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Middle Years Program

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Lincoln Community School

IB Middle Years

Programme Guide Updated 2014

Grades 6-10

The Middle Years Programme Guide 2014 is a publication of the Secondary School in cooperation with the Office of Advancement: Cynthia Davis Hall Editor: Carolyn Mason Parker Photography: Gary Craggs, Dar Roy

Editor’s Note: The content of this publication draws heavily on publications produced by the International Baccalaureate.

#126/21 Dedeibaa Street Abelemkpe, Accra Ghana, West Africa Telephone: From abroad: +233 30 277 4018 Within Ghana: 030 277 4018 Facsimile: +233 302 780985


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Lincoln Community School

Table of Contents

Middle Years Program

MYP Program Overview 3 Global Contexts 4 Student Support 4 MYP Projects- Personal Project 5 Language and Literature 6 Mathematics 8 Individuals and Societies 10 Sciences 12 Language Acquisition 14 Arts (Visual, Musical, Dramatic) 16 Design 20 Physical and Health Education 22


Middle Years Program

Learner Profile Traits: The attributes and descriptors defining the type of learner the IB MYP hopes to develop.

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The IB Learner Profile Traits are a set of qualities that have been identified within the IB programmes to enhance learning. It runs though all strands of the programme and it is applicable to all students and adults in the IB community of learners. IB learners strive to be: Inquirers: They nurture their curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and research. They know how to learn independently and with others. They learn with enthusiasm and sustain their love of learning throughout life. Knowledgeable: They develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. They engage with issues and ideas that have a local and global significance, Thinkers : They use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take responsible action on complex problems; they exercise initiative in making reasoned, ethical decisions. Communicators: They express themselves confidently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. They collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups. Principled: They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness; justice and respect for the dignity of people everywhere. They take responsibility for their actions and the consequences of those actions. Open-minded: They critically appreciate their own culture and personal history, as well as the values and traditions of others. They seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and they are willing to grow from the experience. Caring: They show empathy, compassion and respect. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the world around us. Risk-takers: They approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; they work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. They are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change. Balanced: They understand the importance of balancing different aspects of their lives- intellect, physical, and emotional- to achieve well-being for themselves and others. They recognize their interdependence with other people and with the world in which they live. Reflective: They thoughtfully consider the world and their own ideas and experience. They work to understand their strengths and weaknesses in order to support their learning and personal development.


Page 6 The personal project is an important part of the MYP for all students. It is a reflection of a student’s ability to manage and direct their own inquiry and a reflection of the skills learned through the MYP experience. The process of completing it is led by the student, with supervision by a teacher, and it is a summative assessment of students’ ability to conduct independent work using the areas Extended essay grade of interaction as contexts for their inquiries. A The project is a significant body of work produced over 7 months and is a product of student’s own initiative. It holds an important place in the MYP and should reflect their experience of the program. The project provides an excellent opportunity for students to produce a truly creative piece of work of their choice and to demonstrate the skills they have developed through approaches to learning. The six global contexts will form the core of the program: they are addressed through the subject groups; they bind various disciplines together; they are the basis of varied learning experiences through project work, interdisciplinary activities, and real-life community involvement. The global contexts are central to the experience of the personal project, which is intended to be the culmination of the students’ involvement with the six global contexts; the project is therefore completed during the first semester of Grade 10.

Middle Years Program

Lincoln Community School

prior learning and subject specific knowledge relevant to the project, and they must demonstrate their research skills. B. Planning. Students should be able to develop specific criteria in order to evaluate the product or outcome of their project. Students should plan and record the development process of the project by keeping a journal. Students should demonstrate self-manFormer All MYP Students Students agement skills within their learning. 18.4% 13.9%

B

28.3%

24.7%

C

36.0%

37.1%

D

16.5%

22.0%

E

0.7%

2.3%

Overall DP Score

Former MYP Students

All Students

40-45

6.68%

5.22%

35-39

20.10%

16.33%

30-34

30.36%

28.74%

24-29

32.66%

34.15%

The value of the MYP in terms of approaches to learning, skill development, and experience in the personal project, may be a contributory factor in success of Diploma Programme students in the extended essay, as can be seen from these world-wide grade comparisons.

Personal Project Aims The aims of the MYP personal project are to allow students to demonstrate the personal abilities and skills required to produce and present an extended piece of work. They will engage in personal inquiry, action and reflection on specific topics and issues as they focus on, and demonstrate an understanding of, the areas of interaction. Finally, their reflections on their learning will allow them to share knowledge, views and opinions. Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Investigating. Students should be able to identify a clear and achievable goal, based on personal interests and justified through a global context. Students should be able to identify

C. Taking Action. Students should create a product or an outcome in response to a goal, a global context and a set of specified criteria, in order to overcome a need. Students should demonstrate thinking skills and communication and social skills when interacting and explaining their product or outcome. D. Reflecting. Students should be able to evaluate the quality of the product or outcome of their project based on the specific criteria they have created. Students should be able to reflect on how completing the project has extended their knowledge and understanding of the topic and the global context. Students should be able to reflect on their personal development as IB learners through the project.

The Personal Project continues to provide an excellent opportunity for students to produce a truly personal and creative work and to demonstrate a consolidation of their learning in the MYP, whilst also providing a solid base on which to start building the skills needed in the Diploma Programme.

MYP Projects: The Personal Project


Middle Years Program

Language and Literature: English and French

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Lincoln Community School

MYP language and literature is “fundamental to learning, thinking and communicating, therefore it permeates the whole curriculum. The power of language is best experienced through quality literature. The study of Language and Literature enables students to become highly proficient in their understanding and use of their language. In Language and Literature courses, students develop an appreciation of language and literature, of the nature of language and literature, of the many influences on language and literature, and of the power and beauty of language and literature. “Middle Years Programme language and literature builds on experiences in language learning that students have gained during their time in the IB Primary Years Programme or other primary education. Knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills will have been developed through transdisciplinary units of inquiry or independent language inquiry. The six skill areas in PYP language—listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting—are further developed through the MYP years. “Students continuing on to the DP will have a grounding in at least one language that will enable them to undertake the DP course options, particularly those in studies in language and literature, but also in the core and other academic areas. They will also have developed an inquiring, reflective approach to the study of language and literature. If students have become proficient in two (or more) languages during the MYP they may become eligible for a bilingual diploma in the DP”- MYP Language and Literature Pre-Publication Subject Guide Course Aims The aims of the teaching and study of MYP Language and Literature are to encourage and enable students to use language as a vehicle for thought, creativity, reflection, learning, self-expression and social interaction, develop the skills involved in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting in a variety of contexts, and develop critical, creative and personal approaches to studying and analyzing literary and non-literary works. Students will also engage in literature from a variety of cultures and representing different historical periods, explore and analyze aspects of personal, host and other cultures through literary and non-literary works, engage with information and communication technology in order to explore language, develop a lifelong interest in reading widely and apply Language and Literature skills and knowledge in a variety of real-life contexts. Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria:

A. Analysing: Through the study of language and literature students are enabled to deconstruct texts in order to identify their essential elements and their meaning. Analysing involves demonstrating an understanding of the creator’s choices, the relationships between the various components of a text and between texts, and making inferences about how an audience responds to a text, as well as the creator’s purpose for producing text. Students should be able to use the text to support their personal responses and ideas. Literacy and critical literacy are essential lifelong skills; engaging with texts requires students to think critically and show awareness of, and an ability to reflect on, different perspectives through their interpretations of the text. B. Organizing: Students should understand and be able to organize their ideas and opinions using a range of appropriate conventions for different forms and purposes of communication. Students should also recognize the importance of maintaining academic honesty by respecting intellectual property rights and referencing all sources accurately. C. Producing Text: Students will produce written and spoken text, focussing on the creative process itself and on the understanding of the connection between the creator and their audience. In exploring and appreciating new and changing perspectives and ideas, they will develop the ability to make choices aimed at producing texts that affect both the creator and the audience. D Using Language: Students have opportunities to develop, organize and express themselves and communicate thoughts, ideas and information. They are required to use accurate and varied language that is appropriate to the context and intention. This objective applies to, and must include, written, oral and visual text, as appropriate. Courses: Language and Literature 6 English: Students will study a variety of texts, including Hinton’s The Outsiders, Howe’s The Misfits, African Anansi stories, selected poetry, monologues, and student-selected biographies. Emphasis will be on reading for comprehension and pleasure. Students will focus on writing skills, gaining experience in personal responses to literature, poetry and story-writing and academic writing. Finally, students conduct Meet-the-Author research and gain expereince with oral presentations. Language and Literature 7 English: Students will


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Lincoln Community School

participate in Readers’ Workshop literature circles, with such texts as Spinelli’s Stargirl, Collins’ Hunger Games, and Mikaelson’s Touching Spirit Bear, among others. Together they will read Lowry’s dystopia, The Giver and research other dystopic literature. Short stories by Aikin and O’Henry, poetry by Sandburg, Rose, and Longfellow, and drama by Serling round out student reading experiences in this course. Students will write extensively, beginning with memoir and continuing with poetry and personal response to literature.

Language and Literature 8 English: Students will begin with a study of short stories, including Connell’s “Most Dangerous Game.” Their analysis of Orwell’s Animal Farm will deepen learning both in Humanities and English class. Such interdisciplinary support will continue with a study of Hesse’s Witness and analysis of speeches by Martin Luther King, Jr, Barack Obama, and Nelson Mandela. Students will keep journals; develop descriptive and response-to-literature essays, participate in debates and research a variety of topics. In addition, students will look at film as literature with an analysis of film as literature: Slumdog Millionaire. Language and Literature 9 English: The year will begin with a study of African myths & tales from the Yoruba, Maian, and Akan traditions and move to Greek myth with Homer’s Odyssey. Short stories by Achebe and Poe will lead to the study of a novel, Golding’s Lord of the Flies is an example. Students will begin to understand the power of poetry and poetic devices through a range of poetry, including Akan Drum poetry and the Harlem Renaissance Poets (Cullen, DuBois, Hughes, Dunbar). Romeo and Juliet will offer students opportunities to perform as well as to analyze film productions of the play. Writing will be center stage for students through the year, with experience writing aspects of short story, poetic forms, essays, and journal writing. Grade 9 students will also undertake an extensive unit on research design

Middle Years Program

and planning that maintains academic honesty. Language and Literature 10 English: Students study a variety of short stories including several by Nadine Gordimer and Gabriel Garcia-Marquez and conduct a guided study of a poet of their choice from among Wislawa Szymborska, Judith Wright, Billy Collins, and others. In addition to poetry and short story, the novel study of Yann Martel’s Life of Pi will prepare students’ analytical skills for success in Diploma Programme Language and Literature courses. Students will also study Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice and look at film as literature through the films Living and Life is Beautiful. As with all Language and Literature courses, writing and the writing process is of paramount importance in the course. Students will conduct and write up research, keep process journals, and compose dramatic monologues, literary analyses and personal narratives. Language and Literature 6 French: The structure of a narrative and a story, their development and the tenses used are studied. The readings of Cendrillon and of Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupery together with its attendant reading tests were to help students to practise what they learn in these areas. Students also learn to imagine the continuation of an incomplete story or film thus improving their ability to write. In addition, we study many tales of Jean de La Fontaine, Barbe bleue and Le Petit Chaperon Rouge by Perrault in class. Students learn to write their own tales and to infer lessons from those studied. Language and Literature 7- 8 French: Students engage with the style of the text and the narrative, the description and the portrait,the figures of speech ( comparison and metaphor) used in novels. Then they analyse “Demain des l’aube”, a poem by Victor Hugo, “ Le Renard et le Bouc”, by Jean de la Fontaine and an excerpt from “Voyage au centre de la terre” by Jules Vernes, just to mention a few. Language and Literature 9-10 French: While this course is combined grades 9 and 10, the course will be differentiated by grade level. Both courses are designed to develop the analytical and writing skills of native speakers of French. Texts include poetry, plays, historical and modern French texts. As with all language and literature courses the process of writing and analysing literature is important, and all students will keep a process journal, and a literary analysis guide updated regularly from class extracts.

Language and Literature: English and French


Middle Years Program

Mathematics

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Lincoln Community School

“The study of mathematics is a fundamental part of a balanced education. It promotes a powerful universal language, analytical reasoning and problem-solving skills that contribute to the development of logical, abstract and critical thinking. Mathematics can help make sense of the world and allows phenomena to be described in precise terms. It also promotes careful analysis and the search for patterns and relationships, skills necessary for success both inside and outside the classroom. Mathematics, then, should be accessible to and studied by all students. “Studying mathematics, however, should be more than simply learning formulae or rules. Students should not have the impression that all of the answers to mathematics can be found in a book but, rather, that they can be active participants in the search for concepts and relationships. In that light, mathematics becomes a subject that is alive with the thrill of exploration and the rewards of discovery. At the same time, that new knowledge may then be applied to other situations, opening up even more doors for students. MYP mathematics promotes both that inquiry and application, helping students to develop problem-solving techniques that transcend the discipline and that are useful in the world outside school. “Students should see authentic examples of how mathematics is useful and relevant to their lives and be encouraged to apply it to new situations. Mathematics provides the foundation for the study of sciences, engineering and technology. However, it is also evident in the arts and is increasingly important in economics, the social sciences and the structure of language. Students in the MYP are encouraged to use ICT tools to represent information, to explore and model situations, and to find solutions to various problems. These are skills that are useful in a wide range of arenas. MYP mathematics aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and intellectual capabilities to address further courses in mathematics, as well as to prepare

those students who will use mathematics in their studies, workplaces and lives in general.” -- MYP Mathematics Subject Guide

Course Aims The aims of teaching and learning mathematics are to encourage and enable students to recognize that mathematics permeates the world around us, to appreciate the usefulness, power and beauty of mathematics, to enjoy mathematics and develop patience and persistence when solving problems, and to understand and be able to use the language, symbols and notation of mathematics. Further, the course aims for students to develop mathematical curiosity and use inductive and deductive reasoning when solving problems. They will increase confidence in using mathematics to analyze and solve problems both in school and in real-life situations as well as develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics. Students will develop abstract, logical and critical thinking and the ability to reflect critically upon their work and the work of others, develop a critical appreciation of the use of information and communication technology in mathematics, and to appreciate the international dimension of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives. Assessment: Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Knowledge and understanding: Knowledge and understanding are fundamental to studying mathematics and form the base


Page 10 from which to explore concepts and develop skills. This objective assesses the extent to which students can select and apply mathematics to solve problems in both familiar and unfamiliar situations in a variety of contexts. B. Investigating patterns: Investigating patterns allows students to experience the excitement and satisfaction of mathematical discovery. Working through investigations encourages students to become risk-takers, inquirers and critical thinkers. The ability to inquire is invaluable in the MYP and contributes to lifelong learning. C. Communicating: Mathematics provides a powerful and universal language. Students are expected to use appropriate mathematical language and different forms of representation when communicating mathematical ideas, reasoning and findings, both orally and in writing. D. Applying Mathamtics in Real Life Contexts: MYP mathematics encourages students to see mathematics as a tool for solving problems in an authentic real-life context. Students are expected to transfer theoretical mathematical knowledge into real-world situations and apply appropriate problem-solving strategies, draw valid conclusions and reflect upon their results.. Courses: Mathematics 6: Students learn how to influence opinion through the display of data and graphing techniques. Number and operation sense allows students to solve introductory level algebraic equations and expressions using variables. Geometry concepts include calculating the area and perimeter of polygons and the circumference and area of circles. Students learn to add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals and fractions, including mixed numbers. Students apply concepts in real-life examples and situations from their own lives, and explain their mathematical understanding. Mathematics 7: Students study whole numbers, fractions, algebra, decimal numbers, percentage, length and area, algebra (expansion and factorization), ratio and proportion, equations, polygons, the geometry of solids, line graph, circles, chance, statistics, sets, rates and algebraic fractions. They work in collaborative groups that allow them to communicate and reflect on our learning. Students are expected to use problem-solving methods to discover and

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Middle Years Program

analyze real world applications in mathematics. Mathematics 8: Students learn to apply the concepts and skills in all the five branches of mathematics - numeracy, algebra, geometry/ trigonometry, statistics/probability, and discrete mathematics. Students engage in a series of investigations and problem solving activities for applying their math learning. Topics include a study of whole and directed numbers, algebraic operations, percentages, algebraic expansion, graphing, solving equations, geometry of polygons, indices, radicals and Pythagoras, length, area, volume and capacity, coordinates geometry, simultaneous equations, estimating probability, transformation, similarity/congruence, algebraic factorization, and quadratic equations. Mathematics 9: Students are exposed to the basic skills required for the IB DP math studies curriculum. It touches on the five main branches of mathematics: number, algebra, geometry/trigonometry, statistics/ probability and discrete mathematics. This course uses hands on activities to elicit concepts. It is typically characterized by an individualized approach to learning and generally fun. Extended Mathematics 9: Students study the five branches of mathematics, namely: number, algebra, geometry/trigonometry, statistics/probability and discrete mathematics. Under these branches are sets of concepts and skills which, are required to be understood and mastered respectively by students. There is an additional set of concepts under each of these branches that are usually challenging but interesting. Mathematics 10: Students in this course will study the five branches of mathematics, preparing for success in IB DP Math Studies. Topics in the course include: descriptive statistics; indices, rational/irrational expressions and numbers; factorization; linear and exponential graphs, as well as tangent lines; quadratic equations and functions; sets, probability and logic; trigonometry; mensuration; algebra; simultaneous equations; inequalities and limits of accuracy. Extended Mathematics 10: Students study similar topics to Math 10 but the investigation of topics is deeper and more challenging. Topics include rational and Irrational expressions and numbers; factorization; linear and exponential graphs, and tangents; quadratic equations and functions; sets, probability and logic.

Mathematics


Middle Years Program

Individuals and Societies.

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Lincoln Community School

“MYP individuals and societies incorporates disciplines traditionally studied under the general term “the humanities” (such as history and philosophy), as well as disciplines in the social sciences (such as economics, business management, geography, sociology and political science).

nation with “the human story” as it continues to evolve in an era of rapid change and increasing interconnectedness. Studies in individuals and societies are essential for developing empathy and international-mindedness, including the idea that “other people, with their differences, can also be right” (IB mission statement).

“In this subject group, students can engage with exciting, stimulating and personally relevant topics and issues. Many sensitive and personally challenging topics require careful consideration in the context of a safe and responsible learning environment characterized by respect and open-mindedness. The study of individuals and societies helps students to appreciate critically the diversity of human culture, attitudes and beliefs. Courses in this subject group are important for helping students to recognize that content and methodology can be debatable and controversial, and for practising the tolerance of uncertainty.” - MYP Individuals and Societies Subject Guide

Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Knowledge and Understanding Students develop factual and conceptual knowledge about individuals and societies. B. Investigating Students develop systematic research skills and processes associated with disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Students develop successful strategies for investigating independently and in collaboration with others. C. Communicating Students develop skills to organize, document and communicate their learning using a variety of media and presentation formats. D. Thinking Critically Students use critical thinking skills to develop and apply their understanding of individuals and societies and the process of investigation. Courses: Individuals and Societies 6: This course is designed to acquaint students with ancient civilizations beginning with early humans. Students will address these questions: what is a social scientist? How do they get their information? How do we know their information is accurate? Students will experience an archeological dig and explore the development of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt and Greece. They will analyze and compare each in the areas of geography, politics and culture.

Course Aims The study of individuals and societies helps students to develop their identities as individuals and as responsible members of local and global communities. These explorations of our common humanity are intrinsically interesting, and disciplines in this subject group are filled with potential for creating in students a lifelong fasci-

Individuals and Societies 7: Students will investigate the birth and the impact of religion on society by evaluating the rise of Islam and the influence of Christianity in the Middle Ages. Students focus on the meeting of cultures through trade and exploration. Additionally, students will develop skills such as map-reading and the effects of climate and geography on human development. Students will consider what it means to be a global citizen. Individuals and Societies 8: Students will begin with a study of the American, French, and Industrial Revolutions. Students study the effects of the Slave Trade and evaluate its outcomes. They will investigate current global issues focusing on the differences between more and less


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Lincoln Community School

Middle Years Program

Individuals and Societies

economically developed countries. Emphasis is on the social issues created by poverty and the methods of development.

fear is generated within a society, and the ways in which the world has changed since September 11, 2001.

Individuals and Societies 9: Students study the role of nationalism in the creation of Germany and Italy; and how this concept contributed towards the outbreak of the First World War. We then focus upon conditions in the trenches, and the types of weapons and tactics used in fighting this war. A unit on Political Systems examines the difference between democratic and non-democratic forms of government, and how right wing views differ from left wing ones. An assignment involves looking at forms of government control used in George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty Four. There is a unit on the Second World War and a project that explores the concept of genocide with a focus upon the Holocaust. The final unit is about globalization and the pros and cons of closer connections between countries.

Ghanian Culture Elective 9/10: Students will explore more about the history, political and geographical nature of Ghana. They will discover how this has impacted the people and the customs and how festivals and celebration have been developed and established within the different regions of Ghana.

Individuals and Societies 10: Students will explore distinctions between fact, opinion and bias. They will study the construction of news and the importance of evaluating and questioning information. A unit on apartheid looks at the historical background of segregation and students will complete a project on reconciliation that examines how this system was abolished without civil war. A strong economics element is included in a unit on post-colonial Africa. The final unit involves a study of international conflict since 1945: from the Cold War to the War on Terror. The focus here will be an appraisal of how


Middle Years Program

Sciences

Lincoln Community School

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“The IB continuum of international education provides a progression of learning for students ages 3–19. In the PYP, science is viewed as the exploration of aspects of the natural world. Science within the IB programmes encourages inquiry, curiosity and ingenuity. Learners should develop an understanding of the resources of a rapidlychanging scientific and technological society and how to use those resources wisely. The MYP sciences curriculum aims to build on what students learn and do in the PYP and other student-centred programmes of primary education. There are no prior formal learning requirements.

ity, ethics, culture, economics, politics, and the environment. Scientific inquiry also fosters critical and creative thinking about research and design, as well as the identification of assumptions and alternative explanations. Students should learn to appreciate and respect the ideas of others, gain good ethical-reasoning skills and further develop their sense of responsibility as members of local and global communities. Learning science involves more than simply learning technical terminology. The MYP considers all teachers to be language teachers and, thus, MYP sciences should enable students to access, use and communicate scientific knowledge correctly and confidently in oral, written and visual modes.

The main approach to teaching and learning sciences is through structured inquiry in the context of interdisciplinary units. Students are encouraged to investigate science by formulating their own questions and finding answers to those questions, including through research and experimentation. Scientific inquiry enables students to develop a way of thinking and a set of skills and processes that they can use to confidently tackle the internal assessment component of DP subjects in biology, chemistry and physics. Moreover, the MYP sciences objectives and assessment criteria A–D are aligned with the DP sciences objectives and internal assessment criteria, supporting the smooth transition from the MYP to the DP

Course Aims With inquiry at the core, the MYP sciences framework aims to guide students to independently and collaboratively investigate issues through research, observation and experimentation. The MYP sciences curriculum must explore the connections between science and everyday life. As they investigate real examples of science applications, students will discover the tensions and dependencies between science and moral-

Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Knowing and Understanding Students develop scientific knowledge (facts, ideas, concepts, processes, laws, principles, models and theories) and apply it to solve problems and express scientifically supported judgments. Assessment of this objective must be done using tests or exams. To reach the highest level students must make scientifically supported judgments about the validity and/or quality of the information presented to them. Assessment tasks could include questions dealing with “scientific claims” presented in media articles, or the results and conclusions from experiments carried out by others, or any question that challenges students to analyse and examine the information and allows them to outline arguments about its validity and/or quality using their knowledge and understanding of science. B. Inquiring and Designing Intellectual and practical skills are developed through designing, analysing and performing scientific investigations. Although the scientific method involves a wide variety of approaches, the MYP emphasizes experimental work and scientific inquiry. When students design a scientific investiga-


Page 14 tion they should develop a method that will allow them to collect sufficient data so that the problem or question can be answered. To enable students to design scientific investigations independently, teachers must provide an open-ended problem to investigate. An open-ended problem is one that has several independent variables appropriate for the investigation and has sufficient scope to identify both independent and controlled variables. C. Processing and Evaluating Students collect, process and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data, and explain conclusions that have been appropriately reached. MYP sciences help students to develop analytical thinking skills, which they can use to evaluate the method and discuss possible improvements or extensions D. Reflecting on the impacts of Science Students gain global understanding of science by evaluating the implications of scientific developments and their applications to a specific problem or issue. A variety of communication modes will be applied in order to demonstrate understanding. Students are expected to become aware of the importance of documenting the work of others when communicating in science. Students must reflect on the implications of using science, interacting with one of the following factors: moral, ethical, social, economic, political, cultural or environmental, as appropriate to the task. The student’s chosen factor may be interrelated with other factors. Courses: Integrated Science 6: Students learn about the natural world as they explore topics in earth and space, life, and physical sciences. They are introduced to scientific classification of the animal kingdom and concepts of evolution and natural selection. They examine the atmosphere, water cycle, and factors affecting climate, then explore the structure of the solar system. Their scientific journey of discovery includes engaging laboratory investigations into the basic structure of matter, elements, compounds and mixtures. Integrated Science 7: Students start the year with an intensive focus on understanding the nature of science and scientific inquiry. Students design their own labs, analyze and interpret their own data, and come to their own conclusions during experiments. Students use this conceptual base to learn about human biology, with a focus on cell biology and the biology of cancer, atmospheric and space sciences, the geologic time scale, including speciation and evolution, physical properties of matter, and forces and motion. All of this content is covered with a focus on sci-

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Middle Years Program

entific inquiry and understanding the relevance of science in our daily lives. Integrated Science 8: In Grade 8 Science, students review the scientific method and the use of scientific inquiry. They design their own experiments, and the course focuses particular attention on post-experiment data analysis and evaluation. Students use this conceptual base to learn about genetics and the science of heredity, biodiversity and evolutionary biology, the water and rock cycle, including plate tectonics, physical and chemical properties of matter, including chemical reactions, and the laws of energy and motion. Content is covered with a focus on scientific inquiry and understanding the relevance of science in our daily lives. Integrated Science 9: Students begin with a study of chemistry through laboratory investigations to discover characteristics of groups of elements, methods of bonding and heat transfer in chemical reactions, thus building understanding of the periodic table. They examine differences between kinetic and potential energy in electromagnetic waves as well as the laws of motion and properties of electromagnetic forces. Earth science study furthers understanding of energy through heat and energy transfer in the atmosphere and its implications for weather and climate. Students explore ties between earth science and chemistry as well as life science topics that include heredity and biological evolution. Science 10 Options: Students must take one of the following: Science 10 Biology: In this course students will receive the basic foundations for the diploma program biology course. Among the topics they will study are cell theory, the chemistry of life, genetics, ecology and evolution, human health and plant science. Students who select this course must select one other science 10 option. Science 10 Chemistry: In this course students will receive the basic foundations for the diploma program chemistry course. Among the topics they will study are atomic structure, matter and change, the periodic table, bonding, the mole concept, oxidation and reduction, acids, bases, and salts. Students who select this course must select one other science 10 option. Science 10 Physics: In this course students will receive the basic foundations for the diploma program physics course. Among the topics they will study are mechanics, thermal physics, wave motion, electricity and magnetism. Students who select this course must select one other science 10 option.

Sciences


Middle Years Program

Language Acquisition: French, Spanish, English

Lincoln Community School

Course Aims “The ability to communicate in a variety of modes in more than one language is essential to the concept of an international education that promotes multilingualism and intercultural understanding, both of which are central to the IB’s mission. The study of additional languages in the MYP provides students with the opportunity to develop insights into the features, processes and craft of language and the concept of culture, and to realize that there are diverse ways of living, behaving and viewing the world.

The acquisition of the language of a community and the possibilities to reflect upon and explore cultural perspectives of our own and other communities. MYP language acquisition builds on experiences in language learning that students have gained during their early years. In IB World Schools offering the PYP, all students have the opportunity to learn more than one language from at least the age of 7. In the MYP, students learn at least two languages and are encouraged to learn more. Knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills will have been developed in the PYP through transdisciplinary units of inquiry or independent language inquiry. The six skill areas in PYP language—listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting—are further developed through the MYP years. Students wishing to continue on to the DP will be grounded in at least one additional language, and will have developed an inquiring, reflective approach to language learning.. “Language acquisition in the MYP aims to develop a respect for, and understanding of, other languages and cultures, and is equally designed to equip the student with a skills base to facili-

Page 15 tate further language learning. In all four IB programmes, language learning is recognized as a developmental process in which students have opportunities to build on prior knowledge and skills in order to help them progress to the next phase of language development. The MYP structures additional language learning in phases so that the complexity and range of language profiles that students bring to their MYP classroom is acknowledged and fostered. Students beginning their MYP studies may have exited from any of the five phases of PYP language or may have no prior knowledge or experience of the language to be studied in the MYP. The pathways to further study are multiple. Phases 4, 5 and 6 allow for a smooth transition from MYP language acquisition courses to DP group 2 courses—and, for a number of students, to group 1 courses. The MYP framework for the language acquisition subject group reflects the concepts and skills of the presumed knowledge for these DP courses.” -- MYP Language Acquisition Subject Guide Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Comprehending Spoken and Visual Text: Comprehending spoken and visual text encompasses aspects of listening and viewing, and involves the student in interpreting and constructing meaning from spoken and visual text to understand how images presented with oral text interplay to convey ideas, values and attitudes. Engaging with text requires the student to think creatively and critically about what is viewed, and to be aware of opinions, attitudes and cultural references presented in the visual text. The student might, for example, reflect on feelings and actions, imagine himself or herself in another’s situation, gain new perspectives and develop empathy, based on what he or she has understood in the text. B. Comprehending Written and Visual Text: Comprehending written and visual text encompasses aspects of reading and viewing, and involves the student in constructing meaning and interpreting written and


Page 16 visual text to understand how images presented with written text interplay to convey ideas, values and attitudes. Engaging with text requires the student to think creatively and critically about what is read and viewed, and to be aware of opinions, attitudes and cultural references presented in the written and/or visual text. The student might, for example, reflect on feelings and actions, imagine himself or herself in another’s situation, gain new perspectives and develop empathy, based on what he or she has understood in the text. C. Communicating in response to Spoken, Visual and Written text: In the language acquisition classroom, students will have opportunities to develop their communication skills by interacting on a range of topics of personal, local and global interest and significance, and responding to spoken, written and visual text in the target language. D. Using Language in Spoken and Written Form: This objective relates to the correct and appropriate use of the spoken and written target language. It involves recognizing and using language suitable to the audience and purpose; for example, the language used at home, the language of the classroom, formal and informal exchanges, social and academic language. When speaking and writing in the target language, students apply their understanding of linguistic and literary concepts to develop a variety of structures, strategies (spelling, grammar, plot, character, punctuation, voice) and techniques with increasing skill and effectiveness. Courses: Teaching and learning in the language acquisition subject group is organized in six phases. The phases do not correspond to particular age groups or MYP years. Phase 1: (Foundation One) Emergent communicators in phase 1 understand and respond to simple phrases, statements and questions. They identify basic messages; facts, opinions, feelings and ideas presented in oral, visual and written language, and demonstrate their comprehension in simple oral and written phrases. They convey basic information in a limited range of everyday situations, using oral and written language appropriate to a very limited range of interpersonal and cultural contexts. They begin to be aware that language use is connected to a purpose and an audience. Phase 2: (Foundation Two) Emergent communicators in phase 2 understand and respond to simple spoken and written texts. They identify messages, facts, opinions, feelings and ideas presented in oral, visual and written language, and demonstrate their comprehension in short oral and written form. They interact to share information in a limited range of familiar situ-

Lincoln Community School

Middle Years Program

ations, using basic language appropriate to a limited range of interpersonal and cultural contexts. They are aware that language varies according to purpose and audience. Phase 3: (Standard One) Capable communicators in phase 3 understand and respond to a limited variety of spoken and written texts. They understand specific information, main ideas and some detail presented in oral, visual and written language, and demonstrate their comprehension in a limited range of oral and written forms. They engage in conversation and write structured text to express their ideas, opinions and experiences in a range of familiar and some unfamiliar situations, in a limited range of interpersonal and cultural contexts. They understand that they can speak and write in different ways for different purposes and audiences. Phase 4: (Standard Two) Capable communicators in phase 4 understand and respond to a variety of spoken and written texts. They interpret specific information, main ideas and some detail presented in complex oral, visual and written language, draw conclusions and recognize implied opinions and attitudes in texts read and viewed. They engage in conversation and write structured text to share informative and organized ideas on topics of personal interest and global significance, in a range of interpersonal and cultural contexts. They can communicate substantial information containing relevant and developed ideas and justified opinions on events, experiences and some concepts explored in class. They identify aspects of format and style, and speak and write with a clear sense of audience and purpose. Phase 5: (Advanced One) Proficient communicators in phase 5 analyse specific information, ideas, opinions and attitudes presented in oral, visual, and written language. They draw conclusions, infer information and recognize implied opinions and attitudes. They respond and react to questions and ideas in a range of spoken, visual and written texts. They engage actively in conversations in social and some academic situations to contribute substantial information containing relevant and focused ideas supported by examples and illustrations. They organize information and ideas into a clear and effective structure to express their understanding and opinions on topics of personal interest and global significance. They interpret aspects of format and style, and are able to adapt register and style of language to suit the context. Phase 6: (Advanced Two) Proficient communicators in phase 6 evaluate the important information, details and ideas presented in spoken, written and visual language in social and academic contexts. At Lincoln Community School we place these students into a second Language and Literature class.

Language Acquisition: French, Spanish, English


Middle Years Program

Lincoln Community School

Page 17 Although the objectives can be addressed separately to scaffold learning, when used collectively they enrich teaching and learning of the arts. “Thinking creatively fits naturally in MYP arts, but can easily become a focus in other subject groups too. This objective is essential in modern education to address the need for studentcentred learning and lifelong learning, looking towards a modern context of flexible employment and a higher demand for innovation and change in the workplace. As both an objective in the arts and an ATL skill across the programme, heightened awareness of thinking creatively encourages students to develop metacognitive skills and become self-regulated learners.

The Arts: Music, Drama, Visual Arts

“Arts in the MYP stimulate young imaginations, challenge perceptions and develop creative and analytical skills. Involvement in the arts encourages students to understand the arts in context and the cultural histories of artworks, thus supporting the development of an inquiring and empathetic world view. They challenge and enrich personal identity and build awareness of the aesthetic in a real-world context.” – MYP Arts Subject Guide “The arts are a universal form of human expression and a unique way of knowing that engage us in effective, imaginative and productive activities. Learning through the arts helps us to explore, shape and communicate our sense of identity and individuality. A focus on the individual enhances our self- confidence, resilience and adaptability. It encourages our sense of belonging and community through the recognition of identities. During adolescence, the arts provide an opportunity for age-appropriate and holistic development of the social, emotional, intellectual and personal intelligences of the student. In MYP arts students have opportunities to function as artists, as well as learners of the arts. Artists have to be curious. By developing curiosity about themselves, others and the world, students become effective learners, inquirers and creative problem-solvers. Students develop through creating; performing and presenting arts in ways that engage and convey feelings, experiences and ideas. It is through this practice that students acquire new skills and master those skills developed in prior learning. “Development in the arts is a dynamic process, and not necessarily linear. The student moves freely through a creative process towards a deeper understanding of the arts. MYP arts values the process of creating artwork and the point of realization; the two elements combined tell us what students have experienced, learned and attempted to convey. In MYP arts, the four objectives have equal importance and value.

Course Aims Every person has the ability to be creative. In a rapidly changing world, it cannot be assumed that the knowledge and understanding that students develop during their formal education will be sufficient. Learning to think critically and creatively enables us to analyse situations, revisit challenges, create possible solutions, and innovate our way into a better future. Providing students with the tools for generating creative thought and encouraging creative behaviours will allow students to develop their creativity across all subject groups and foster lifelong learning. Creativity is an MYP key concept, defined as the capacity to generate new ideas and consider existing ideas from new perspectives, as well as the ability to recognize the value of an idea in order to solve problems or innovate. It may be evident in process as well as outcome, solution or product. Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Knowledge and Understanding. Through the study of theorists and practitioners of the arts, students discover the aesthetics of art forms and are able to analyse and communicate in specialized language. Using explicit and tacit knowledge alongside an understanding of the role of the arts in a global context, students inform their work and artistic perspectives.


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Lincoln Community School

B. Developing Skills. The acquisition and development of skills provide the opportunity for active participation in the art form and in the process of creating art. Skill application allows students to develop their artistic ideas to a point of realization. The point of realization could take many forms. However, it is recognized as the moment when the student makes a final commitment to his or her artwork by presenting it to an audience. Skills are evident in both process and product. C. Thinking Creatively The arts motivate students to develop curiosity and purposefully explore and challenge boundaries. Thinking creatively encourages students to explore the unfamiliar and experiment in innovative ways to develop their artistic intentions, their processes and their work. Thinking creatively enables students to discover their personal signature and realize their artistic identity. D. Responding Students should have the opportunity to respond to their world, to their own art and to the art of others. A response can come in many forms; creating art as a response encourages students to make connections and transfer their learning to new settings. Through reflecting on their artistic intention and the impact of their work on an audience and on themselves, students become more aware of their own artistic development and the role that arts play in their lives and in the world. Students learn that the arts may initiate change as well as being a response to change. Courses students may take a selection of those on offer. Courses may include, but are not limited to those listed below. Visual Arts 6-10: Visual art has contributed to all cultures and societies throughout time. Experience in a wide range of visual art activities adds a creative and cultural dimension to student development that will benefit them for the rest of their life. While traditional practices in the arts (for example, painting, sculpture, ceramics and architecture) have historically provided cultural records, contemporary practice and access to technology have given the tools of visual art a very broad palette. Digital technology, timebased art, installation and performance, to name but a few, add to traditional practice and bring

Middle Years Program

an extra dimension and meaning to the students’ experience in the visual art. The process of making ideas a reality using the skills and practices of visual art is an integral part of the substance of the MYP arts curriculum. Visual Arts 9-10: In this course, art history, criticism and aesthetics will be addressed as a part of each project. Students keep a developmental workbook that reflects their understanding of art and design including research, experiments, ideas, sketches and personal reflection. Throughout the year students look at a wide range of artists and cultures and work with practicing local Ghanaian artists. At this level students use the whole design cycle from idea to outcome. The course guides students to develop a greater mastery in applying media, techniques, and processes; understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures; explore, express and communicate ideas; develop self-confidence and self-awareness through art experiences and to reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others. This course meets technology and art requirements for grade 10. Advanced Visual Arts 10: For students with a love of the arts who intend to continue their study of visual arts in the Diploma Program, this course places special emphasis on knowledge and skills that prepare young artists for the rigors of the diploma course. Media 9-10: Through learning about media and how to create media, students have the chance to understand better the power of media as a tool for expression and investigation. Imagery in film and media tells a story that immediately crosses cultural boundaries to speak in a universal language. Media also allows students to develop planning and organizational skills within a highly motivating context. MYP Film and Photography 9/10: Students will learn photographic and film techniques, develop ideas, produce short films and look at historical development and samples. This course combines practical and theoretical work involving the use of still and video cameras along with the critical investigation of notable films and photographic works. Students will develop a portfolio that showcases their own film and photographic works. Links are made with other

The Arts: Music, Drama, Visual Arts


Middle Years Program

The Arts: Music, Drama, Visual Arts

Lincoln Community School

areas of the curriculum, in particular, with English and Technology. Students will keep a developmental workbook throughout the course - taking notes, planning ideas and storyboards, collecting feedback and reflecting on their practical work. This course meets technology and art requirements for grade 10. Drama 6-10: Drama in the MYP engages students in an active relationship with theatre and encourages autonomous learning and exploration. It encourages the growth of creative, reflective and communication skills through practical work. Emphasis is placed on the artistic process and the students’ understanding of this process as an essential component to their artistic development through continuous investigation, planning, goal setting, rehearsing, performing, reflection and evaluation. This course will emphasize to students the importance of working as an ensemble. Students will gain knowledge and skills related to the theatre as they research, devise, write, direct, perform, and design for various classroom productions. Throughout the program drama will be employed to explore socially relevant material, as well ideas and issues investigated in other courses. A strong focus of the class will be on learning about theatrical traditions from a variety of times and cultures. High School Drama 9/10: The full year drama program will include many of the elements of the semester-long course, but these elements will be examined and practiced in much greater detail. Students will first be taken to the days of Ancient Greece through an exploration of Greek tragedy, mask, and the Ancient Greek chorus. The elements of comedy will then be explored through a practical examination of Commedia dell’Arte and related comedic traditions. Examining Theatre for Education productions and principles, students of HS Drama will devise a class performance piece with a specific socio-historic focus. In the final semester students will gain knowledge and understanding of playwright, director, designer, actor or technician through an independent project of the student’s own choosing. Multiple opportunities for student performance in and around the community will occur throughout the year. Dance 6-10: Dance within the MYP has a central rationale as an artistic, aesthetic, cultural and physical subject. It engages students to express and communicate ideas and feelings; it encourages exploration of different times and cultures. It facilitates the growth of creativity, reflection and communication skills through practical work and the development of artistic understanding. It is a physically focused activity that develops kinesthetic skills as well as skills that

Page 19 enable students to choreograph, rehearse and perform their own work. Dance 9-10: In High School Dance students will be able to deepen their understandings of the theoretical, and the practical nature of movement. They will explore the role of the artist and that of the choreographer in creating a piece to express feeling, and emotion. Music 6-10: Music in the MYP gives students access to musical experiences that allow for the development of thinking skills, intuitive skills, practical abilities, communication and the ability to relate to others. Engagement with existing and emerging music from the local community and from around the world allows students to understand the significance of music to the cultures of the world and, by engaging in practical work, to develop understanding of how the act of making music is a significant and universal aspect of human expression.

Instrumental Music: This course gives students in the Middle School to change to learn a new instrument or to continue learning an instrument they have already been playing. The course will introduce ensemble playing, reading and writing music in a variety of styles, and enable students to practice their skills and to grow a greater appreciation for a vaiety of musical genres. Students will be given opportunities to showcase their learning at multiple school events throughout the year. Band 9/10: In High School Band, students perfect sound production on their instrument, use and deepen their understanding of music reading and writing. They are exposed to jazz


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Lincoln Community School

Middle Years Program

The Arts: Music, Drama, Visual Arts

and will be challenged to write in a variety of styles for a range of instruments beside their own. They will have the opportunity to practice and perform in smaller ensembles. Throughout the course students develop their instrumental skills, performing skills and music awareness and appreciation. The major assessments in the course include performances, practice journals, written commentaries and project presentations. Vocal Music: The program begins with structured technical exercises starting from pitch, fragmented melodies and motifs, breath control, enunciation and projection as fundamental blocks in creating the awareness of music in various cultures. Throughout the course students gain further insight into different styles of music and are guided to understand approaches of different songs, their characterization and the context in which they were written. In addition comparative analysis of songs, a visit to a professional recording studio and formal recording are conducted. Students will be given opportunities to showcase their learning at multiple school events throughout the year. Choir 9-10: Students will experience wide variety of tunes and styles, including pop songs and jazz. Trios, duets and solos are highly encouraged. The focus is on expression and deeper understanding and application of voice technique.

Skills include body as the instrument, voice projection and expression, and music interval identification. Topics include protest songs, taking the lead, and barbershop quartet. Students should have working knowledge of note and rhythm reading. Creativity “ Creativity is the foundation of the arts; it permeates the skill and structure of artwork. Creativity is what makes the audience pause to take a closer look at a work of art; to examine what it might be that thrills the viewer, what excites the senses, what titillates the perceptions. When we stumble out of an exhibition or performance, reeling with possibility, it is often not the mastery of skill that holds us enthralled, but the magic; the innovation; the exploration of the unknown; a compilation of the familiar in a novel way. The creativity of the artist is what compels them to write, create, paint, play, structure, compose—injecting their personal signature into their work—ultimately making it their own through an idea in conception, an individual perception, or a unique approach. It is curiosity, imagination, courage and determination. This is creativity in the arts.”


Middle Years Program

Design

Lincoln Community School

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“Design, and the resultant development of new technologies, has given rise to profound changes in society: transforming how we access and process information; how we adapt our environment; how we communicate with others; how we are able to solve problems; how we work and live.

sible solutions, the creation of solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. In MYP design, a solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed and created independently. “ -- MYP Design Subject Guide

Design is the link between innovation and creativity, taking thoughts and exploring the possibilities and constraints associated with products or systems, allowing them to redefine and manage the generation of further thought through prototyping, experimentation and adaptation. It is human-centred and focuses on the needs, wants and limitations of the end user. Competent design is not only within the reach of a small set of uniquely skilled individuals, but can be achieved by all. The use of well-established design principles and processes increases the probability that a design will be successful. To do this, designers use a wide variety of principles which, taken together, make up what is known as the design cycle.

Course Aims MYP design challenges all students to apply practical and creative thinking skills to solve design problems; encourages students to explore the role of design in both historical and contemporary contexts; and raises students’ awareness of their responsibilities when making design decisions and taking action. Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Inquiring and Analysing Students are presented with a design situation, from which they identify a problem that needs to be solved. They analyse the need for a solution and conduct an inquiry into the nature of the problem.

“Designing requires an individual to be imaginative and creative, while having a substantial knowledge base of important factors that will aid or constrain the process. Decisions made need to be supported by adequate and appropriate research and investigation. Designers must adopt an approach that allows them to think creatively, while conforming to the requirements of a design specification.

B. Developing Ideas Students write a detailed specification, which drives the development of a solution. They present the solution.

Inquiry and problem-solving are at the heart of the subject group. MYP design requires the use of the design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of fea-

D. Evaluating Students design tests to evaluate the solution, carry out those tests and objectively evaluate its success. Students identify areas where the solution could be improved and explain how their solution will impact on the client or target audience.

C. Creating the Solution Students plan the creation of the chosen solution and follow the plan to create a prototype sufficient for testing and evaluation.

Courses Design 6: Sixth grade design is an integrated course that encourages creativity and personal accountability while emphasizing real-world computer concept and skills. Students will investigate the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology, and practice responsible use of technology, information systems, and software. Students also develop positive attitudes towards technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity. Topics include Cyberawareness and computer etiquette, research strategies, computer terminology, integration of presentation tools and desktop publishing.


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Middle Years Program

Lincoln Community School

Design

Design 7: Students familiarize themselves with computer security, terms of use, networks, and organization of data and folders. Students brainstorm various ways they can use technology to solve everyday problems in the community. They create a floor plan and budget to furnish of their dream room. They learn how to calculate, form equations, and create pie charts and graphs with Excel. Other projects include blogging, Google Apps; online virtual school, and discussion forums. Design 8: Students explore technology through the use of cutting-edge industry standard multimedia applications including but not limited to the Adobe Creative Suite. Students design a website for an historical, personal, or evolutionary journey. In the process they use Adobe Photoshop, and Dreamweaver to develop and create content. Students continue with a community-based project where they adopt a local non-profit group and help them increase visibility through branding and logo design. They will use iMovie to write, act, produce, and direct their own movies. iAnimation 9/10: Students will familiarize themselves with computer security, networks, and organization of data and folders; they learn to format and keep process journals. Students create spreadsheets that analyze and present results of intergenerational surveys. They also develop skills in calculation, sorting, and filtering data and creating a variety of charts are covered. Students also work on innovative technology solutions to current technology issues, making them more user-friendly and more functional. Students create digital portfolios to share their work and ideas – the portfolios include video advertisements of school activities and a Photoshop-designed CD cover.

iMedia 9/10: Students will create and present a personal narrative in the form of a photo-essay using Adobe Photoshop. They will look at design principles and digital photography techniques in the process. They will examine an analysis of a significant social issue related to technology, ranging from the dumping of e-waste in the developing world. Students create a short animation, with Adobe Flash, that addresses an aspect of the issues’ problems and solutions. The semester concludes with an introduction into sequencing using Skratch where students work in groups to design, build, and evaluate a water ride for a theme park. Design and Publishing 9-12: Students are responsible for producing the schools’ story over the course of the school year. Both digital and print materials will be employed to record of the year’s events and their contexts in terms of students, teachers, faculty, the community and the world. Products will include the Yearbook Webpage for the LCS website with print supplements. Integrated into the course are skills in writing, graphic design, photography, desktop publishing, web design, construction, and maintenance, goal setting, organization and general ethical business practices.


Middle Years Program

Physical and Health Education

Lincoln Community School

“MYP physical and health education aims to empower students to understand and appreciate the value of being physically active and develop the motivation for making healthy life choices. To this end, physical and health education courses foster the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes that will contribute to a student’s balanced and healthy lifestyle. Through opportunities for active learning, courses in this subject group embody and promote the holistic nature of well-being. Students engaged in physical and health education will explore a variety of concepts that help foster an awareness of physical development and health perspectives, empowering them to make informed decisions and promoting positive social interaction. “Physical and health education focuses on both learning about and learning through physical activity. Both dimensions help student to develop approaches to learning (ATL) skills across the curriculum. Physical and health education contributes a unique perspective of the development of the attributes of the IB learner profile, promoting the health of individuals and communities. “Physical activity and health are of central importance to human identity and global communities. They create meaningful connections among people, nations, cultures and the natural world, and they offer a range of opportunities to build intercultural understanding and greater appreciation for our common humanity..” -MYP Physical Education and Health Subject Guide Course Aims Through physical and health education, students can learn to appreciate and respect the ideas of others, and develop effective collaboration and communication skills. This subject area also offers many opportunities to build positive interpersonal relationships that can help students to develop a sense of social responsibility. At their best, physical and health education courses develop the enjoyment, engagement and confidence in physical activity that students need in order to achieve and maintain a balanced, healthy life. MYP physical and health education courses, in combination with MYP sciences, help specifically to prepare students for the study of sports, exercise and health science in the IB Diploma Programme (DP). This rigorous course enables students to inquire into systems of the human body and explore how and why these systems work together. In their study of sports, exercise and health science, students learn how to apply their knowledge and understanding by critically analysing human performance and through planning and conducting laboratory investigations.

Page 23 Assessment Students will be assessed against four criteria: A. Knowing and Understanding Students develop knowledge and understanding about health and physical activity in order to identify and solve problems. B. Planning for performance Students through inquiry design, analyse, evaluate and perform a plan in order to improve performance in physical and health education. C. Applying and Performing Students develop and apply practical skills, techniques, strategies and movement concepts through their participation in a variety of physical activities. D. Reflecting and Improving Performance Students enhance their personal and social development, set goals, take responsible action and reflect on their performance and the performance of others. Courses: Physical Education and Health 6: The goal of this course is to provide a variety of games and activities to help students develop the knowledge, skills, and the attitude necessary to attain a level of health and fitness that enables them to function effectively in society: track and field, soccer, tee ball, basketball, volleyball, swimming, badminton and racket games. Students are expected to develop skills such as running, sprinting, jumping, shooting, goal-keeping, batting, throwing, catching and serving. Physical Education and Health 7/8: Students will develop an approach to healthy, active living through participation in a variety of activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. We believe that students can gain an appreciation for an active lifestyle by discovering different activities that encourage lifelong participation. Physical Education and Health 9/10: Students will develop the knowledge, skills, and the attitude necessary to attain a level of health and fitness that enables them to function effectively in society and build self-confidence. The course introduces them to a variety of activities including track and field, soccer, tee ball, basketball, swimming, soccer and badminton. Physical Education and Health Leadership 9/ 10: Students will develop leadership skills and experience opportunities to apply them practically in an active health setting. In addition to the standard MYP PE and Health Aims and Objectives, this course focuses on the development


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Lincoln Community School

of leadership and coordination skills related to recreational activities. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills required to plan, organize, and implement recreational events. They will also learn how to promote the value of physical fitness, personal well-being, and personal safety to others through mentoring. Health: Health 6: This course enables students to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills and the use of critical and creative thinking processes. By the end of the grade students will demonstrate an understanding of factors that contribute to healthy development. Demonstrate the ability to apply health knowledge and living skills to make reasoned decisions and take appropriate actions relating to their personal health and well-being, enabling them to justify their choices. Health 7: This course continues to build on the skills critical and creative thinking processes through personal and interpersonal relationships. Students will demonstrate an understanding of factors that contribute to healthy development, including the ability to apply health knowledge and living skills to make reasoned decisions and take appropriate actions relating to their personal health and well-being. Students will demonstrate the ability to make connections that relate to health and well-being – how their choices and behaviours affect both themselves and others, and how factors in the world around them affect their own and others’ health and well-being. Health 8: As students continue through the Health program they will identify the physical, emotional, interpersonal, and spiritual aspects of health (e.g., respect for life, ethical questions in relationships, contraception). Students will be able to identify local support groups and organizations that provide information related to health and well-being. They will be able to apply living skills (e.g., decision-making, problemsolving, and refusal skills) to respond to matters related to, drug use, and healthy eating habits.

Health 9/10: In this course students take the time to examine and explain strategies to promote positive lifestyle choices and relationships with others. Students will learn to manage and demonstrate understanding of the factors affecting human sexuality as it relates to themselves and others, including building an awareness of individuals and organizations available to help guide them in making these decisions. Students will demonstrate understanding of the issues and coping strategies related to substance use and abuse and explain how healthy eating fits into a healthy lifestyle.

Middle Years Program

Physical and Health Education


Middle Years Program

Lincoln Community School

MYP Notes

#126/21 Dedeibaa Street, Abelemkpe, Accra

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Telephone: From abroad: +233 30 277 4018 Within Ghana: 030 277 4018 Facsimile: +233 302 780985


MPY Programme Guide 2014  
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