       11. Are  there  any  new  prepress  or  production  technologies  that  we  should  begin  to   teach  our  students?              

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Advisory Board  Meeting     April  4,  2011  

Discussion Questions    

Career                           12. Will  earning  both  print  and  web  design  degrees,  or  a  print  degree  with  a  web   certificate  significantly  improve  job  placement  opportunities  for  our  students?       13. Educationally,  should  the  students’  next  step  be  a  Bachelor’s  Degree?         14. How  does  having  or  not  having  a  BS  degree  impact  a  student’s  future  job   opportunities  and  earning  potential?     15. Do  you  have  any  suggestions  for  specific  colleges/programs  of  study?         Professionalism                         16. Based  on  the  work  you  evaluated  during  judging,  what  projects  would  you   recommend  we  add  to  our  courses/curriculum  to  improve  our  students’  portfolios?       17. What  are  the  most  important  qualities  you  seek  in  a  graphic  designer?         Future  Trends                         18. Do  you  develop  or  design  any  work  that  is  utilized  strictly  for  tablets  or  handheld   technologies,  such  as  publications.     19. How  has  social  media  and  social  media  technologies  changed  design?         20. Should  our  students  focus  on  developing  a  solid  understanding  of  these   technologies?       21. How  should  a  print  designer  adapt  their  skills  in  this  technology  driven  age?       22.  Where  do  you  see  the  future  of  print  design?          

 

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COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN    

Advisory Board Meeting Minutes April 4,  2011   MWCC  Boardroom   6:00PM–8:00PM  

In Attendance:   Vice  President  of  Academic  Affairs—Dr.  Melissa  Fama   Dean  of  Business,  Science  and  Technology—Janice  Barney   CGD  Faculty:   Department  Chair—Leslie  Cullen   Professor  Paul  Swerzenski   Adjunct  Faculty  and  Computer  Lab  Aide—Sonya  Shelton   Board  Members:   Alan  Bernard—Prepress,  Travers  Printing   James  Concannon—James  Design   Caitlin  Donahue—MWCC  Alumni     &  Senior  Design  Student,  UMASS  Lowell   Jason  Taylor—Jason  Taylor  Design   Tiffany  Wrobel—Barbanel  Design       Computer  Graphic  Design  Update   Leslie  Cullen,  CGD  Department  Chair  provided  the  following  update:     New  Technologies   • Leased  40  20”  iMac  computers  in  October  2008.  Lease  expires  June  2012.     • PC  computer  lab  (web  development  and  design  labs)—computers  were   upgraded  fall  2009.   • 4-­‐terabyte  Mac  Snow  Leopard  server.  To  be  installed  this  Friday.   • Remain  current  with  all  Adobe  software.  Will  be  installing  CS5  this  summer.   Run  Quark  Xpress  8.0.    

Service Learning   • Require  Service  Learning  in  our  Portfolio  Preparation  Capstone  course.  17   current  students  with  ongoing  projects.   • Email  is  sent  each  December  to  local  non-­‐profits,  students  select  a  client   project  based  on  interest/skills.     • Including  the  web  curriculum,  both  programs  complete  an  average  of  20–30   Service  Learning  projects  each  year.  

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Articulation Agreements   • Currently  working  to  finalize  agreements  with  UMass  Lowell  and  Fitchburg   State  University   • High  school  Tech-­‐Prep  is  changing  and  we  plan  to  meet  with  area  high  school   faculty  to  formulate  agreements.  Met  with  Fitchburg  HS  March  23rd.   Current  Curriculum  and  Curriculum  Changes   • Current  Certificate  and  Degree  Programs   • New  Course:  Advanced  Electronic  Illustration  (fall  2010).     • Changes  to  curriculum:  First  level  page  layout  course:  CGD235  Typography   in  Visual  Communication  with  InDesign.  Second  level:  CGD102  Publication   Design  with  Quark  8  and  InDesign.  

Q  and  A  Session  with  Board  Members   Questions  were  provided  to  board  members  and  discussed  during  the  meeting.   FEES   How  do  you  set  your  design  fees—per  hour  or  per  project/job?  Students  often   ask  what  they  should  charge,  do  you  have  a  recommended  per  hour  rate  for  a   new  designer  doing  freelance  work?   Jason:  Pricing  per  client/project.  The  Graphic  Artist’s  Guild  Pricing  and  Ethical   Guidelines  book  is  highly  recommended.  Pricing  is  very  competitive  and  you  must   know  what  the  competition  is  pricing  their  work  at.   Jim:  Students  need  to  know  what  a  billable  hour  is  and  what  isn’t.   Jason:  To  start,  flat  fees  for  the  entire  project  are  helpful  and  better.   Jim:  Spell  out  the  process  in  a  contract  between  the  designer  and  client,  even  who   owns  the  artwork  at  the  end  of  the  project.   SKILLS/PREPRESS   Are  there  any  topics  we  should  encourage  our  students  to  pursue  after   completing  our  program?  Are  there  any  particular  software  or  skill  sets  that   would  increase  their  job  opportunities?  Are there any new prepress or production technologies that we should begin to teach our students? The  board  all  agreed  that  IT/computer  troubleshooting  skills  were  essential  for   both  the  hardware  and  the  software.  There  is  no  time  in  the  industry  to  be  incapable   of  fixing  a  computer  or  software  issue  or  calling  someone  in.  Students  need  to  be   tech  savvy  and  know  how  to  troubleshoot  an  issue  or  how  to  be  resourceful  and  find   an  answer.   If  the  students  pursued  only  print  design  at  MWCC,  then  they  should  work  to   understand  and  pursue  various  areas  of  web  design.  4  out  5  job  postings  wanted   web  design.  

318


Web design,  for  most  who  are  still  primarily  print  designers,  is  done  in  Photoshop   and  then  sent  out  for  development.  The  designer  matches  the  presence  of  the  web   site  to  the  various  print  media  they  have  already  developed  for  the  client.  Knowing   how  to  build  the  structure  and  mockup  of  a  site  in  Photoshop  or  InDesign  will  make   print  design  students  more  valuable.   Students  should  understand  how  the  end  product  will  be  used.  If  Direct  Mail,   students  should  get  the  mail  standards  from  the  US  post  office.   All  projects  should  be  “Collected”  or  “Packaged”  for  output  and  then  a  final  PDF   should  be  made.  Knowledge  of  Acrobat  and  creating  PDFs  is  a  must.  Student  must   know  how  to  develop  work  in  RGB  and  the  same  work  in  CMYK  and  fully   understand  the  color  variances  between  these  two  color  models.  Only  20%  of   projects  go  to  press  anymore,  most  clients  want  the  PDF.     Do  you  think  students  should  learn  design  on  Macintosh  only,  PC  only  or  both?     Most  board  members  agreed  that  the  Mac  is  the  industry  standard  and  should  never   be  illuminated  from  the  curriculum.    However,  Jason  Taylor  noted  that  Windows  7  is   far  more  useable  then  previous  windows  operating  systems.  It  would  still  require  a   custom  built  PC  and  when  you  do  this,  the  price  begins  to  match  that  of  fully   equipped,  standard  Mac  anyways;  however,  the  software  is  identical  and  can  be   used  on  both  platforms.   CAREER   Educationally, should the students’ next step be a Bachelor’s Degree? How does having or not having a BS degree impact a student’s future job opportunities and earning potential? Bachelor’s  degree  or  not  the  portfolio  speaks  volumes.  A  student’s  design  strength  is   the  key.    The  industry  is  very  competitive  so  a  Bachelor’s  degree  would  likely   increase  their  marketability.  Students  need  to  be  highly  trainable  and  be  able  to  fully   show  what  their  skills  are.  Having  real  work  in  their  portfolio  is  essential  in  the   portfolio.  The  board  suggested  students  do  as  much  pro  bono  or  service  leaning   work  as  possible  to  gain  real  world  experience.   PROFESSIONALISM  OF  WORK   Based  on  the  work  you  evaluated  during  judging,  what  projects  would  you   recommend  we  add  to  our  courses/curriculum  to  improve  our  students’   portfolios?   Students  should  have  more  3D,  tangible  pieces.  Develop  and  assemble  comps  to   show;  multi-­‐panel  and  folds,  package  design,  etc.     Logo  design  should  be  designed  in  black  and  white  and  then  students  add  color.  If  it   works  in  black  and  white  it  will  be  effective  in  color.   FUTURE  TRENDS   How  should  a  print  designer  adapt  their  skills  in  this  technology  driven  age?  

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CGD110 Introduction  to  Animation  was  discussed.  Jason  Taylor  recommended   students  have  an  understanding  of  Motion  Graphics  but  not  necessarily  Adobe  Flash.   Cinema  4D  and  AfterEffects  were  recommended;  info  graphics  for  television,  news   broadcasting.  It  is  also  used  for  mockups  of  3D  graphics.   Closing  Statements   Caitlin  Donahue  offered  a  comparison  of  MWCC  and  UMass  Lowell.   • She  was  very  glad  she  came  to  MWCC  first.   • MWCC’s  program  is  design  and  technically  driven.  The  course  in  Print   Production  was  essential  to  her.   • Student’s  work  is  conceptually  driven  at  UML,  but  they  require  a  fast  turn   around  and  the  quality  can  really  suffer  and  need  revisions  or  rework.   • MWCC  work  is  portfolio  ready.   • MWCC  focuses  on  both  the  concept  and  the  technical.   • Sometimes  software  can  drive  a  project  so  we  have  to  make  sure  students   are  focusing  on  the  concept  and  the  technology  is  the  tool.  Students  should   have  a  full  grasp  of  what  they  are  selling,  promoting,  designing  for,  not  just   how  to  make  it  look  good.  

320


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Appendix G: Program Assessmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Spring Exhibit Assessment Sample

322


323

Program  Objective  1:   Exhibit  a  solid  understanding  of   the  fundamentals  of  design,   including  the  elements  and   principles  of  design  and   typography  as  they  are  applied   to  the  development  of  effective   communication  pieces  for  both   print  and  web  design.    

CGD Program  Objective  

ALL   categories,   except  11,  17   and  21  

Design Category     Students  have   provided   evidence  of   above-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students’  work   is  competent   with  little  to  no   evidence  of   mastery  with   this  program   objective  

Average

Above-­‐ Average

Mastery   Students  display   mastery  and  a     high  level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

3

4

2

Students’  work   displays  a   below-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Below Average  

Rating Standards  

Students’  work   displays  an   insufficient   level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Insufficient

1

RATING

We  ask  that  you  carefully  review  the  student  design  work  we  have  laid  out  for  our   annual  judging  and  rate  our  student  outcomes  (design  projects)  to  provide  an   overall  assessment  of  our  students’  knowledge,  skills  and  abilities  and  level  of   competency.     Please  review  each  objective  listed  below  and  rate  the  students’  design  work   within  each  corresponding  category.  Most  program  objectives  will  correspond   with  several  design  categories.  Please  review  all  corresponding  categories  before   providing  a  rating.    

5

The  Computer  Graphic  Design  Program  has  nine  Program   Objectives/Learning  Outcomes.  These  objectives  are  what  students   are  expected  to  know  or  do  by  the  time  they  graduate:    the   knowledge,  skills,  and  abilities  that  a  student  should  attain  by   completing  the  degree  program.    

Spring Exhibit  2011  

Computer Graphic  Design  Program  Assessment/Outcomes   Professional  Evaluation  of  Student  Design  Work  


324

Categories:   5   8   16–self   promo   22  

Categories:   3   7   9   16–CD  

Program  Objective  5:   Create  complex  electronic   illustrations  and  single  page   layouts  with  a  solid   understanding  of  the  complex   functions  of  Adobe  Illustrator.  

Program  Objective  7:   Exhibit  the  ability  to  work  with   advanced  graphic  design   principles,  grids,  typography,   and  advanced  layout  techniques   while  utilizing  QuarkXPress  and   Adobe  InDesign.  

Design Category     Categories:   11   12     13   15   21  

CGD Program  Objective  

Program  Objective  4:   Transform  digital  images  into   new  pieces  of  art  through  the   use  of  Adobe  Photoshop  with   emphasis  on  the  creation  of   high-­‐quality  graphics  for  print   and  the  web.  

Students  display   mastery  and  a     high  level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students  display   mastery  and  a     high  level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students  display   mastery  and  a     high  level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Mastery

5

Students  have   provided   evidence  of   above-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students  have   provided   evidence  of   above-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective     Students’  work   is  competent   with  little  to  no   evidence  of   mastery  with   this  program   objective  

Students’  work   is  competent   with  little  to  no   evidence  of   mastery  with   this  program   objective  

Students’  work   is  competent   with  little  to  no   evidence  of   mastery  with   this  program   objective  

Average

Above-­‐ Average   Students  have   provided   evidence  of   above-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

3

4

2

Students’  work   displays  a   below-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students’  work   displays  a   below-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students’  work   displays  a   below-­‐average   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Below Average  

Rating Standards  

Students’  work   displays  an   insufficient   level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students’  work   displays  an   insufficient   level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Students’  work   displays  an   insufficient   level  of   competency   with  this   program   objective  

Insufficient

1

RATING


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Appendix G: Program Assessmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Spring Exhibit Assessment Results

326


Computer Graphic Design Program Assessment/Outcomes Professional Evaluation of Student Design Work Spring Exhibit 2011 and 2012 RESULTS Evaluators CGD Program  Objective

Results 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Program Objective  1: Exhibit  a  solid   understanding  of  the   fundamentals  of  design,   including  the  elements  and   principles  of  design  and   typography  as  they  are   applied  to  the   development  of  effective   communication  pieces  for   both  print  and  web  design.  

4

5

4

4

4.5

3

3

3

4

3.5

4

3.8

Above Average

Program Objective  4: Transform  digital  images   into  new  pieces  of  art   through  the  use  of  Adobe   Photoshop  with  emphasis   on  the  creation  of  high-­‐ quality  graphics  for  print   and  the  web.

3

5

3

4

4

3

3

4

4

3

4

3.6

Average to   Above   Average

Program Objective  5: Create  complex  electronic   illustrations  and  single   page  layouts  with  a  solid   understanding  of  the   complex  functions  of   Adobe  Illustrator.

3

5

4

5

4

4

3

4

4

4

3

3.9

Above Average

Program Objective  7: Exhibit  the  ability  to  work   with  advanced  graphic   design  principles,  grids,   typography,  and  advanced   layout  techniques  while   utilizing  QuarkXPress  and   Adobe  InDesign.

4

4

4

4

5

4

3

4

4

3.5

3

3.9

Above Average

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APPENDIX H: Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population Marketing and Communications Projects Catch the Wind T-shirts and Banners e-News and Gardner News 3 Yellow Balloons T-shirts e-News and Gardner News Prius Car Wrap News Storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Awards BCT CREW T-shirt Graphic

328


329


Appendix H: Marketing and Communications Projects Catch the Wind T-shirts and Banners e-News and Gardner News

330


windenergy

reliable save

change renewable

plug-in

gust

efficient blades

turbine

Innovation is

a breeze

MWCC progress

natural air

our power future

331


T-shirt Design Please see the front/pg 1 of this form for all color and style options

FRONT

Wind Turbines with Slogan

windenergy

reliable save

windenergy

change renewable

plug-in

reliable save

gust

change renewable

gust

efficient

turbine blades

plug-in

efficient

turbine blades

Innovation is

a breeze

Innovation is

a breeze

MWCC

MWCC

progress

natural air

progress

natural air

our power future

our power

future

BACK

Mount Wachusett Community College Logo

332


r

pl

gu

Innovation is

t

a breeze

In

Banner 1: Original Concept

333


MWCC's $9 million wind project is being funded through a variety of sources, including $3.2 million MWCC's $9 million wind project is being funded through a variety of sources, including $3.2 million in U.S. Department of Energy grants secured by Congressman John Olver; $2.1 million from a low in U.S. Department of Energy grants secured by Congressman John Olver; $2.1 million from a low interest Clean Renewal Energy Bond (CREB) made available through the American Reinvestment interest Clean Renewal Energy Bond (CREB) made available through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act; and $3.7 million from Massachusetts Clean Energy Investment Bonds. and Recovery Act; and $3.7 million from Massachusetts Clean Energy Investment Bonds. "It's wonderful to see those puppies spinning," instructor and advisor Bob Mayer remarked as he left "It's wonderful to see those puppies spinning," instructor and advisor Bob Mayer remarked as he left the building Friday evening. "I think it's great!" the building Friday evening. "I think it's great!" New Spin on Green: Computer Graphic Design Club Creates School Pride T-Shirt Spin on March Green: Graphic Design Club Creates School Pride T-Shirt Mount Wachusett CommunityNew College e-News 28,Computer 2011 The Computer Graphic Design Club is putting a new spin The Computer Graphic Design Club is putting a new spin on going green, with a T-shirt design celebrating the on going green, with a T-shirt design celebrating the college's wind turbine project. All proceeds from T-shirt college's wind turbine project. All proceeds from T-shirt sales will go toward student scholarship funds. sales will go toward student scholarship funds. The design features a silhouette of the college, the two wind The design features a silhouette of the college, the two wind turbines and a word cloud. The word cloud contains the turbines and a word cloud. The word cloud contains the phrase "Catch the Wind-Innovation is a Breeze," along with phrase "Catch the Wind-Innovation is a Breeze," along with additional words to describe the college's energy initiatives. additional words to describe the college's energy initiatives.

"We knew it was a big opportunity," said Noah Chicoine,

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1104942143811.html[5/28/13 11:50:27 AM] who helped create the design along with Doug York and http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1104942143811.html[5/28/13 11:50:27 AM]

Jon Skinner. Club members worked on the slogan ideas, coming up with Innovation is a Breeze, and will continue to volunteer selling the T-shirts.

The project began in November as a collaborative effort between the CGD Club, Leslie Cullen, chair of the Computer Graphic Design program and club advisor and the Marketing and Communications Department, to build school pride for the wind turbine project. "This was the best collaborative effort of the club and the most rewarding," said Cullen, adding that the students acted as junior graphic designers in a real-life design firm. T-shirts are available for $15 to $17 and can be ordered in light blue and pear green in women's sizes and light blue and stonewashed green for men's and unisex sizes. Club members will be taking orders through April 1. Members will be available in the cafeterial hallway on March 29 and March 30 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The shirts also can be purchased from Leslie Cullen at l_cullen@mwcc.mass.edu. - Kim Anderson MWCC Receives North Central Massachusetts College Access Challenge Grant MWCC and seven partner high schools are launching a new college transition program over the next two years that will help prepare 450 North Central Massachusetts high school students, college freshmen and adult learners enroll in college and complete their degrees. MWCC was recently awarded $250,000 from the Massachusetts Department of Education under the College Access Challenge Grant Program to launch the new regional initiative. The North Central Massachusetts College Access program is designed to give underrepresented high school students, college freshmen and adult learners from the region additional tools and support services to help them persist and succeed in college. The partnering schools and educational centers include: Athol High School; Fitchburg High School; Gardner High School; Leominster High School; the Ralph C. Mahar Regional High School in Orange; Murdock Middle/High School in Winchendon; the North Central Charter Essential School in Fitchburg; and the North Central Educational Opportunity Center in Leominster. The program, administered by MWCC's Division of Access and Transition, will serve low-income, minority or first-generation college students as they prepare to enter the local college of their choice. Within the total number of students served, 100 will be high school juniors, 100 will be high school seniors, 175 will be college freshmen and 50 will be adult learners. "This is a very exciting opportunity for students in our region," said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. This new initiative will benefit our communities by helping residents of all ages reach their dream of completing a college degree." "Freshman year is a time when many students struggle with the transition from high school to college," said Pati Gregson, vice president of Access and Transition. "This initiative will allow us, through advising, to follow students from senior year right through to the end of their freshmen year.

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Mount Wachusett Community College e-News June 28, 2011

Go to top Computer Graphic Design Club Raises $1,900 for Student Scholarships Two memorial scholarships at Mount Wachusett Community College received a boost this spring thanks to the Computer Graphic Design club, which designed and sold MWCC wind turbine t-shirts to benefit students in need of financial assistance. The CGD club sold 258 shirts commemorating the college's new wind energy program, which resulted in a profit of $1,908.24 to benefit the David H. Butler Memorial Scholarship and the Robert H. Gilman Memorial Scholarship, both administered by MWCC Foundation, Inc. The club far exceeded its goal of selling 150 shirts. "We are very proud of what we accomplished through our fundraising efforts and never imagined we would get such an overwhelming response from the college and greater community," said Associate Professor Leslie Cullen, chair of the Computer Graphic Design department and the club's advisor. "We had individuals from on and off campus looking to buy t-shirts throughout the month of April and well into May," she said. "The efforts of key CGD club members should be noted: Laura LaBarge, Noah Chicoine, Jon Skinner and Doug York were hugely committed to the success of this project. Together they came up with the design and slogan for the t-shirt, helped to sell shirts at various times on campus, distributed the t-shirts and served as student volunteers for the college during the turbine dedication ceremony," Cullen said. In addition, the students worked with the college's Marketing and Communications Department to develop the project. "As the club advisor and department chair of the Computer Graphic Design programs, I couldn't be more proud of the success of this fundraiser," Cullen said. "We are also thrilled we are able to support the Gilman and Butler scholarships with the $1,900 we raised, and that our efforts will continue support so many students across this community." David Butler served on the campus security force at MWCC from 1974 to 1995, including serving as chief from 1989 to 1995. An alumnus of MWCC, he was committed to the college and the greater Gardner community as demonstrated by his involvement in a variety of agencies and associations. Bob Gilman also was an instrumental and well loved figure at MWCC, where he served in a number of capacities in the student services division from 1970 to 1997, including counselor, director of financial aid and director of advisement. "The contribution by the CGD Club to these memorial scholarships honors the memory of Mr. Butler and Mr. Gilman in a manner that they both would so appreciate," said Foundation Executive Director Darlene Morrilly. Thank you to the club for supporting their legacies." Pictured: Computer Graphic Design students Jon Skinner and Noah Chicoine wearing the club's turbine t-shirts at the April 27 dedication ceremony. Go to top Gateway to College Graduation Celebrates Student Success Amid a sea of theater lights and family and friends, 19 area students reached a milestone when they received their high school diplomas though MWCC's Gateway to College program. A graduation ceremony took place June 8 in the Raymond M. LaFontaine Fine Arts Center.

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Appendix H: Marketing and Communications Projects 3 Yellow Balloons T-shirts e-News and Gardner News

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(Unisex)

$20.00

(shipping charges apply at checkout)

Unisex and Women’s Front Design Only Blue and Yellow Graphic on Gray Shirt (Women’s)

ORDER TODAY! www.cgdclass.com/3yellowballoons 342


$20.00

(shipping charges apply at checkout)

Unisex and Juniors Front and Back Design Blue Graphic on Yellow Shirt (Back)

ORDER TODAY! www.cgdclass.com/3yellowballoons 343


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“3 Yellow Balloons” T-shirts to Benefit the One Fund Boston Apply for Admission

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“3 Yellow Balloons” T-shirts to Benefit the One Fund Boston MAY 6, 2013

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The Computer Graphic Design Club at Mount Wachusett Community College is sponsoring a tshirt sale to benefit The One Fund Boston after the Boston Marathon bombing. Computer Graphic Design Department Chair Leslie Cullen designed the “3 Yellow Balloons” logo and t-

Events MWCC Offers Information Night for Prospective Students James D. Murphy Art Exhibit and Reception at MWCC MWCC Announces Summer Business Luncheon Series

shirts after the tragedy as a fundraising contribution for the victims of the attack. When two bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon on April 15, three yellow balloons were catapulted upward by the force of the extreme blast. The balloons gracefully fluttered and floated above the ground as chaos erupted amongst the crowd. These three yellow balloons are now a profound symbol of the three lives lost in those fateful moments, Cullen said. They also pay homage to all the victims and their long recovery ahead; they salute the heroes and the first responders who so bravely aided in the hours and days that followed; and they appreciate the manner in which all of Boston, our communities and beyond, rose together above it all.

Recent Stories Student Achievements Celebrated During 40th Annual Nurse Pinning Ceremony MWCC Graduates Urged to Act on Their Dreams MWCC Students Inducted Into Honor Societies

“As a professor of graphic design and someone who is passionate about this cause, I wanted a way to help,” Cullen said. “I designed the 3 Yellow Balloons graphic to represent the thoughts and feelings surrounding these tragic events, but most importantly it is a symbol of hope, strength, rising to challenges, and the power of the human spirit. By purchasing a t-shirt, you will be providing the 200-plus victims of the marathon bombings with much needed support in their long road to recovery.” All proceeds from the sales of these t-shirts will go directly to The One Fund Boston, Inc. The t-shirts can be ordered through May 14 at: www.cgdclass.com/3yellowballoons

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Appendix H: Marketing and Communications Projects Prius Car Wrap

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admissions@mwcc.mass.edu. Pictured: Mount Wachusett Community College President Daniel M. Asquino and Automotive Technology Professor Peter Kaufmann with two GM vehicles the college received for the new GM ASEP academic program at MWCC.

MWCC's Prius Adorned with Energy-Themed, Student-Designed Car Wrap MWCC's 2008 Toyota Prius is not only energy efficient, it's now an eye-catching billboard on wheels. This month, the stark white Prius was adorned with a colorful, energy-themed car wrap created by Zak Stoddard, a Computer Graphic Design-Print major at MWCC. Stoddard's design depicts an electrical plug blooming among flowers, text promoting the college's Energy Management and Computer Graphic Design programs, and phrases encouraging onlookers to "Go Green" and "Charge Up Your Career." Sonya Shelton, an adjunct instructor in the Computer Graphic Design program, initially thought up the idea of a car wrap to simultaneously promote the college's green programs and the work of CGD students. A college team, including representatives from Marketing & Communications, Facilities Management and the CGD and Energy Management programs, met to explore the idea. Mount Wachusett Community College e-News July 26, 2011 the college's hybrid Prius, used to deliver mail between campuses The team decided that wrapping

and for employee travel purposes, was a great opportunity to spread the word about the college's academic programs.The wrap, installed by D&G Custom Graphics of Fitchburg, was funded by http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1106786203739.html[5/28/13 11:52:16 AM] MWCC Foundation, Inc. through a grant the foundation received from an anonymous donor to promote the new Energy Management program. Shelton and CGD Chair Professor Leslie Cullen were excited to use the car wrap as a learning opportunity and as a way to showcase students' work. Students in Cullen's capstone CGD course, Portfolio Preparation, had the opportunity to submit designs for the car wrap. "This project was something unique and quite different than anything our students have done in the past," Cullen said. The class worked closely with D&G graphics, the same company that applied MWCC's logo and initials to the college's two wind turbines, to obtain a full-size template for the car. Students were then asked to create various layout sketches from the template provided, then created drafts of their ideas in full scale on the template. The project was presented as a real world project from start to finish. The client, David Schmidt, chair of the Energy Management department, came to the class to discuss the project parameters and provide information on the concept of energy management and what the curriculum entails at MWCC, Cullen said. The Marketing & Communications department provided guidelines for elements to include on the car, such as the college logo, and students researched car wraps, energy management concepts and green solutions for inspiration for their graphics. Ultimately, a variety of creative, attractive submissions were narrowed down to a handful of finalists, with Stoddard's winning submission selected by the college's Executive Council. "All the students who volunteered to design a car wrap should be commended for their workmanship and effort," Cullen said. "The final design was chosen by the Executive Council, and I personally couldn't be more proud of Zak Stoddard and his design. Zak has been a consummate professional throughout the entire project, from the initial concept to working closely with D&G Graphics to make sure production went smoothly. Zak deserves a world of credit for his work," she said. "I look forward to his future successes and am thrilled to have his work showcased and the CGD department recognized every day when the Prius hits the road. Also, I couldn't be more excited about what was learned along the way. The educational value of this type of project surpasses so much of what we could have taught from a book or in the classroom alone," Cullen said. Stoddard said implementing the project from start to finish provided an invaluable learning experience. "It was a great opportunity for me because of the people I got to meet at the college through this process," Stoddard said. "I was glad to have this opportunity because it allowed me to gain experience in the field I plan to go into. When I saw this car finished, it made me very proud." Pictured: Computer Graphic Design student Zak Stoddard with MWCC's Toyota Prius now decorated with the car wrap he designed. Go to top

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MWCC Expanding Opportunities in the Dental Field Mount Wachusett Community College is


Appendix H: News Storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Awards

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- Angela Marini Pictured: Luz Cruz, president of the ESL Club at MWCC, speaks about the club's civic engagement activities during The Democracy Commitment regional meeting. Also pictured, club member Yendy Rodriguez, club secretary Maria Quinteros and MWCC Academic Counselor JosĂŠ Manguel. Go to top MWCC Receives 13 NCMPR Awards for Communications Excellence The National Council for Marketing and Public Relations, District 1, has awarded 13 Medallion Awards for excellence in communications to Mount Wachusett Community College's Marketing & Communications division. The awards were announced on Nov. 14 during the annual district conference in Baltimore, MD. More than 315 entries were submitted in 41 categories. MWCC received six gold Medallion Awards, including a top award for the college's print viewbook and for the "I did it. You can too" marketing campaign featuring MWCC students and alumni in print, radio, online, billboard and mall advertising. The college also received gold awards in the radio advertising category for the "I did it. You can too" series; in the online marketing/advertising category for the branding of MWCC across social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter; and in the social marketing category, for the Green on Green Street blog. In addition, the college won a gold award in the communications success story category for media coverage, new media, community outreach and photography pertaining to the construction and dedication of the college's two wind turbines, which also incorporated videos created by Joel Anderson, chair of the Broadcasting and Electronic Media department, students Tiffianie LeBlanc, Andrew LeBel, Anthony Scheffield, Benjamin Arsenault, and the Media Services department. MWCC received four silver Medallion Awards, including an award in the outdoor advertising/billboard category for the "Innovation is a Breeze" wind turbine banners created in conjunction with Computer Graphic Design students Doug York, Jon Skinner and Noah Chicoine and CGD Chair Leslie Cullen; and in the transit advertising category for the Prius car wrap created in conjunction with Cullen's CGD class and CGD student Zak Stoddard. In addition, the college received silver awards in the government/community relations category for the AmeriCorps Job Ready Project, which is a collaboration between MWCC's Center for Democracy & Humanity and Fitchburg State University; and in the website category Mount Wachusett Community College e-News Nov. 22, for 2011the homepage refresh implemented as an interim step in the college's website redesign. MWCC received three bronze Medallion Awards, including in the postcard category for the summer

registration flip flop mailing; in the original photography category for a photo depicting in http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1108742266501.html#LETTER.BLOCK17[5/28/13 12:27:07students PM]

the courtyard that was used on the cover of the college viewbook; and in the specialty advertising campaign category, for the turbine pride t-shirts created in conjunction with Cullen and CGD students. An affiliate of the American Association of Community Colleges, the NCMPR is the only organization of its kind that exclusively represents communications professionals at community and technical colleges. District 1 is comprised of community colleges in the eastern U.S. from Maine to the District of Columbia, as well as in the maritime provinces of Canada and in the United Kingdom. Public Relations Director Janice O'Connor and former Marketing Director Nichole Carter served as co-chairs of the Medallions committee, with assistance from Vice President of Marketing & Communications Robin Duncan and department staff Christine Sargent, Sarah McMaster, Dana Armstrong and Stephanie Pinto. Don Knower, Darlene Morrilly, Lisa Williams, Kristine Asselin, Karen Doherty, Shelley Errington-Nicholson, Fagan Forhan and MWCC's media services and IT departments also provided assistance in the process. In this capacity, MWCC took the leadership role of coordinating the awards program, which was judged by an independent panel of communications professionals from the region.

Area professionals serving as judges were: Mary Lourdes Burke, chief communications officer at HealthAlliance Hospital, Leominster Campus; Andres Caamano, senior news editor at The Gardner News; Tim Carelli, vice president of sales, Travers Printing; James Casey, Principal Creative Director of Casey Design & Visual Communications; Ed Collier of Ed Collier Photography; Ron DiNinno, independent film director/producer; Tisha Geeza, senior account executive, Davis Advertising; Abby Guinard, president/creative director, Barbanel Design, Inc.; Leah Lamson, editor, Worcester Telegram & Gazette; Matt Maguy, founder/strategist, Compassed; Dana Mattson, senior 349 partner, MassMedia; Maegen McCaffrey, chief communications officer, RCAP Solutions; Gary McGovern, account executive, CBS Radio/Digital/Event Marketing; Jim Pond, founder/strategist,


Jr., MWCC executive vice initiatives, president emeritus andfor resident engineer, energy for his vision. leadership on the project and other campus energy and to both their renewable and other campus energy initiatives, and to both for their renewable energy vision. A charter signatory of the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment, MWCC A charter signatory the American awards Collegeinand University Climate Commitment, MWCC was recognized withofenvironmental 2011 from thePresidents' U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was recognized with environmental awards in 2011offrom the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Second Nature/ACUPCC and the Commonwealth Massachusetts for its success in renewable Secondand Nature/ACUPCC energy conservation. and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for its success in renewable energy and conservation. Go to Top Go to Top "Catch the Wind at MWCC" Communications Project Wins Top National Award Mount Wachusett Community College e-News March 27, 2012 "Catch the Wind at MWCC" Communications Project Wins Top National Award "Catch the Wind at MWCC," a multi-faceted "Catch the Wind project at MWCC," a multi-faceted communications developed throughout communications project developed throughout the construction and activation of the the construction and activation of the a top college's wind turbines, has received college's wind received a top award from theturbines, Nationalhas Council for Marketing award fromRelations. the National Council for Marketing and Public and Public Relations.

MWCC's Marketing and Communications Division received the coveted gold Paragon

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1109571983514.html[5/28/13 11:55:48 AM] Award in11:55:48 the "Communications Success Story" http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1109571983514.html[5/28/13 AM]

category. The division shares the honor with faculty, staff and students who provided their talent, time and skills on various aspects of the campaign. The award was announced March 13 during the NCMPR national conference in San Francisco. The construction and dedication of MWCC's two 1.65 MW Vestas V82 wind turbines from September 2010 to April 2011 provided an extraordinary opportunity to showcase the college's renewable energy initiatives through an in-house, multi-channel communications project incorporating traditional media, social media, video and photography documentation, a special event, and staff and student graphic design contributions in the areas of signage, banners, invitations, event program and t-shirts. From a communications standpoint, the project showcased MWCC's decade-long commitment to sustainability and the college's leadership role in the national campus climate commitment movement, while enhancing awareness about the benefits associated with renewable energy. The communications project consisted of ongoing press releases and story proposals to media outlets as the construction ensued and leading up to the April 2011 dedication ceremony; social media, including the launch of the Green on Green Street blog and posts to the college's Facebook and YouTube pages; a turbine construction video and dedication ceremony video created by Broadcasting & Electronic Media Department Chair Joel Anderson, the Media Services Department and students for use in various media outlets; photography capturing virtually all aspects of construction for use in the blog, media releases and other venues; and several graphic design projects, including those done in conjunction with Computer Graphic Design Department Chair Leslie Cullen and CGD students. The department also worked with the President's office, Advancement and External Affairs, Print Services, and other departments to prepare materials for the dedication ceremony. Independent judges selected to review the entries noted "excellent, sustained media coverage" and "student creativity and participation" as key factors that earned MWCC an A+ in the category. More than 1,800 entries were submitted by over 200 colleges in 44 categories. Sponsored by the NCMPR, the Paragon Awards recognize outstanding achievement in communications at community and technical colleges. It is the only national competition of its kind that honors excellence exclusively among marketing and PR professionals at two-year colleges in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. NCMPR is an affiliate of the American Association of Community Colleges. Pictured: MWCC's Marketing & Communications staff with the NCMPR Gold Paragon Award, from left: Marketing Director Alexa Poulin; Coordinator of College Graphics Stephanie Pinto; Administrative Assistant Joyce Cormier; Director of New Media Sarah McMaster; Public Relations Director Janice O'Connor; Vice President of Marketing & Communications Robin Duncan; and Web and Digital Asset Specialist Dana Armstrong. Go to Top Congresswoman Niki Tsongas Visits MWCC Congresswoman Niki Tsongas visited MWCC on March 15 to tour the campus, learn about the college's academic and community initiatives, and meet with

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Gateway and Pathways 2012 graduates MWCC Receives CASE Gold Circle of Excellence Award for Turbine Communications Mount Wachusett Community College has received the gold Circle of Excellence Award from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) in the Public Relations and Community Relations category for the multi-faceted "Catch the Wind at MWCC" communications project. The communications effort highlighted the activation and dedication of MWCC's two 1.65 MW wind turbines, as well as the college's decade-long commitment to renewable energy and energy conservation; sustainability awards received from Massachusetts Secretary of Energy and state and national agencies for the wind project; Environmental Affairs Richard K. Sullivan Jr. and leadership role in the national campus climate addressing the audience during the 2011 wind commitment movement. turbine dedication ceremony. Further, the effort showcased MWCC's integral role in the Massachusetts "Leading by Example - Clean Energy and Efficient Buildings" program. The story of MWCC's wind energy initiative became an integrated, cross-college concept, sparking excitement and interest throughout the campus and involving the Marketing & Communications Division, the President's Office, Institutional Advancement, Facilities Management, Media Services, Student Life, faculty, students and student clubs. The project combined in-house communications efforts in the areas of public relations, social media, website, and photography with service-learning projects for students majoring in Computer Graphic Design and Broadcasting and Electronic Media. Aspects of the project included ongoing media relations; graphic design projects for signage, banners, turbine pride t-shirts sold to raise funds for student scholarships, and a car wrap; social media projects including to Facebook, YouTube and the college's Green on Green Street Mount Wachusett Community College e-News June posts 25, 2012 blog; video projects and photography. The project also created opportunities for others. For example, key state agencies, Congressman John Olver, and environmental organizations such as http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs023/1102470512203/archive/1110331618855.html#LETTER.BLOCK52[5/28/13 11:58:37 AM] the U.S Department of Energy, posted news and videos on their own websites, blogs and Facebook pages. "This gold recognition is a great tribute to everyone at the college for stepping up to the challenge of incorporating new ways to communicate and bring greater visibility to our college," said President Daniel M. Asquino. "The wind project was a complex one, with many other sustainability efforts being implemented at the same time. Our communications team did an outstanding job of building a campaign that tied all these efforts together, and bringing not only local, but national recognition to Mount Wachusett Community College." Robin Duncan, MWCC vice president of Marketing & Communications commented, "I am very fortunate to work with a great group of people, and I am especially proud of this recognition as it truly showcases the diverse and cutting-edge talents among team members. This project was a collaborative college-wide effort and the communications strategy was a successful one. That's what we do, here in our office - spread the good word about Mount Wachusett Community College! But it's nice to be acknowledged by our colleagues for doing our jobs well, across all kinds of media traditional and new." Advancement professionals from a number of higher education institutions, including Columbia University, Dartmouth College, Mount Holyoke College, Rutgers, Seton Hall University and Tulane University, served as judges in a wide range of categories for the 2012 CASE awards, which focused on work completed in 2011. MWCC joined silver award winner Duke University and bronze award winner Thomas More College as the top winners in the PR/Community Relations category. CASE is an international professional association serving educational institutions and the advancement professionals who work on their behalf in alumni relations, communications, development, marketing and allied areas. CASE helps its members build stronger relationships with their alumni and donors, raise funds for campus projects, produce recruitment materials, market their institutions to prospective students, diversify the profession, and foster public support of education. The Circle of Excellence awards celebrate programs that measure up to high standards, contribute to a growing body of knowledge and add substance and insight to the profession and its practitioners. Go to top MWCC Instructor Receives Massachusetts Colleges Online Award MWCC instructor Kristin Riordon has been recognized with a Course of Distinction Award from Massachusetts Colleges Online, for her online 351 course, "Comparative Religion." Riordon, an Athol resident, received the award during the June 6 Massachusetts Colleges Online: Sharing Best Practices conference.


Section II: Mission, Goals and Target Population APPENDIX I:

Technology Upgrades List Curriculum Changes 2008-2013

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Appendix I: Technology Upgrades List

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Technology Upgrades Hardware & Software Upgrades 2008-2013 The goal of the CGD program is to stay current with industry standards and market trends, and to maintain state-of-the-art computer labs at the college. The following is a list of new hardware and software purchased for the CGD program between 2008 and 2013. •

Effective Fall 2008 Hardware Updates: Apple iMac Lease With our 4-year Macintosh computer lease due to expire on Dec. 31, 2008, the CGD department established a new lease agreement in October 2008 with Apple. This new lease agreement provided our department with much needed, state of the art upgrades and computing power for two of our three computer labs. The lease and work agreement entailed a great deal of negotiating, but upon approval of the final 3-year agreement the following equipment and services were provided to the CGD Department: • • • • • •

Forty 20-inch iMac computers with Intel Duo Core processors, keyboards, and mice 3 years of Apple Care hardware maintenance for all 40 computers The computers were unpackaged, imaged and installed by Apple Certified technicians during two days in mid-October 2008. All 37 of our old G5 Macintosh computers were boxed and shipped to a recycling company. One day, on-site, image training will be provided to the MWCC ISS technicians. This new lease saved the college $2700 per year over our previous lease agreement.

Software Updates: Quark Xpress As part of our computer upgrades, the CGD department purchased and upgraded Quark Xpress, from version 6.5 to 8.0. This is the industry leading software in page layout utilized throughout the graphic design industry. Students and faculty adjusted their curriculum and training throughout the semester to match this upgrade.

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Effective Fall 2009 Hardware Updates: Nemesis (CGD storage server): New drives to accommodate our storage needs and to eliminate permissions issues were ordered and installed in Nov 2009 for our storage server. PC Lab—October 09 Updates In October 2009, ISS acquired and installed 19 new, Windows-based, PC computers with 20” flat screen displays for room 354, Professor Swerzenski’s office, and one is also being used as student station in room 350. The lab was replaced when several computers and monitors began to fail in Sept 09 and the units or parts could not be replaced due to the age of the ailing systems. The computers as of Sept 09 were 4 years old. The average refresh rate on campus has traditionally been 3 years. It was decided through administration and the ISS group to complete a full refresh of the systems in October. The computers were installed and imaged on a weekend in midOctober. Professor Swerzenski came in to assist the ISS team with the image development and the deployment. By Monday morning all systems were functioning perfecting and the teaching and learning in room 354 proceeded without interruption. Additionally, this lab was the first test lab for the new Windows 7 operating system and was monitored throughout the semester. Software Updates Adobe CS5 Over the summer of 2009, The ISS department installed the newest Adobe Creative Suite (CS5) software in all three of our graphic design labs. This required CGD faculty members to prepare their syllabi and course content across both the CGD and CGW programs to reflect the changes in the computer software. As well, faculty updated their own skills to be able to provide the highest level of software training to our students. By upgrading to and utilizing the newest Adobe software for graphic design we are staying on the cutting edge of this ever-changing industry.

Effective Fall 2010 Hardware Updates: New Mac Snow Leopard Server Purchased With our previous server ailing, IT purchased the newest Snow Leopard server for use by all faculty and students in the CGD and CGW curriculum. This new server was available for student use at the start of the fall 2011 semester.

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Software Updates: Universal Type Font Server Over the summer months and into the fall semester of 2010, the IT department in collaboration with the CGD Lab Aide, worked to upgrade our aging font management system. We were transitioning from Extensis Suitcase X1 to the Universal Type Server (UTS). The project was completed with the assistance of Extensis, as the transition proved to be complex, but was finally completed by late October/early November. PC Lab—Room 354—Testing of Windows 7 The PC lab was the first lab to utilize and fully test the functionality for the new Windows 7 operating system and was monitored throughout the past year by IT. The system worked well and testing proved to be valuable for campus-wide use of the operating system. Operating System Updates for Macs In July of 2010, the newest operating system, Snow Leopard 10.6, was purchased for the Macintosh computers. This software was installed throughout our Mac labs and was utilized throughout the 2010-2011 academic year with no major issues reported. This system proved to be very stable for our design environment. Kapersky Anti-Virus Added The IT department added the Kapersky anti-virus software to all of our Mac and PC computers in fall of 2010. This proved to be a valuable tool, as it detected and quarantined several Windows based viruses that were attached to students’ thumb drives. It also detected a virus being housed on the server. IT was able to remove and clean out these viruses with the aide of this new software. •

Effective Fall 2011 Software Upgrade: Adobe CS 5.5 In July 2011, all of the CGD labs and faculty computers were upgraded with the newest Adobe Creative Suite software—Adobe CS 5.5. This software was utilized throughout the 2011-2012 academic year with no major issues reported. This software has proven to be very stable for our design environment.

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Effective Fall 2012 Hardware Upgrade: Apple iMac Lease With our 2008 Macintosh computer lease due to expire on June 30, 2012, the CGD department established a new 3 year lease agreement in July 2013 with Apple. This new lease agreement included: • • •

Thirty-nine 20-inch iMac computers One 15-inch MacBook Pro 3 years of Apple Care hardware maintenance for all 40 computers

Software Upgrade: Adobe CS 6 In July 2012, all of the CGD labs and faculty computers were upgraded with the newest Adobe Creative Suite software—Adobe CS 6. This software was utilized throughout the 2012-2013 academic year with no major issues reported. By upgrading to and utilizing the newest Adobe software for graphic design we are staying on the cutting edge of this ever-changing industry. Printer Upgrade: Xerox Phaser 7800 A new duplexing, large format laser printer was purchased and installed in the summer of 2012. This printer handles all of the CGD department’s color printing needs and replaces a similar, but aging Xerox Phaser 7400.

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Appendix I: Curriculum Changes 2008-2013

360


Changes to the Degree Programs and Certificates 2008–2013 2008/2009 Academic Year Curriculum Changes to CGW: The CGW program made some significant curriculum changes during the 08/09 academic year. The changes are as follows: •

Instead of requiring CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging for all web majors, we now allow a choice between CGD204 and BCT115 Digital Photography. Rationale: Most web clients request images for their websites that cannot be purchased through a stock image gallery. Since the web is a lowresolution, non-print platform, providing clients with digital-based images is extremely helpful and cost effective. Training web students in the proper uses and technical know-how of a digital camera will make our web majors more marketable. However, having CGD204 as an option allows our students to gain more practice and experience with Adobe Photoshop, one of the premiere and most widely used software. Students can now choose one course over the other.

CGW majors are now required to take CGD242 Advanced Website Animation and CGD244 E-Commerce Design in place of a CGD Restrictive Elective and a CGD Professional Elective. Rationale: With a new adjunct faculty member who is committed to teaching courses for our program, and a long-standing need to train our students in the advanced tools and techniques used in web design, now was the time to enact a change in our curriculum. This change will provide our students with the advanced, higher level training necessary to obtain the skills and preparation to do all levels of web design upon graduation.

2009/2010 Academic Year •

CGD204 Adjusted as a Requirement in the Web Design Program We have reduced the use of Adobe Photoshop as a web development program. CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging is no longer required for web majors. Students can now choose between taking CGD204 and PHO115 Digital Photography. The reduction and adjustment in emphasis on Photoshop for web development brings our curriculum more in line with the industry trends and standards.

361


CGD102—Indesign and Quark As part of our curriculum changes in 08-09, we eliminated CGD237 (a course in Quark Xpress) as a core course requirement and replaced it with CGD235—a course that focuses on typography and uses InDesign as the primary software/tool for design. As a result, Professor Leslie Cullen implemented the use of both Quark Xpress and InDesign into her CGD102 Publication Design class. This was the first time both industry standard page layout applications were taught and used in the same course. The course curriculum was broken into two units with Quark Xpress being taught and used for the first creative design project, and InDesign utilized for the second creative project. The response to learning both was positive and students will now have the skills necessary to work with either page layout software. This will make our students far more marketable in the print design industry.

CGW Curriculum—Name changes for 2010-2011 catalog: CGD110 Introduction to Animation and Gaming changed to CGD110 Introduction to Animation Rationale: “Gaming” gave students the wrong impression, as gaming is only a small module in the course.

CGD112 Communication in Design and Technology changed to Communication in Multimedia Design. Rationale: Puts this course more inline with what is taught and with the industry standards.

New CGD225 Advanced Electronic Illustration Elective (will be offered in fall 2010) Rationale: This course will provide CGD Print majors with greater experience with electronic illustration, advanced techniques in Adobe Illustrator and other related media. This course will allow students to explore their own illustration style, and apply these skills to print and online media for the purpose of self-promotion and marketing. Also addressed within the course will be the enhanced visibility of the designer, networking, and the investigation of and exposure to other illustrators and designers within the industry.

2010/2011 Academic Year • No new curriculum changes were made.

362


2011/2012 Academic Year Curriculum Changes In an effort to broaden the offerings of the Computer Graphic Design department and to involve a wider cross-section of the student population, major changes were proposed and approved to the structure, course content, and specific courses within the CGD curriculum. •

The substitutiom of CIS127 Computer Technologies as an alternative to CGD109 Introduction to Web Media. Rationale: This change allows for any student taking the required CIS127 course to be exposed to the CGD labs, philosophy, specialized software, and creative environment.

Other changes approved through academic governance include: Name changes that better reflect course sequence and content: o Creative Web Design – Creative Web Design I o Integrated Website Design – Creative Web Design II o Advanced Website Animation – Interactive Web Design

Sequence changes and new courses: o CIS127 (as noted above) added to both the Print and Web curriculums. o Social Science Elective was moved to the last semester to accommodate the addition of ART251 Two Dimensional Design in the 2nd semester of both the Print and Web curriculums. o ART251 became the approved Humanities course for the CGD and CGW programs. o Advanced Digital Imaging will be required for both majors. The choice to take either PHO115 Digital Photography or CGD204 Advanced Digital Imaging has been removed from the Web curriculum. o Designing for E-Commerce was moved from the 3rd semester to the 4th semester in the web curriculum, while the Interactive Website Design class was moved to the 3rd semester rather than the 4th. These two courses were swapped in the sequence. o With the addition of CIS127 utilized as a Business elective, a professional elective was added to the Web curriculum. o MKT241 Advertising was replaced with MKT142 Marketing in the Print curriculum. o The CGD Restrictive Elective was replaced with CGD241 Creative Web Design II in the Print curriculum.

New professional elective options were added for both curriculums.

363


Section III: Curriculum APPENDIX J:

Service Learning Client Surveys: Print and Web Client Survey Questions Print Client Survey Results Web Client Survey Results Project Assessments

364


365


Appendix J: Service Learning Client Surveys Print and Web Client Survey Questions

366


2013—Client Survey—PRINT 1. Service Learning Survey

On behalf of the Computer Graphic Design Department and our Portfolio Preparation students, I wish to thank you for  giving our new designers an opportunity to learn from a real­world experience by designing a project for you this  semester.     Would you please take just a few minutes to complete this evaluation? Your evaluation will not only help me, but it will  help the students in their future endeavors. If you could reply to this survey promptly the student will be able to have a  more comprehensive evaluation before the semester is over.     Please respond to this survey as soon as possible, but no later than Tuesday, May 1. We appreciate your prompt  attention.    Thank you again for your participation this semester!    Leslie Cullen, Department Chair  Computer Graphic Design Print Program  Mount Wachusett Community College 

*1. Client information Client Name: Designer's Name: Project Title/Description:

*2. How many times did the student meet with you in person this semester? j 0 times in person k l m n j 1 time k l m n

j 2 times k l m n j 3 times k l m n j 4 times k l m n

   

j 5 or more times k l m n

Please comment on your answer. 

5

6

367


2013—Client Survey—PRINT

*3. Overall was the student/client communication satisfactory?

(Effectiveness of Communication)

(5) = Excellent­­exceeded my expectations (4) = Very Good­­met my expectations (3) = Good­­average (2) = Fair­­could use some improvement (1) = Poor­­did not meet expectations Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

N/A

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Greeting and Handshake

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Attire

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Demeanor

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Attitude

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Verbal Communication 

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Ability to Listen

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

If the student could not 

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

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j k l m n

The student designer  contacted you to arrange  meetings. He/she was on time and  prepared each time you  met. When the student met with  you, he/she presented  themself in an acceptable  manner

Skills

meet with you for a  scheduled meeting, he/she  contacted you to  reschedule. If you, or the student  designer, had questions or a  need to follow­up, the  student was prompt and  thorough. The student remained in  regular and frequent  contact with you throughout  the project (in person, by  phone, by email). If email was the means of  communication, the student  wrote clear and concise  business emails with little or  no typing errors.

368


2013—Client Survey—PRINT Please provide feedback to your answers where ever possible. 

5

6

369


2013—Client Survey—PRINT

*4. How satisfied were you with the students initial preparation? (5) = Excellent­­exceeded my expectations (4) = Very Good­­met my expectations (3) = Good­­average (2) = Fair­­could use some improvement (1) = Poor­­did not meet expectations The student showed a  willingness to hear my 

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

N/A

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

initial ideas and thoughts. He/she conducted a  professional client interview  to obtain the necessary  project information. The interview included a  series of specific questions  to assess design needs and  goals The student designer  prepared drafts with various  ideas (concepts) and  layouts. The student presented and  communicated his/her  various concepts and  layouts in a clear and  informative manner. The student easily  translated my ideas into  working concepts/layouts. Please provide feedback to your answers where ever possible. 

5

6

370


2013—Client Survey—PRINT

*5. How satisfied are you with the work completed? (5) = Excellent­­exceeded my expectations (4) = Very Good­­met my expectations (3) = Good­­average (2) = Fair­­could use some improvement (1) = Poor­­did not meet expectations The results of the project  are... The project was completed  in the time allotted The project looks  professional The final design has met  our needs/goals

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

N/A

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

Did the student designer provide you with more design work than you anticipated? Less design work than you anticipated? Please explain. 

5

6

371


2013—Client Survey—PRINT

*6. How would you rate the professionalism of this designer? The student designer has a  grasp of the graphic design 

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

N/A

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

j k l m n

profession. He/she showed an ability to  communicate design  concepts. He/she showed an ability to  achieve project goals. He/she showed an ability to  design with skill, creativity  and professionalism. The student managed their  time and the project  efficiently and effectively. Please provide feedback to your answers where ever possible. 

5

6

*7. What do you feel are the student's main strengths?

What are the student's weaknesses—what can they improve upon? 5 6

372


2013—Client Survey—PRINT

*8. Would you recommend this designer to other individuals?

j Yes k l m n j No k l m n

Please explain your reasons why or why not? 

5

6

*9. How do you feel the the client/student relationship can be improved?

What could you (the client) have done differently? What could the student have done differently? 5 6

*10. What do you believe are the benefits and difficulties of this learning experience?

Comments and suggestions:

5 6

2. Thank you!

I appreciate the time you have given to this service learning experience and the time you took to complete this evaluation  today.     If you wish to contact me at any time to discuss your student designer further, please email me at  l_cullen@mwcc.mass.edu or please call me at: 978.630.9347. Thanks again! 

373


Appendix J: Service Learning Client Surveys Print Client Survey Results

374


1. Client  information 2010—Client  Survey—PRINT Client  Name:

Designer's Name:

Project Title/Description:

North County  Land  Trust/Fitchburg   Greenway  Committee

Noah Chicoine

Fitchburg Watershed  Trails

Susan Goldstein Maureen  Provost Jessica  Connors Paul  Wolff Greg  Clement Bill  White

Ashley Stevens Megan  Weisel Dave  Bartlett Evan  Cormier Ericks  Liepins David  Bartlett

Mount Observer  news  stand Week  of  the  Young  Child  Art  Show  Poster Relay  for  Life  Benefit Professional  Development  flyers Student  Center  "Get  Involved"    Display  boards Fitchburg  Longsjo  Classic  Poster

Gardner 225th  Anniversary  Committee

Barbara Stowell

Historic Gardner  Booklet  and  Walking  Tour   Brochure

Sarah Marchessault

LAS Communications  poster

Susan Goldstein

2011—Client Survey—PRINT Client  Name: Spanish  American  Center Linda  Oldach Young  Entrepreneurs  Society Leslie  Cullen Greater  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce Doug  Parker David  C.  Graham

Designer's Name: Zac Meagan  Beauchamp Josh  Nichols Shelby  Skowronski Julanne  Thibeault Curtis  Croteau Madeline  Plaut  (sp?)

Lynne Franciose

Michael Rolfe

Thayer Memorial  Library Montachusett  Addiction  Council Josh  McNamara

Margaret Grande Justin  Zanghi

Project Title/Description: Branding  Identity redesign  of  library  PR  materials BizVenture  print  materials CGD  Exhibit  posters,  slides  and  signage Flyers  for  Chamber  Speaker  Program CLS  Banner Swim  Lesson  Handbook Green  Street  Cafe  Weekly/Daily  Menu  and   Catering  Gui Library  Letterhead  and  Stationary MAC  Center  Brochure-­‐flyer Veteran  Homestead

Noreen Piazza,  Planning  Director,  Town  of   Eduardo  Franco Lancaster

Sterling-­‐Lancaster Community  Television  Logo

MVOC-­‐ Rachel  Andler Maureen  Provost Justine  Fallon First  Church  Unitarian  Universalist

"Did You  Know"  type  flyers Week  of  the  Young  Child,  Poster,  Cards Recycling  Posters design  marketing  brochures

Carina Morand Katie  Tonet Angela  Fidler Luan  Nguyen

375


2012—Client Survey—PRINT Client  Name: Town  of  Athol L.H.S.  Teen  Reach  Youth  Venture

Designer's Name: Heather  Chadsey Matthew  Phelps

Project Title/Description: Economic  development  flyers Bullying  Book

Associate Professor  Maureen  J.  Provost

Maegan Beauchamp

Week of  the  Young  Child  poster                                                     and  postcard  design

Sharon Henrickson East  Quabbin  Land  Trust Kris  Cullen,  GFA  Federal  Credit  Union Leominster  Recreation  Department Joanie  Cohen-­‐Mitchell Devens  Eco-­‐Efficiency  Center

Rachel Letourneau Renee  Douglas Trudy  Baranoski Daniel  Provost Britney  Mckeen Alex  Gyles

Children's Financial  Activity  Book Property  brochure Student  Services  Brochure Logo  and  Facility  Brochure United  Way  brochure Logo  and  Brochure

Emily Austin-­‐Bruns  (North  Central  Charter   Jonathan  Van  Dyke Essential  School)

NCCES Magazine

2013—Client Survey—PRINT Client  Name: LUK  INC  Mentoring

Designer's Name: Eddie  Sanchez

Project Title/Description: Mentor  Recruitment

Associate Professor  Maureen  Provost,   Garrison  Center  for  ECE

Tamara Malay

Week of  the  Young  Child  Art  Show,  Poster,  cards   and  announcement

Greater Gardner  Suicide  Prevention               Task  Force

Tamara Malay

Suicide Prevention  Postcard

Susan Goldstein

Rebecca Landry

Relay for  life  t-­‐shirt  design

Millers River  Watershed  Council-­‐                     Keith  Davies

Rebecca Landry

Upper Millers  Blue  Trail  map

Bigelow Free  Public  Library  (Erin  Klemm)

Jon Skinner

Print Logo  Design

376


377

0.0% 0.0% 11.1% 33.3% 22.2% 33.3%

Response Percent 0.0% 6.3% 6.3% 37.5% 18.8% 31.3%

Response Percent

6

0 1 1 6 3 5 16

Response Count 0.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 50.0% 20.0%

Response Percent

2012

2010

Please comment  on  your  answer.

2011

7

0 2 1 0 5 2 10

Response Count 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 50.0% 0.0% 50.0%

Response Percent

2013

6

0 0 0 3 0 3 6

Response Count 0.0% 7.3% 7.3% 29.3% 24.4% 31.7%

Total Percent

26

0 3 3 12 10 13 41

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

Luan met  with  me  to  plan,  to  review,  to  help  me  see  what  he  was  doing,  to  get  clarity  about  the  brochure  and  to  present  me  with  the  final  product

She met  with  me  to  see  the  space  and  kickoff  the  project

Katie was  always  on  time,  pleasant,  enthusiastic,  flexible  and  professional.

Michael scheduled    appointments  each  week  with  me  to  review  his  progress.    He  was  always  prompt  and  prepared.

3 times  once  for  initial  meeting,  second  with  a  draft  which  we  went  over  and  then  a  final  meeting  to  solidfy  touch  up

My schedule  was  hectic,  making  it  difficult  for  Curtis  to  see  me,  so  he  was  very  good  in  emailing  and  contacting  me.

2011

In addition,  Sarah  followed  up  with  e-­‐mails  and  quick  conversations  in  the  hallway  (since  my  office  is  right  across  from  Graphic  Design)

Barbara was  very  professional  and  our  meetings  were  productive!!!  It  was  a  joy  to  work  with  such  a  dedicated,  talented  and  organized  person!    When  we  met  of  thought  of  her  as  a  graphic   designer,  never  as  a  student  graphic  designer!

Very prompt.

Evan and  I  met  regularly  throughout  the  semester.

Excellent work  ethic

7

0 0 1 3 2 3 9

Response Count

My meetings  with  Noah  were  pleasant  and  productive.

Please comment  on  your   answer.

0 times  in  person 1  time 2  times 3  times 4  times 5  or  more  times answered  question

Answer Options

2010

2. How  many  times  did  the  student  meet  with  you  in  person  this  semester?


378

2012

2013

Jon invited me to the MWCC and was happy to give me a tour of the campus. He also attended two of our Board of the Trustees meetings to gain feedback on the logo mockups he had done for us. I was happy with his willingness to meet in person.

Our meetings were very productive. We also communicated over email and a few snail mails. Her enthusiasm was very good and she enjoys her work. She had good initiative to offer design suggestions and responded well to feedback.

Both in person and email. She was in continual touch.

Tamara met with me on an as needed basis and was very accomodating to my schedule.

Tamara was very professional. I enjoyed our meetings.

We met for an initial informational session, then for a tour of the campus/classroom and again when he attended one of our Celebrations to take photographs to utilize in our marketing materials.

Alex was  always  punctual  and  prepared  and  took  notes  of  our  conversation

We were  not  able  to  meet  due  to  my  schedule  and  Dan's  schedule  the  week  before  the  final  brochure  was  due.    Then  Dan  was  unable  to  meet  a  few  days  before  the  final  brochure  was  due.   We  had  to  communicate  via  e-­‐mail.  This  may  have  caused  Dan  some  stress.

Our communication  was  primarily  based  in  email,  therefore  we  met  in  person  at  the  start  of  the  project  and  again  mid-­‐way  through  the  project  to  ensure  we  had  adequate  face  to  face  time.

Maegan was  flexible  and  professional.    She  is  extremely  talented. We  have  held  bi-­‐weekly  meeting  with  Rachel  and  our  Book  Committee  to  review  her  materials  and  to  provide  additional  guidance.

Matthew was  very  cordial  and  professional  during  our  meetings.    He  politely  listened  to  the  comments  or  questions  the  members  of  Teen  Reach  made.    Matthew  then  provided  suggestions   for  change  or  improvement.

Good productive  meetings.    She  came  well  prepared.


379

25

28 27 24 31 32 25 23

19

20

22

21

He/she was  on  time  and  prepared   each  time  you  met.

When the  student  met  with  you,   he/she  presented  themself  in  an   acceptable  manner

Greeting and  Handshake

Attire

Demeanor

Attitude

Verbal Communication  Skills

Ability to  Listen

If the  student  could  not  meet  with   you  for  a  scheduled  meeting,   he/she  contacted  you  to   reschedule.

If you,  or  the  student  designer,  had   questions  or  a  need  to  follow-­‐up,   the  student  was  prompt  and   thorough.

The student  remained  in  regular   and  frequent  contact  with  you   throughout  the  project  (in  person,   by  phone,  by  email).

If email  was  the  means  of   communication,  the  student  wrote   clear  and  concise  business  emails   with  little  or  no  typing  errors. 12

11

14

5

11

10

5

6

10

7

10

12

8

3

3

3

3

5

6

4

4

7

6

2

2

7

3

0

3

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

0

0

12

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

4.63

4.44

4.56

4.63

4.63

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

Rating Average

9 16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

9

4.27

3.69

3.75

4.38

4.19

4.25

4.69

4.63

4.31

4.53

4.56

4.31

4.25

7

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

4.20

4.50

4.50

4.75

4.50

4.60

4.70

4.70

4.40

4.40

4.70

4.50

4.67

10

9

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

4.17

4.00

4.33

4.33

4.50

4.50

4.67

4.67

4.33

4.50

4.33

4.33

4.33

6

5

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

4.32

4.16

4.29

4.52

4.46

4.51

4.68

4.67

4.43

4.53

4.57

4.45

4.48

41

30

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

41

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

Response Total   Count Average

2013

Response Rating   Count Average

2012

Response Rating   Count Average

2011

Response Rating   Count Average

2010

answered question

0

5

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Very Good Good Fair Poor N/A

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

25

Excellent

The student  designer  contacted   you  to  arrange  meetings.

Answer Options

Totals 2010-­‐2013

3. Overall  was  the  student/client  communication  satisfactory?  (Effectiveness  of  Communication)                                                                                                                                                                                                                         (5)  =  Excellent-­‐-­‐exceeded  my  expectations  (4)  =  Very  Good-­‐-­‐met  my  expectations  (3)  =  Good-­‐-­‐average                                                                                                                                                                                                                     (2)  =  Fair-­‐-­‐could  use  some  improvement  (1)  =  Poor-­‐-­‐did  not  meet  expectations


380

Luan, called me when he had questions. He was able to explain what he needed and in one case when i did not understand what he needed he restated his needs in a different way. He remained in regular contact with me. He brought 3 possible mock ups to me and helped talk me through the finished product.

Initially, Angela contacted me and we set up a time to meet to go over the project. She was very professional and open to my ideas. I pulled together information to educate her on the topics and to use for a final poster. I never heard from her again. She never showed me any drafts for my input, not did I see a final design. I contacted her via email to check in on the project, but never heard from her. I am curious to see what she came up with, if anything. I thought perhaps she dropped out of the class, but she never communicated that to me.

Katie went above and beyond the call of duty by getting our cards cut by deadline by driving them to Monty Tech. She provided requested info for her bibliography and she attended the art show.

We were pleased with Margie's ability to take constructive criticism and receive feedback which resulted in letterhead and business cards we would consider using.

Michael impressed me from the first meeting. He was prepared with samples of his previous work, and even had menu samples. He is very positive confident and knowlegable. I am extremely pleased with the final results.

His communication was very good.

Curtis is mature, efficient and professional in his work.

The quick turn around time for this particular project would have benefitted from more timely communication.

Shelby met with me a few times at the beginning of the project, but did not schedule any further appointments and when the project got closer to the deadline she completed 3 out of the 5 pieces. She was unable to complete the rest, but did not communicate that to me.

When I first met with Meagan to discuss the project I was optimistic that we would be able to work well together. Subsequently she did not come at the agreed time for the appointments and didn't get in touch. Eventually she disappeared.

2011

Sarah was professional in all meetings with me and quite enthusiastic about the project throughout the semester! I was amazed at her follow through and impressed that she was always on top of due dates and suggestions.

Re: last question. We primarily met in person, but we also had excellent e-mail contact...

I have participated in service learning programs in the past with poor results. Generally the students rarely follow through or complete the project. David was very thorough and professional. It was a refreshing experience. Thanks, Bill White

Ericks was simply the best student I have worked with here at MWCC. The quality of his work was top notch. He is great with costumer service. He can interpert what a client wants and produce an amazing product! His talents , professionalism speaks to his ablities and the quality of your program. I had a great experience working with him and could not be more pleased with the outcome.

She was awesome and responsible in every way! We loved the poster! She even came to the Art Show!!!!!

Ashley was extremely professional at all times and knowledgeable about the subject

This was a very good experience. It was very good to work with a student from the community on work that is beneficial to the community.

2010

3. Please  provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.


381

Jon was always prepared and responded quickly to any questions or concerns that I had. He was professional, yet very friendly and approachable.

Last reply: she wrote clear, personable, maybe not ideally business like- in a formal sense, nothing negative here. This was not an issue in our situation as we had more informal arrangement and may not be in most situations. Depends on work environment she settles into.

Tamara always presented herself in a professional manner and displayed a level of maturity that made interaction with a pleasure. She was very responsive to any questions I had and always responded to my emails.

Honestly, she was excellent in every way. Clear, flexible and met our needs!

Eddie was professional and enjoyable to work with whenever we met but did not always clearly understand what our program was looking for in marketing assistance.

2013

I wanted to see Jonathan succeed in this project and I hope he was able to do so with the information I provided. I wish I had been reminded sooner of his class deadline so that I had more time to give him photos to use for his project. As it was, I had to rush text to him at 5 p.m. on the Friday before Spring Break which could have been done with more advanced notice.

When I fell behind Alex demonstrated initiative with a friendly check in and reminder to keep us on track

Dan had a problem with his laptop at the end, so he was not able to make changes on site, but he made the changes at home and e-mailed me. We had one miscommunication on a changed date to meet. Dan had a few problems with spelling errors. Overall he did great. Dan did everything we asked him to do except reverse the mid section of the brochure, but that may be a format that can not be changed on the program.

Trudy was pleasant and professional to work with, however I would suggest she focus on areas such as dressing at a more professional level and being more forward in her greeting. Her dress was not inappropriate; however it was a bit casual for working with professional clients. Also, she would benefit from being a little more forward with her communication.

Grammar and spelling, things like 'no' when she means 'know', and not double checking sentence structure before hitting send. Nothing outrageous, but definitely needs more attention.

Rachel has been a pleasure to work with. She has accepted feedback/direction well.

I honestly cannot think of anything that did not meet my approval. Excellent in every way! Keep drawing, keep learning, keep your positive attitude!

All communication was coherent. Matthew conducted himself in a professional manner.

She did an outstanding job for us. She also handled the fact that we were slow in providing her what she needed. I was very impressed.

2012


382

25

27

28

27

30

He/she conducted  a   professional  client  interview   to  obtain  the  necessary   project  information.

The interview  included  a   series  of  specific  questions  to   assess  design  needs  and  goals

The student  designer   prepared  drafts  with  various   ideas  (concepts)  and  layouts.

The student  presented  and   communicated  his/her   various  concepts  and  layouts   in  a  clear  and  informative   manner.

The student  easily  translated   my  ideas  into  working   concepts/layouts. 5

7

6

7

11

7

Very Good

3

4

3

6

4

1

Good

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

33

Excellent

The student  showed  a   willingness  to  hear  my  initial   ideas  and  thoughts.

Answer Options

0

1

1

0

0

0

Fair

Totals 2010-­‐2013

3

2

2

0

0

0

Poor

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.67

4.78

Rating Average

answered question

0

0

1

1

1

0

N/A

9

4

9

9

9

9

9

9

4.25

4.06

4.19

4.38

4.50

4.81

16

8

16

16

16

16

16

16

4.60

4.60

4.67

4.56

4.33

4.80

10

5

10

10

10

10

10

10

4.33

4.33

4.33

4.67

4.67

4.67

6

4

6

6

6

6

6

6

4.46

4.42

4.47

4.57

4.54

4.77

41

21

41

41

41

41

41

41

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

Response Total   Count Average

2013

Response Rating   Count Average

2012

Response Rating   Count Average

2011

Response Rating   Count Average

2010

4. How  satisfied  were  you  with  the  students  initial  preparation?      (5)  =  Excellent-­‐-­‐exceeded  my  expectations  (4)  =  Very  Good-­‐-­‐met  my  expectations  (3)  =  Good-­‐-­‐average                                                                                                                                                     (2)  =  Fair-­‐-­‐could  use  some  improvement  (1)  =  Poor-­‐-­‐did  not  meet  expectations


383 2012

2013

It was  a  pleasure  working  with  her.

Tamara listened  to  my  feedback  and  would  make  any  changes  I  requested  and  also  gave  valuable  input  to  guide  me  with  the  design  of  project.

Keep up  the  great  work  with  your  students!!!!!

Eddie's initial  preparation  was  very  thorough  and  he  was  excited  to  start  the  work.  He  provided  us  with  one  example  of  the  work  he  was  doing  but  never  again  produced  another  product.

I was  very  impressed  with  the  knowledge  that  Dan  had  on  various  formats  and  on  his  suggestions.

With regards  to  the  interview,  I  rated  Trudy  in  the  N/A  based  on  the  nature  of  our  first  meeting.    In  that  meeting,  I  was  forward  in  describing  our  project  and  what  we  were  looking  for.    She  did  ask  questions  that  I  had  not   covered,  but  it  didn't  take  the  form  of  a  formal  interview.

Again, no  complaints!

Matthew did  not  need  to  provide  us  with  a  variety  of  layouts;  however,  he  clearly  communicated  which  layouts  would  meet  the  desired  effect  the  Teen  Reach  students  were  looking  for.    Matthew  even  spoke  with  potential   printers,  then  presented  the  options  to  us.

Once again  she  did  an  outstanding  job.

During the  first  meeting  i  sensed  he  was  somewhat  unsure  of  how  to  proceed  with  the  interview.  He  was  so  matter  of  fact  that  i  wondered  if  i  had  expressed  my  needs  clearly.  Yet  when  we  reviewed  what  he  was  working  on  it   was  clear  that  he  had  heard  me  and  was  incorporating  my  ideas.  I  would  suggest  that  as  he  is  gathering  information  he  restate  what  he  has  heard.    At  one  point  i  sent  a  whole  lot  of  information  and  he  replied  to  me  telling  me   exactly  what  he  needed  me  to  do  so  that  he  could  effectively  work  with  what  i  had  sent.

I would  have  liked  her  to  bring  samples  of  her  work  to  the  initial  interview.

The Posters  and  cards  say  it  all!!!!!!!!    I  love  them!

Michael listened  well.    He  had  lots  of  ideas  and  esuggestions.    He  was  able  to  create  the  designs  very  succesfuly,  incorporating  my  needs  and  vision  with  his  wonderful  talent.

I was  extremely  satsified  with  Curtis'  initial  preparation.

In general  the  needs  and  goals  of  the  project  were  provided  rather  than  elicited  by  interview.

Shelby initially  only  presented  one  idea.  I  had  to  ask  her  to  come  up  with  others.  In  the  end  she  showed  me  two.

I am  sure  Meagan  is  capable  of  great  work,  and    I    I  was  impressed  with  her  when  we  first  met.    She  did  not  display  professionalism  in  subsequent  meetings.

2011

Sarah was  fully  prepared  when  we  met  the  first  time.  She  took  notes  and  then  sent  me  a  follow-­‐up  e-­‐mail  that  summarized  our  discussion.  When  we  met  again,  she  had  incorporated  some  of  my  needs  and  then  kept  re-­‐ adjusting  as  we  continued  to  talk.

Barbara worked  diligently  to  put  together  fabulous  designs  for  our  two  projects.  She  listened  to  my  vision  and  critiques  and  was  able  to  achieve  projects  that  were  beyond  the  Committee's  expectations!!!!!!!!!!

Excellent!

Members of  the  Fitchburg  Greenway  Committee  liked  Noah's  logo  design  options.    Noah  made  reccomended  changes  to  the  most  popular  design.

2010

4. Please  provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.


384

5

27

23

The project  looks  professional

The final  design  has  met  our   needs/goals 4

3

2

3

Good

0

0

2

0

Fair

1

1

1

1

Poor

5

4

4

5

N/A

2010

9

8

9

9

9

9

4.21

4.36

4.07

4.36

Rating Average

2010

16

11

16

16

16

16

Response Count

4.50

4.78

4.56

4.67

Rating Average

2010

10

9

9

9

9

10

Response Count

5.00

5.00

5.00

5.00

Rating Average

2010

6

5

6

6

6

6

Response Count

4.55

4.66

4.57

4.63

Total Average

41

33

40

40

40

41

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

2011

Luan was excited to share the final draft with me. he added some very creative graphics that he was proud of. He took pride in his work and was genuinely pleased when i expressed how great the work was. he was able to bring one set of brochures that had been done at a print shop and one done on a computer printer. He and I clearly loved the one from the print shop however he knew that the church would not have the money to afford printing these. So we admired their perfection and then talked about how to print out the others on computer. he was able to take a lot of information and put it into the brochure and make it look great not crowded. I appreciated that he often sent the project back asking me to proof read and reminding me that i should get someone other than me to proof as he said, "you are the author it is hard to see your own mistakes."

I never saw a draft or a final design. So I can't even really comment on the project.

When I requested that Katie do cards she did it right away! She was pleasant about any requests, she was polite to all!

The student provided several types of logos in with different colors, fonts, sizes, etc. This worked out very well as it gave the Board of Directors many options from which to choose for both our print and electronic media applications.

I am away and have not seen the finished work yet. But I am happy with the time he has spent to make sure that he got it right.

Michael completed the weekly and daily menus quickly. I was so pleased, that I asked if he'd be interested in another project re-designing our catering menu. He eagerly agreed. We are in the final stages of completion. Taking this on, gave some relief to our staff designer, and I am excited that Mike's work and talent will connect and be featured in each of these projects. He completed a great deal of work in a short period of time.

Curtis not only translated my thoughts and concepts into a professional product, his work exceeded my expectations,

The student provided design work as anticipated.

Shelby produced less work than I had asked for. She never created a JPEG or PDF invitation and did not make hallway signage for the Awards ceremony.

Less. Joshua did take the time to show me how to use In Design enough that I was able to fine tune his work and be able to modify the 4 print items for next year's program.

There was really no project presented so I can't answer the questions.

Since I am not a designer and have trouble visualizing my ideas, I was completely awed that Sarah could take our initial conversations and turn them into such beautiful work! The poster goes beyond my initial expectations. It is professional work and I am quite proud to be able to display this poster in a variety of ways.

Barbara's work was exceptional...far beyond what we had hoped the final projects would look like. She was professional and creative and her work was amazing!!

He went above and beyound my expectations

I had a lot of specific ideas about the design concept. Evan might have provided more design alternatives if I had not given him so much to start with. I would have appreciated more input.

The student dropped off a final comp in my office when I was not here and sent me an email explaining that he would be talking to the printer and would make arrangements for the posters to be printed. The only thing I have is the final comp and a CD. I never received the final prints and never heard from the student or the printer. We were not able to use the posters as advertisement for the benefit.

AWESOME

The finished project is beautiful and functional! I only hope I can find the money in our budget to follow through with this design plan.

We liked the number of logo options Noah provided. He also provided us with a good mock-up of a map brochure.

answered question

4.50

4.50

4.63

4.50

Response Count

2010 Rating Average

Did the  student  designer  provide  you  with  more  design  work  than  you  anticipated?  Less  design  work  than  you   anticipated?  Please  explain.

7

6

25

The project  was  completed  in   the  time  allotted

6

Very Good

26

Excellent

The results  of  the                       project  are…

Answer Options

Totals 2010-­‐2013

5. How  satisfied  are  you  with  the  work  completed?                  (5)  =  Excellent-­‐-­‐exceeded  my  expectations  (4)  =  Very  Good-­‐-­‐met  my  expectations  (3)  =  Good-­‐-­‐average  (2)  =  Fair-­‐-­‐could  use  some  improvement  (1)  =  Poor-­‐-­‐did  not  meet  expectations


385

I was disappointed that the brochure was not on a program that we could make updates on in the future.

2013

We are so pleased with our final logo design! Jon really listened to what we were looking for and produced exactly what we wanted.

Her work is top notch, it met and in ways exceeded our goals. Thank you!

I was surprised at how quickly Tamara could come up with various designs and pleased that she was able to give me several options to choose from as I always believed I had many choices to pick from.

Tamara went above and beyond the call of duty. Her work speaks for itself. I might add, I had a foot injury and she did some extra running around!

I cannot answer this with any determination as Eddie has not been in contact with the program since mid-semester (except for the same day that you sent the survey).He has assured me that he would continue to assist us over the summer to achieve what we were seeking. I will follow up with him but do not expect to receive a final product asap. I understand that Eddie took on many tasks this semester and I do hope that he was able to achieve what he desired with those other tasks, even though we did not receive a product at this time.

I hope we have time to train on the software program so that his design can be used.

Alex was very responsive to my opinions and preferences. He was also very patient with my fine tuning and eager to ensure a satistfied client.

Dan guided me throughout the process. I was impressed with his design work.

I am very satisfied with the completed project. It aligns with our brand while adding elements to attract our target audience. With respect to the final design it has met our design goals; however we are not able to report yet whether it meets our promotion goals as it has not been launched yet.

The amount of design work is fine. As a professional she will need to get more familiar with the work so that she can do more brainstorming and proposing of ideas and wording that will enhance any marketing piece that she produces.

We still have just a couple more meetings to finalize the end product but we have no concerns at this stage. Excellent work provided. Because we are not finalized that is my only reason for giving Very Good instead of excellent.

Maegan went above and beyond the call of duty in every way!

Due to technical difficulties at Office Max (Office Max & Staples do not have a printing program compatible to the programs used by MWCC), we were not able to see the final copy yet. Matthew did tell us how he enhanced the work the students presented to him. He will be meeting with us next Sunday to show us the work he did that is saved on his disk.

She provided additional drafts. I was expeting a trifold however she produced 2 trifolds (one for mailing) and a bifold which added a lot to our abilities to attract businesses to our area. Also when we were having trouble getting good quality photos to her she went out and took photos herself!

2012


386

24

24

25

24

He/she showed  an  ability  to   communicate  design   concepts.

He/she showed  an  ability  to   achieve  project  goals.

He/she showed  an  ability  to   design  with  skill,  creativity   and  professionalism.

The student  managed  their   time  and  the  project   efficiently  and  effectively. 8

9

11

10

14

Very Good

3

1

2

1

0

Fair

4.22

4.44

4.44

4.56

4.56

answered question

2

2

3

2

2

N/A

9

5

9

9

9

9

9

4.13

4.57

4.36

4.43

4.43

4.40

4.40

4.50

4.50

4.50

10

5

10

10

10

10

10

Response Count

2012 Rating Average

4.80

4.50

5.00

4.33

4.50

2011

4.39

4.48

4.58

4.46

4.50

41

20

41

41

41

41

41

Total Count

2010-­‐2013 Total Average

Luan worked within a time frame that he explained to me. He was very creative and the finished product is great. He managed his and my time well. he came to meetings prepared and most were short and to the point.

I feel I cannot comment on her graphic design skills because I never saw any of her work. Overall, professionalism was poor, especially when she stopped communicating. In professional situations, never avoid clients and stop communicating. A short email or phone call explaining that she was having a difficult semester, dropped the class (?), or was having difficulty with the project is important. She needs to understand that people are generally understanding and she should always be forthright and upfront about the status of her projects, even if she thinks they will be disappointed or upset.

Everything on time!!!!

Michael was always courteous, professional, and respectful.

As noted above previously, the student's professionalism was meritorius.

The student is very creative and professional. She would be an asset to a graphic design business.

After a couple of meetings there was really no project so I can't answer these questions.

6

3

6

6

6

6

6

Response Count

2013 Rating Average

Sarah is quite professional. She met all deadlines. She was prepared for all meetings. She followed through with suggestions and kept in touch with me. Her level of enthusiasm was wonderful!

Barbara's work was exceptional and she presented herself in a professional manner.

2010

16

7

16

16

16

16

16

Response Count

2011 Rating Average

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

1

0

0

0

0

Poor

Response Count

2010 Rating Average

Evan had a lot of responsiblities this semester and I think at times it was challenging to manage all of this.

Great work

Noah was effecient and professional.

3

4

1

4

3

Good

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

22

Excellent

The student  designer  has  a   grasp  of  the  web  design   profession.

Answer Options

Totals 2010-­‐2013

6. How  would  you  rate  the  professionalism  of  this  designer?


387

2012

I felt like I was working with a professional the whole time.

In each area Tamara excelled and I really thought of her as a professional rather than a student.

She came to the show and presented herself very well. She worked with the print shop and I had excellent feedback!

2013

My suggestion in this area is that Trudy take charge of the project timeline to proactively ensure it was on track with our deadline and her course needs. Working with marketing professionals in the future, she is likely to see them balancing several projects at once, thus needing her to control the timeline more actively. This particular project may have been easier to complete if she were driving the deadlines.

My only comment is that I think Rachel could have been a little more creative on her own for example fonts (could have just used a jungle type of lettering instead of waiting for us to ask for it given the subject matter GFA Ape, added more background to pictures to to dress up pages). Once we asked she met the request.

I gave Maegan creative license and she did a great job. She offered two designs in many ways!

It was a pleasure working with Matthew. I would definitely recommend his services to anyone who who is looking for a graphic designer.

Very pleased with the products that she produced. She is a very talented young lady!


7. What  do  you  feel  are  the  student's  main  strengths?                                                                                                                                                                                 What  are  the  student's  weaknesses—what  can  they  improve  upon? 2010 Noah asked good questions to determine what we needed. Ashley's main strengths include her knowledge of graphic design, her background in newspapers at her high school (which helped with this project), and her professionalism. Excellent and creative Work

The only weakness is lack of confidence....this comes with experience!

He had a very good vision and wonderful ideas. Evan is very amiable. This is a great quality for working with clinets. He is very dedicated to a project and has excellant follow through The challenge is that design is so subjective. David might want to minimize using "color filters" to modify images. In addition, he may want to spend more time on selecting fonts and how they are used. Excellent designer; creative; great listener; able to achieve our vision; professional; worked well with me and with the print shop; organized; dedicated to project..Absolutely NO weaknesses!!! Her work and her work ethic were exceptional!!! Sarah has many strengths and I don't think I can pinpoint just one. I think she has a strong visual eye and she is very good at being able to put abstract ideas into a concrete form. Perhaps her strongest strength is her personality: friendly, open, excited about the project. I did not see any weaknesses in regards to this project. 2011 Student's main strengths are creativity. The student could improve on content review. Good personality, enthusiasm at the beginning of the project. Main weakness was dropping the ball and not contacting the client to explain. willingness to listen, learn and try. consistent communication, follow-through. josh was very sporadic and everything took a lot longer than he said it would. the last assignment, to have started 3-4 weeks ago, was not completed nor did I receive anything or any update on it to date. Shelby is young and needs to learn to balance life, school and work better. She was unable to produce all the pieces I asked her to, and never came back to discuss that with me directly. Strengths: Excellent creative skills, easy to work with. Area to improve upon; Could be more proactive in communications with client Strengths-ability to translate concept to product very well Weakness-none, really. He could have 'bugged me w/ constant contact, but I'm rather glad he did not'. A good, independent student. ability to take my requests and make them into acceptable ideas and layouts Michael is knowlegable, confident and very creative. These qualities are essential in putting the client at ease.I can't think of any weakness. Strengths: Motivated, Managed time well, Good communication skills, Technical skills Things to work on: Experience, Confidence, Creativity Strong designing and interpretation skills. We were all very impressed with the way that Justin presented our information in a way that not only stood out but that delivered our message in a friendly, inviting manner. He is interested in his project. He is willing to do the work.

388


The student's strengths lied in his ability to understand the nature of our business and how this applies to communicating our brand.I did not really see anything needing improvement. Carina took my ideas and vision and made them reality in an easygoing and pleasant manor. She was a pleasure to work with. Katie is very talented and flexible. My only wish for her is to continue to gain self confidence and brag:) about her work! Strengths: She was friendly, engaged, open to ideas.

Weaknesses: Communication

Luan is a very personable man. He has many interests and life experiences it was great to get to know him. When he first presents himself he seems so reserved as to seem unsure of himself, but once he gets more comfortable his personality and experiences come out. Luan is from Vietnam and is aware that his English is not perfect but he did and does repeat or clarify when i have not heard his words clearly. If there is any weakness it could be his struggle with the English language particularly over the phone. I knew him so i was comfortable telling him i did not get what he was saying but my staff sometimes could not understand what he wanted when he telephoned. He is a humble person and his self esteem needs bolstering because he is talented and competent. His strengths- his talent and creativity with design. 2012 Strengths - Her desire to provide quality products for the customer with the customer's desires clearly a part of the project. She deserves an A!. Weaknesses - Hard to come up with any The only weakness Matthew had was using a program that was not compatible with Office Max or Staples. She is professional and energetic and of course talented. I hate to be the kind of teacher that offers no suggestions for growth....but honestly she was awesome! Tajing direction without any defensiveness, timeliness of submissions... Renee was very willing to hear my suggestions for the brochure, maybe not a super amount of creativity or comfort with the material. One way to enhance her ability would be to research on-line how other organizations create similar property brochures. Trudy's strengths are in that she is able to translate our needs for the look and feel of the piece into imagery that worked to meet our design needs.The only weaknesses I saw were with regards to the timeline as above and ensuring her voice is heard when communicating with clients. Knowledge of design and layout where his strengths. Spelling errors were is weakness Personal professional presentation needs a little work Good communication skills. Perhaps could have benefited from a bit more research on my organization and sector to better understand its mission. Jonathan is very professional and his talent and skill were evident in the examples he showed me at our first meeting. I was very comfortable in his ability to deliver a professional-looking product. I would have loved to see a timeline for his project with us. I believe I had asked him for one but I didn't follow up on it. I would have enjoyed seeing his process for time management and how it intertwined with my own busy schedule. I'd hate to think that I held him back in any way or that I missed out on using his project due to timing issues or lack of planning ahead.

389


2013 Eddie's strengths are certainly around trying to create professional and eye catching designs.His potential to "over commit" can be seen as a weakness due to not being able to produce products for all that he has committed to. She is creative and professional. Be sure to continue on this path!!! Tamara's strength is her ability to listen to the client and respond in a timely fashion. I only saw strengths here. She completely understood what we needed and she was on top of any changes we requested. Her attitude was so pleasant and she was extremely easy to work with. She has a very personable personality, easy to work with and convey needs to. She seems to have fine talent in working with the design programs. Not sure of any weaknesses. Jon is a wonderful listener and does a fabulous job incorporating what you tell him into the design. He promptly responded to emails and stayed right on schedule. He communicated with me through each step so I knew where we stood for the whole process. If I didn't know better, I would have been convinced I was working with a seasoned professional.

390


391

100.0% 0.0%

Yes

No

9

6

0

9

Response Count

16

13

3

13

Response Count

2010

10

9

0

10

Response Count

16.7%

83.3%

Response Percent

2013

6

5

1

5

Response Count

9.8%

90.2%

Total Percent

41

33

4

37

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

He wants to please and can work well with limited time.

He quickly grasped the concepts needed to create these visuals. His first draft was amazing!

We would recommend Margie as an intern working closely with professionals. We think she shows promise and expressed a genuine interest in understanding the designer-client relationship.

I am already thinking about working with Michael again.

Did the job as asked, w/o a lot of hand-holding (time on my part).

Excellent creative work.

Yes, she is talented and I do think she can do very well.

if he could improve upon the above, then i'd switch to yes.

The project wasn't completed

2011

Absolutely! She was an ideal designer to work with in terms of artistic work, personality, and professionalism!

I would absolutely recommend her without reservations!

David understands the key elements to overall good design, which is very important.

Evan was reliable and professional.

She did exactly what I asked on time.

0.0%

100.0%

Response Percent

2012

Please explain  your  reasons  why  or  why  not?

18.8%

81.3%

Response Percent

2011

Noah has a good rapore with his client and he is able to translate client needs into a good product.

answered question

Please explain  your  reasons  why  or  why  not?

Response Percent

Answer Options

2010

8. Would  you  recommend  this  designer  to  other  individuals?


392

Absolutely- easy to work with and a wonderful product in return!

If any other watershed council or land trust needs a map, I will recommend her.

I would highly recommend Tamara as I believe she made my job so much easier and I was extremely confident in her skill level.

Yes! She met all deadlines and did exactly what was requested!

I would only recommend Eddie if the other individuals were his primary focus. Again, we completely appreciate and understand his busy work load, but he did not produce an end result for us therefore we do not have any option but to not refer him at this time.

2013

Depending on how our partnership is finalized I would recommend Jonathan to others. As of right now, I like his design but I am unsure if we will be able to apply it to our project.

As stated above

I would recommend him as long as he had someone proof information before publication.

I believe Trudy has great potential to be a successful graphic artist. As this was her first project working with a real client, I think she did a great job in delivering the design we were looking for.

Renee was very pleasant and created a nice end product.

Easy to work with

Maegan is creative and professional!

Absolutely yes!

She did a great job for us.

2012

see above I would suggest that Luan be told that it is okay for him to express his needs too and not just see to the clients needs. see my note below.

Based on her lack of communication skills. She missed an important opportunity to have worked with someone on a real project and then have that person as a reference going forward.

I did not ever feel worried that the work would not get done. That is a relief!

It was a real pleasure working with Eddie. We view this project as being a very successful colaboration between the SLCT company, the Towns of Sterling and Lancaster, and MWCC. We hope to work with you again in the future!


9. How  do  you  feel  the  the  client/student  relationship  can  be  improved?    What  could  you  (the  client)  have   done  differently?  What  could  the  student  have  done  differently? 2010 We  would  like  to  do  this  again.    It  is  great  to  work  with  students  and  to  get  some  needed  work  done  for  free! Ashley  did  everything  beautifully.  In  hindsight,  I  should  have  been  clearer  about  the  lack  of  funds  in  my   budget.  This  would  have  meant  a  different  outcome,  though,  and  I  can't  imagine  something  other  than  what   was  designed. Really  everything  was  positive I  could  have  made  more  of  an  effort  to  follow  up  when  I  started  not  hearing  back  but  we  have  been  very  busy   here  and  I  was  told  that  they  would  be  in  touch  with  me.    I  felt  that  that  was  part  of  the  job. I  think  that  it  really  helped  that  Evan  happened  to  be  one  of  my  students  in  the  NRD104  class.  Thios  allowed   us  to  have  more  facetime  that  we  might  have  had  otherwise.  I  could  have  given  Evan  more  lead  time  with  the   project,  but  it  came  up  at  the  last  minute.  Evan  had  a  lot  of  other  responsiblities  this  semester  with  his  other   classes  and  working.  It  might  have  helped  to  explore  time  managment  skill  building  to  maximize  his  available   time. It  worked  out  great  as  is. None I  would  not  change  a  thing!!  I  loved  working  with  Barbara;  she  was  easy  going,  amenable  to  changes  we   suggested  and  I  think  our  relationship  was  great! I  cannot  think  of  anything. 2011 Student  client  relationship    in  terms  of  professionalism  was  excellent.  Student  could  improve  confidence  wise. The  student  could  have  followed  through  or  ended  the  project  instead  of  just  disappearing. see  above  and  below I  would  have  contacted  her  more  frequently  to  make  sure  I  got  the  final  product  I  wanted.  Shelby  should  have   contacted  me  regularly  and  communicated  her  reasons  for  not  completing  the  project.  The  work  I  did  receive   was  professional. Perhaps  we  could  have  been  more  clear  on  deadlines  and  the  student  could  have  been  more  proactive  in   communicating  with  and  updating  the  client. Perhaps  I  should  have  (if  I  had  the  time)  taken  more  time  to  help  and  encourage  Curtis.  Perhaps  he  could  have   stopped  by  or  emailed  me  every  week,  but  I'm  glad  he  didn't. none I  am  extremely  pleased  with  the  process  and  the  final  results.    There  is  no  area,  or  aspect  of  it  that  could  have   been  improved  on. We  wish  we  had  known  more  about  the  school's  expectations  in  advance.  Perhaps  you  could  send  the  survey   at  the  beginning  of  the  project  to  let  clients  know  what  they  will  be  grading  the  intern  on. Nothing,  I  think  that  given  the  time  constraints  students  have  with  their  school  and  work  schedules,  Justin  did   quite  well.

393


I could  have  been  more  demanding  and  spent  more  time  just  to  give  him  an  idea  of  the  real  world. No  recommendations.    The  project  worked  out  well. NA Honestly,  we  were  a  perfect  match:)    Thank  you  for  putting  us  together. Communication. i  think  we  had  a  good  working  relationship.  together  we  were  able  to  create  a  professional  looking,  quality,   and  vibrant  brochure  set.  there  is  always  a  tension  between  remaining  strictly  professional  and  the  getting  to   know  a  person  one  is  going  to  work  with.  I  found  that    Luan  had  a    difficult  time  with    finding  this    balance.  At   first  he  was  very  reluctant  to  share  any  personal  information  which  would  have  been  fine  to  do  and  assisted   me  in  knowing  his  needs.  He  is  from  another  culture,  struggles  with  the  language  and  uses  canes  to  walk  with.   Being  out  front  about  some  of  this  from  the  very  beginning  would  have  been  very  appropriate  for  him  to  let   me  know  what  he  needed  or  didn't  need  to  feel  comfortable. 2012 We  should  have  been  more  involved  and  provided  her  the  information  quicker. The  Venture  could  have  begun  their  rough  draft  earlier  and  they  could  have  emailed  myself  or  Matt  their   illustrations  as  they  were  completed.    Matthew's  client/student  relationship  does  not  require  any   improvements  as  his  relationship  with  us  was  excellent. No  suggestions Use  her  creativity  more. I  like  the  design  that  she  came  up  with,  but  it  might  have  helped  her  more  if  I'd  given  her  some  more  options   or  asked  her  to  research  brochures  so  that  she  could  have  a  broader  exposure. I  would  have  preferred  a  little  more  definition  of  the  timeline  and  expectations  from  the  student/course   throughout  this  project.    I  would  have  placed  a  little  more  priority  of  this  project  to  ensure  a  deeper  learning   experience.    I  would  have  also  welcomed  more  questions  from  the  student  about  the  process. I  should  have  typed  information  given  instead  of  hand  writing  it.    Dan  could  not  read  some  of  my  information   hand  written. nothing  ,  it  was  great  working  with  Britney Satisfied! I  could  have  been  more  on  top  of  my  communication  with  Jonathan.    When  email  didn't  seem  effective   enough,  I  wish  Jonathan  had  picked  up  the  phone. 2013 To  improve  this  relationship,  I  think  it  would  have  been  beneficial  to  communicate  bi-­‐weekly  about  the  status.   We  also  did  not  provide  him  with  a  clear  deadline  so  this  could  have  hindered  us  receiving  a  product  prior  to   the  end  of  his  semester. I  am  very  pleased....honest!!!!! I  don't  believe  there  are  any  improvements  that  could  be  made  except  maybe  the  project  wasn't  challenging   enough  as  Tamara  seem  to  pull  if  off  so  effortlessly. Nothing! Unsure.  This  was  a  very  good  experience  for  MRWC. Our  process  went  off  seamlessly.

394


10. What  do  you  believe  are  the  benefits  and  difficulties  of  this  learning  experience?                                                     Comments  and  suggestions: 2010 I  think  the  best  learning  experience  is  a  real  client  experience.    It  was  mutually  beneficial  to  client  and  student. Benefits  are  to  both  sides:  Ashley  gained  excellent  material  for  her  portfolio  and  The  Observer  gained  an  idea   on  how  to  market  the  issues  more  effectively. I  think  this  is  a  great  experience  because  I  allow  creativity  but  I  have  a  deadline  and  expectations I  would  have  really  liked  to  have  been  able  to  use  the  final  product  for  advertisement. I  think  it  is  a  great  opportunity  for  students  to  obtain  real  world  experience.  I  also  really  like  incorporating   students  into  adminsitrative  and  staff  functions.  I  would  suggest  that  Evan  or  another  student  be  given  the   opportunity  to  work  directly  with  Stephanie  Pinto  on  the  energy  managment  program  materials  as  they  are   created. It  was  a  great  way  to  showcase  student  talent  and  also  it  gave  me  an  opportunity  to  work  with  a  student  who   I  might  not  have  had  contact  with.    Also  as  Ericks  sharred  with  me  because  of  the  nature  of  the  project  it   made  him  aware  of  a  side  of  the  college  he  had  not  eplored  and  gave  him  an  insight  to  something  that  he  did   not  know  about. See  comments  above. We  gave  Barbara  2  big  projects  and  she  handled  them  well!!!  The  benefits  for  Barbara  are  that  she  was  able   to  produce  quality,  professional  work;  do  a  service  for  the  community  (the  City  of  Gardner)  and  work  with   MWCC  staff...There  were  no  difficulties  encountered.  It  was  a  positive,  wonderful  experience!!!  Kudos  to   Barbara  and  thank  you  for  the  opportunity  to  work  with  this  gifted  and  kind  student!!!!!!!!! I  only  saw  benefits  here.  I  was  able  to  have  a  beautiful  project  designed  that  will  help  attract  attention  to  a   program  and  Sarah  was  able  to  practice  working  with  a  real  client.  I  thought  it  went  well  and  offered  benefits   to  both  of  us!  Thanks  for  the  opportunity! 2011 Working  with  a  student  was  truly  a  wonderful  experience. The  benefits  would  be  getting  a  product  I  could  use  and  getting  to  know  a  student.    The  difficulty  was  having   the  feeling  that  I  should  follow  up  instead  of  having  the  student  follow-­‐up. with  'live'  program  deadlines  to  meet,  it's  tough  to  be  waiting  around  for  things  to  be  completed  and  hold  up   the  programming  work.  we're  quite  behind  with  our  program  outreach  as  a  result. Keeping  the  students  motivated  and  engaged  in  the  process  is  the  biggest  challenge.  We  want  them  to   succeed  but  they  have  to  want  that  too. One  of  the  most  difficult  things  in  a  project  of  this  nature  is  communicating  the  corporate  culture  in  addition   to  the  project  goals.  This  was  not  an  issue  in  this  particular  case.  The  student  grasped  the  culture  aspect  very   well  as  evidenced  in  the  pieces  she  created. Real-­‐world  project.    Direct  applications  of  his  training.    Demonstration  of  effectiveness  of  his  'schooling'  here.   His  match-­‐up  with  me  was  perfect.    A  difficulty  might  be  if  the  student  and  sponsor  are  not  well-­‐matched. Excellent  resource  for  the  college,  completed  a  project  without  using  outside  contractors  on  something  that  is   out  of    my  ability  to  create

395


To work  with  a  real  client  offers  insight  into  what  the  future  hods  as  a  designer.    I  can't  imagine  a  better  way   to  learn.    For  me,  it  offered  an  opportunity  to  connect  and  work  closely  with  a  student  which  is  important  to   me,  and  to  accomplish  several  projects  that  had  been  on  hold  for  lack  of  time. This  learning  experience  approximates  an  actual  designer-­‐client  interchange  and  enables  the  student  to  go   through  the  various  stages  of  the  process.  Because  we  use  Microsoft  Word  for  our  publications  here  at  the   library,  and  have  no  funds  to  purchase  Quark,  we  are  at  something  of  a  disadvantage.  In  the  real  world,  we   would  probably  ask  Margie  to  use  Word  so  that  we  could  then  build  on  her  design. Benefits:    Students  gain  knowledge  of  area  businesses,    Our  business  gained  much  needed  help  with   advertising.    I  would  suggest  that  MWCC  try  to  target  non-­‐profit  businesses  as  they  need  much  help  with   advertising  and  spreading  their  important  information  (in  our  case,  life-­‐saving!)    Difficulties:    time  constraints   of  students. I  believe  he  learned  where  to  go  to  get  the  best  deals  on  decals,  and  supplies  for  his  project. It  gives  the  municipalities  and  non-­‐profits  with  constrained  budgets  the  ability  to  get  invaluable  design   services  at  no  cost.    It  is  truly  a  win-­‐win  as  the  students  can  get  the  real  world  experience  and  better  prepare   themselves  for  their  career  search  and  helps  to  establish  network  connections. The  learning  experience  was  in  and  of  itself  a  benefit  to  my  organisation-­‐  resulting  in  a  new  flyer  campaign  to   spread  knowledge  and  resources. Katie  said  it  all  when  she  came  to  the  art  show  and  said  something  like,  "Wow,  this  is  a  huge  event  and   important  for  all  the  families"    At  that  moment  she  knew  why  she  was  completing  her  project! The  benefits  are  having  a  professional  work  experience  and  a  real  product  to  put  in  a  portfolio  of  work.    An   additional  benefit  is  having  a  reference  for  future  job  opportunities. I  am  a  strong  proponent  of  learning  experiences.  Working  with  real  clients  on  real  problems  in  real  time   demonstrates  in  ways  that  can  never  be  duplicated  in  the  classroom.  it  is  a  test  of  the  maturity  and  job   readiness  of  a  student  as  they  have  to  navigate  the  many  subtleties  of  the  world. 2012 The  Town  of  Athol  received  a  good  service  that  we  would  not  have  gotten  otherwise  and  the  student  got  real   time  experience.    Difficulties  is  just  trying  to  work  the  project  into  our  schedules. The  only  suggestion  is  making  sure  that  MWCC  maintain  programs  that  are  compatible  with  those  available   within  the  demographic  area. The  benefits  are  that  Maegan  had  a  wonderful  experience  here(I  hope)  and  there  were  no  challenges  this   semester.    I  hope  that  this  gave  her  a  deeper  understanding  of  her  field  and  a  strong  service  learning   experience.    Bravo  and  thank  you!!!! Benefits:  Working  with  a  professional  organization,  understanding  and  meeting  timelines,  multiple   personalities  and  honing  her  skills  Difficulties:  understanding  where  to  drawn  the  line  in  using  her  own   creativity. The  benefits  are  the  end  product,  which  we  can  replicate  for  other  property  brochures  using  her  layout.  There   were  no  particular  difficulties  from  my  perspective.  I  didn't  always  get  back  to  her  within  24hours,  so  that  may   have  affected  her  experience,  but  she  didn't  say  so.

396


I think  the  benefits  of  this  program  are  for  both  the  local  companies  and  the  students  participating.    This  is  a   great  way  to  link  students  with  real  clients  to  get  a  feel  for  working  with  them  in  the  context  of  a  real  project.     And  the  companies  benefit  from  design  work  at  no  cost.    For  our  particular  project  we  also  benefitted  from   Trudy  being  a  student  -­‐  which  was  the  target  audience  for  our  marketing  piece.  I  can't  think  of  any  difficulties   with  the  learning  experience  at  this  time. Hopefully,  Dan  learned  that  doing  a  brochure  takes  time  and  numerous  revisions  to  satisfy  the  customer. Hands  on  experience  for  the  designer,  gets  to  experience  it  in  a  controlled  environment Glad  to  be  able  to  provide  an  opportunity  for  Alex  to  get  some  "real"  experience  and  I  am  pleased  to  have  a   logo  and  brochure  that  presents  the  organization  in  a  more  professional  manner,  so  win/win. I  didn't  expect  to  work  one-­‐on-­‐one  and  I  enjoyed  giving  Jonathan  the  independence  to  run  with  the  project.    I   am  glad  that  MWCC  is  delivering  such  a  high-­‐calibre  student  that  allows  this  kind  of  independent   collaboration.    Unfortunately,  I  don't  have  more  time  in  my  schedule  to  devote  to  mentoring  or  hand  holding,   I  think  this  program  adequately  accommodates  a  schedule  like  my  own.    We  were  fortunate  to  be  able  to  do   much  of  the  communicating  via  email.    My  only  hope  is  that  the  students  aren't  so  reliant  on  technology  that   they  lose  the  skill  to  present  themselves  face  to  face  or  over  the  phone.    Overall,  I  had  a  wonderful   experience.    Thank  you. 2013 We  enjoyed  the  ability  to  work  with  a  student  from  MWCC  and  are  certainly  open  to  doing  so  again,  however   we  would  go  into  the  next  relationship  with  the  understanding  that  we  need  to  be  clear  about  deadlines  in   the  future.  The  benefits  would  have  been  or  could  be  that  we  will  receive  invaluable  assistance  with  better   marketing  materials. Benefits  are  many;    the  children,  families  and  all  involved  in  the  art  show.    Your  students  can  be  creative  and   practice  their  profession!    I  believe  in  this  program!    We  must  continue  to  provide  this! This  was  such  a  nice  experience  for  myself  to  not  only  see  the  talent  of  a  student  but  also  to    watch  a  project   come  together  was  very  rewarding.  I  found  no  difficulties  with  this  experience. All  benefits!  We  got  a  beautiful  design  that  captures  our  ideas  and  Rebecca  gained  real  experience Here  both  a  local  non-­‐profit  and  a  student  benefited.  The  biggest  difficulties  are  our  schedules  and  the   semester  time  line.  But  this  was  a  very  positive  outcome.  Thank  you. Clients  are  provided  with  professional  results,  which  they  may  not  be  able  to  afford  otherwise.  Students  gain   real  world  experience,  while  assisting  non-­‐profits.

397


Appendix J: Service Learning Client Surveys Web Client Survey Results

398


1. Client  information

2010—Client Survey—WEB Client  Name:

Designer's Name:

Project Title/Description:

Veronica Kell

Thomas Cutaia

Townsend Conservation  Land  Trust/Website

Maureen Dupuis,  The  Chester  Mossman   Teen  Center

Amanda Wilzynsky

Chester Mossman  Teen  Center  Website

Sr. Loretta  Ciccarelli-­‐Venerini  Sisters Montachusett  Addiction  Council Martha  Moore

Dean Richard Luan  K.  Nguyen Margi  Grande

Venerini Sisters'  Centennial  Celebration Maccenter.Org The  Bulfinch  Fund

Chair City  Pipers  Chorus/Jan  LeClair

Tayla Salter

website for  our  chorus

2011—Client Survey—WEB Client  Name:

Designer's Name:

Project Title/Description:

Loaves &  Fishes  Food  Pantry,  Inc. Our  Father's  House Tiffany  Doggett Karen  Lenthall First  Church  Unitarian  Universalist   Leominster

Krystal Thomas Deb  Fnine Tyler  Gould Ken  Caddieux

Website design Web  Site  overhaul Groton  Local Greater  Gardner  Community  Choir

Ken Leblanc

design-­‐ redesign  church  web  site

Carol Ambrozy,  Ed.D.

Jeannie Morley

Website work  for  April  4th  vote  on  Athol  Public   Library  renovation/expansion  project

Ashburnham-­‐Westminster Literacy  Action   Task  Force,  Ashburnham-­‐Westminster   Fabiola  Salvant Regional  School  District,  Ashburnham-­‐ Westminster  Community  Partnership,

Ashburnham-­‐Westminster Literacy  Action  Task   Force  website

2012—Client Survey—WEB Client  Name:

Designer's Name:

Project Title/Description:

The Bolton  Fair Allencrest  Community  Center Thomas  Matsuda Cleghorn  Neighborhood  Center Doyle  Field  Foundation Lori  McDermott Aaron  Williams Gail  Steele

Jon Skinner Luke  LeBlanc Peter  Turi Blanca  Lisasuain Eric  Beaulieu Jessica  Gloriant Benjamin  Stone Luke  LeBlanc

Bolton Fair  Logo  /  Website  Improvements Web  Site  up  date  &  Facebook  link Website  update CNC  Website Webpage  update/rebuild Benefit  Concert  Website  Design Give  Back  Ride  (logo  and  website) Memory  Game  for  Survivor,  the  Musical

2013—Client Survey—WEB Client  Name:

Designer's Name:

Project Title/Description:

Avanti Mohan Kayleigh  Zick Monadnock  Community  Early  Learning   Center Jeremiah's  Inn Virginia  Foresman

Ed Sanchez Colleen  Mulligan

Simple Treasures  Logo Lassie  League  Gear

Carina Morand

Web redesign

Sarah Wilson Laura  LaBarge

Website update/overhaul website  update  and  flyer

399


400

Response Percent 0.0% 16.7% 0.0% 16.7% 33.3% 33.3% 5

Response Count 0 1 0 1 2 2 6

Response Percent 0.0% 0.0% 28.6% 14.3% 28.6% 28.6% 6

Response Count 0 0 2 1 2 2 7

Response Percent 25.0% 25.0% 0.0% 12.5% 25.0% 12.5%

2012

2010

Please comment  on  your  answer.

2011

7

Response Count 2 2 0 1 2 1 8

Response Percent 40.0% 40.0% 20.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

2013

4

Response Count 2 2 1 0 0 0 5 15.4% 19.2% 11.5% 11.5% 23.1% 19.2%

Total Percent

22

4 5 3 3 6 5 26

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

I did  not  have  the  ability  to  go  to  Gardener,  but  we  worked  around  that  through  email  and  phone, Everything  was  done  by  email. Carina  came  once  to  our  Early  Learning  Center  with  an  amazing  prototype  for  our  website.  We  have  had  emails  back  and  forth  with  her.    On  May  21st  she  is  scheduled  to  come  back  and  show   us  her  completed  project.    So  far  things  look  great  and  we  hoping  she  is  able  to  follow  through  and  complete  her  project  with  us. Laura  was  a  pleasure.  She  asked  all  the  proper  questions  and  listened  to  my  needs.

2011

Tayla was  in  constant  contact  with  us  via  email  between  our  meetings.  She  even  attended  a  rehearsal!    We  enjoyed  working  with  her,  very  cooperative  and  accommodating.

I wanted  to  be  available  to  help  Dean  to  modify  the  entensive  material  into  the  4-­‐5  page  website.    I  also  drove  him  to  Fitchburg  so  he  could  take  photos  himself  of  the  site  featured  on  the   site:    St.  Anthony  School  in  Fitchburg.  It  gave  him  an  opportunity  to  use  his  photography  skills.    I  found  him  eager  to  learn,  and  to  take  suggestions,  and  offer  suggestions  to  enhance  the  site.     It  was  unusual  for  me  to  work  with  someone  who  had  no  previous  acquaintance  with  the  subject,  and  he  was  enthusiastic  about  the  details  in  the  material.    My  only  criticism  was  his   spelling...so  incidental  today  with  spell-­‐check. It  may  have  been  5  times,

I tried  to  meet  with  Amanda  on  multiple  occassions  and  her  schedule  just  didn't  coincide  with  times  I  was  available  (8am-­‐2pm  Monday-­‐Friday  and  anytime  on  weekends).    We  were  only  in   contact  via  email.

Tom began  the  project  in  March  and  worked  on  it  for  about  a  month.    We  met  3  times  on  Wednesdays  for  about  45  mins  each  time  at  my  MWCC  office.    Tom  attended  the  April  14  TCLT   meeting  at  the  Townsend  Public  Library  where  he  unveiled  the  first  pass  of  the  site  and  we  suggested  a  few  edits.    Although  Tom  and  I  had  dates  to  meet  and  exchanged  e-­‐mails,  we  never   met  again.

Please comment  on  your   answer.

0 times  in  person 1  time 2  times 3  times 4  times 5  or  more  times answered  question

Answer Options

2010

2. How  many  times  did  the  student  meet  with  you  in  person  this  semester?


401

I did  not  have  the  ability  to  go  to  Gardener,  but  we  worked  around  that  through  email  and  phone, Everything  was  done  by  email. Carina  came  once  to  our  Early  Learning  Center  with  an  amazing  prototype  for  our  website.  We  have  had  emails  back  and  forth  with  her.    On  May  21st  she  is  scheduled  to  come  back  and  show   us  her  completed  project.    So  far  things  look  great  and  we  hoping  she  is  able  to  follow  through  and  complete  her  project  with  us. Laura  was  a  pleasure.  She  asked  all  the  proper  questions  and  listened  to  my  needs.

2013

We held  detailed  conversations  on  the  phone  &  e-­‐mailed  due  to  ur  conflicting  schedules. Very  punctual  and  worked  hard We  thought  it  was  best  to  communicate  through  email/phone.  Blanca  was  excellent  at  following  up  and  making  sure  that  the  project  was  moving  forward. We  never  met  in  person.    We  talked  on  the  phone  once  and  then  all  other  communication  was  through  email.    This  strategy  worked  perfectly  for  us. Initial  meeting  to  discuss  the  scope  of  the  project. We  had  an  initital  meeting  to  discuess  the  project  requirments  and  then  had  3  more  meetings  to  check  on  progress,  make  adjustments,  etc.

Had a  good  initial  meeting.    We've  been  communicating  online  so  I  did  not  feel  another  in-­‐person  meeting  was  required.    In  my  day-­‐to-­‐day  job  I  have  a  team  of  iOS  developers  working  for  me,   none  are  local.

2012


402

14

14 13 11 14 18 14 15

7

11

14

12

He/she was  on  time  and  prepared   each  time  you  met.

When the  student  met  with  you,   he/she  presented  themself  in  an   acceptable  manner

Greeting and  Handshake

Attire

Demeanor

Attitude

Verbal Communication  Skills

Ability to  Listen

If the  student  could  not  meet  with   you  for  a  scheduled  meeting,   he/she  contacted  you  to   reschedule.

If you,  or  the  student  designer,  had   questions  or  a  need  to  follow-­‐up,   the  student  was  prompt  and   thorough.

The student  remained  in  regular   and  frequent  contact  with  you   throughout  the  project  (in  person,   by  phone,  by  email).

If email  was  the  means  of   communication,  the  student  wrote   clear  and  concise  business  emails   with  little  or  no  typing  errors. 5

3

6

2

8

7

6

7

6

4

9

7

6

Very Good

5

6

4

1

1

3

1

1

4

2

0

2

3

Good

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

15

Excellent

The student  designer  contacted   you  to  arrange  meetings.

Answer Options

2

1

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Fair

Totals 2010-­‐2013

0

2

4

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2

2

Poor

3.40

4.17

3.67

3.00

4.50

4.67

4.67

4.50

3.83

3.80

4.50

4.50

3.83

Rating Average

answered question

2

0

0

14

1

1

1

2

5

6

3

1

0

N/A

6 7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

6

4.29

4.00

3.86

5.00

4.71

4.57

4.86

4.71

4.57

4.86

4.71

4.57

4.57

5

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

4

6

6

6

6

6

4.43

4.25

4.13

4.00

4.29

4.14

4.86

4.83

4.80

4.60

5.00

3.86

4.75

8

5

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

4.20

3.40

3.25

5.00

4.40

4.00

4.20

4.20

4.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

3.40

5

3

5

5

4

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Response Count

2013

Response Rating   Count Average

2012

Response Rating   Count Average

2011

Response Rating   Count Average

2010

4.08

3.96

3.73

4.25

4.48

4.35

4.65

4.56

4.30

4.32

4.55

4.23

4.14

Total Average

26

19

26

26

25

26

26

26

26

24

26

26

26

26

26

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

3. Overall  was  the  student/client  communication  satisfactory?  (Effectiveness  of  Communication)                                                                                                                                                                                                                       (5)  =  Excellent-­‐-­‐exceeded  my  expectations  (4)  =  Very  Good-­‐-­‐met  my  expectations  (3)  =  Good-­‐-­‐average  (2)  =  Fair-­‐-­‐could  use  some  improvement                                                                                                                         (1)  =  Poor-­‐-­‐did  not  meet  expectations


403

Luke did  a  fabulous  job  all  around!

Communication was  great.    E-­‐mails,  texts,  and  phone  calls  throughout  the  whole  process.

Although we  never  met  in  person,  I  felt  as  if  Jessica  had  great  presence  -­‐  she  came  off  as  a  good  listener,  a  creative  thinker,  and  an  initiator  of  additional  avenues  for  us  to  consider  with  respect  to  promoting   our  concert.

We had  set  time  aside  to  talk  during  the  school  break  &  was  not  contacted  which  wasted  that  block  of  t  ime  for  me.  He  apologized  later.

Jon presented  himself  not  just  as  a  college  student  but  as  a  person  who  I  would  consider  was  in  the  business  and  capable.    He  was  a  bit  unsure  of  himself  at  first  but  as  things  progressed  he  gained  that   confidence.    Our  working  relationship  was  as  any  other  developer  I  would  be  working  with  in  my  professional  career  (I  manage  an  iOS  development  team)  and  given  the  opportunity  I  would  consider  him   capable  to  work  on  the  team  in  an  entry  level.

2012

My colleagues  and  I  count  ourselves  incredibly  fortunate  to  have  had  Fabiola's  assistance.  She  went  above  and  beyond  with  this  project.  We  give  her  the  highest  of  accolades  and  credit!

Jeannie started  out  with  enthusiasm,  met  twice,  and  then  completely  abandoned  the  project.

Partnering with  Ken  was  a  wonderful  experience.  He  accepted  all  of  my  feedback  and  made  changes  accordingly.  He  gave  us  suggestions  that  were  very  welcome  and  beyond  what  we  originally  imagined  that   we  would  receive  from  this  program.  I  felt  that  this  entire  experience  was  nothing  but  positive. Ken,  is  very  knowledgeable.  He  understood  what  i  wanted  and  was  able  to  design  a  web  site  that  is  vibrant,  active,  accessible.  He  is  clear  in  communications,  though  a  bit  shy  at  times  when  trying  to  engage   him  in  general  conversations.  He  asked  questions  when  he  was  not  clear  or  when  i  did  not  make  myself  clear.  He  attended  to  detail  and  seemed  to  really  like  the  project.

The student  was  thorough  and  reminded  us  when  we  got  off  track,  of  busy  and  kept  the  ball  moving  so  the  Web  site  could  be  finished  in  a  timely  manner.

Krystal was  very  professional  during  our  meetings,  listened  and  asked  appropriate  questions.  I  would  suggest  that  in  the  future  she  bring  a  notepad  to  record  significant  information  as  I  wasn't  certain  how  she   was  going  to  retain  everything  we  discussed.

2011

One of  the  problems  we  have  had  is  spelling.    Tayla's  emails  were  always  on  point  tho'  more  casual  than  businesslike.    That  may  have  been  our  partly  fault  since  we  tend  to  be  more  casual  in  our  approach.     Now  to  the  errors  in  spelling.    The  text  we  sent  her    might  have  had  typos  in  it  but  those  should  have  been  picked  up  by  the  designer  before  they  went  onto  the  website.    I  can  say,  however,  that  she  fixed   everything  we  noted  promptly  and  efficiently.    BTW,  we  kept  changing  our  minds  about  the  color  scheme  which  delayed  the  work  somewhat.    Tayla  took  our  recommendation  on  color  and  made  it  better!

scheduled meeting  and  kept  the  meetings.  He  was  on  time  and  knew  exactly  what  he  was  going  to  ask  as  well  as  listened  to  what  we  wanted.

I feel  I  explained  my  feedback  in  detail  above.

Emails sent  back  and  forth  were  more  informal  between  Amanda  and  I.    Not  being  able  to  meet  face  to  face  to  see  the  website  was  difficult.    When  we  did  meet  the  week  before  it  was  due  to  be  finished  it   looked  really  nice  and  I  was  impressed  with  the  amount  of  work  Amanda  had  put  into  it.    It  was  also  really  comforting  to  see  that  she  was  willing  and  able  to  make  any  changes  to  the  site  at  that  point.

Tom's performance  was  excellent  until  he  disappeared  after  showing  the  website  to  us.    He  did  an  excellent  job  of  keeping  in  contact  until  April  14.      We  had  appointments  that  were  cancelled  and   rescheduled.    The  last  one  said  he  was  sick  -­‐  but  he  never  contacted  me  again  after  that.    I  called  him  on  a  cell  number  he  had  given  me  early  in  the  process.    He  was  doing  a  tattoo  and  couldn't  really  talk  (this   was  after  the  end  of  the  semester).

2010

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.


404 3

5

5

4

6

7

Very Good

4

3

2

3

1

1

Good

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

14

12

The student  designer   prepared  drafts  with  various   ideas  (concepts)  and  layouts.

The student  easily  translated   my  ideas  into  working   concepts/layouts.

15

The interview  included  a   series  of  specific  questions  to   assess  design  needs  and  goals

13

15

He/she conducted  a   professional  client  interview   to  obtain  the  necessary   project  information.

The student  presented  and   communicated  his/her   various  concepts  and  layouts   in  a  clear  and  informative   manner.

17

Excellent

The student  showed  a   willingness  to  hear  my  initial   ideas  and  thoughts.

Answer Options

1

0

1

0

1

0

Fair

Totals 2010-­‐2013

2

2

3

2

1

0

Poor

4.17

4.20

4.40

4.00

4.00

4.33

Rating Average

answered question

2

3

3

2

2

1

N/A

6

5

6

6

6

6

6

6

4.14

4.00

3.86

4.57

4.29

4.71

7

6

7

7

7

7

7

7

4.29

4.13

4.14

4.38

4.75

4.88

8

2

8

8

8

8

8

8

3.50

4.67

3.25

3.67

4.33

4.50

5

3

5

5

5

5

5

5

4.03

4.25

3.91

4.16

4.34

4.61

26

16

26

26

26

26

26

26

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

Response Total   Count Average

2013

Response Rating   Count Average

2012

Response Rating   Count Average

2011

Response Rating   Count Average

2010

4. How  satisfied  were  you  with  the  students  initial  preparation?      (5)  =  Excellent-­‐-­‐exceeded  my  expectations        (4)  =  Very  Good-­‐-­‐met  my  expectations                                                                                                                                                 (3)  =  Good-­‐-­‐average  (2)  =  Fair-­‐-­‐could  use  some  improvement  (1)  =  Poor-­‐-­‐did  not  meet  expectations


405

We received  only  one  concept.  Only  a  few  out  of  dozens  of  photos  that  we  provided  were  incorporated.  The  final  product  that  we  received  did  not  reflect  the  one  proposed  concept  that  she  sent  on  4/25.

Again we  are  waiting  to  see  the  finished  work.  But  so  far  what  she  has  done  is  excellent.

Was not  with  this  student  for  the  initial  preparation.

2013

Ben called  me  to  discuss  my  ideas,  and  he  already  had  working  concepts  prior  to  our  first  meeting.    I  explained  to  Ben  what  I  was  looking  for  and  he  translated  my  ideas  into  something  concrete.

Being in  this  line  of  work  I  also  came  prepared.    I  think  that  presented  opportunities  and  challenges.    I  provided  a  project  scope  to  him  that  was  fairly  detailed  so  his  interaction  was  less  on  the  information  gathering  and  more  on   translating  it  into  what  he  can  do.    I  think  he  handled  it  well.

2012

Fabiola Salvant  is  an  exceptional  worker  and  person.  She  is  highly  professional  and  committed  to  her  work.  We  are  so  fortunate  to  have  had  her  assistance.

Never finished  the  project.

Ken, took  my  concepts  and  ran  with  them  to  create  a  great  project.  I  ended  up  learning  a  lot  from  him.  I  told  him  "i  thought  i  had  some  grasp  of  how  a  web  site  works  but  now  i  feel  like  i  know  enough  to  be  able  to  maintain  the   site  myself"      He  is  creative  with  the  computer  and  was  able  to  translate  creativity  into  a  very  good  product.

Ken gave  me  "homework"  which  I  thought  was  cute  to  get  an  idea  of  what  I  was  thinking  in  terms  of  a  direction  and  we  went  from  there.

Tyler only  presented  me  with  one  fairly  finished  design.  I  think  he  should  have  come  up  with  at  least  three  not  finished  designs  to  get  a  look  and  feel  established.  That  is  more  professional.  But,  knowing  that  this  is  for  a  class  and   the  time  constraints,  I  wasn't  being  picky.  He  was  very  open  to  my  ideas  to  finesse  the  design  to  a  finished  stage  and  in  the  end  the  whole  group  was  very  pleased  with  the  end  result.

Very good  job.  Drew  up  rough  drafts  based  on  supplied  information  and  envisioned  a  finish  product.

I feel  as  though  I  controlled  the  meetings  we  had  together.    I  was  expecting  that  she  would  be  taking  the  lead  as  the  professional,  offering  guidance,  suggestions  and  direction  but  that  never  happened.

2011

I had  some  concerns  about  the  website  not  looking  dynamic  enough.    Suggestions  were  made  about  changing  fonts  and  layout;  most  were  carried  out.    I've  seen  other  examples  of  her  work  and  found  them  considerably  more   interesting  to  look  at  than  our  final  product.    I  have  to  say,  however,  that  might  have  been  our  lack  of  clarity  in  what  we  wanted.

Before we  had  our  first  meeting  Luan  already  look  at  our  site  and  came  in  with  specific  questions  regarding  our  old  website  and  what  we  would  like  it  to  be.

Most of  these  were  covered  above.

I was  not  shown  anything  prior  to  the  'final'  draft  which  I  asked  to  make  alterations  to.

Tom was  doing  a  great  job  early  on  and  we  really  like(d)  his  first  pass.

2010

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.


406

4

12

12

The project  looks  professional

The final  design  has  met  our   needs/goals 3

4

3

4

Good

2

2

2

2

Fair

4

3

3

3

Poor

2

1

3

1

N/A

7

2010

7

7

7

7

7

6

3.86

4.00

4.00

4.00

Response Count

5

5

6

6

6

Rating Average

2010

3.71

3.71

3.43

3.86

Rating Average

2010

8

7

8

8

8

8

Response Count

3.50

4.00

4.00

3.60

Rating Average

2010

5

4

5

5

5

5

Response Count

3.67

3.80

3.86

3.74

Total Average

26

23

25

26

26

26

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

The work  that  Fabiola  has  done  has  more  than  met  our  expectations.  We  count  ourselves  very  fortunate  to  have  had  her  help  and  assistance.  She  is  professional,  skilled  and  conscientious!

Did not  complete  the  project  and  never  got  the  website  up  although  a  great  deal  of  information  was  provided  to  her  for  her  use.

He presented  me  with  more  design  work  than  i  had  imagined.  He  took  concepts  and  made  them  real.  Ken  took  my  vision  and  made  it  a  reality.  He  instructed  me  as  he  did  things  and  explained  them  in  a  way  i  could  understand.  He  taught  me  as  he  designed.

He provided  more  design  work  in  that  he  created  a  new  logo  for  us.  He  also  created  a  new  page  that  wasn't  on  our  original  website  for  the  sale  of  the  group's  CD  recording.

Tyler actually  hasn't  finished  up  with  me  or  returned  my  calls.  I  need  access  to  his  design  so  I  can  actually  get  it  on  the  web.  I'm  sure  I  will  connect  with  him  eventually,  but  the  finish  fizzled  a  bit.

The student  provided  us  with  much  more  than  expected,  not  only  in  tangible  material  but  in  knowledge.

I had  anticipated  that  Krystal  would  have  provided  us  with  more  than  a  basic  template  of  a  webpage.    I  had  hoped  that  she  would  be  able  to  provide  one  or  two  pages  of  content.

2011

She gave  us  more  than  we  anticipated.    We  didn't  need  a  fancy  site  with  no  substance.    We  got  a  very  practical  site  with  every  expected  characteristic  and  more.    Just  would  have  liked  a  bit  more  creativity  for  more  pizzazz.

I haven't  seen  it  yet  -­‐  not  the  final  version  anyway  so  my  answers  would  be  based  on  the  last  version  which  I  saw  back  in  the  beginning  of  April  I  think

He gave  more  design  work  than  i  expected  and  more  options.

I was  so  please  that  Dean  was  creative  enough  to  design  a  composite  photo  for  the  last  item  in  the  website  to  include  a  variety  of  examples  in  the    ending  caption.    He  also  revised  it  quite  easily  when  I  made  a  suggestion  about  how  to        improve  it.

There is  no  deliverable  -­‐  and  we  would  really  like  the  project  at  whatever  state  it  is  in  so  that  we  can  go  forward  and  complete  it.  Tom's  non-­‐delivery  of  the  project  was  absolutely  unanticipated.  The  meeting  where  we  were  to  purchase  the  url  and  space  for  the  site   and  put  up  the  project  with  the  suggested  updates  never  happened  (Tom  kept  cancelling).    We  would  have  been  (and  are  still)  happy  to  accept  the  site  in  its  incomplete  form.

answered question

3.60

3.50

4.00

3.50

Response Count

2010 Rating Average

Did the  student  designer  provide  you  with  more  design  work  than  you  anticipated?  Less  design  work  than  you   anticipated?  Please  explain.

2

3

12

5

11

Very Good

The project  was  completed  in   the  time  allotted

Excellent

The results  of  the                       project  are…

Answer Options

Totals 2010-­‐2013

5. How  satisfied  are  you  with  the  work  completed?    (5)  =  Excellent-­‐-­‐exceeded  my  expectations  (4)  =  Very  Good-­‐-­‐met  my  expectations                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     (3)  =  Good-­‐-­‐average  (2)  =  Fair-­‐-­‐could  use  some  improvement  (1)  =  Poor-­‐-­‐did  not  meet  expectations


407

2012

Less than  anticipated,  we  didn't  hear  much  from  the  student  -­‐  she  didn't  ask  for  our  ideas  or  feedback  after  the  first  face-­‐to-­‐face  meeting.  She  did  send  us  screen  shots  of  the  concept  to  review  but  didn't  ask  for  us  to  do  any  "design  work"  on  it.  She  did  asked  for   pictures  which  we  sent.  The  end  result  looked  very  similar  to  our  current  website.  She  changed  the  color  of  the  background  and  font.  The  layout  and  design  is  otherwise  exactly  the  same.

Her initial  design  was  more  than  we  anticipated.    She  recreated  our  logo  which  looks  much  more  professional  than  our  old  one.  And  the  colors  she  used  for  the  logo  and  website  were  much  more  fitting  to  colors  used  today  in  business  graphics.

The student  designer  provided  us  with  just  the  right  amount  of  design  work.

He was  able  to  provide  a  design  which  communicated  the  goal  of  our  charity  and  provided  several  examples  of  work  that  were  varying  but  not  overwhelming,

2013

We used  the  Memory  Game  as  part  of  our  production  of  Survivor  the  Musical.  The  game  worked  flawlessly  and  enhanced  the  overall  production  greatly.

Initially, I  was  more  interested  in  a  logo  for  my  annual  motorcycle  charity  ride,  something  that  people  would  recognize  going  forward.    He  also  designed  a  website  for  the  ride  and  it's  gotten  great  feedback.    I'm  very  happy  with  all  he's  done.

Jessica provided  three  initial  website  mock-­‐ups  for  me  to  choose  from  (which  was  great  to  have)  and  then  followed  up  with  a  Facebook  page.  She's  been  great  about  continuing  to  update  the  website  whenever  we  have  new  advertisers/sponsors  sign  on,  and  that   is  greatly  appreciated.

I still  haven't  seen  the  final  project

Peter did  more  than  I  asked  for  or  expected  in  the  time  we  had.  He  worked  to  fast  for  me  to  keep  up.  I  regret  checking  his  work  quick  enough  and  he  went  ahead  re-­‐designing  many  pages.  There  is  still  more  to  be  done  revising  his  designs  to  my  satisfaction.  I  did   not  want  to  burden  him  since  he  worked  so  hard  and  spent  a  lot  of  time  already.

Less-­‐he did  remove  an  element  from  our  existing  website  which  pleased  me  but  did  not  add  a  replacement.        He  also  added  Cute  News  which  is  great.

It was  a  very  big  project  he  took  on  for  the  Bolton  Fair.    The  Fair  committee  loved  the  logo  design  and  we  have  rolled  it  out  and  will  be  using  it  as  presented.    The  website  changes  is  taking  longer  and  I  wasn't  sure  how  much  time  he  could  devote  so  the  plan  was   always  to  scale  it  back  and  work  as  a  team  where  necessary.    I  am  happy  with  the  end  results  and  the  areas  that  are  not  complete,  Jon  is  still  working  on  and  has  agreed  to  complete.    My  timeframe  was  to  roll  out  the  changes  in  May  and  we  will  meet  that  goal.


408

9

10

10

10

He/she showed  an  ability  to   communicate  design   concepts.

He/she showed  an  ability  to   achieve  project  goals.

He/she showed  an  ability  to   design  with  skill,  creativity   and  professionalism.

The student  managed  their   time  and  the  project   efficiently  and  effectively. 5

9

7

9

4

Very Good

2

2

3

3

2

Fair

3.20

4.17

3.83

3.67

3.67

answered question

2

0

1

0

0

N/A

6

5

6

6

6

6

6

Response Count

2010 Rating Average

3.86

4.00

3.86

4.00

4.14

3.75

3.88

4.14

3.75

4.00

3.00

3.40

3.25

3.20

3.80

6

2

5

5

5

5

5

Response Count

2013 Rating Average

3.45

3.86

3.77

3.66

3.90

6

15

26

26

25

26

26

Total Count

2010-2013 Total Average

2011

Fabiola is  fantastic!  She  has  taught  us  a  lot  and  accomplished  so  much.  We  have  been  so  pleased  to  have  her  help!

Never completed  the  project.

I am  grateful  for  this  program.  the  work  Ken  did  equals  and  surpasses  websites  that  my  colleagues  have  had  to  pay  heartily  for.  I  did  not  feel  like  i  was  taking  advantage  of  him  as  he  often  expressed  his  delight  at  being  able  to  re-­‐learn  or  try  new   things  out  as  he  built  the  site.

We will  recommend  student  for  other  jobs

See notes  from  question  #6  above.

Tayla knows  what  she  is  doing  but  couldn't  recommend  a  web  host  to  us.    That  may  not  have  been  a  part  of  the  project  but  would  have  been  welcomed  since  we  knew  nothing  when  we  started  this  project!  She  definitely  worked  efficiently  with   the  chorus  design  team,  much  more  efficiently  than  we  worked  as  the  team!

The progress  made  was  too  tied  to  the  next  deliverable  for  class  vs  just  getting  the  project  done  ahead  of  schedule.    But  that  may  have  been  a  requirement  of  the  professor  so  the  project  woudln't  be  ahead  of  others.

Professional looking  sight  and  the  ability  to  show  more  than  one  way  to  look  at  the  same  idea.

6

3

8

8

7

8

8

Response Count

2012 Rating Average

There was  only  one  occasion  that  our  "signals"  wer  confused  and  I  wasted  a  morning  when  I  planned  my  day  around  our  meeting.        The  other  comments  were  detailed  above.

2010

6

5

7

7

7

7

7

Response Count

2011 Rating Average

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

5

2

2

3

2

Poor

Al of  these  would  have  been  very  good  or  excellent  had  there  been  follow  through  to  delivery.

2

3

2

2

5

Good

Please provide  feedback  to  your  answers  where  ever  possible.

13

Excellent

The student  designer  has  a   grasp  of  the  web  design   profession.

Answer Options

Totals 2010-2013

6. How  would  you  rate  the  professionalism  of  this  designer?


409

2012

It seemed  that  the  majority  of  the  projected  was  worked  on  at  the  end  of  the  semester.

As stated  above  she  has  not  finished  our  project  yet.

2013

Very impressed  with  how  well  Jessica  managed  this  project  and  coached  me  through  as  the  client  (especially  with  regard  to  envisioning  the  website  options  and  how  to  go  about  acquiring  the  URL  and  host  site).

He was  updating  a  website.

Jon understood  what  we  wanted  to  accomplish  on  the  website  and  examples  were  provided  of  similar  work  to  help  guide  him.    He  was  able  to  take  that  and  successfully  provide  the  solution  the  first  iteration.  The  logo  was  totally  a  creative  effort   with  less  guidance.    It  would  have  been  very  challenging  for  an  experienced  professional.    Jon  nailed  it!    Like  I  mentioned  previously,  everyone  was  impressed  and  satisfied  with  his  creative  effort.    I've  since  posted  it  on  Facebook  to  our  followers   and  received  positive  feedback.


7. What  do  you  feel  are  the  student's  main  strengths?    What  are  the  student's  weaknesses—                                           what  can  they  improve  upon? 2010 Tom  knows  what  he  is  doing  technically.    He  has  a  lot  of  growing  to  do  professionally. The  site  itself  came  out  great!    It  was  almost  exactly  what  we  were  looking  for.    It  would  hae  been  easier  on  us   and  less  stressful  if  we  could  have  been  more  involved  along  the  way. I  feel  Dean  throughly  knew  his  material  and  the  scope  of  the  assign  so  he  capsulize  the  significant  information.     He  didn't  hesitate  to  make  suggestions  and  took  the  lead  in  designing  the  website.    I  found  his  verbal  skills   professional  and  his  manner  relaxed  to  encourage  open  discussion  as  the  project  advanced.  He  could  be  more   professional  in  his  emails...using  correct  grammar  and  spelling. Professional  looking  sight  and  the  ability  to  show  more  than  one  way  to  look  at  the  same  idea. Their  web  skills  were  not  as  advanced  as  I  had  imagined.  For  some  reason  I  thought  the  students  were  at  the   end  of  the  web  design  classes. Tayla's  strength  is  her  willingness  to  work  long  hours  to  accomplish  her  task.    She  also  worked  well  with   people  who  were  much  less  prepared  than  she  was! 2011 Krystal's  creativity  with  our  template  page  was  very  good.    She  captured  the  essence  of  our  organization  and   was  able  to  produce  a  product  that  represents  us  well.    I  would  suggest  that  she  focus  on  time  management   skills  -­‐  a  skill  that  is  difficult  for  the  most  seasoned  professional. No  need  for  improvement Tyler's  strengths  are  a  great  understanding  of  Dreamweaver  and  the  internet.  His  weakness  is  most  likely  time   management  under  a  tight  deadline. His  strength  is  his  flexibility  and  his  personality. He  is  a  personable  and  pleasant  man  but  he  comes  off  as  shy  and  quiet.  Once  engaged  in  conversation  and  as   we  have  come  to  know  one  another  he  relaxed  more  but  i  would  suggest  he  might  work  on  social  comfort   skills.    This  would  never  stop  him  from  getting  work  but  as  he  develops  more  social  ease  it  will  put  him  in   better  position  to  get  jobs  and  contracts. Excited  at  the  outset.    Presented  herself  well,  on  time,  and  enthusiastically. Jeannie  understood  the  timeline  and  importance  of  the  website  to  our  proposed  project.    She  made  the   commitment  to  complete  it,  using  a  number  of  prepared  documents  that  only  needed  uploading  to  the   website.  Jeannie  never  completed  the  project.    Students  need  to  contact  their  advisors  for  help  if  they  are   having  difficulty  and  cannot  complete  the  task  at  hand.    Follow  up  with  the  client  is  essential! Fabiola  is  professional,  kind,  conscientious  and  attentive  to  details.  We  have  seen  no  weaknesses.

410


2012 Strength -­‐  creative  ability.  Area  for  improvement  -­‐  communication  could  be  more  regular.    Though  I  never  had   to  chase  him  for  status. Knowledge  verbally  about  his  craft. hard  worker.  communication  skills,  but  tries  hard. Strength-­‐followed  throght,  take  feedback  well,  kept  me  on  check  (and  was  nice  at  the  same  time!) Improvement-­‐none Hard  Worker    No  results  were  ever  shown  to  us Understanding  our  needs  better  than  we  did!    Asking  all  the  right  questions  up  front  and  being  very  creative   with  the  concept  to  design  to  implementation  process.    No  weaknesses  noted. Ben  listened  to  my  ideas  and  thoughts,  and  easily  brought  it  to  fruition.    He  offered  his  own  ideas,  and  we   were  on  the  same  page  throughout  the  project. Luke's  main  strengths  are:  dependability  and  the  ability  to  communicate  technical  information  to  someone   who  is  not  "tech  savvy." 2013 The  format  of  his  designs  were  easy  to  understand  and  he  gave  a  variety  of  designs.  A  strength  of  was  his   creativity  because  I  had  given  very  little  information  about  what  I  wanted  into  look  like,  giving  him  a  range  of   places  to  start,  and  he  was  able  to  use  the  information  about  Simple  Treasures  to  create  well  though  out   logos. Organizes  information  well.  Watch  out  for  clashing  color  schemes. The  use  of  colors  and  designing  of  our  logo.    Keeping  in  a  little  better  communication  with  us. Strengths:  she  was  very  polite  and  seemed  enthusiastic  about  the  project  initially.  She  is  a  nice  person.   Weakness:  Communication  and  time  management.  I  feel  as  though  if  the  communication  was  better  then  she   would  have  been  able  to  manage  her  time  better  resulting  in  a  better  experience  for  her  as  the  student  as   well  as  for  us,  the  customer.  Sarah  showed  us  examples  of  other  website  projects  from  her  portfolio  and  its   clear  that  she  has  talent.  It  just  didn't  necessarily  reflect  with  this  project.  I  anticipated  more  interaction  which   probably  would  have  resulted  in  us  getting  more  of  what  we  expected,  rather  then  more  of  what  we  already   have  with  our  website. Main  strengths-­‐graphic  designing.  weaknesses  -­‐  not  enough  communication  to  express  level  of  weaknesses

411


412

33.3%

No

6

5

2

4

Response Count

7

5

1

6

Response Count

12.5%

87.5%

Response Percent

2012

2010

8

7

1

7

Response Count

Please explain  your  reasons  why  or  why  not?

14.3%

85.7%

Response Percent

2011

20.0%

80.0%

Response Percent

2013

6

3

1

4

Response Count

18.5%

77.8%

Total Percent

27

20

5

21

Total Count

2010-­‐2013

Anyone would  be  fortunate  to  have  Fabiola  working  on  their  project.  She  is  the  best!

absolutely. His  skill  and  knowledge  far  exceeds  a  student.  He  is  responsible  and  remains  in  communication.  He  asks  questions  and  makes  sure  he  understands  what  I  was  trying  to  accomplish.  He   seemed  like  a  partner  on  the  project  and  this  was  a  good  feeling.

Based on  the  entire  experience  I  would  not  hesitate  to  recommend  him  and  have  already  asked  him  if  he  is  interested  in  a  potential  web  design  for  the  company  I  work  for  sometime  in  the  future.

Dependable and  imaginative

Krystal is  a  young  lady  with  a  great  deal  of  talent.    She  is  pleasant,  professional  and  willing.    In  time,  her  project  management  skills  will  develop.

2011

But only  for  very  basic  design  -­‐  two  columns,  couple  of  pages,  limited  if  not  interactive  capabilities

Professional work.  Able  to  give  several  ideas  on  the  same  concept.  Done  in  a  timely  manner.  all  round  great  work.

I certainly  would  recommend  this  designer  to  other  individuals.    He  was  professional  at  all  times  and  I  felt  he  was  affable  even  though  he  admitted  that  he  didn't  know  at  first  what  it  would  be  like   working  for  a  "nun".      I  did  ask  him  why  he  chose  our  project  and  he  was  candid    and  I  feel  we  started  with  the  trust  that  he  would  do  well.

It was  very  difficult  not  being  included  in  the  design  process  more.

No, because  there  is  no  guarantee  that  you  will  get  the  completed  work.

answered question

Please explain  your  reasons  why  or  why  not?

66.7%

Response Percent

Yes

Answer Options

2010

8. Would  you  recommend  this  designer  to  other  individuals?


413

Im honestly  uncomfortable  with  giving  a  negative  review,  especially  since  this  was  not  a  project  we  paid  to  have  done.  But  I  feel  as  though  I  would  be  doing  Sarah  a  disservice  by  not  being  truthful.  I   don't  want  to  see  her  get  a  terrible  grade,  but  I  do  feel  that  she  has  much  more  potential.  Its  evident  based  on  what  she  showed  us  from  her  portfolio.  it  seemed  that  she  had  a  lot  of  school  work   and  possibly  too  much  on  her  plate.

Clearly likes  what  she  does  and  seems  like  a  hard  worker!

Yes, he  was  flexible  and  creative  in  his  designs.

2013

In fact,  I  was  just  at  a  meeting  for  the  college's  50th  anniversary  and  I  mentioned  Luke  as  someone  who  we  might  hire  to  work  on  the  50th  anniversary  web  site!

Although Ben  hasn't  agreed  with  me,  I  reached  out  to  him  probably  an  unfair  amount  of  times  with  changes  and  updates  to  the  project.    He  continues  to  field  my  emails  and  texts  and  makes   updates  to  the  website  promptly.Going  forward,  he  will  be  my  graphic  designer/web  site  for  this  project  and  others.    Highly  recommended.    This  experience  has  been  a  pleasure.

Jessica exceeded  our  expectations  on  all  fronts  -­‐  creativitiy,  competence,  willingness  to  make  changes,  knowledge,  and  being  a  very  pleasant  person  to  work  with  on  this  project.

see number  7  above

She is  very  enthusiastic  and  cares  about  the  project  she  works  on

If it  were  free.

Because of  his  professionalism  and  creative  ability.

2012


9. How  do  you  feel  the  the  client/student  relationship  can  be  improved?    What  could  you  (the  client)  have   done  differently?  What  could  the  student  have  done  differently? 2010 To  improve  the  relationship,  the  student  needs  to  follow  through  to  completion.  I  am  only  at  mwcc  on   Wednesdays  and  Fridays,  so  I  needed  to  meet  with  Tom  on  those  days  which  apparently  was  a  constraint  for   Tom  after  4/14.    I  should  have  completed  this  survey  sooner,  but  the  hotmail  address  is  used  only  for  TCLT.    (I   thought  my  mwcc  e-­‐mail  was  the  address  on  record  for  this  project.)  The  student  could  have  found  time  to   meet  after  April  14  and  followed  through. If  we  had  ahad  a  formal  meeting  introducing  ourselves  to  each  other,  that  would  have  been  the  perfect  time   to  ask  questions  about  what  we  wanted  the  page  to  look  like/contain.    Instead,  I  responded  to  an  email  with   what  I  was  looking  for  and  hoped  Amanda  understood  as  I  don't  really  know  the  correct  vocabulary  to  use   regarding  websites. I  don't  know  how  the  relationship  can  be  improved  except  perhaps  that  the  students  possible  meet  with  their   clients  before  the  first  encounter  to  "break  the  ice"  as  they  say.    I  don't  know  what  either  of  us  could  have   done  differently. Did  everything  the  way  a  professional  should. Weekly  or  bimonthly  checkins  would  have  been  helpful  to  keep  progress  of  project As  the  client,  we  should  have  been  able  to  get  material  to  her  in  a  more  efficient  manner.    Most  of  our  stuff   was  created  as  needed.    Tayla  might  have  been  a  bit  more  creative  in  her  layouts. 2011 I  believe  that  a  student  team  might  have  been  more  effective  given  the  scope  of  our  project.    I  believe  that   the  project  would  have  been  more  successful  if  we  had  developed  a  project  plan.    I  could  have  suggested  this   at  the  outset,  and  Krystal  could  have  developed  a  work  plan  to  keep  the  project  on  time. Nothing I  think  we  should  have  created  a  project  time  line  with  dates  for  certain  parts  of  the  design  to  be  done,  not   only  for  him,  but  me  too!  I  think  I  was  late  getting  him  things  he  needed  and  I  was  unclear  of  the  exact  due   date,  even  though  I  asked  for  it  a  few  times. We  met  in  the  front  hall  at  the  tabels  near  the  front  entrance....I  think  mayb  a  different  spot...sometimes    I   felt  that  we  were  talking  in  an  area  that  asked  for  you  to  respect  the  quiet  of  the  designated  area. nothing On-­‐going  meetings  might  have  helped  us  understand  that  Jeannie  was  unable  to  complete  the  task  at  hand.     She  seemed  competent  and  was  part  of  a  class.    I  did  not  realize  that  she  was  not  seeking  assistance  to  help   her  to  complete  the  job. Fabiola  has  maintained  a  wonderful  client/student  relationship  with  us.  As  her  client  we  wish  we  had  more   time  to  devote  to  this  endeavor  -­‐-­‐  but  this  project  is  not  our  only  concern.

414


2012 I think  it  went  very  well.  I'm  pleased  with  the  results  and  honestly  can't  suggest  any  areas  for  improvements. With  set  scheduled  times  to  talk. i  should  have  explained  my  ideas  more  clearly  from  the  start I  didn't  follow  through  in  all  deadlines  and  need  to  improve  on  that  because  Blanca  was  waiting  for  content   and  it  took  me  a  little  while  (and  some  persistance  from  Blanca)  to  get  it  all  in.  Student-­‐she  was  fine better  preparation  and  communication N/A No  improvements,  Ben  and  I  clicked  right  away. This  went  incredibly  well  and  I  was  highly  satisfied.  No  further  comment 2013 It  would  have  been  easier  for  both  parties  if  we  could  meet  in  person;  however,  transportation  was  not   reliable. If  my  schedule  were  more  flexible  I  would  have  liked  to  meet  her  in  person  while  trying  to  work  on  our   project. Stayed  in  better  communications  with  us. We  could  have  reached  out  to  her  more.  We  did  send  various  emails,  but  when  they  were  not  responded  to   we  could  have  called.  Sarah  could  have  communicated  better;  overall  not  a  lot  of  reaching  out  on  her  end.  It   would  have  been  great  if  she  provided  us  with  a  few  different  design  ideas  to  select  from. More  communication  could  be  an  improvement.

415


10. What  do  you  believe  are  the  benefits  and  difficulties  of  this  learning  experience?                                                     Comments  and  suggestions: 2010 There  are  great  benefits  to  the  student  -­‐  learning  to  work  professionally,  following  the  cycle  of  a  project  that   is  "real",  i.e.,  you  really  don't  know  what  it  is  that  you  will  encounter  when  you  start,  having  the  opportunity   to  do  this  without  the  risks  that  would  be  encountered  in  the  workplace  (Tom  would  have  been  fired  if  he   didn't  just  quit.).  I  think  it  is  well  worth  doing  this  as  a  class  project,  and  I  hope  that,  despite  the  lack  of   success  TCLT  encountered,  other  non-­‐profits  did  have  their  projects  delivered. I  think  it  was  difficult  to  determine  who  was  supposed  to  'take  charge'  of  meeting,  discussing,  etc.    I  was   under  the  impression  that  she  would  be  contacting  me  frequently  and  that  i  should  keep  my  schedule  clear  to   meet  with  her  ehenever  possible. I  feel  the  difficulties  include  the  fact  that  neither  is  familiar  with  the  other  previously  and  the  benefits  include   preparing  the  student  to  know  how  to  introduce  themselves  and  learn  how  to  confidently  discuss  their  ideas   with  the  clients.    I  DO  feel  that  Dean  was  WELL  prepared  for  this. Benefit  of  working  on  a  real  world  site  and  client  gives  a  great  experience  to  any  student. The  professor  wasn't  involved  at  all  -­‐  an  email  or  some  form  of  communication  telling  the  client  what  the   expectations  were  of  them  and  also  for  the  student  in  terms  of  learning.    It  woulld  have  been  helpful  if  we   knew  ahead  of  time  where  they  were  in  terms  of  training/knowledge  of  web  design. The  difficulty  is  working  with  technologically  illiterate  clients!    The  benefits  are  the  real  world  experiences   working  with  technologically  illiterate  clients! 2011 I  firmly  believe  in  hands-­‐on  learning  and  welcome  students  to  our  operation.    It's  a  mutually  beneficial   relationship  -­‐  they  receive  real  life  experience  and  we  receive  much  needed  support.    A  challenge  with  this   type  of  arrangement  is  the  considerable  effort  it  requires  from  the  organization.    As  a  non-­‐profit  operation,   our  time  is  already  stretched. Benefits,  of  course,  are  getting  our  Web  site  done  and  having  the  student  learn  at  the  same  time I  think  its  a  great  way  to  learn,  but  I  could  see  how  certain  projects  and/or  clients  could  be  better  than  others.   It  would  be  interesting  for  a  group  of  kids  to  work  with  one  client  and  see  how  they  all  create  different   designs  to  the  same  issues,  then  the  client  could  choose  which  design  met  his  needs. Students  receive  the  benefit  of  interacting  with  real  clients  and  discovering  that  what  they  think  is  a  wonderfu   design  may  not  be  what  the  client  wants.  I  can  forsee  difficulties  for  the  pairing  of  student  and  client  if   scheduling  time  to  meet  is  a  problem.  I  was  fortunate  in  my  schedule  that  I  could  meet  Ken  once  a  week  at   the  college. It  is  crucial  to  have  practical  hands  on  learning  for  all  the  intricacies  of  a  task.  Social  and  communication  and   the  opportunity  to  see  a  project  through.  I  am  a  strong  proponent  of  learning  experiences. Short  time-­‐line  required  diligence.    Everyone  had  responsibilities  to  ensure  the  success  of  this  project.    We   relied  on  Jeannie  for  the  website  additions.    Perhaps  student  experiences  do  not  prepare  them  for  this  short   of  a  time-­‐line?    Suggest  monitoring  student  projects  as  they  relate  to  the  timelines  that  they  commit  to.    The   instructor  would  know  if  the  project  was  proceeding  as  intended,  if  student  needed  help,  etc.    It  appears  that   she  was  overwhelmed  and  didn't  ask  for  assistance?

416


Our task  force  members  learned  a  lot  about  web  design  and  possibilities.  We  hope  that  Fabiola  learned  about   the  specifics  of  our  organization  and  its  goals. 2012 I  think  it  went  well.    This  was  a  new  experience  for  me  so  I  didn't  know  what  boundaries  I  could  operate  in.    I   treated  him  like  a  professional  and  he  stepped  up  to  it. A  busy  semester. great  help. Benefit-­‐students  get  real  life  experience  and  help  build  the  organization's  (in  this  case  a  non-­‐profit  with  a   small  budget)  capacity.  Difficutlties-­‐students  may  not  have  enough  experience  and  may  not  be  aware  of  best   practices  (or  best  ways  to  achieve  the  desire  outcome) all  learning  experiences  are  benficial,  positive  or  negative Real  world  scenarios  for  students  to  experience;  affordable  (i.e.,  free  :-­‐)  expert  support  to  non-­‐profits;   extended  benefits  to  the  larger  community  (i.e.,  promoting  our  concert  in  this  way  will  raise  money  for  early   childhood  services).    No  difficulties  encountered.  Thank  you  so  much  for  enabling  students  and  the  "real   world"  to  work  together  in  this  way! The  benefit,  for  me,  was  having  an  experienced  person  complete  my  project  with  ease.    Can't  think  of  any   difficulties. Clearly,  the  theatre  benefited  by  acquiring  a  Memory  Game  that  can  be  part  of  future  productions.  It's  hard  to   comment  on  the  student  perspective. 2013 Benefits:  Real  world,  contact  with  people  (clients),  collaboration  with  someone  who  is  not  oriented  with   design.  Difficulties:  Seeing  where  the  design  will  used. Great  opportunity  for  students  to  get  a  taste  of  the  real  world  and  what  their  future  career  entails.  It's  difficult   to  meet  with  them. I  know  Carina  works  and  is  going  to  college  I  commend  people  who  do  that.    Finding  the  time  for  this  project  I   am  sure  was  hard  but  so  far  the  prototype  for  our  website  looks  great  and  we  look  forward  to  seeing  the   completed  project  she  is  designing  for  us. I  think  this  is  a  good  learning  experience  for  both  parties;  the  student  is  given  the  opportunity  to  conduct  a   real-­‐world  business  transaction.  The  customer  is  provided  with  a  free  service. I  believe  the  benefit  and  difficulties  of  having  students  work  on  actual  businesses  is  incredible,  each  student   knows  that  they  must  each  business  owners  needs  and  work  up  to  their  expectations.

417


Appendix J: Service Learning Client Surveys Project Assessments

418


Initial Client Contact Guideline Sheet

Client: _____________________ Designer: ____________________

Contact Start:        

Think about what type of contact you wish to make. What impression you wish to leave with the client. Be pleasant to all people you speak with (admin. staff, secretary you are talking with at the outset). Think ahead before you speak. Be prepared with some questions. Start initial contact with a client when you are prepared to talk (not rushed distracted, on a car phone), Initial contact will be by phone. If they are not there leave clear message with your telephone number. Practice your succinct message to avoid sounding hesitant, unsure or long winded. Speak clearly and slowly giving reason why you called (to talk about their need for a web site project). Check your voice mail phone message sounds professional (in case your client leaves a message).

Contact Established:  Establish rapport. Connect with the client. Be personable and interested in their project.  Find out their availability. What is the preferred communication method (in-person, phone, e-mail)?  Establish “best times” for meetings, phone calls and e-mail. Set some specific dates for meetings. Person-to-Person Meeting:  Make sure you look presentable when you are meeting with your client (no dirty ripped jeans, sweats, t-shirts, no visible offensive labels, tattoos, and excessive piercings).  Continue to “look the part” as a new web designer (not necessarily “funky artist” nor “Sunday best”)  Meet in person very early in the semester so that you can establish a good working relationship  In subsequent meetings make a specific list of questions that will need to be addressed  Give more than expected regarding the web site but do not over promise or under produce Telephone Meetings:      

In telephone meetings make sure you are in a quiet location without potential distractions Keep a list of specific questions or concerns that need to be addressed in front of you Check off items that you have covered Set time and date for next phone conversation (if needed) Explain when you will next be in contact Give periodic updates on progress and areas of concern (such as the lack of content from client)

E-mail Correspondence:  Use the college email address Do not use cute personal email addresses like “coolboy523 or “hottie7” avoid hotmail yahoo mail  Use clear concise easy to read full sentences Do not use shortcuts, texting jargon, lowercase “I” or phrases  Use professional business sentence structure and Spell and Grammar check before sending  CC yourself on all correspondence BCC instructor on all correspondence  Keep your email messages organized in a separate email folder Contact Maintenance:       

Abide by the agreed upon “best times” for meetings, phone calls and e-mail. Establish ongoing meeting dates (either phone or in-person) Always follow-up with missed/delayed calls or meetings Be open to client ideas and share your own design concepts Reach compromises when client requests cannot be met or conflict with “good” web design practices Physically obtain web page materials as early as possible do not wait for promises Give more than expected (in attitude, demeanor, excitement, enthusiasm, timeline and results)

Computer Graphic Design

client_initial_contact_guideline_sheet210s2011.doc © 1999-2011 instructor p_swerzenski@mwcc.mass.edu

419


Data Sheet Designer Information

Designer’s Last Name:

First Name:

Local Street Address:

City/Zip

Local Phone:

Cell Phone:

MWCC E-mail address

(Attach Current Work / Class Schedule)

Designer's Learning Objectives

(What do you want to learn by completing this project?)

1. 2. Client Information Client:

(Name of Organization Agency/ Company)

New Project Title:

(What working title will be used to identify this project)

Mailing Address:

City /zip:

Main Contact Person:

Phone:

E-mail:

Secondary Contact Person:

Phone:

E-mail:

Research Information Client’s Business:

( What is the nature of the organization's work? Type of business, type of department or program)

Project Purpose: (Detail clients needs)

Project Objectives: 1. 2. Describe client include specific requests or design objectives if they are known)

Current Media Presence (web, print media, identity) (Current web site address? _________________)

Nature of Services: Describe basic work designer will be doing:

Additional (Information / Concerns / Questions/ Resources that need to be addressed to complete project)

Approvals Designer Signature

Date:

r APPROVED r Conditionally Approved r NOT approved r New Client Needed Instructor Signature ¨ Outside Business project

Date: ¨ Outside Non-Profit Agency /Group

¨ Service learning project ¨ MWCC Site

This form is to be completed by each designer. Keep a copy for yourself

420


Client Meeting Notes # Designer: ______________________Project Title __________________ Person contacted: __________________ Date of Meeting __________________r initial contact Type of meeting:

r face to face

r 2

nd

r telephone

421

meeting

rd

r 3 meeting r Email

r other ___________ r other ___________


Weekly Time Sheet Time Sheet: # __ of __ Week #__ Enter Dates

Client Project: Organization Name / Working Title Description

Time Spent

Enter Brief Description of Service / Activities Performed *

Start

End

Minutes

Hours

1 Monday __/____/2012

2 Tuesday __/____/2012

3 Wednesday __/____/2012

4 Thursday __/____/2012

5 Friday __/____/2012

6 Saturday __/____/2012

7 Sunday __/____/2012

Week Number _______ Totals Note: Description of Service / Activities Performed should include all work related to the client project including preparation time. Since these are only brief descriptions, more extensive notes and comments should be written in the client notes files you create.

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Section IV: Instructional Support APPENDIX K:

CGD Facultyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Adjunct versus Full-time

424


CGD Faculty Adjunct  vs  Full-­‐time Term  Code FY 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200709 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200801 2008 200806 2008 200806 2008

Subj CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD

Course N Course   umberSInstr   ection Last  NameInstr  First  Name Campus  CBilling   ode Attribute   Status**CodeTotal  Courses  FY2008 101 SCE Boudreau Kristen GAR B200 Adj 40 101 SGI Boudreau Kristen GAR B200 Adj FY2008  Adjunt  Courses %  Part-­‐time 101 W1G Boudreau Kristen GAR B300 Adj 32 80 102 CE Cullen Leslie GAR B100 FT FY2008  FT  Courses %  Full-­‐time 241 SBD Gerry Rebecca GAR B200 Adj 8 20 204 WEB Gillis Margaret WEB B300 Adj 235 WEB Gillis Margaret WEB B300 Adj 104 SFH Jordan Kristine GAR B200 Adj 104 SHJ Jordan Kristine GAR B200 Adj 104 SBD Mayer Robert GAR B200 Adj 107 SF Mayer Robert GAR B200 Adj 107 WE2 Mayer Robert WEB B300 Adj 107 WEB Mayer Robert WEB B300 Adj 107 MCO Mayer Robert WEB C000 Adj 204 SJL Mayer Robert GAR B200 Adj 109 BD Swerzenski Paul GAR B100 FT 109 FH Swerzenski Paul GAR B100 FT 109 HJ Swerzenski Paul GAR B100 FT 110 CE Swerzenski Paul GAR B100 FT 110 GI Swerzenski Paul GAR B100 FT 104 M1G Wrobel Tiffany GAR B300 Adj 237 SBD Boudreau Kristen GAR B200 Adj 237 SFH Boudreau Kristen GAR B200 Adj 105 GI Cullen Leslie GAR B100 FT 105 GM Cullen Leslie GAR B100 FT 105 IS Cullen Leslie GAR B300 Adj 210 SCE Gerry Rebecca GAR B200 Adj 240 SBD Gerry Rebecca GAR B200 Adj 240 SFH Gerry Rebecca GAR B200 Adj 240 R1G Gerry Rebecca GAR B300 Adj 205 WEB Gillis Margaret WEB B300 Adj 235 WEB Gillis Margaret WEB B300 Adj 103 SGM Jordan Kristine GAR B200 Adj 106 SGM Jordan Kristine GAR B200 Adj 104 T1G Mayer Robert GAR B300 Adj 107 SF Mayer Robert GAR B200 Adj 107 WE2 Mayer Robert WEB B300 Adj 107 WEB Mayer Robert WEB B300 Adj 204 SBD Mayer Robert GAR B200 Adj 101 M1G Wrobel Tiffany GAR B300 Adj Margaret WEB B300 Adj 205 WEB Gillis 107 WEB Mayer Robert WEB B300 Adj

425


CGD Faculty Adjunct  vs  Full-­‐time 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200809 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200901 200906 200906

2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009

CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD

101 102 241 244 204 205 235 101 104 104 107 107 107 204 101 109 109 109 110 110 104 105 106 112 112 242 205 235 103 104 107 107 107 204 105 105 210 240 240 101 204 205

CE GI SFH SHJ WEB WEB WEB SGM SFH SHJ W1G WE2 WEB SBD R1G BD FH HJ CE GI T1G GI HJ SF SJL SE WEB WEB SHJ T1G SE WE2 WEB SHJ SAC W1G AC BD F R1G WEB WEB

Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Wrobel Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Wrobel Gillis Gillis

Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Tiffany Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Sonya Paul Paul Paul Tiffany Margaret Margaret

426

GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB

B100 B100 B200 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B200 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B300 B100 B100 B100 B100 B100 B300 B100 B100 B200 B200 B200 B300 B300 B200 B300 B200 B300 B300 B200 B200 B300 B100 B100 B100 B300 B300 B300

FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT FT FT FT Adj FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT FT Adj Adj Adj

Total Courses  FY2009 40 FY2008  Adjunt  Courses %  Part-­‐time 28 70 FY2008  FT  Courses %  Full-­‐time 12 30


CGD Faculty Adjunct  vs  Full-­‐time 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 200909 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201001 201006 201006 201006

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD

101 102 109 241 244 204 205 235 104 104 104 104 107 107 107 204 101 101 101 109 109 109 110 110 105 106 112 112 240 242 204 205 235 103 104 107 107 107 204 105 105 210 240 240 101 204 205 107

F HJ R1G SE SGI WEB WEB WEB SHJ SJH SF M1G SG WE2 WEB SBD SBD SE W1G AC E GI BD F F HJ SGI SJL R1G SE WEB WEB WEB SHJ T1G SG WE2 WEB W1G SBD M1G HJ AC CE R1G WEB WEB WEB

Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Jordan Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Shelton Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Wrobel Gillis Gillis Mayer

Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Kristine Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Sonya Sonya Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Sonya Paul Paul Paul Tiffany Margaret Margaret Robert

427

GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB WEB

B100 B100 B300 B200 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B200 B200 B300 B200 B300 B300 B200 B200 B200 B300 B100 B100 B100 B100 B100 B100 B100 B200 B300 B300 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B300 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B300 B100 B100 B100 B300 B300 B300 B300

FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT FT FT FT FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj

Total Courses  FY2010 45 FY2008  Adjunt  Courses %  Part-­‐time 33 73 FY2008  FT  Courses %  Full-­‐time 12 27


CGD Faculty Adjunct  vs  Full-­‐time 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201009 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201101 201106 201106

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD

101 102 106 109 241 241 244 204 205 235 104 104 104 104 107 107 204 101 101 101 225 109 109 109 110 110 105 106 112 112 240 242 204 205 235 103 104 107 107 107 101 105 105 210 240 240 204 107

F HJ IS R1G SE T1G SGI HYB WEB WEB SHJ SJH SF M1G SG WEB SBD SBD SE W1G SAC E GI SAC F SBD F HJ SGI T1G R1G SE WEB WEB WEB SHJ T1G SG WE4 WEB R1G SBD M1G HJ SAC SCE WEB WEB

Cullen Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Jordan Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Shelton Shelton Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Shelton Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Gillis Mayer

Leslie Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Kristine Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Sonya Sonya Sonya Paul Paul Paul Paul Paul Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Sonya Sonya Paul Paul Paul Margaret Robert

428

GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB

B100 B100 B300 B300 B200 B300 B200 B200 B300 B300 B200 B200 B200 B300 B200 B300 B200 B200 B200 B300 B200 B100 B100 B200 B100 B200 B100 B100 B200 B300 B300 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B300 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B300 B100 B200 B200 B300 B300

FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT Adj FT Adj FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT Adj Adj Adj Adj

Total Courses  FY2011 46 FY2008  Adjunt  Courses %  Part-­‐time 38 83 FY2008  FT  Courses %  Full-­‐time 9 20


CGD Faculty Adjunct  vs  Full-­‐time 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201109 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201201 201206

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD

101 101 102 109 241 241 244 244 204 204 205 235 104 104 104 107 107 107 225 109 110 110 101 102 105 106 240 240 241 242 204 205 235 103 104 107 107 107 210 210 107

F SE HJ R1G SE IS SGI IS HYB WEB WEB WEB SBD SF SNO SG WE4 WEB SAC E BD F SE IS F HJ SGI R1G IS SE WEB WEB HYB SHJ SF SG WE4 WEB HJ IS WEB

Cullen Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Gillis Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Shelton Swerzenski Swerzenski Swerzenski Cullen Cullen Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Gillis Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Swerzenski Swerzenski Mayer

Leslie Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Margaret Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Robert Sonya Paul Paul Paul Leslie Leslie Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Margaret Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Paul Paul Robert

429

GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR GAR WEB

B100 B200 B100 B300 B200 B300 B200 B300 B200 B300 B300 B300 B200 B200 B200 B200 B300 B300 B200 B100 B100 B100 B200 B300 B100 B100 B200 B300 B300 B200 B300 B300 B200 B200 B200 B200 B300 B300 B100 B300 B300

FT Adj FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT FT Adj Adj FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT Adj Adj

Total Courses  FY2012 40 FY2008  Adjunt  Courses %  Part-­‐time 31 78 FY2008  FT  Courses %  Full-­‐time 9 23


CGD Faculty Adjunct  vs  Full-­‐time 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201209 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301 201301

2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD CGD

101 101 102 102 240 241 241 204 235 104 104 107 107 110 105 105 106 210 240 240 244 235 103 104 107 107 107 112

E SF HJ IS SEG SEG R1G HYB IS SF SG SD WEB BD F SE SHJ IS SE SGI SH SH SHJ SD SG WE4 WEB HJ

Cullen Cullen Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Gillis Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Swerzenski Cullen Cullen Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gerry Gillis Jordan Mayer Mayer Mayer Mayer Swerzenski

Leslie Leslie Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Margaret Robert Robert Robert Robert Paul Leslie Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Rebecca Margaret Kristine Robert Robert Robert Robert Paul

430

GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR GAR WEB WEB GAR

B100 B200 B100 B300 B200 B200 B300 B200 B300 B200 B200 B200 B300 B100 B100 B200 B200 B300 B200 B200 B200 B200 B200 B200 B200 B300 B300 B100

FT Adj FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT FT Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj Adj FT

Total Courses  FY2013 28 FY2008  Adjunt  Courses %  Part-­‐time 23 82 FY2008  FT  Courses %  Full-­‐time 5 18

2013 CGD Program Review  
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