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Welcome to the 15th Annual Coushatta Pow Wow Celebration I am honored to welcome you here to celebrate our heritage. Many of you have traveled from all parts of the United States and Canada to join us in this celebration as we gather together to share our cultures and traditions. Every year, the Coushatta Pow Wow Celebration has a significant meaning for our people. Not only does this serve as a “gathering of all nations” but also as a “homecoming” to our Coushatta Tribe. We have the honor of meeting new friends and welcoming back our friends from other tribes. During this three-day pow wow, many of you will be taking part in the dance and drum competitions. Best of luck to you all! Others have come to witness the festivities and enjoy the beautiful wares of our native craftspeople and artisans. Welcome! I thank you for choosing to join us to commemorate our culture, our history, our lives and our families. Best regards,

Kevin Sickey Chairman Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana 2


TABLE OF CONTENTS Chairman’s Welcome................................. 2 Coushatta Seal........................................... 4 Coushatta Pow Wow Committee............. 5 Coushatta Tribal Council........................8–9 Pow Wow Schedule............................12–13 Head Staff............................................14–15 Men’s Dance Categories.......................... 16 Women’s Dance Categories.................... 17 Host Drums.............................................. 18 Coushatta Royalty.................................... 19 The Stomp Dance.................................... 21 Tribal Heritage Center............................. 22 Honoring Coushatta Veterans............24–25 Camp Coushatta...................................... 26 Autographs............................................... 27

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Coushatta Seal The Garfish, once used for food and jewelry, represents courage, wisdom, strength, and discipline. The colors, reflecting traditional clothing worn by tribal members, also reflect the various colors of the day and night and have individual meanings. Black represents Night. White represents Daylight. Yellow represents the Sun. Orange represents Discipline. Red represents Life-giving Blood. The Whole Shape represents the Never-ending Circle of Life and Eternity.

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“Akayok pahoos haslak” (We’re Glad You All Came) The Coushatta Pow Wow Committee would like to thank everyone for attending the 15th Annual Coushatta Pow Wow Celebration. It is our hope that you have a great time while you are here with us. Every year we have the privilege of hosting this unique gathering, a celebration that brings families back together, rekindles old friendships, and gives us the chance to make new friends. Many tribes are represented here this weekend: from dancers and drummers across Indian country, to skilled artisans, craftspeople, and cooks showcasing their talents in the traders’ marketplace. We invite you to listen to the heartbeat of the pow wow in the different drums and styles that are unique to each dance. We hope you enjoy seeing and learning about the different dance styles, and dance regalia that take so much time and effort to create. To our visitors and spectators, we invite you to enjoy sights and sounds unique to our Native culture. We give thanks to our Creator for the gifts and traditions that define us as a nation, and a tribe. We offer our warmest welcome to all—visitors, spectators, sponsors, vendors, old and new friends, family and extended family. There are those who are an integral part of this pow wow’s success. We would like to thank the Tribal Council for their support. We are working together, and working hard to preserve our past, live in our present, and plan for our future. We would also like to thank our performers, volunteers, sponsors, and vendors—without you, the pow wow experience could not offer as much excitement and variety to our visitors and spectators. For the latest news about Coushatta Pow Wow, visit our website throughout the year:www.coushattapowwow.com. We encourage everyone to give us your comments and ideas so we can make this pow wow bigger and better every year. A’ leela’ mo, Coushatta Pow Wow Committee 2009 Janson Poncho, Pow Wow Chairman Danielle Poncho, Secretary Loretta Williams, Treasurer Levi Johnson, Member Traci Poncho, Member Nicole Rich, Member Reta Rich, Member

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Coushatta Tribal Council Kevin Sickey, son of Ernest and Ena Sickey, is a member of the Deer Clan. Kevin lives in Elton, where he was raised. He is a graduate of Elton High School and attended McNeese State University. Kevin joined the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana Police Department in 1991, and in 1997, was appointed Chief of Police by the Coushatta Tribal Council. Kevin was first elected Coushatta Tribal Chairman in 2005. He was re-elected in June 2009 and is currently serving in that capacity.

Kevin Sickey Tribal Chairman

David Sickey Vice Chairman

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David Sickey, 31, was born May 1, 1978, to Ernest and Ena Mae Sickey. He is a resident of Elton, Louisiana and a 1996 graduate of Elton High School. He is Married to Kelly Cannon Sickey of Kinder Louisiana, and together they have one daughter, Marianna. As a member of the Coushatta Tribe (Deer Clan) and currently the Vice-Chairman, he is serving his second term as a member of the Coushatta Tribal Council. David was first elected to the Coushatta Tribal Council in May 2003, at the age of 25, making him the youngest to be elected to the Council. Vice-Chairman Sickey would like to wish everyone a very safe and enjoyable experience during your visit to the Coushatta Nation.


Jerold Poncho was born May 22, 1970 to Jerome and Lula Poncho. He is a graduate of Sulphur High School. Jerold graduated from McNeese State University and earned two degrees in business- Accounting and Management. Jerold worked as the General Accounting Manager at the Coushatta Casino & Resort before becoming elected in 2009. Jerold and his wife Adrienne have 4 children, Sara, Nicholas, Kole and Jude. They are also awaiting the arrival of a new baby to add to their clan. Jerold hopes everyone has a great time while visiting Coushatta.

Jerold Poncho

SECRETARY TREASURER

George “Pratt” Doucet Councilman

Wayne Wilson Councilman

George “Pratt” Doucet is the son of Richard and Shirley Doucet, whose mother has been the Education Director for the Coushatta Tribe for the past 20 years. Pratt graduated from University of Louisiana, Lafayette in 1997. Pratt and his wife, Michelle LeDoux Doucet, have two children, Trevor and Julia. He was recruited to San Antonio as Director of Marketing for a national medical company specializing in treating diabetic wounds. In 2000, Pratt opened the first Coushatta Casino Resort office in San Antonio marketing to VIP customers. In 2004, he returned to Louisiana as the General Manager of the Coushatta Millworks. Pratt would like to send a special thank you to the Pow Wow Committee who year after year volunteer hard working hours to coordinate one of the largest Pow Wow events around! “Thank you Pow Wow Committee! We appreciate you!”

Wayne Wilson, 31, son of Kenneth & Patricia Wilson is one of the newly elected officials of the Coushatta Tribe.  Wayne grew up in Elton, and is a 1995 graduate of Elton High School. He is married to Jeanne Landry Wilson and has two children, Kylie & Trent Wilson.  In 1998 he moved to Lafayette, LA to pursue music interests.  While in Lafayette he started Wilson Concerts & Events, which later became Wilpro Services, LLC.  Wilpro Services provides professional production services varying from video, audio, lighting, staging, & labor for concerts, festivals, private & corporate events and everything in between.   Wayne would like to welcome everyone that attends the Coushatta Powwow, and hope they have a great time there. 

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The Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana Department of Public Safety

The Coushatta Tribe Police and Fire Departments wish everyone a safe and joyous time at the 14th Annual Coushatta Pow Wow. 3602 Powell Road Elton, LA 70532 Tel: 337-584-1457 Fax: 337-584-1570


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Pow Wow Celebration

SCHEDULE of events SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing

SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing

SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing

SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

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Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing


Pow Wow Celebration

SCHEDULE of events SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing

SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing

SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing

SATURDAY, October 4 • Evening Session 7pm – Grand Entry Invocation and Prayer Flag and Victory Songs Introduction of Coushatta Tribal Council Introduction of Coushatta

Princesses Introduction of Visiting Princesses Intertribal* Exhibition Dancing * Tiny Tots 0-5 yrs.

Little Girls 6-12 yrs. Little Boys 6-12 yrs. Intertribal Dancing */ Specials TBA Golden Age Women Golden Age Men Intertribal Dancing


2008 POW WOW HEAD STAFF VINCE BEYL Master of Ceremonies

Vince Beyl is a member of the Chippewa Tribe of Minnesota. He is a United States Marine Corps Vietnam Veteran who served in the Marine Corps from 1969 to 1971. He is currently the Director of Indian Education in the Bemidji Public Schools in Bemidji, Minnesota. As an educator, Vince has had the great honor and privilege to work with American Indians of all ages promoting educational opportunities, personal enhancement, and spiritual growth among Native students. As a public speaker, Vince has been a presenter, master of ceremonies, or announcer in 26 states, four Canadian Provinces, and at sporting events, commencements, banquets, coronations, and awards ceremonies. Vince says, “It is a great honor to be a part of the gift and legacy left to us by our ancestors and forefathers of song and dance. Let us all enjoy the beauty of coming together as one great nation to celebrate and carry-out this gift of song & dance and make everyone feel welcome.” Vince is the proud parent of a daughter and son, and grandparent of a three-year old future champion “Jingle Dress” dancer, Kylie.

Juaquin Hamilton-YoungBird Head Man Dancer

Juaquin Hamilton-YoungBird is the son of Don and June Hamilton-YoungBird of Pawnee, Oklahoma and currently resides in Shawnee, Oklahoma with his wife Dyanni, and their young son Kealan. He is an enrolled member of the Sac and Fox tribe of Oklahoma. Juaquin manages his small business “Fancy Fox Creations” and also sings with his family’s drum group, the YoungBird singers. In 2002, he attended the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles for the nomination of YoungBird’s album “Change of Life” in the “Best Native American Music Album” category. As a devoted member of the Native American Church, Juaquin is very grateful for all of his life experiences and gives thanks to the creator for all he is blessed with. He would also like to thank the committee for this opportunity to display his style of dancing. AHOSKIES!

natanis “kit” landry Head Lady Dancer

Kit started dancing jingle when she was around 9 years old and travelled to traditional powwows in Ontario Canada with her parents and sisters. She took a break from dancing in her late teens to focus on singing with Bear Creek. As she travelled extensively with the group throughout North American, she wanted to begin dancing again in the original style of the jingle dress. She felt it was important to dance old style jingle to express her origins of being an Anishinawbe Kwe. Now, Kit enjoys dancing and singing within the various pow wow circuits at traditional and competition powwows. Kit is a two-time champion dancer at the Schemitzun pow wow for 2006 & 2007. This past April, she was proud to represent her Ojibwe Nation as being Head Lady at the Gathering of Nations Pow Wow in Albuquerque, NM.

JOE BOINTY Southern Arena Director

Joe Bointy is a member of the Kiowa-Comanche-Arapaho tribes of Oklahoma. He is the son of John Scott and the late Veree “Betty” Bointy Scott. He is father to Joey and Samantha, and currently lives in Lawrence with his wife Shelley and their baby daughter Shelby. Joe Bointy is a Red Teepee descendent and an original member of the Kiowa Gourd Clan, revived in 1955, whose annual ceremonials take place in Carnegie, OK. He has danced all of his life, winning many championships in the Men’s Fancy Dance category all over North America. His experience and successes in the dance arena have enabled him to travel all over the world, including performances at Kirov Stadium in St. Petersburg, Russia for the opening ceremonies of the 1994 Goodwill Games and performances in Atlanta, GA during the 1996 Olympic Games. Joe also served as the Dance Competition Coordinator for the Red Earth Festival in Oklahoma City, OK from 1995 to 1999. Joe is honored to serve as this year’s Southern Arena Director for the Mesquaki 2005 Proclamation Day Powwow.

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JONATHAN WINDY BOY Northern Arena Director

Jonathan Windy Boy is a member of the Chippewa Cree Tribe in Rocky Boy, Montana. He is currently the Vice Chairman of the Chippewa Cree Tribe. Jonathan also served 3 two year terms (6 years) in the Montana House of Representatives. Although Jonathan was eligible to run for the House seat one more term, Jonathan decided to run a campaign against an incumbent Senator for Senate District 16. Jonathan was successful on his bid, making this victory the first year of an eligible 8 years in the Montana Senate. Before entering into the political arena, Jonathan has become well-known in the dancing arena of the powwow. Being a perrenial grass dance champion, he one prestigious contests such as 14 times at the United Tribes International Championships, 15 times at the Gathering of Nations Pow-wow in Albuquerque NM., 7 consecutives saddles during the Samson band pow-wow in Hobemma Alberta Cananda. 6 times at the Schemitzun Pau wau, in Connecticut during it’s early years.

MICHAEL ROBERTS Head Dance Judge

Michael Roberts, a member of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, resides in Ada, Oklahoma, along with his family. He is a multiple time World Champion Southern Men’s Fancy Dancer and a current member of the drum group, WARSCOUT. Michael has been dancing this style since the age of two. Many times he is called upon to serve as Arena Director, Head Drum Judge or Dance Judge at these celebrations. Currently, Michael is Director/ Choreographer of the dance troupe know as ANOLI. Michael has had the opportunity to travel abroad to places such as France, Italy, Germany, The Netherlands, and Korea to name a few. While abroad, he shared his culture through song and dance. “I would like to thank the COUSHATTA POW WOW COMMITTEE for bestowing this honor upon me. It is with great pleasure that I am here with you all today/” YA-KO-KE!

randy paskemin Head Drum Judge

Tansi, my name is Randall Paskemin. I am Plains Cree from Sweetgrass, Saskatchewan, Canada. I currently reside in Utah with my family. I have been singing since a very young age with various groups and now have a group called Warscout; which I sing with my sons and my close friends. I am very honored to be chosen as the Northern Drum Judge for this year’s celebration. I hope everyone has a good time and I wish all safe travels. Hiy Hiy.

Walter Ahhaitty Head Gourd Dancer

I am currently residing in Carnegie, Oklahoma. I am employed by the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma as the Social Service and CCDP Director. In addition to being a vetern of the United States Marine Corps, I am a member of the Kiowa Gourd Clan, Kiowa Blackleggins Society, Kiowa Marine Corps Association, and currently a Sergeant at Arms for the Kiowa Chapter, Native American Church. I am the youngest son of Glenda Ahhaitty and the late Melvin Ahhaitty. I am also a member of the Comanche and Cherokee Tribes. I am honored that the Committee thought enough of me to ask me to be Head Gourd Dancer for this year’s pow-wow. Thank you again. A-ho

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Men’s Dance Categories Traditional

There are similarities between this dance and the Southern Straight. This dance has a slower tempo and the story line in this dance tells tales of a war party recounting its feats for the tribe. These dancers’ regalia have one bustle, which mostly consists of eagle feathers. Most dancers wear face paint as if in preparation for battle.

Chicken Dance This text is for placement only. This dance tells the story of a war party on the trail of an enemy and of quietly sneaking up on a village unawares.

Grass

This dance originated with the Plains Indians. This style of dance emulates the tall grass of the plains or prairie. Dancers dance smoothly and gracefully in a swing-and-sway style. Steps made on one side are made on the other as well.

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Fancy

Southern Straight This dance tells the story of a war party on the trail of an enemy and of quietly sneaking up on a village unawares. You will see dancers move gracefully in a zig zag pattern around the dance arena.

This dance is flashy and colorful, and requires strength and coordination. There are two styles: Northern style and Southern style. Northern style consists of higher steps and bigger moves. Southern style is faster paced and concentrates on footwork. This is the only dance whose regalia consists of two bustles. It is the most colorful and energetic style of competition dance.


WoMen’s Dance Categories Buckskin

Nothing can quite describe the enduring elegance of the buckskin dancer. This style of dance gives onlookers a brief glimpse into the way a Native woman would represent her family and status among her people.

Jingle Dress

This style of dance is given its name because of the dress itself. Hundreds of small cones adorn the dancer’s dress, producing a “jingling” sound while dancing. The very skilled and graceful dancer will make music with her dress and keep in perfect time with the drum beats and stops. When dancing the more traditional style, smaller and more delicate steps are required of the dancer. She will dance in a zigzag pattern, honoring other dancers by not passing in front of them, always being mindful to stay on her own path.

Fancy Shawl

This style of dance gives the ladies a way of expressing a more “fancy and free style” of dancing. Many different elements are used to express the dancer’s individual personality. The colors and detail of shawls, skirts, and beadwork represent countless hours spent on getting everything “just right.” Watch for light footwork, graceful shawl movement, and endless energy!

Southern Cloth

This dance is a true testimony of spirit overcoming obstacles and adversity. During the early days of reservation living, our lifestyle changed dramatically. The innate resourcefulness of Indian women prompted them to use material and fabric to adorn themselves and to walk in honor. The ability to honor their families and tribes while in the dance circle remains an important part of their lives. That triumphant spirit can be seen in the movements of the dance. Light, brisk foot movements keep time with the drum as the dancer slightly bows during the honor beats. 17


Coushatta Pow Wow 2009

Host Drums

The drum is the heartbeat and central pulse of a pow wow. There are always one or more groups who sing as they beat a rhythm in unison on a large drum. Each group of singers is called a drum. Each drum has a lead singer and a “second� who repeats the lead line on a different or similar key. The drum or drums are positioned around the edge of the dance arena.

Host Southern Drum

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Host Northern Drum

Cozad Singers

Stoney Creek Singers

The Cozad Singers are a Kiowa drum group from Hog Creek, Oklahoma. The group was founded by Leonard Cozad, Sr., in the 1930s. The drum group consists now of his sons, grandsons, and also great grandsons and other members of the family. Cozad, as they are commonly known, are southern style pow-wow and gourd drum group, and have released several albums. The Cozad singers have traveled throughout the U.S. and have made many friends. With all the many blessings, Cozad family thanks the creator first for everything.

The Stoney Creek Singers are members of the HaliwaSaponi, Lumbee, Waccamaw-Siouan, and Algonquin Tribes from the community of Hollister, NC. Stoney Creek compose songs in Tutelo-Saponi language. Stoney Creek has released nine recordings and has traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada competing and hosting pow wows. They have inspired long-lasting relationships with natives from all parts of U.S. and have inspired a new generation of singers of North Carolina and on the east coast.


Coushatta Royalty 2008–2009

COUSHATTA PRINCESS – ANGELE PEOPLES She is 18 years and a senior at Bethal Christian School. She is the daughter of Kathy & Shelby Peoples and her clan is Panther.

Coushatta Princess Angele Peoples

Coushatta Jr. Princess Nicci Savant

COUSHATTA JR. PRINCESS – NICCI SAVANT She is 11 years old and attends Bethel Christian School. She is the daughter of Cindy & Richard Savant and her clan is Beaver. COUSHATTA MAIDEN – JANIE FISHER She is 10 years old and attends Lacassine Elementary. She is the daughter of Carla & Tony Fisher and her clan is Beaver. COUSHATTA JR. MAIDEN – SYDNEY ROBINSON She is 7 years old and attends Indian Bible Academy. She is the daughter of Sandy & Cheryl Robinson.

From left to right: Sydney Robinson, Nicci Savant, Angele Peoples, Janie Fisher, and Ariel Guidry; Bottom row: Avery Fontenot and Nokomys Williams; Not pictured: Cassidy Hill

LITTLE MISS COUSHATTA – ARIEL GUIDRY She is 6 years old and attends Elton Elementary. She is the daughter of Candace & Anthony Guidry and her clan is Beaver. TINY MISS COUSHATTA – CASSIDY HILL She is 5 years old and attends Elton Elementary. She is the daughter of Jaime & Jeremy Hill and her clan is Bobcat. TODDLER MISS COUSHATTA – AVERY FONTENOT She is 3 years old and attends Little Indian School. She is the daughter of Raynella & Elam Fontenot and her clan is Beaver. BABY MISS COUSHATTA – NOKOMYS WILLIAMS She is 2 years old and the daughter of Torrie Williams & Chris Godeaux.

From left to right: Sydney Robinson, Janie Fisher, Ariel Fontenot; Bottom row: Avery Fontenot and Nokomys Williams; Not pictured: Cassidy Hill

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Monday – Sunday • 7am–10pm

Convenience Store & Washeteria Kenneth Wilson Manager/Director

P.O. Box 1107 3624 Powell Road Elton, Louisiana 70532 Phone: 337.584.1590 Fax: 337.584.1592


The Coushatta, Alabama, Seminole, Creek, Chickasaw, and Choctaw Tribes are all related Muskogean tribes. We share traditions, ceremonies, and even language through this relationship. One of those traditions is a dance commonly known to these tribes as the

Stomp Dance

What is a Stomp Dance?

The Stomp Dance is a form of dance to celebrate our culture. Dancers dance in a counter-clockwise circle, woman following man following woman, and so on. Women wear long skirts and turtle “shakers”, one of the main components in making the music. Men “call” and are the highlight of the song by setting the pace of the dancers. This particular dance is common to Indians in the southeast part of the United States. The dance is celebrated socially and religiously. Social stomp dances are held throughout the year and can be held indoors or outdoors, with or without a fire. Religious stomp dances are held during the summer at the height of the new crop season at particular stomp dance grounds during the Green Corn Ceremony.

What does the Green Corn Ceremony have to do with the Stomp Dance? The Green Corn Ceremony is a festive holiday our Koasati ancestors once participated in to give thanks to Abba Chokoli, our Creator for providing us with food, life, and faith. The ceremonial fire provided for the Green Corn Ceremony is never allowed to burn out. It is made to represent the ongoing faith and belief for Abba Chokoli. As we dance the Stomp Dance during the night our prayers are symbolically sent to Him through the smoke flowing high above the fire to the Heavens. As we dance, we pray, give thanks, and ask for forgiveness of our sins through song and dance.

How do you “lose” a tradition?

It is common for cultures to lose traditions over time for different reasons. For our Coushatta people, the struggle to maintain the lands our ancestors thrived on forced us to move from our original lands of Tennessee to Texas and then finally to Louisiana. Influence from non-Indian cultures and religion made a big impact toward losing our Koasati ways. Presently, very few of our people know the original dances, songs, and ways of our ancestors.

How do we know the Stomp Dance is a part of our Koasati tradition?

Historical accounts of the Koasati people participating in the Stomp Dance and Green Corn Ceremonies do exist. One of the first anthropologists to research our tribe was John Swanton. His research revealed many facts about the Koasati tribe, including details of our migration and how our people used to live among the Creek villages. There are many resources that detail our people’s history in old documents, researchers’ notes, and many books.

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Celebrating what makes this community feel like home

Events like this remind us just how important our local communities are. Our friends and neighbors come to feel like our extended family. We proudly celebrate the Coushatta Pow Wow.

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HIICHA! (LOOK!) FOLLOW THE DAILY PROGRESS OF CONSTRUCTION ON THE NEW TRIBAL HERITAGE CENTER AT HTTP://WWW.COUSHATTA.ORG/ The 10,000 square foot center is expected to be complete next summer and opened to the public in fall 2009. It is located on an eighty-acre site three miles north of Elton, just off of Powell Rd. across from the tribal recreation complex. The new, state-of-the-art tribal heritage center will house a theatre, interactive exhibit areas, and digital video displays that will tell the Coushatta story, as well as house a library collection of language and history materials. “We need to draw strength from our past, while doing everything we can to preserve our future,” says Tribal Chairman Kevin Sickey. “This facility allows us to create a learning center for all of our people.” Watch for more exciting developments on the new tribal heritage center in the months ahead!

Sylestine Legacy is a family dance troupe made of champion dancers from the great state of Alabama. This troupe consists mainly of descendants of Lloyd Jimmerson and Wanda Sylestine: children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and nephews. They are part of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana and the AlabamaCoushatta Tribe of Texas. They belong to the Bobcat Clan, Beaver Clan, and Turkey Clan. To all the visitors and dancers here this weekend, we hope you enjoy the pow wow. May God watch over you and your families as you travel safely home.

Lloyd “Jimmy” Sylestine June 18,1 929 – Oct. 21, 2003

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rrich@coushattatribela.org

Don Eric Sylestine Oct. 29, 1967 – Jan. 27, 2008


Roy Abbey

Burnett Langley

Hilton R. Langley

Lovelin Poncho

Richard Robinson

Arron Abbey US Army, Honor Guard Washigton DC

Burnett Langley, Deceased US Marine Corps 1951-1955

Lloyd Abbey U.S. Marines 1966-1970 Corpral CPL Vietnam

Marvin Ray Langley, Deceased US Marine Corps 1967-68 Vietnam Received following medals and commendations: Bronze Star, Purple Heart, National Defense Medal      Vietnam Campaign, Navy Achievement Medal      Expertise Medal, Expertise in Rifle, Expertise in Pistol      Marine Corps Medal

Roy Abbey, Deceased Private Second Class Date of service: May 23, 1952 Served in Korea. Fifth Armory Division. Received following medals and commendations:      Commendation Medal, Korean Service Medal      UN service Medal, 3 DZ Service Stars Solomon Battise - US Army, Purple Heart Christopher Alan Paul Breaux (son of Alan & Vickie Sylestine Breaux) Currently serving in the United States Navy USS Ronald Reagan CVN -76. Air Division V-1 Chris began active duty September 2005 Chad Michael Breaux (son of Alan & Vickie Sylestine Breaux) Currently serving in the United States Navy in Gaeta, Italy as Master at Arms Chad began active duty September 2005 Able John Austin John - US Army Herbert John - US Army, World War II Germany

Hilton R. Langley US Army 1972-74, 11 B 10 Infantry, Vietnam Served during the end of the Vietnam War Served 2 years in Panama Canal Zone, Central America Johnny Leger US Army (Retired) April 1971 – May 1992, 21 years Received following medals and commendations:      National Defense StarArmy Chief Medal      (6) Good Conduct Medal S/Oak Leaf Clusters      (3) Army Commendation Medals      (3) MCD Development Ribbons, (6) Overseas Ribbons      Army Service Ribbon, Expertise Marksmanship Daniel Moreno March 12, 1969–December 30, 1970 June 1969 – December 1969 - Fort Bliss – Military Police Training and On the Job training. December 1969 through December 1970 – Republic of Vietnam – 716th MP Battalion and 92nd MP Detachment as Military Police, Security, and Convoy Escort. Long Xuyen, Tan Son Nuh Air Base, Saigon and surrounding areas. Army Commendation Medal

Ricky John US Air Force 4 years active duty, stationed at Reese AFB, TX, 1985 to 1989. Reserved duty at Barksdale AFT, LA, 1989 – 1991. Designation – tactical aircraft maintenance specialist. Honorably discharged with rank of Sgt.

Greg Poncho US Marine Corps, LCPL 1983-89 US Marine Corps Air Station, South Carolina

Stewart John - US Marine Corp. Desert Storm

Jerome Poncho

Tom John U.S. Marines, Korea War. 2 Tours of Duty Vietnam.

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Marvin Ray Langley

Jamison Poncho - World War II


Jason Sylestine

PFC LeRoy Sylestine

Nathan Sylestine

Lovelin Poncho Army-Inf., Nov.1969 - Nov. 1970 11B20 Lt. Wpns. Infantryman National Defense Service medal, Vietnam Service Medal; Combat Infantry Badge; Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal; Army Commendation Medal; Bronze Star Medal Army Commendation Medal Valor; Bronze Star Medal Valor; Vietnam Air Medal; Purple Heart; Expert (Rifle M-16); Sharpshooter (Rifle M-14) Vietnam, Americal Infantry Division; Squad leader; 101 Air Borne Division; special forces; 4 weeks Recon Patrol Service in state - Ft. Hood, Texas, Hell on Wheels Discharged: June 71 Marvin R. Robinson U.S. Army 1966-1969 KIA, Vietnam Richard Robinson, Deceased US Army 2 years. World War II in Germany. Richard Robinson, at the age of 18, honorably served his country. Sam Robinson U.S. Army 1942-1946 Corporal CPL Stationed Germany World War II Anthony Gene Sylestine US Navy USS Oldendorf DD-972, HT-2,ES Served 1989-1993 Dan Sylestine Jason Sylestine United States Navy Stationed at Whidbey Island WA Served aboard: USS Coral Sea Carrier USS Constellation Carrier 1980-1986 Kent Sylestine

Roland Sylestine

Eugene W. Williams

Horace Williams

PFC LeRoy Sylestine D.O.B.- 11/04/33 United States Army, 1950-53 432nd Eng. Const. Bn. Toured: Europe, Germany, France, Italy, & Holland Married to Zeline (Langley) Sylestine for 51 years He has two daughters, six grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren LeRoy still resides in Elton, LA and is retired. Nathan Sylestine May 1986 – Boot Camp, San Diego, CA July 1986 – Port Hueneme, CA, Utilities Man School Oct 1986 – 1991, Naval Air Station, Adak, Alaska (stayed in Alaska for 5 years) May 1991 – Honorable Discharge Rate – Utilities man (Plumber, Pipefitting, Heating, Boilers, Sewage Treatment) Rank – 3rd Class Petty Officer Roland Sylestine, Deceased US Army – Private E-1 Time served:  September 1967-1969 Vietnam War – 1968-1969 T.A Weir - US Army, Desert Storm Eugene W. Williams Marine Corps 1959-1964 Vietnam Era Tank Battalion Stationed at Okanawa Horace Williams, Deceased MSGT USAF Retired. He joined the Army in July 1953 and trained at Camp Gordon, GA (Company 20). He was stationed at 1st FLD ARTY at Ft. Sill, OK, and was discharged from the Army in July 1956. He joined the Air Force in 1958 at 2049 AACSGP at McClellan AFB, CA. His overseas duties included South Ruislip, AS, England; Torrijon AB, Spain; Sidi Slimane AB, Morocco; Misawa AB, Japan; and Lindsey AS, Germany. He retired at Griffiss AFT, New York, July 1, 1980 (485th Communications & Installation Group). He received the Air Force Commendation Medal for Meritorious Service.

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