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A Unique Gallery A Great Shopping Experience!

Colin Fisher Studios

68929 Perez Road, Suite M, Cathedral City, CA 92234, 760-324-7300, Email:colin@colinfisher.com A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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ON THE COVER: Rancho De La Luna Refrigerator Collage THIS PAGE Bombay Beach Biennial Enthusiastic Visitors

TABLE OF CONTENTS HIGHLIGHTS 20 ART + SOUND

at Janssen Artspace

22 CAFE EUROPA

Holocaust Survivor Tile Quilt Art Tribute

22 FIRST ANNUAL PALM SPRINGS PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION

COMMUNITY 24 KAREN RILEY

and the Joys of Collaboration

28 SAFEHOUSE of the DESERT

Teens Install Art at Wildest Greens

HISTORY:

30 MEAN STREETS

Arthur Lyons & Private Eye Jacob Asch

ARTIST PROFILES: 34 ROBERT MARION

Sculpting a New Career at Home & Abroad

36 BACKSTAGE at UNDER the SUN

Pageant of the Masters Creative Talent

42 JULITA JONES

An Award-Winning Printmaker with a Passion for Endangered Animals

50 ROCK & ROLL MAGIC

A visit to Rancho de la Luna

COLLECTOR:

60 MORROCAN DESERT BEAUTY

EXHIBITION:

70 THE FEMININE BODY:

Nancy Floyd • Sandra Jones Campbell Cat Calebresse • Peter Palladino

78 ART MARKET 12

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Sandra Jones Campbell

“BUNNY HOP GONE AWRY” (Acrylic, 67x45)

SANDRA JONES CAMPBELL STUDIO 949.310.0074 sandrajonescampbell.com “BAR MENU” (Acrylic, 22x30)

“DAVE’S DATE REVEALS SHE’S ELVIS” (Acrylic, 30x40) A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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PU B LI SHER Bruce Dodd (760) 898-7623 Bruce@ArtPatronMagazine.com

EDI TOR I N CHI EF Christine Dodd (208) 771-1135 Christine@ArtPatronMagazine.com M A N A GI N G EDI TOR Stephen Baumbach Stephen@ArtPatronMagazine.com A SSI STA N T EDI TOR Grove Koger CON TR I B U TOR S Stephen Baumbach Louisa Castrodale Christine Dodd Liz Goldner Grove Koger Tom Lamb Denise Tanguay

DI R ECTOR OF PHOTOGR A PH Y Stephen Baumbach Stephen@ArtPatronMagazine.com PHOTOGR A PHY STA F F Stephen Baumbach Tom Lamb

DI R ECTOR OF OPER ATI ON S Russell Wong Russell@ArtPatronMagazine.com

A DVERTI SI N G DI R ECTOR Christine Dodd (208) 771-1135 Christine@ArtPatronMagazine.com

CU STOM ER SER VI CE R EPR ESEN TATIVE Catherine Ellis Catherine@ArtPatronMagazine.com GR A PHI C DESI GN Christine Dodd Jared Linge

www.ArtPatronMagazine.com For Advertising and Editorial Information: 333 E Amado #1904, Palm Springs, CA 92263 or email info@ArtPatronMagazine.com The opinions expressed by writers and contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Laguna Beach ART Patron Magazine and Palm Springs ART Patron Magazine are published six times a year by Laguna Beach ART Magazine, LLC Pick up a copy of ART Patron Magazine at your favorite art gallery or at the following summer fine art events: Laguna Art-A-Fair Pageant of the Masters Sawdust Art & Craft Festival

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Delos Van Earl

James Hill

2 0 1 7 / 2 0 1 8

E L

PA S E O

John Neumann

E X H I B I T I O N

Bringing together artwork from emerging and renowned artists, the 2017/2018 El Paseo Exhibition delights and inspires! The collection of 18 sculptures installed along Palm Desert, California’s world-class shopping thoroughfare is on display through 2018. Enjoy docent guided tours September through May and upon request. For more information call 760 346-0611, email dglickman@cityofpalmdesert.org or download the El Paseo Exhibition app by Otocast at the Apple or Google Play store. Visit Palm Desert

PA L M D E S E R TA R T. O R G

Tim Shockley

Steven Rieman

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Michael Anderson

Susan Rankin

Stephen Fairfield

Michael Dunton


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HIGHLIGHTS

ART + SOUND at Janssen Artspace

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articipants enjoyed what artist and gallery owner Steven Janssen called a “radical abstract experience” March 31 and April 7 at Janssen Artspace in Downtown Palm Springs. The event involved cocktails, a sake and wine tasting, a Binaural Headset Live Guided Meditation, and an exhibit of contemplative paintings by Hooper Dunbar, Sarah Robarts, Sebastian Siegel and Janssen himself. Hooper Dunbar was raised in Los Angeles and had an opportunity to experience the creative energy of old Hollywood. His artwork intertwines elements of faith, nature, spontaneity, movement, chaos and calm, while his meticulous technique allows viewers to delve into his mind and his soul. Dunbar’s paintings are included in private collections around the globe, and have been exhibited at the United Nations Offices of the Baha’i International Community and the executive offices of SOHO China in Beijing. Born and raised in East Africa, Sarah Robarts attended West Heath School in England and received her B.F.A. from Queen’s University in Canada. After completing her post-grad studies in France, Robarts lived and painted in the UK, where her work was exhibited in galleries on Wigmore and Walton streets. She also trained in public relations, and a decade later moved to Los Angeles, where she founded Ballantines PR in 2001. As an influential woman in business, Robarts paints with elements of femininity and strength. Her large-scale canvases display a broad spectrum of color and a meticulous technique.

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Anglo-American writer, filmmaker and artist Sebastian Siegel was born in Oxford, England. His work juxtaposes themes of transcendence, happiness, intimacy, compassion, will, eternal life, paradox, and intuition. Siegel is largely influenced by the Indian comics he grew up on, as well as by the writings of such authors as Alan Watts. His book Die Bewusstseinsrevolution (“The Consciousness Revolution”) is published by Giger Verlag in Switzerland, and he regularly hosts think tanks at his home in Los Angeles. A native Angelino, Steven Janssen attended California State University at Long Beach, where he studied life drawing and painting. After leaving college, he began working in the art department of a small production company, learning the crafts of scenic painting and prop making on productions for Showtime, TLC, ABC and the Golden Globes telecast. Janssen’s signature style combines the human form with organic abstract movement and a hint of eroticism. He exhibited in numerous galleries before opening his own in downtown Palm Springs in 2006. After closing it in 2009, he relaunched Janssen Artspace last year and soon found himself immersed in all the elements he missed—the desert, working as a curator and running a business. Janssen Artspace is located at 255 Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs 92262.


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HIGHLIGHTS

1st Annual Palm Springs

PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT

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tephen Baumbach Studio and Gallery is hosting the 1st Annual Palm Springs Photographic Exhibit. The exhibit is meant to give visibility to valley-based photographers and mentor newcomers to the craft. The studio will be home to the Palm Springs Photographic Center whose mission will be to help local photographers get into the business, learn fine art, practice studio photography and appear in in various gallery shows during the year. The photographic center is open to all photographers in the valley both experienced and novice. The Palm Springs Photographic Exhibit (PSPE) is the perfect vehicle to highlight the year’s successes. The exhibit can be viewed throughout the month of May at Stephen Baumbach Photography Studio and Gallery. Located at 4116 Mathew Drive, Palm Springs, CA 92264, for more information call 760.501.6806, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm

Holocaust Survivor Tile Quilt ART TRIBUTE at Cafe Europa

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ewish Family Service (JFS) of the Desert, in collaboration with the Tolerance Education Center and Old Town Artisan Studio, presented Café Europa’s Holocaust Survivor Tile Quilt Art Tribute at the Tolerance Education Center on March 21. The event featured the unveiling of art created by local Holocaust survivors, who will be forever honored and remembered. For over 35 years, JFS of the Desert has provided services throughout the Coachella Valley to those in need, regardless of religion, age, income, ethnicity, disability, national origin or orientation. JFS services and programs are made possible through the financial support of Jewish Federation of the Desert, Desert Healthcare District, Kaiser Permanente, United Way of the Desert and other organizations, as well as through the generous support of donors. Most of the nearly 2,500 men, women and children JFS serves are from low-income households. They rely on JFS for low-cost mental health counseling, crisis intervention and food support. JFS provides isolated, homebound seniors with care management, transportation and enrichment activities, and offers counseling in local elementary schools. It is also the largest provider of social services to the local Jewish community. JFS of the Desert is located in Palm Springs. For more information, visit www.jfsdesert.org or call 760-325-4088. The Tolerance Education Center is located at 35147 Landy Lane in Rancho Mirage. 22

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“Zurich in Spring” from the Abstract Series

SHEILA

“Boca Grande” from the Seascape Series

OLSEN

“Big Coco” from the Palm Series

Sheila O ls en G aller y 784 S. Coas t Hwy Laguna Beac h s heilaols en. c om 949- 423- 9990

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COMMUNITY

KAREN

RILEY and the Joys of Collaboration

written by Louisa Castrodale, PSUSD Visual and Performing Arts Coordinator

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ollaborating is one of my favorite methods of making art. There is something satisfying about creating side by side with a fellow artist, with each of us bringing a unique perspective and talent to the work. This also holds true in my professional life, which involves working with students. One of my favorite collaborators is Karen Riley, founder and Executive Director of the SCRAP Gallery. Riley’s mission is centered on children and creating works of art from recycled items. Her artmaking is beautiful, practical and environmentally friendly. I had the pleasure of getting to know Riley about seven years ago, when she first suggested a project to me. Of course, I knew she was busily involved in our various schools on a number of endeavors, but I hadn’t worked with her personally. She pitched an idea for a 16–foot-square, oneday installation made entirely from recycled products. The piece was to be based on the work of Vic Muniz, and was highly ambitious in scope and


Welcome to the colorful world of Elena Bulatova Fine Art! Featuring artwork by Elena Bulatova and Efi Mashiah as well as an array of international artists! We love Bulatova’s whimsical and colorful Sweet Life series of lollipops and popsicles which add that extra touch of fun to everyday living. She creates beautiful and colorful abstract art that you want to decorate your whole home with. The color combinations are so happy. Efi Mashiah brush paintings and 3d screw artworks represent spectacular encapsulation of pop-Art and post-Pollock sensibility.These pieces challenge the boundary of painting and sculpture, performance and monument, and simplicity and deep complexity in art. More can be found in the galleries Efi and Elena run in… Laguna For more information please visit

Beach • Palm Desert • Palm Springs • Las Vegas www.elenabulatovafineart.com or call 844-Elena-00 A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Celebrating 40 Years of Wyland Galleries

scale. We ended up creating it with students at Cathedral City High School, and the results were phenomenal! I became a big fan of Riley’s, and that was the beginning of many collaborative projects to follow. Last year, Riley and I organized a Studio Day with a group of girls from Rancho Mirage High School, where we put together an homage to the work of Yayoi Kusama. (Making homages to various artists has become one of our signature approaches!) The student artists created costumes and a matching backdrop, and were photographed wearing wigs and holding a studentcreated papier-mâché pumpkin. This project later showed at College of the Desert’s Walter Marks Gallery as a series of 10 large-scale photographs, along with an installation of over 100 pumpkins that were made by students in schools across the Palm Springs Unified School District. This year, Riley wanted to do a project based on the work of European artist Clet Abraham and involving artists from five of our high schools that we had pulled together on a Studio Day the preceding October. We called the project “Sign of the Times” and we set out to create playful street art using discarded traffic signs from the area. As always, we were surprised and delighted by the students’ interpretations of the text in new and different ways. Not only were students that wouldn’t normally meet collaborating on a larger project, they were working with a concept that challenged their thinking and led to greater discussion. Working with Karen Riley is a treat for me and for the students. She is one of the valley’s quiet, unsung heroes in the arts. I feel it’s important for students to create as much as possible, and I’m even more enthusiastic when we enhance their learning through meaning-making in art. The street signs we created showed at College of the Desert in May and June of this year, and once again were a vibrant and engaging display of student art and potential. Riley and I are already planning next year’s project, so stay tuned!

“Wyland” Official Limited Edition Gicleé on Canvas of the 40th Anniversary of Wyland Galleries

Discover the latest original and limited edition paintings, sculptures, and photography from one of the world’s most iconic marine life artists and conservationists.

WYLAND GALLERIES 509 S. Coast Highway Laguna Beach, CA 92651 1 800-WYLAND-1

For more information visit www.wyland.com

Congratulations to the Wyland Foundation’s new partnership with the United Nations Environment Program. Follow Wyland on:

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COMMUNITY

SAFEHOUSE of the Desert Teens Install Art at WILDEST GREENS

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LIFE’S TOO

SHORT

TO WEAR

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olorful graffiti-inspired artworks created by SafeHouse of the Desert teens as part of their Skills Lab Art Program were installed April 11 at Wildest Greens. The pieces were incorporated into the restaurant just in time to welcome festival-goers for the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival, and are intended to act as a Step-and-Repeat backdrop for their photos. Based in Thousand Palms, SafeHouse of the Desert offers immediate help to youth and families experiencing crisis situations. Staff members are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and the organization provides a 20-bed shelter for runaway, homeless and other youth in crisis ages 11 to 17. Valohna Wynn—popularly known as “Lady V”—is the Art Director at SafeHouse, and took the lead in setting up the project. “This is a lovely collaborative effort,” she points out. “Denise DuBarry Hay has been a great supporter of SafeHouse over the years, and I was thrilled when she came to me to commission some works for the restaurant. I thought having some of the youth in our program involved in creating that art would be a real win-win.” Along with Wynn and the teens at SafeHouse, Amanda James also assisted in the creation of the art pieces. James is a fine artist currently interning with Wynn, and plans to become an art therapist to help children in need. The Skills Lab Art Program empowers and educates the young people who come through SafeHouse’s doors. The teens’ artworks deliver a message of hope while allowing them to learn techniques and self-sustaining skills they can use in the real world. “Everything is art therapy,” says Wynn. “It helps them let their guard down and get their feelings out. Art is a therapeutic medium for change.” Wildest Greens is located at 72990 El Paseo #3, Palm Desert 92260. For more information, go to WildestGreens.com or call (760) 636-0441.

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HISTORY

MEAN

STREETS

Arthur Lyons & Private Eye Jacob Asch written by Grove Koger

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hen prominent Palm Springs resident Arthur Lyons died in March 2008 at the age of 62, his readers were as shocked as his family and many friends. Besides co-founding the Festival of Film Noir, Lyons had put in time as a local restaurateur and city councilman. But he had first made his name as a crime novelist during the 1970s, thanks to his creation of P.I.—that’s private investigator, or private eye—Jacob Asch. Lyons was born in L.A. in 1946 and moved with his family in the mid1950s to Palm Springs, where his father and uncle opened Lyons English Grille. The young man graduated from UC Santa Barbara in 1967 and eventually took up writing, but his start was far from auspicious. Lyons initially tried science fiction, but the response he received to one of his first submissions was far from encouraging. As Lyons recalled, the editor wrote him that it was “the worst story he’d ever read in his life.” He persisted, however, publishing an investigation of Satanism in America and then, in 1974, with the encouragement of Ray Bradbury, his first novel. The Dead Are Discreet mixed kinky sex with Lyons’ newfound knowledge of religious cults. It also introduced Asch, a former reporter who had gone to jail rather than reveal his sources. Upon his release a few months later, he 30

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Nestled in beautiful Laguna Canyon, the Laguna Art-A-Fair is the premier fine arts summer destination in Southern California

Fine Art, Cuisine, & Live Entertainment

Summer 2018

Open daily: June 29 – Sept 2 Check our website for updates on daily events, live music, art demos, and art workshops:

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Connecting fine art with luxury home design.

Work with expert decorators during our designer events for ideas on home redesigns and renovations.

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discovered that the paper didn’t need him anymore and turned to private investigation. Ten more novels and a handful of stories featuring Asch followed, each focused on a particular field—boxing, politics, waste management (really!), filmmaking and so on. The P.I. proved a hit with readers and reviewers alike. As journalist and blogger J. Kingston Pierce pointed out, Asch “borrowed cynicism from Philip Marlowe, compassion from Lew Archer, and exuberant youthful horniness from Mick Jagger.” (Marlowe and Archer are the creations of Raymond Chandler and Ross Macdonald, respectively.) Part of the investigator’s appeal was his ordinariness. “You’ll never find Asch doing anything unlikely,” Lyons explained. “He will not usually find stuff through coincidence. He’s a plodder. That’s what private detection is, going through papers. All of Asch’s cases come out of paper. He works with paper more than he does people.” He’s not particularly fast with his fists—a welcome relief from one of the genre’s more tedious clichés— but certainly quick with a wisecrack. And, as Pierce noted, cynical. “People are like inner tubes,” Asch observes in his debut; “inflate their egos with a little air and you really get to see where all the leaks are.” What’s Lyons’ best novel? He himself thought it was 1977’s Dead Ringer. Fellow writer Dick Lochte included the challengingly convoluted Hard Trade of 1981, with its echoes of Chandler, on his list of the top 20 private eye novels. But a lot of readers preferred Castles Burning from 1979. I’d choose the first Asch novel I read, The Killing Floor (1976), which is set in the world of the meat-packing industry, and Three with a Bullet (1984), a tightly wound mystery involving a sleazy Jim Morrison clone. Kirkus Reviews praised the latter for serving up “precisely the right mixture of deadpan drollery and true disgust.” Asch’s last big case, False Pretenses, appeared in 1994, and that was it, except for a short story in 1997. Why did Lyons retire him? His widow, Barbara, explains that it was a combination of readers’ changing tastes and publisher’s growing reluctance to pay decent advances. But he’d also developed a new interest, one that his P.I. shared. In Asch’s final novelistic outing, he settles in for the evening: ”I finished my sandwich, then made myself a strong vodka see-through and turned on a forties film noir about a woman who believes her husband innocent of murdering a sexy femme fatale and talks an alcoholic songwriter into helping her find the real killer.” (Asch doesn’t mention the title, but I think it was the classic Black Angel with Dan Duryea, June Vincent, and Peter Lorre.) Of course Lyons’ new interest was scarcely a surprise, as he had employed noir effects from the beginning. In any case, it led to his last book, Death on the Cheap: The Lost B Movies of Film Noir, and the Palm Springs Film Noir Festival, which he founded with Barbara and former Palm Springs International Film Festival executive director Craig Prater. Now renamed the Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival, the event’s scheduled for May 10–13 at the Camelot Theatres, 2300 East Baristo Road. The first of this year’s dozen selections is Farewell, My Lovely, the 1975 version of Chandler’s 1940 novel. Directed by Dick Richards, it stars Robert Mitchum in what Roger Ebert called the actor’s “definitive performance.” Closing the festival is Michael Curtiz’s Flamingo Road, with Joan Crawford, Zachary Scott and Sydney Greenstreet. Variety hailed it as “a class vehicle” for Crawford, “loaded with heartbreak, romance and stinging violence.” For details, tickets and all-access passes, visit http://arthurlyonsfilmnoir.ning.com/.

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ARTISTS PROFILE

Sculpting a New Career

ROBERT MARION at Home & Abroad

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efore retiring and moving to France, Robert Marion had enjoyed a multifaceted 40-year career as an awardwinning automobile designer, product developer and consultant. Marion’s contributions to the automotive industry ranged from developing turnkey operations for limited build transportation products to creating advanced materials applications. He designed the exterior and interior for an electricpowered bus and produced prototype electric bicycles for Lee Iacocca. He established and supported advanced design studios for a number of major corporations, including Chrysler and the Toyota California Design Group. Marion’s passion for architecture also led him to develop a number of residential and commercial projects, including the restoration of a retail environment in Temecula. In France, however, Marion took what appeared to be a different direction. He surrounded himself with a community of artists and developed his talent for sculpture, drawing upon his experience in clay modeling, toolmaking, composite construction and sheet metal forming. His artistic sensibility, combined with his design background and his deep understanding of materials, turned out to be a perfect foundation

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Opposite Page: Red Monolith Large Abstract Steel Sculpture, Fired in the highest grade auto paint in Ferrari Red This Page (clockwise): Robert Marion; Gravity, Aluminum Sculpture; in the studio.

for his new career. He went on to create works on commission for Cesar Baldaccini, then France’s premier sculptor . Marion applies his engineering and design skills to each of his extraordinary sculptures. He works with a variety of metals, including his favorite, aluminum, which he values for its light weight and pliability. His monumental pieces in the medium are virtually seamless and highly reflective, and it is almost impossible to find a weld in them. Marion describes his sculptures as minimalistic architecture. They display his passion for simple, whimsical shapes with an almost carefree expression, but he devotes serious attention to detail, construction methods and professional craftsmanship. He does not like replicating anything he has created, but instead may take a popular design in alternative directions in order to explore its themes. Today many of Marion’s beautiful sculptures are held in private collections in the United States, Canada and Europe. For information on available works, contact Colin Fisher Studios via email at colin@colinfisher. com or call 760.324.7300.

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ARTISTS PROFILE

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The Artists BACKSTAGE at written by Liz Goldner photographed by Tom Lamb

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hen this year’s Pageant of the Masters opens in July, viewers will be awed by the “living pictures” on the Irvine Bowl stage. Yet few members of the audience ever have the opportunity to see how this extraordinary spectacle—which is celebrating California and French Impressionists this year with the theme “Under the Sun”—is assembled. A visit backstage with five crew members reveals dedicated artists, sculptors, seamstresses and carpenters. These individuals bring seasoned expertise with them when they create the various components of the Pageant’s living pictures, or tableaux vivants. Two scene painters, David Cooke and Dave Rymer, share a studio behind the Irvine Bowl. This large space is decked out with motorized scaffolding that the two climb to paint large re-creations of the living picture backdrops. Working alongside each other with passion and dedication, they share stories and crack jokes. Cooke is a self-taught figurative painter and has shown in major galleries throughout California. A pageant scene painter since 2006, he has created large renditions of masterpieces by artists from a wide range of eras. One of his favorites from past productions is Coffee and Donuts by Festival of Arts A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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exhibitor Scott Moore. He has also re-created paintings by Henri Rousseau and Roger Kuntz. This year he is excited to be working on paintings by Laguna plein air artists Joseph Kleitsch, Franz Bischoff and William Griffith and by French Impressionist Claude Monet. Cooke explains that painting for the Pageant has expanded his knowledge of art history. He regards Wayne Thiebaud as his foremost inspiration and mentor, and cites Richard Diebenkorn, Edward Hopper and Richard Bunkall as influences, along with Ashcan School painters John Sloan, George Bellows and Robert Henri. He will be displaying his own works, which are sought after by collectors, in his booth this summer at the Festival of Arts. A figurative artist and sculptor who has exhibited in local galleries, Rymer has been involved in the pageant for several decades. “I love working here,” he says. “It gives me the opportunity to paint all day, to do something I love.” The more he likes the original painting, he explains, the more he enjoys re-creating it. He adds that the job has taught him the importance of following a daily routine: “An artist needs to work every day.” Among the paintings that Rymer has depicted in stage-size format are several by David Hockney (his favorite artist) and Diego Rivera. This year he is working laboriously on paintings by Paul Gauguin, John Singer Sargent and California Impressionist Edgar Payne. Dave Talbot (there are four Daves in the pageant crew!) is the show’s construction foreman, overseeing construction of all of the sets. A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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With a background in theater arts and theatrical construction, he has worked for several playhouses but prefers the pageant. “There is a great amount of artistic freedom here to construct the props and sets,” he says. Talbot also likes being involved with the technical aspects of the show, adding that pageant director Diane Challis Davy is open to all kinds of suggestions and ideas. Among Talbot’s tasks is determining how to fit the many volunteer cast members into the sets based on their measurements. He also shapes thin rods to create armatures to support the cast members when on the sets, and builds metal templates to go under clothing, especially under long skirts. During the summer, he oversees a crew of eighteen people, making sure that each night’s show runs smoothly. It is apparent from talking with Dave—who is also an exhibiting photographer and painter—that the Pageant of the Masters is a well-oiled machine with dozens of people working together harmoniously. Two other pageant crew members are Melissa Meza and Daniel Stonebraker. Among the show’s youngest and newest production people, they bring lifelong interests in sewing and sculpting to their jobs, creating costumes and headpieces for the cast. They both grew up with an interest in costumes, particularly those worn by comic book and sci-fi characters. As children and teenagers, they made costumes for themselves and for friends and neighbors. At the pageant, Meza sews muslin garments that are later painted to reflect the period of each living picture. Skilled in sculpting, Stonebraker shapes headpieces from Styrofoam that he often fashions to look like hair. As is the case with other Pageant crew members, Meza and Stonebraker are applying their artistic passions to their work. In turn, the work stimulates their own creative output beyond the pageant. 40

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Inspired Art For Your Eyes

EuropeanOpticalinc.com

One of a Kind Hand Crafted in Germany

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JULITA JONES An Award-Winning Printmaker with a Passion for Endangered Animals written by Liz Goldner photographed by Tom Lamb

The Rapist A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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ARTIST PROFILE

Eleanor Roosevelt’s lines “Beautiful young people are accidents of nature / But beautiful old people are works of art” perfectly describe Laguna Beach artist Julita Jones.

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Julita Jones in her Studio

... and the Best Goes On

Sellers Sea Eagle

African Elephant A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Mole in a Hole


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he white-haired woman emanates beauty from within, and this attribute is manifested in her etchings of wild and colorful birds and other animals, as well as in her home, perched atop steep stairs at the end of a bucolic cul–de-sac. To enter the dwelling, where she has lived with her husband for nearly sixty years and raised two children, is to enter the private world of an endlessly artistic individual. A visit with Jones yields tales of her early life and of how she became an award-winning artist. Growing up in the San Fernando Valley, she developed an early interest in artmaking. Her mother, Virginia McCallister, was a wellknown watercolor artist, while her grandfather, Bruce McCallister, was a fine book printer. She became involved with printmaking as an undergraduate at UC Santa Barbara, where she graduated in 1961. She went on to take advanced courses in printmaking at various SoCal universities, continuing to study the discipline into the early 1990s. Jones began exhibiting at the local Festival of Arts in 1970 and at the Sawdust Art Festival in 1982. She has won “Best of Show” and “Best Printmaker” awards in the Sawdust, along with awards at the Scottsdale Festival of the Arts. She has also shown her work at the Laguna Art Museum and in galleries and libraries throughout the southland and across the country. Originally known for her whimsical serigraphs, Jones has specialized in “viscosity etching,” a process that involves layering several inks of different viscosities onto one etching plate. For each piece, she first creates the design on paper, then on her press, using ink. She sometimes adds newspaper and magazine clippings or even individual words describing the character and origin of the animals she is illustrating. She then places a sheet of paper over the materials before rolling the press over them, creating a textured, mixed media work. With each completed print, she draws the viewer into her artistic/ spiritual world. “Using a multi-level approach,” Jones explains on her website, “I present as much information as I can about each animal’s plight and the

Mole in a Hole

Jones’s Living Area

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Galapagos Giant Tortoise

important role it has played in the history of mankind. The unique framing takes the message one step further.” She adds that she transforms layers of ink and other materials into depictions of endangered creatures that “may soon become only a fragment of our memories.” Among Jones’ deftly wrought and compassionate prints are “Night of the Iguana,” “Cheetah, the Spotted Sphinx” and “Giraffa.” “The Good Hummer” and “The Macaw” feature birds, and “The Bondo” portrays a lonely gorilla. Jones’ subjects display human-like qualities, and suggest individuals striving to express their independence and creativity—just as the artist herself does. The Joneses’ custom-designed house, which they share with their beloved cat, is as much their personal assemblage as it is their home. It is filled with Julita’s artwork, which is hung in nearly every room, and includes colorful ceramic tiles on the inside stairway and throughout the kitchen. A metal sculpture of an octopus and a large totem figure from Seattle stand in the entryway, and there are exotically colored tapestries on many of the walls. The unusual folk-art furniture includes a coffee table crafted to look like an alligator, and the living room sofa is upholstered in fabric with an animal print . The piece de resistance is a large collection of Fiesta dinnerware displayed on racks in the kitchen. While the only birds in the Jones domicile are in Julita’s prints, their living counterparts would certainly feel at home here. 48

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ROCK & ROLL

MAGIC written by Denise Tanguay photographed by Stephen Baumbach

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he Joshua Tree area has become a hotbed for artists and musicians, many of whom are inspired by creative desert pioneers such as Dave Catching. He’s the man behind the music for heavy-hitting rock bands such as Queens of the Stone Age, Foo Fighters, Arctic Monkeys, Masters of Reality and many others who have recorded some of their best music at his renowned Rancho de la Luna recording studio. On my way to meet Catching on a freakishly windy day in the high desert, my GPS routed me through the back roads to his home studio near downtown Joshua Tree. As I drove past funky desert homes with hot rods parked out front and trees adorned with tequila bottles in the yard, I knew I was getting closer to the Rancho. Suddenly, I was in the middle of a makeshift dirt bike track with rockers on motorcycles jumping all around me. One of them pointed me down the road to a curvy stucco home with a wide porch and expansive desert views. I had finally arrived at indie rock’s musical mecca. “Hi there,” Catching called out as I pulled up to the driveway. “Come on in!” From the warmth of Catching’s personality to the coziness of his home recording studio, you would not suspect that some of the biggest names in modern rock had worked at the Rancho. Dave Grohl went there to musically reboot after Nirvana ended, and years later recorded a song at the studio for the Foo Fighters’ Sonic Highways album and documentary. Guitarist Joe Walsh called for a session, but it was already booked by Queens of the Stone Age, whose lead singer, Josh Homme, has collaborated with Catching in numerous bands. Iggy Pop recently recorded there. The A-list goes on and on. “I’ll be in trouble if I mention any favorite bands from the studio because there have been so many,” says Catching. “Someone will be bummed if I don’t include them.” A lifelong guitarist and cofounder of desert rock bands Gnarltones, Queens of the Stone Age, earthlings? and Mojave Lords, Catching lives and works as a music producer at the studio he established with his friend Fred Drake in 1993. When Drake

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Art of Baja California

Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens June 15, 2

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6-8 PM

Join us for an opening party!

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Live music & ballet folklรณrico Food & drinks made onsite by chefs Meet-&-greet renowned artists For the latest information about our programs, visit CasaRomantica.org/Calendar or call (949) 498-2139

ESAU ANDRADE VALENCIA

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with generous support from


passed away from an illness, Catching continued running the studio with chief engineer John Russo, who oversees operations when Catching is on tour with his band Eagles of Death Metal. This year the studio is celebrating its 25th anniversary. “I think a lot of artists came here because Queens of the Stone Age recorded here, which led to the Desert Sessions recordings that brought many different bands together in the studio,” Catching explains. “For the sessions, Josh [Homme] would hand-pick his favorite people, who had never met each other. He thought it was fun to bring a group of uniquely diverse musicians into the desert and see what happened.” This collaborative, intuitive approach to creating and performing has become the hallmark experience of musicians who have worked at Rancho de la Luna. The results are soulful, cathartic, electrifying and powerful. Ask any musician who has recorded there and he or she will say that some of their best work was created at the Rancho. “The studio is in a small house near the center of Joshua Tree with a great vibe created by the

owners who built it,” says Catching. “They had parties where they would play music and cook with their friends. It’s a very giving, inspiring place for a lot of people. It’s also beautiful and quiet.” With its long-term reputation for artistic innovation and joyful collaboration, Rancho de la Luna has become its own authentic brand. Anthony Bourdain stopped by the studio for an episode of his foodie television show Parts Unknown. Catching is also launching Rancho de la Luna brand mescal tequila with his Mojave Lords bandmate Kevin Richey. Music fans often try to find the studio, curious about the mystic desert space where their favorite bands recorded. Catching believes that the Joshua Tree area will always attract the creative community and its patrons. “People need a magical spot, and so far, this place has proved to be one of them,” he reflects. “People seem to feel better when they come here.” Note: Rancho de la Luna is a private property open to the public by appointment only. For more information, visit www.ranchodelaluna.com.

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Experience some of the most breathtaking views from one of our seaside restaurants overlooking the surf and the dramatic ocean landscape at The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel. For breakfast, lunch or dinner, the creative dishes are as elevated as the oceanfront setting. CASUAL ELEGANCE | PANORAMIC OCEAN VIEWS | CULINARY & VISUAL EXPERIENCES One Ritz-Carlton Drive, Dana Point, California 92629 | 949.240.2000 | RitzCarlton.com/LagunaDining

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MOROCCAN

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photography by Stephen Baumbach

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ucked away in a quiet gated enclave in Rancho Mirage is a Moroccan masterpiece. The highlight of this mini-replica of a Moroccan palace is the intricately carved interlacing plasterwork. This spellbinding interior was painstakingly carved over two years by three craftsmen who came to California to hand-sculpt the homes ornamental walls and ceilings, with permission from King Hassan II of Morocco. On the following pages homeowners Alain and Liliane answer a few questions for Art Patron Magazine.

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How did you come to live in this beautiful house?

Upon visiting it, Alain was awed by its intricate artwork and fell in love immediately although he had no intention of buying such a house. He knew instantly he should have it. Indeed, the purchase transaction was concluded within a week.

How was this masterpiece created?

The house is a mini-replica of an authentic Moroccan palace. The inspiration came from a visit to Morocco for work. Commissioned by the former King Hassan II of Morocco to produce a documentary aimed at promoting Morocco as a golf destination, the original owner/movie producer (and former owner of the land on which Clancy Lane South and Clancy Lane Estates sit) visited Morocco and the King’s palaces. He became so enamored with the exquisite Moroccan craftsmanship that he decided there and then that his home would be built as a mini-replica of one of these palaces. After permission from their sovereign, one of the King’s team of artisans followed him to California, where they spent more than 2 years in a labor of love, hand-sculpting the house’s walls and ceilings. That team later built palaces and homes across the world and was commissioned to build the Moroccan Pavilion in the New York’s Metropolitan Museum.

Did you ever dream of living in a piece of art?

After their fast marriage (following five-days of bliss after they met) living in this artful home was totally fitting with the fairy tale they were living!!

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What is your favorite thing about your home?

The unique craftsmanship and the calm and serenity. Everything about this house is beautiful and, as an artist herself, Lily appreciates the manual labour, patience, commitment and love invested in these beautiful walls and ceilings.

What was the best piece of advice you have been given about decorating this home?

Decorating this house came naturally to Lily because she loved it so much and was familiar with the style. Conscious of preserving its integrity, every antique rug, piece of furniture, lamp, brass item, etc. was selected to be in harmony with the style of the house.

What is the biggest sacrifice you have made to maintain the integrity of the home? Being at times constrained in our decorating selections, but this kept us focused.

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Name the biggest overall lesson you have learned about being a steward of a home like this. Respect for art and the ingenuity and creativity of the artists.

In your opinion, what should someone consider before committing to a home that is an art object? Commitment sounds like a sacrifice or an effort ... this house is an inspiration of art. This home should only belong to art lovers and should not represent a sacrifice. It is however a commitment to art loving.

What would you tell yourself ten to twenty years ago that you wish you knew then about your life in this home?

We will be so fortunate to live in a house like this one. Although we thought we knew many things, every new element that surfaced was a gift. This house was indeed a gift!

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11 CLANCY LANE R

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$2,485,000 Located in the exclusive gated enclave of Clancy Lane South is a mini-replica of an authentic Moroccan palace. Visit our website for the 3D tour and drone video: www.encorepremiergroup.com

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EXHIBITION by Christine Dodd

The Feminine Body “It took me quite a long time to develop a voice, and now that I have it, I am not going to be silent.” —Madeleine Albright

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In My Brother’s Robe,1983/2012 • Nancy Floyd From the series Weathering Time,1982-Present I have been photographing myself since 1982. If I fail to take a picture the film is advanced so a blank image is recorded, creating a visual calendar. The 2,500+ photographs include my body from head to toe, as well as some of my environment. It’s not just the body that changes: Fashions and hairstyles evolve; pets come and go; typewriters, analog clocks, and telephones with cords disappear; and finally, film gives way to digital and the computer replaces the darkroom. While Weathering Time is a personal archive, and I am mining the archive to address issues of the female body, the family snapshot and loss, I am also interested in producing images that suggest some of the experiences of my generation. Indeed, the photographs underscore the cultural, technological, and physical changes that have occurred over the past thirtyfive years—from my youth to the dawn of my old age. For more information about Nancy Floyd: www.joshuatreeartgallery.com www.nancyfloyd.com

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“You don’t have to be pretty. You don’t owe prettiness to anyone ... Prettiness is not a rent you pay for occupying a space marked ‘female.’” —Erin McKean

Measure Twice, Cut Once • Sandra Jones Campbell Twenty some years ago I began sketching a woman under the scrutiny of cosmetic surgeons, dashing lines created a pattern on her body to show how they could improve her all over appearance. The self awareness of beauty in Orange County is quite persuasive. Then two years ago when facing a classed A2 “simple” lumpectomy due to breast cancer, that prior drawn sketch leaped onto a canvas. Gone were the surgeons, now black suited men carefully measured a pre-inked woman with dotted lines for where to cut. For more information about Sandra Jones Campbell: sandra@sandrajonescampbell.com www.sandrajonescampbell.com

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“Feminism isn’t about making women strong. Women are already strong. It’s about changing the way the world perceives that strength.” —G.D. Anderson

The May Queen and her Minions (Working Title) • Cat Celebrezze The May Queen and her Minions are a set of 10 lamination constellations. Each constellation consists of six tri-tiered laminations, a central 5x7 lamination and 5 smaller laminations. The laminations depict women and girls from tintypes and old Victorian photographs, in typical feminine mien, only with a goat head substituted atop their shoulders. These constellations, with their disruption of the expectation of “The Feminine” with that which could be considered monstrous and malevolent, ask: What is nefarious in these forced molds of binary gender identity? What nefariousness can these molds obscure? What nefariousness grows at the heart of these territorial machines? For more information about Cat Celebrezze: www.joshuatreeartgallery.com www.laminatedlove.com

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"In a world where masculinity is respected and femininity is regularly dismissed, it takes an enormous amount of strength and confidence for any person, whether female or male-bodied, to embrace their feminine self." - Julia Serano

Holly Woodlawn • Peter Palladino “Gender Identity is an absolutely separate issue from Sexuality. Gender Identity is the persona that one acts out and presents to the world as masculine or feminine and Sexuality is the role one chooses to express the act of having sex. Gender is expressed as male or female and the variations of sexuality is as varied as ones imagination will allow. Given the relatively recent culture shifts and acceptance of heretofore unacceptable social behaviors and norms, the definitions of “feminine” and “masculine” too have shifted and are not absolute. My most succinct definition of femininity is that it is the opposite of and complement to masculinity. It’s not unlike when U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stewart said, “I know pornography when I see lt.” Similarly, I know femininity when I see it. For more information about Peter Palladino: www.simeondengallery.com www.palladinodenphotography.com

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ART MARKET

Ruth Gooch

Maureen Perkins

Marcia Stevens

Ferial Nassirzadeh

The premier art event in the leading destination The premier art event in the leading destination and community fineartleading art galleries. The premier artcommunity event of in the destination and of fine galleries. and community of fine art galleries. The premier art SAVE eventTHESE in the leading destination DATES SAVE THESE and community of fineDATES art galleries.

THU R Spremier D AY art | M AY 3 R D destination | 2018 The in the DATES leading SAVEevent THESE of fine art 3 galleries. SAVEM THESE DATES T H U R S D AY and |community AY RD | T H U R S D AY | JUNE 7TH | 2018

T H U R ST HDUAY R S D AY | U R S D AY| T H U R S TDHT HAY U R S D AY

M AY THESE | SAVE M AY DATES 3 R3DR D | |

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T H U R S D AY | JUNE 7TH | 2018 T H U R S DJoin AYour member | galleries J U Nthroughout E 7 Laguna T H Beach |

2018

2018 2018

2018 T H U R S D AY | JUNE 7TH | 2018 Ton H the U Rfirst S D AY | J U LY 5 T H | 2 Thursday of every month from 6 9 pm for an art-filled evening. T H U R S D AY | J U LY 5TH | 2018 0 1 8 T H U R S D AY

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T H U R S D AY 5 AT LHK . O R |G F I R S T T| H U R S JD U A LY Y S A R T W

2018

Joinmember our member galleries throughout Laguna Beach Beach Join our galleries throughout Join our member galleries throughout LagunaLaguna Beach

on the first Thursday of every month from 6 - 9 pm for an art-filled evening.

on the first member Thursday of every month from 6 - 9 pm for an art-filled evening. Join our throughout on the first Thursday of everygalleries month from 6 - 9 pmLaguna for an Beach art-filled eveni F I R S T T H U R S D A Y S A R T W A L K . O R G F I R S T T H U R S D A Y S A R T W A L K . O R G

on the first Thursday of every month from 6 - 9 pm for an art-filled even F I R S T T H U R S D A Y S A R T W A L K . O R G F I R S T T H U R S D A Y S A R T W A L K . O R G

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Fine Art Gallery open daily 10am-4pm Paintings • Ceramics • Sculpture • Photography • Jewelry Classes for all levels

(949) 922-5350 • Festival of Arts 2018 www.antjecampbell.com

Supporting art education in the Coachella Valley 550 North Palm Canyon Drive 760 323 7973 • www.desertartcenter.org

2018

“Family”

CALL FOR ART Attn: ARTISTS

Juried Art Exhibition with cash awards ELISABETH POLLNOW

ENTRY DEADLINE:

June 25, 2018 ART EXPO:

September 15-16, 2018 www.jtnparts.org

Art Exhibition, Artists’ Market, Demos, Music, Food 29 Palms Inn & 29 Palms Art Gallery

DOUG SHOEMAKER

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A R T M A R K E T PA L M S P R I N G S

Barbara Gothard

2017/2018 El Paseo Exhibition 18 sculptures between Portola Avenue and Highway 74 on El Paseo in Palm Desert

Tours as part of First Weekend and upon request.

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Fluttering Rainbow by Stephen Fairfield

Contemporary Artworks Entangled Series, New Media Digital Paintings barbaragothard.com

saatchiart.com/barbara.gothard

760-837-1664 • www.palmdesertart.org

Classes • Workshops • Exhibitions • Events • Gallery

Creating community enrichment through the arts CREATE Center for the Arts CreateCenterForTheArts.com | 760.834.8318 73733 Fred Waring Drive #106 Palm Desert, CA 92260 80

A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M gresto_apad.indd 1

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presents

SandScapes

whe re t ima he gin be a at ch ion me ets blo the sso gard ms en

Featuring sand sculptures by “Mr. Sand Castle”

Chris Crosson June 1-September 3 slgardens.org

2647 East Coast Highway Corona del Mar, CA 92625

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logotype JORDAN SCHNITZER

COMBINING ACADEMIC NEEDS WITH COMMUNITY C

JSMOAWSU 82

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JSMOAWSU, BRAND, CUBE LOGO

JSMOAWSU, SQUAR


WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF THE JORDAN SCHNITZER MUSEUM OF ART AT WSU APRIL 2018

Photo: Robert Hubner, Washington State University

Standing as a beacon for the arts, this crimson “jewel box” designed by internationally recognized architects Olson Kundig will serve over 25,000 students who attend the University in Pullman, Washington.

MUSEUM OF ART WSU

CONNECTIONS TO TRANSFORM THE REGIONAL ART EXPERIENCE

RE LOGO

JSMOAWSU (MAIN), SINGLE LINE LOG0 (WITH TAGLINE)

JORDAN SCHNITZER MUSEUM OF ART WSU JSMOAWSU, STACKED LOGO

Our sincerest thanks to Oregon philanthropist and businessman Jordan D. Schnitzer for his generous contribution. A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Palm Springs Art Patron May/June 2018  

Explore the Desert art scene in the Coachella Valley!

Palm Springs Art Patron May/June 2018  

Explore the Desert art scene in the Coachella Valley!