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These 19 students whose work is on display provide insights into different stages of a research process. Some students have only just begun their enquiries, where they are (re)defining and contextualising research question(s); whilst others are at a more advanced stage, developing and producing outcomes. It is through this lens of ‘becoming’ that this remarkable show should be understood; not as final work, but as a dynamic set of individual propositions and research processes. Professor Teal Triggs


Thesis title Living outside society: the visualization of migrant counter cultures in south east Spain .......................................... Title of work exhibited Beyond the riverbed .......................................... Year of study 3rd year part-time ..........................................


My research is a study of migrant neo-nomadic countercultures who have colonised an infertile riverbed and a mountainous region of South East Spain. Within these self marginalised loosely structured communities are people from a variety of backgrounds, whose ideologies challenge the conventional accepted structures of mainstream society. Some choose to accept the unwritten rules of a particular site, and others prefer to, and are allowed to reject any authority and live in isolation, within the boundaries of the community. Using a large format film camera and more recently making sound recordings, I am exploring the representation and expression of group and personal identity, and how these multi national subcultures relate to each other and to their host community. Through a process of repeated field trips to specific sites, the gradual acceptance of my presence there and my resulting photography, I am aiming to ask how these intentional and unintentional communities exist, cooperate or divide and how they construct their temporary autonomous zones. The photographic work is augmented with conversation, recorded interview and substantial theoretical writing. I intend the work to reflect the ways in which these people alienate themselves from conventional mainstream society, what their value systems are, and why it is that they have congregated in this area. I have chosen to do this primarily through concentrating on making photographs of their depopulated makeshift dwellings and environments.


My research explores the pivotal role of visuality in the production of contemporary geopolitics. In my thesis I determine how different visual languages might be employed to explore borders in a global context, and how urban and geopolitical theory can inform the creation of images. Through examining both landscape theory and my own experience of an embodied approach to landscape I reflect on the potential of photography to act as a portal to experience the landscape whole. Through a consideration of my own practice and others’, I demonstrate a web of connections: between landscapes; between practitioners; and significantly, between practice and theory. Thesis title Plastic towns and ecotones: how can landscape photography be used to explore geographies of difference and the politics of architecture on the New Political Equator? .......................................... Title of work exhibited Imported landscapes .......................................... Year of study 3rd year full-time ..........................................

Imported Landscapes is a site-specific billboard installation and series of photographs commissioned by Manifesta 8 Paralelos, 2010. The work creates a visual dialogue between the Mediterranean landscapes of southern Spain and northern Morocco, considering not only their shared topography but also their ongoing history of trade, mobility and colonisation. Imported Landscapes forms part of a long-term, ambitious project to investigate the desert landscapes that lie on the ‘new political equator’. Based on a revised geography of the post-9/11 world, a straight line drawn from left to right across a world map intersects at three highly contested territories: the Mexico USA frontier; southern Spain and northern Africa; and Israel Palestine. This concept of the new political equator is a destabilisation of historical ways of mapping and colonizing: it suggests a different politics of space. Through my practice and research I investigate how these landscapes interconnect and overlap, both politically and symbolically. These desert spaces have all been imagined and created through a prism of the enduring Judeo-Christian myth of the American West and the Promised Land. My ongoing practice in Spain and Morocco and Israel Palestine explores how yearning and desire, mobility and colonisation can be made visible through the construction of landscape, and how one landscape can be allied with another.


Thesis title Contemporary Armenian Exiles: objects, narratives, histories .......................................... Title of work exhibited Objects: from Dyarbakir and Zeytoun .......................................... Year of study 3rd year part-time ..........................................

The thesis aims to explore the role of objects including photographs that have survived the route of exile from historic Armenia through family history. These family stories are taken from Armenian diaspora families in London and Paris who as active participants provide me the researcher/ photographer with stories from their lost landscapes. Recent events in Syria have hindered my research with diaspora families in Aleppo. Key research questions will relate to the role of these objects (including photographs) in the narration of disappeared existences. I will also interrogate the ‘places of memory’ the literal traces of Armenian presence in what is now another country, the Republic of Turkey. Post-memory is explored in the Armenian context drawing on established research in relation to the Jewish experience, which although similar is also very different. I interrogate these sites of memory and their significance as spaces that embody communal memory. I question the silence surrounding these historical events and my role as an outsider/ artist who identifies with their loss. Through my fieldwork which uses sound, photography and interviews I narrate these sites of cultural effacement whilst creating an archive of these traces. As a photographer engaged with the sensory aspects of these places, the notion of embodiment and the engagement of the photographer/ researcher on a multi-sensorial level is questioned. In the context of the ancestors historical places, Dyarbakir, Zeytoun and Marash, located in Eastern Turkey (Western Armenia) each present themselves as sites of memory where newer identities and realities have taken place. This multi- layered reality is examined in the context of another group of people, mainly Kurds who have taken possession of the spaces once inhabited by the Armenians.


My research explores the personal space of private collections. Each collecting room is a narrative space, where the biography of the collector is evident within the accumulated objects. Focusing on the idiosyncrasies of each participant, collection and space, I create a series of intimate portraits of the collectors and their spaces. Combining photographs, film, oral histories and ambient sound my work reveals repetitive sequences, patterns of behaviour and cycles of personal narrative. Thesis title Collecting Rooms: objects, identities and domestic spaces .......................................... Title of work exhibited Unobtainable Dreams (film), Hook, Line and Sinker (film and a series of photographs) .......................................... Year of study 4th year (2 years part-time, 2 years full-time on UAL Studentship) ..........................................

Collected objects are static. They are items that have had their original purpose and function removed, only to be replaced by a new notion designed by the collector. Therefore the objects in a collection are re-animated by the collector, who breathes life and purpose back into them through their stories, associations and significance. My creative practice collaborates closely with each participant; the films are constructed to disclose biographical elements, pieced together from stories about individual items within the collection. As each object is significant to the collection as a whole, the individual stories combine to create a unified representation of the collector. These are not necessarily self-aware biographies, but rely on the indirect method of discussing the separate objects within the collection. This technique imbues the films with a confessional quality that discloses the complexity of collectors who particularly invest significance to objects. Complex and multifaceted these representations not only reveal personal insights into the collector’s life, family and comprehension of the world, but also offer alternative perspectives on collecting and the pleasure of having a private space.


Thesis title Single Saudi Women: spaces, things, self .......................................... Title of work exhibited A package of a package of a package .......................................... Year of study 4th year full-time ..........................................

My practice-based research endeavours to illuminate and understand a very complex mode of living embraced by single Saudi woman residing in the United Kingdom.Pictorial conventions in global mass media exhibit recurring visual tropes which stereotype and essentialise the portrayal of Saudi women. As a result, such generalisations have suppressed Saudi women’s efforts in reconciling with their identities and asserting their sense of individualism. The many aspects of their lives revealed in this study so far demonstrate an ongoing negotiation with historical gender conventions both responding and effecting space; and evidenced with material culture. The multidirectional photographic component responds to the participants’ unfolding realities as well as investigate their nature in both private residences and urban space. The themes emerged reveal that both public and private arenas to be textured with the activities and traces of these women. There is often the question of the veil and veiling that is inextricably linked to the Saudi woman. The two sets of photographic works featured in the exhibition explore the veil both as metaphor and physical object. They also call into question notions of the public and the private that are concealed and/or revealed through performances and belongings. Moreover, these become signifiers to the women’s attempts to gain agency in forging new identities that to varying degrees align and/or resist a generic Saudi identity.


Thesis title Patterns of belief: design methods for visualising language as structures and processes mutually constitutive of audience and social reality within contemporary news media .......................................... Title of work exhibited 73,241 aircrew .......................................... Year of study 1st year part-time ..........................................


My research interest is in design practice for data visualisation. Data comprises of information that can be complex and heterogeneous. The aim of data visualisation is to aid understanding of and allow insight into data through its translation into visual form. This research relates to design methods for visualisation of language ‘patterns’ in contemporary news media. In this context visualisation describes computer based display of information that participants can interact with, where language patterns are structures and processes that are identifiable in news media language and are thought to affect how news reports are received, understood and ultimately believed. My aim is to determine a design framework for visualisation of complex information about patterns found in news language, thereby making their existence and ramifications more understandable. Design success should be determined by ability to support participants (broadly: news authors and audiences) to understand and make judgments about language patterns and their effect in the context of news media.


The main area of this research is located at the intersection of graphic design with design criticism and critical theory. This research is being undertaken from a practitioner’s perspective with an aim to develop a process for critical graphic design practice.

Thesis title Designing a critic – research methods for critical graphic design practice .......................................... Title of work exhibited The architecture of gambling .......................................... Year of study 2nd year full-time ..........................................

The unfinished project presented here – titled The Architecture of Gambling – is part of a set of exercises ranging from self-initiated work, professional practice and academic workshops. These aim to explore graphic design as an emancipatory tool, by investigating the critical role of the designer on three levels: individual freedom, disciplinary discourse and public interest, as put forward by Dutch designer Jan van Toorn (van Toorn 1997, 127). The Architecture of Gambling analyses visual and geo-political tactics used by aggressive ‘brand-led businesses’ that occupy a significant part of today’s urban landscapes. They have been contaminating public space with promiscuous and obsessive relations with sports, finance and by operative in tax havens such as Gibraltar, Isle of Man or Malta.


In the last ten years, there has been an increase in the number of projects around the world that have employed rephotography as a visual method of presenting change, many of which vary in their accuracy, approaches, techniques and motivations. With the success of rephotography projects such as that of Sergey Larenkov (2010), the practice is also beginning to enter the language of visually literate users of the world wide web; a trend evidenced by the popularity of online crowdsourced projects (e.g. History Pin, 2011), as well as computer scientists researching ways to automate the rephotography process and place it within consumer digital cameras (Bae et al, 2010; Lee et al, 2011). Thesis title SNS challenger: rephotographing a Victorian voyage collectively .......................................... Title of work exhibited SNS challenger (2009ongoing) .......................................... Year of study 3rd year part-time ..........................................

Coming from a background in Digital Imaging, my visual communication practice has increasingly used the act of rephotography as a platform for visual exploration. This began when I was researching and rephotographing photographs taken in Japan in 1875 during the voyage of HMS Challenger, a Royal Naval research ship that sailed around the world between 1872 and 1876. The primary aims of Challenger’s voyage were to gather scientific data pertaining to the oceans around the world. However, a second objective consisted of photographing the people and places encountered, which resulted in a collection of over 500 images (Brunton, 2004). The Challenger photographs form the visual core of my practice-led research. Working in conjunction with contemporary visually literate individuals in the locations once visited by HMS Challenger, my research employs the practice of rephotography and a continually designed social network site (SNS) to rephotograph the locations in the Challenger photographs collectively. Through this, I am proposing rephotography as a potentially suitable visual methodology for developing the visual communicability of online participants, while also exploring the effectiveness of SNSs for conducting remote collective research. For this exhibition, I am presenting the website SNS Challenger in its current guise. The project is usually viewable to online participants only. However, for the duration of this exhibition, the site will be welcoming all visitors through an exhibited computer terminal as part of an open access initiative.


Thesis title A practice-led study of design principles for screen typography – with reference to the teachings of Emil Ruder .......................................... Title of work exhibited The Waste Land App – iPad edition of T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land (1922), published by Faber & Faber and Touch Press UK, June 2011 .......................................... Year of study 8th year part-time ..........................................

The PhD research centers on the need for a clearer understanding of the nature and practice of typography in a screen environment and on trying to define the current and emerging design principles and methodologies that govern that practice. The main practical focus of the research is the development of an experimental practice methodology for designing screen typography, which is greatly influenced by the work and teachings of Swiss typographer Emil Ruder. The Waste Land App is a major practical outcome from the research. It applies the methodology developed during the PhD to the typographic design of a full interactive screen based text – namely the iPad edition of The Waste Land poem by T.S. Eliot (originally published in 1922).


Thesis title Communication design methods for social integration – case study: youth in Lebanon .......................................... Title of work exhibited Visual summary of design research process to date .......................................... Year of study 4th year part-time ..........................................

Social integration rose as a priority following a century that ended with the collapse of many states and the sharpening of many strifes around the world. Therefore, social integration is seen as a pathway to reinforcing common identities, supporting cooperation and lessening the likelihood of violence and conflict. For the past 15 years, international, public, academic and third sector organisations ventured into tackling this issue, however interventions were limited to the level of policy making and lacked collaborative and interdisciplinary approaches from the bottom up. Additionally, the contribution that the communication design discipline can offer to social integration interventions remained unexplored. The practice-led research addresses the extreme case-study of a politically, religiously, geographically, culturally and linguistically segregated youth in Lebanon. It is grounded upon two key principles: interdisciplinarity (drawing on sociology, political science, psychology and design) and collaboration (engaging young people, civil society, authorities and experts). Through these principles, the research explores the potential of the communication design discipline in affecting social integration. The practical outcomes of the research are a collaborative online platform, and a set of communication design guidelines transferable across other socially segregated communities worldwide.


Thesis title The bones of the book: schematic structure and meanings made from books .......................................... Title of work exhibited Metaphors, schemata and the book .......................................... Year of study 4th year full-time ..........................................

This practice-led study seeks to critically evaluate ways in which books provide a variety of resources, in addition to writing and imagery, that participate in meaning making. Rather than approaching the book as a neutral format that transparently contains and re-presents information, an alternative understanding of the book is investigated; one in which written, visual, spatial, tactile and kinaesthetic cues, can all be utilised by readers to recall, construct, and fix conceptual structure. These processes being approached as a form of conceptual integration (Fauconnier & Turner, 2002): where concepts evoked by the book as a whole are blended, enabling new meaning to emerge. Such blends can involve metaphorical associations utilising two different conceptual domains. For example, the book format tunnel-book uses a metaphor that suggests a way of thinking about books in general, whereby schematic structure from the source domain of tunnel is projected onto the target domain of book. Practice presented as part of this project has focussed on synchronising different fundamental image schemata relevant to book form (such as, front/back, centre/ periphery and source/path/goal) on the one hand with text and imagery to suggest new meaning on the other.


Sounds of the Central Laietani is an ethnographic recording of a day in the life of the Laietani, encompassing ritual, domestic, economic and environmental spheres. The piece has been constructed entirely with sounds taken from contemporary audio recordings of Barcelona, a buzzing and undeniably modern metropolis.

Thesis title Ways of listening in sound art: how can multiple ways of listening inform contemporary sound art practice? .......................................... Title of work exhibited Sounds of the central Laietani .......................................... Year of study 1st year part-time ..........................................

My research is investigating the different ways of listening apparent in sound art practices. Recorded sound has always maintained an ambiguous relationship between sound and its source. Concrete music of the 1950s highlighted the possibilities of acousmatic sound, in which, through manipulation of existing recordings, new sounds could be created, destroying the original context and opening up new sonic vistas for the listener. Recordings also allowed people to hear a multitude of site-specific sound via a stereo system, albeit thousands of miles from its source. Collections of ethnographic field recordings allowed listeners to eavesdrop on the everyday life of groups in Papua New Guinea, Ethiopia or Tasmania. Often with little understanding of the subtle meaning of the sounds presented, listeners could indulge in an exotic auditory tourism, experiencing soundscapes unimaginable in their own surroundings. This has been developed in recent years as the area of sound arts called phonography, where soundscapes are presented as aesthetic products as much as sonic documents of objective reality. These two different understandings of sonic material – two ‘hearings’ – demand different approaches to listening; one is a kind of essentialist listening – which demands a belief in the reality of the sound, and the other an imaginative listening – one which actively creates new hearings from the material presented.


This practice-based research on radio art explores the rich history of radio as an artistic medium and the relationship between the artist and technology, emphasising the role of the artist as a mediator between broadcast institutions and a listening public. It then considers how radio art might be defined in relation to sound art, music and media art, mapping the shifting parameters of radio art in the digital era and prompting a consideration of how radio has moved from the shared ‘live’ event to one consumed ‘on demand’ by a fragmented audience. Thesis title “The Radio of the Future”: can the convergence of new media technologies redefine radio art as we know it and push forward the artistic boundaries of radio arts practice? .......................................... Title of work exhibited Numbers .......................................... Year of study 7th year part-time ..........................................

I have explored the implications of this transition through my radio practice which focuses upon the productive tensions that characterise the artist’s engagement with radio technology, specifically between the autonomous potentialities offered by the re-appropriation of obsolete technology and the new infrastructures and networks promised by the exponential development of new media. My final pre-recorded work, Switch Off (Dead Air) incorporates elements from a series of live radio actions, towards investigating this tension at the core of our contemporary understanding of ‘radio’. Alongside this I have developed a body of work which considers issues of radio-as-liveevent from a number of perspectives in practice, through interactions and interviews.


My research is an inquiry into writing and sound experiments by William S. Burroughs’ in the late 1950s through to the mid ’70s as the basis for an articulation of interactions with audial art practices.

Thesis title Nothing short of complete liberation: a burroughsian ideal of space in the audial arts .......................................... Title of work exhibited Exteriorisation exercise #2: playback experiment #2 .......................................... Year of study 5th year part-time ..........................................

By the end of the 1950s Brion Gysin had introduced Burroughs to the use of tape machines as a means of artistic investigation. However instead of using audio tape purely to develop artistic propositions, Burroughs mixed principles drawn from Dianetics and Scientology (also introduced to him by Gysin); a concept of technology as a mediator between biological and paranormal phenomena, such as in the activities of Wilhelm Reich and Konstantns Raudive, and a principle of reality-as-material that could be manipulated, cut up and restructured. One of the outcomes of Burroughs’ framing of an alternative context for audio technologies was the belief in the idea of a tape recorder as an extension of the human nervous system and one that could be used to manipulate both the preconditioned behavioural patterns of individuals and the general flow of external reality. Among Burroughs’ activities with tape were those he dubbed “playback” experiments. In these instances the recording and subliminal replaying of audiotape in an environment could, according to Burroughs, engineer quite powerful social effects, from the inciting of unrest, to closure of a business.


What is the best way to record an object? How can we come to know an object – its weight, surfaces, balance, temperatures, and so on – and is the capture of this information in the best interests of the object itself? It occurred to me that maybe it was possible to allow something to write itself using itself; to offer all of its surfaces to the record using a kind of exploratory imprint. To this end, a few years ago I began using rubbing, Thesis title or frottage. This trace of an activity is clearly neither a Silent night, luminous noise photograph, despite its autographic (self-writing) flavour, .......................................... nor a drawing in the strictest sense, since the action of Title of work exhibited the mark-making device is coerced by the physicality of Eidola series the object in a directly causal manner; rather it oscillates .......................................... between these categories as well as others. But also, Year of study it seemed to be directly analogous to a certain ancient Viva passed theory of the mechanism of how images reach us – December 2011 specifically that atom-thin skins (Eidola) flit lightning-fast .......................................... from the surface of objects to enter our eye; made of the same stuff as the object itself, allying vision and touch. My PhD has centred on how sound can be synthesized using light, and I have looked extensively at how an emergent sense of touch within this type of media can bridge the unbridgeable gulf between hearing and vision, since it is to a greater or lesser degree common to both.


Thesis title Considering the sonic signifier in space: the violin as ‘amateur’ .......................................... Title of work exhibited Seven improvised bridges .......................................... Year of study 4th year part-time ..........................................

My practice led research has developed unique associative strategies in approaching the making of sounds as live, site-specific performances. The thesis draws on the analysis of a portfolio of soundworks that operate as an interface between the space and the experiencer within the space. The approach to and treatment of the sounds has been informed by associative aspects of the site allowing ideas for specific sound making to be triggered by prior exploration of, for example, historical, visual and aural characteristics of the location. Locating the practice within the contextual background of the dialogues of sitespecific art, I have undertaken a series of performances that seek to push the boundaries of expectation in terms of sonically orientated artworks in non-traditional art spaces. These sonic elements are explored and achieved through the use of sound making devices which have included an instrument (violin), voice, amplification, digital sound layering equipment and, on occasion, other participants. The practice has been informed contextually by the consideration of many past and contemporary sound art practitioners who have used alternative sites in which to stage their work. Most significant is the work of Max Neuhaus, both in his use and displacement of the sonic materials of site and determination to reach non-traditional, passing audiences and of Alvin Lucier, in heightening the awareness of sounds within specific spaces. The methodology draws on questions surrounding site-specificity and the nature and expectations of sounds in a space posed by theorists such as Brandon LaBelle who explores sounds and the conditions of site; Nick Kaye and his notion of aspiring to a performance of place; and Jean Jacques Nattiez on aspects of musical semiology.


Thesis title How can the moving image be used to convey the material and physical essence of place? .......................................... Title of work exhibited Winspit (2012) 5mins single screen and motorized rig .......................................... Year of study 2nd year part-time ..........................................


In Atlas of Emotion: Journeys in art, Architecture and Film (Verso, 2002), Bruno discusses ‘this shift away from the long standing focus of film theory on sight, towards the construction of a moving theory of site’. As discussed in Martin Jay’s Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought (Berkeley and Los Angles, 1994), while Western culture privileged sight, touch had often been positioned at the bottom of the hierarchy of the senses. Traditional theories of the ‘filmic gaze’ fail to address the affect of spatiality, the act of crossing or inhabiting space are not explored or explained. Bruno suggests that we need to build a new theoretical map, as mobile as that of motion pictures, one must use a traveling lens and make room for the sensory spatiality of film, for our appreciation of space, including filmic space, occurs through an engagement with touch and movement (Bruno 2002:16). This practice-led study critically evaluates ways in which artists’ film can capture and convey the ‘essence’ of place through a phenomenological approach. Characterised by a spirit of enquiry this research explores ways to capture, represent and re-present within the gallery space the ‘material’ and ‘physical’ qualities of place. By constructing camera motorized rigs to capture and create moving images that could not be perceived by the human eye, this mechanical process of filming is in fact an investigative way of looking, that becomes less about ‘viewing’ and more about ‘searching’ and ‘experiencing’ place.


Thesis title Archive aesthetics: can film-making be a future archaeology? .......................................... Title of work exhibited CAPITAL (2011) .......................................... Year of study 3rd year part-time ..........................................

Currently there is a lot of interest in the idea of archives and archiving in relation to art-practice, yet there has been no thorough research conducted into the political implications of artists using archives for the creation of their own artworks. This study proposes the possibility of an undemocratic, hierarchical nature inherent in the concept of the archive and looks into the ways in which artists can use archive material in order to highlight the political problems at stake. Proposing the idea that archaeology can be a critical methodological approach to archival research, this project examines the relationship between archaeological method to art-practice, specifically focusing on film practice that uses both textual and visual archive material. The research raises questions about film as archival research, the nature of the archive as a futural resource, and the relation of archives to democracy. In looking towards current developments of thinking aesthetics and politics through a convergence of art practice and philosophy, this study suggests that archaeological method as a critical art-practice is one of the ways in which art can be part of the development and production of a cultural commons – working towards re-thinking private and public space in relation to ideas of community and communal being.


Thesis title Filming place, belonging and performative folk traditions in England .......................................... Title of work exhibited Untitled .......................................... Year of study 2nd year full-time ..........................................

This research investigates senses of place and representations of place through film by focusing on two seasonal performative folk traditions in rural Britain (Haxey Hood in North Lincolnshire and May Day in Padstow). By considering the experiential qualities of the annual rituals and their significance for local communities, (as seen in their wider socio-economic contexts), the research will raise broader questions regarding place and belonging in contemporary society, the inter-relationships between places, and how film as a medium capable of directly conveying phenomenological experience might represent, disrupt and question the sensual qualities of lived experience, place, and landscape. This study will be approached via an experimental ethnographic methodology. Key conceptual aspects of this investigation such as the embodied camera, movement, autoethnography and fictionalisation will be used to explore the complex ways that places may be known, understood, and de-familiarized both through the subjects’, camera’s and filmmaker’s phenomenological and subjective experiences, and in turn the cinema audiences’ experiences of filmic space and place. The key questions for the research are as follows, incorporating a multi-layered and reflexive approach then to both experiences of place and the filmmaking process: - How are places and landscapes lived in and through, experienced, imagined, performed, contested, understood, and remembered through these folk traditions? What is the nature of the interconnections between these places and others, in terms of socio-economics, those who live away and return, and the filmmaker’s own experiences, and how might these be conveyed to an audience? - How might experimental ethnographic methods contribute to an understanding of both the phenomenological, subjective and political aspects of documentary filmmaking in exploring representations of place?


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PhD Research in Progress Pushing Boundaries and Practices

Current PhD Students

Organising Committee: - Dr. Angus Carlyle - Dr. Phil Green - William Raban - Wendy Short - Dr. Jennifer Tomomitsu - Professor Teal Triggs - Professor Val Williams - Dr. John Wynne

Photography Paul Lowe Wasma Mansour Ben Murphy Helen Sheehan Corinne Silva Sam Vale Design Klaus Birk Joanna Choukeir Katie Hayes Philip Jones Hilary Kenna Francisco Laranjo Gary McLeod Sandra Peach Johannes Reponen Chris Twigg Antonius Vandenbroek

Curator: Wendy Short Project Organiser: Dr. Jennifer Tomomitsu Designer: Joanna Choukeir Printer: Aldgate Press Vinyl suppliers: Valley Graphics Thanks to LCC for their generous support of this exhibition and catalogue. In particular Professor Sandra Kemp, Les Claridge, Dr. Phil Green, Theresa Keane, Danny Hollowell, Richard Coles and Jackson Jessop. University of the Arts London Research Centres and Networks based at the London College of Communication: photographyresearchcentre.co.uk crisap.org informationenvironments.org.uk

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D

U

A

N

R E S E

A R T S

E I V

CRISAP

Sound Arts Philip Durrant Iris Garrelfs Margaret Hall Mark Jackson Derek Michael Robert Mullender Johnny Pavlatos Daniel Scott Peter Sinclair Tansy Spinks Mark Wright Film Rosalind Fowler Louis Henderson Julie Marsh Colour Imaging Alexander Awramenko Kwame Frimpong-Manso Baah Rohit Kumar Dasgupta Kiran Deshpande

C

H

I N T O

S

O


Research in Progress: Pushing Boundaries and Practices