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Laguna Coast Rentals Coastal Sales - Luxury Rentals

Cynthia Ayers, Broker Direct: 949.494.0490 CynthiaAyers@cox.net Lic. 01070654

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50,000-$60,000/mo 15 Blue Lagoon, Laguna Beach $1,748,800 2419 S Coast • Laguna Beach • Ocean Front 2049 Ocean Way • Laguna Beach • 4BD/4BA e with panoramic, Neighboring the Montage Resort with sprawling ocean views. Turnkey 2 6,218 s.f. • 4BD/5BA + Ofc & Bonus • $20,000 mo 2536 SqFt • Ocean Front • $25,000 mo ome w/ complete Bdrm + 2 Bath villa at Blue Lagoon with Resort Amenities: Pool, tennis, beach lian Villa style. access. Fully furnished and ready for move-in or year-round INCOME.

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34371 Green Lantern • Dana Point • 2BD Turn-Key • Harbor Front • $5,000 mo D

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35325 Beach Road, Laguna Beach

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591 Dunnegan• North Laguna • Ocean View Contemporary • 2BD/2BA + Den • $10,000 mo

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30394 Via Estoril, Laguna Niguel

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992 Cliff Dr • Laguna Beach • 1BD/2BA 310Toes Lookout Dr. • 4BD/3BA • Ocean View 34300 Lantern Bay Dr Villa #110 • Pool • Tennis in the Sand living behind guarded gates on Beach Rd. 4 Bdrm single family panoramic views, large lush yard with pool, jacuzzi, House across st from beach •Perfect $4,500family mo oasis with Steps toand Harbor/Beach • Dana Point •bedrooms, $6,000 mo. home with spacious great room; 2 Bdrms outdoor living areas, garden infrared sauna. 5 spacious 3 Walk to Beach/Downtown • $9,000 mo on main floor. Parking for 5 vehicles. Great income generating property (at price ranges of $9,500-$12,500/mo).

4 A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M $3,700,000 30394 Via Estoril, Laguna Niguel

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484 Cliff Dr #9 North Laguna • Ocean Front 2BD/2BA • Lux Condo • 1136 SqFt $1,689,000

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PA S S I O N I N E V E R Y D E TA I L . A P R I VAT E R E S I D E N T I A L G O L F C O U R S E C O M M U N I T Y 800.551.5578

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PA L M D E S E R T, C A L I F O R N I A

W W W. B I G H O R N G O L F . C O M A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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SHEILA OLSEN GALLERY

“Emerald Bay Lake Tahoe” 48”x72” mixed media original

“Victoria Beach” 48”x72” oil original

784 S. Coast Hwy Laguna Beach ∙ 949-423-9990 olsensheila@yahoo.com ∙ www.sheilaolsen.com

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Page 24

HIGHLIGHTS

Page 38

Building an Art Collection The PEARLY GATES Collection

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Home Is Where the Art Is The Heartfelt Collection of TRACY & CHRIS KEYS

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FRUIT of the LOOM Nettie Peña Chronicles the Vibrant Story of Mayan Weaving

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The Gift of Being an Artist LAURETTA LOWELL’s Whimsical Assemblages

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TIM SHOCKLEY Organic Surrealism in the Desert

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LARRY HEMMERICH Renewing the Artistic Landscape

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SYNERGY in ACTION Emerging Artists Intersect at Joshua Tree Highlands Artists Residence

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VANCE BURKE A Visual Symphony

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16 ARTISTS TO KNOW in 2019 Dennis Buck Joshua Tree Highlands Artists Residence, Page 66 18

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RUTH MAYER FINE ART INC.

Ruth Mayer’s 60 year career as a professional artist has taken her to distant places on the globe, painting virtually hundreds of works. When not traveling and painting Ruth can be found in her California home studio or in Laguna Beach art gallery.

Laguna Beach

380 S Coast Hwy, Laguna Beach, CA 92651 • (949) 494-8185

www.ruthmayer.com artist@ruthmayer.com

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P UB L I S H E R

BRUCE DODD (760) 898-7623 Bruce@ArtPatronMagazine.com E DI TO R I N C H I E F

CHRISTINE DODD Christine@ArtPatronMagazine.com A SSI STA N T E DI TOR

Grove Koger

Grove@ArtPatronMagazine.com A RT DI R E CTOR

Christine Dodd Christine@ArtPatronMagazine.com DI R E CTOR OF P H OTOGR A P H Y

Tom Lamb

Tom@ArtPatronMagazine.com CON TR I BU TOR S

Louisa Castrodale Bruce Dodd Christine Dodd Liz Goldner Barbara Gothard Grove Koger Tom Lamb Bernard Leibov Michael McCall Pam Price Judy Sklar Denise Tanguay Catherine Tramell DI R E CTOR OF OP E R ATI ON S

Russell Wong

Russell@ArtPatronMagazine.com DI R E CTOR OF BU SI N E SS DE VE LOP M E N T

Darian Chambers

Darian@ArtPatronMagazine.com A DVE RTI SI N G DI R E CTOR

Christine Dodd

Christine@ArtPatronMagazine.com

www.ArtPatronMagazine.com

For Advertising and Editorial Information: 333 E Amado #1904, Palm Springs, CA 92263 or email info@ArtPatronMagazine.com The opinions expressed by writers and contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Laguna Beach Art Patron Magazine and Palm Springs Art Patron Magazine are published six times a year by Laguna Beach Art Magazine, LLC

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ART STOP

NOAH PURIFOY and his Outdoor Desert Art Museum

A key figure in assemblage art, Southern Californian art history and the chronicling of the AfricanAmerican experience, Noah Purifoy was born in 1917 in Snow Hill, Alabama, where his family lived in the atmosphere of the Jim Crow South.

Graduating with a degree in teaching, he served in the Navy during the Second World War as a carpenter’s mate and went on to earn a graduate degree in social services administration. These elements are useful in understanding the trajectory of Purifoy’s art practice as it emerged in the 1950s and ‘60s. Purifoy lived briefly in Cleveland, Ohio, after receiving his graduate degree, but then moved even further from the South, to Los Angeles, in 1950. Three years later he became the first African American to enroll in Chouinard Art Institute, the predecessor of the California Institute of the Arts, and graduated with a BFA in 1956. His pedagogical

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and social work background came into play in his roles as a founding director of the Watts Art Center and as a founding member of the California Arts Council, in the latter of which he was instrumental in creating art in the schools and art in prisons programs. While always operating from a social conscience, Purifoy found himself radicalized by the Watts riots of 1965. He became an organizing member of an exhibition of protest art, 66 Signs of Neon, that was constructed from the debris of the riots and that traveled widely to educational institutions. Purifoy’s own piece, Shelter, was a sizable installation and may have heralded his move to the desert, an environment in which he could build at scale. Following stints teaching art and a return to social work, Purifoy took up an invitation from his friend, artist Deborah Brewer, to move to Joshua Tree in 1989 at the age of 72. From 1989 until his death in 2004, he created a series of assemblage/ environmental works made of found objects, an array scattered over 7.5 acres that continues to move and inspire viewers. In his vast desert studio, Purifoy experimented with concepts of sculpture within sculpture and developed his interest in the effects of the weather on the works. Some of the pieces are quite didactic, particularly on the topic of race, but most are open to a variety of readings, including critiques of consumerism and the sociopolitical establishment. Purifoy is sometimes depicted as an outsider artist—a characterization that, given his background and experience, is obviously untrue as well as tinged with racial prejudice. Nods to artists such as Mondrian, Nevelson, Picasso, Heizer and Smithson can be found in what is now the Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum. I also see a parallel between Purifoy and Donald Judd, both of whom headed into the desert to make the work they wanted to make, away from the noise of the art market and primarily for their own benefit, leaving testaments to what the human spirit can create. Today, no visit to Joshua Tree is complete without a pilgrimage to the museum for an education and a dose of inspiration. Note: Tours of the Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum are conducted only by the Noah Purifoy Foundation and are therefore not part of Joshua Tree Cultural Expeditions mentioned below. Directions: Take Sunburst Ave. north from Hwy. 62, turn right on Golden St., left on Border Ave., right at Aberdeen Dr. and left again where the pavement runs out. Proceed a short way to Blair Ln. and make a right onto Blair to park in designated parking spots. Please note that a short portion of the final leg is on dirt road. Bernard Leibov is Founder/Director of BoxoPROJECTS, a residency and programming initiative in Joshua Tree, and co-founder of the Joshua Treenial, a weekend of installations, performance and community-building that celebrates the area. Bernard also gives guided tours of the local cultural highlights through Joshua Tree Cultural Expeditions (jtculturalexpeditions.com). Prior to coming to Joshua Tree in 2011, he was Deputy Director of the Judd Foundation and exhibited artists from Joshua Tree in New York City. A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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ART ED

Coordinating Arts for

KIDS

Pacific Symphony Expanding Coachella Valley Offerings written by Catherine Tramell

Palm Springs Unified School District (PSUSD) Arts Coordinator Louisa Castrodale sees a side of the Coachella Valley that others don’t. “Most people don’t understand the high poverty level that students in our Valley face,” Castrodale says. “We have wonderful band directors, but there is most definitely a need for supplemental instruction for music students in the form of lessons.” A new regional partnership between the internationally renowned Pacific Symphony of Orange County and the Palm Springs Friends of Philharmonic (PSFP) could help Castrodale bridge that gap for her students. Over the last year, the PSFP Board has been in talks with the Symphony about exciting new opportunities for expansion in the Coachella Valley, including a symphony-inresidence educational program with the school district. “The Friends are collaborating with us on a plan in the coming year for our musicians to participate in several residencies, mostly in the PSUSD to begin with,” explains Pacific Symphony President John Forsyte. “It includes our musicians coaching young instrumentalists, teaching master classes with gifted students, establishing peer mentorship and building the strength of these young musicians.” The year 2018 has been a whirlwind for the internationally renowned Costa Mesa-based Pacific Symphony, which has been celebrating its 40th anniversary season. Catapulted by a final stop in Palm Desert, the Symphony embarked on its first trip to China in May, performing five concerts during a ten-day tour. Recent European tours have also received glowing accolades and critical acclaim. In June, the orchestra made its television debut on PBS’s “Great Performances,” a first-of-its-kind national-level exposure for the Symphony. And it continues to hold an annual performance with the PSFP (scheduled in 2019 for January 30 at the McCallum Theatre in Palm Desert), that is consistently well-received and attended. As the Symphony’s acclaim continues to grow, so do its educational outreach and community engagement programs. When the Symphony approached the Friends board last spring about expanding their offerings to the area, PSFP Board Member Dean Kauffman was thrilled. “I’m very excited about it,” Kauffman says. “They made a number of proposals to us and we decided to underwrite their activity with the schools. I think that’s a good first step.” “How often do you get world-class musicians coming into the classroom and working with an instrumental band or orchestra?” Forsyte asks, referring to the Symphony’s partnership with PSUSD. “It shows them what hard work can accomplish.” Palm Springs Friends of Philharmonic 2019 Series, Pacific Symphony, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, 7:30 pm Tickets: Call (760) 341-1013

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NETTIE PENA PHOTOGRAPHY Guatemala

nettie-pena.pixels.com nettiepenaphotography@gmail.com • (760)264-3522

Guatemala I Italy I Hawaii I Utah I Palm Springs I Joshua TreeA RNational T P A T R O N M A G APark Z I N E . C O M 27


k Lewis robert Fine Art Paintings

“Young Lady in Winter Coat” 18”x 36” Oil on Canvas

Lady Lead and Boys Arts Mentoring How a Pair of Arts Programs are Inspiring Students written by Louisa Castrodale

310.435.9731

studio@k-lewis-robert.com We are blessed in the Palm Springs Unified School District to have a wide range of wonderful partners helping us provide quality arts education. For instance, we offer Alternative Education students a series of classes we call Art with Heart, featuring the talented Meridy Volz and Luiz Castro, and have presented other artists in residence over the past twelve years. Three years ago Sarah Scheideman and I developed another exciting art initiative, Lady Lead, in response to reports from principals that girls in middle school were struggling with such issues as peer pressure, body image, social media abuse and low self-esteem. This program focused on promoting “girl power” and used community art tables as a platform to bring girls together. The response to Lady Lead was phenomenal. Although we planned for 45 participants at most, 175 girls took part in the program’s first round! We had set out stickers and pins with positive quotations, water bottles, and movie and book lists at the tables, and we marveled at the warm atmosphere that enveloped this all-female environment. The girls made lovely connections among themselves as well as with the woman waiting to teach them. We were making a new world of art experiences available, and it was clear that they were sorely needed. Besides such events in the schools themselves, we also set up podcasts featuring local women leaders, as well as sites on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. During the time I spent working with girls, boys often asked me what kind of arts programs I could give them. At first, the question stumped me, I suppose because I had been so focused on launching Lady Lead. But after two years of success, I felt ready to put together a companion program. Several factors prompted me to move forward last year. 28

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NEW WORKS FEBRUARY 2, 2019 Ted Casablanca Gallery is now a working-studio gallery

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY bbibby@tedcasablanca.com

310-291-7679

First of all, I was concerned about our disproportionate rates of suspension and expulsion of boys of color. (This is a problem, of course, for schools nationwide.) Second, I started paying more attention to the challenges the black community faces. Finally, I had the honor of hearing two speakers at the 2018 California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) conference—Dolores Huerta on human dignity and Enid Lee on the “school-to-prison pipeline.” As a result, I felt compelled to create another specialized arts program. My supervisor, Dr. Mike Swize, proposed a name for the program right away—Boys Arts Mentoring, or BAM—and I decided to use it. Next, I asked Luis Fausto, who had created our Lady Lead logo, to design another one, a bold, masculine logo to give the new program an identity. Then I asked Will Carr, our Director of Technology, to create a website, and a team of three of his men under the lead of Pedro Palomares did a brilliant job for us. We soon filled the site with resources, which I had been avidly studying and collecting, and profiles of many of the men of color who I am privileged to know in our community. The last step was to bring together a team of artists, as we had done with Lady Lead. The group included Tysen Knight, who would work with visual art; Josiah Ihem, with breakdance; A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Diane Kline Art dianeklineart.com

“I want people to feel an emotional response, to be drawn into the painting by the movement of color and design and to feel a connection in their soul.”

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Michael Cuevas, with spoken word; Chari Godakanda, with photography; and Ray Lindsey, with world drum. Each of these artists is a kind and lovely presence and was chosen as much for his potential to be a mentor and role model as for his talent. We began BAM this year at Desert Springs Middle School, where we focused on 20 6th grade boys from each middle school site, for a total of 120. We spent an hour and a half with them as they rotated through the various stations of art making, then wrapped up with a worksheet dealing with identity, passions and goal setting. Students received journals that would allow them to keep working with the ideas presented during the meetings. Each session concluded with a cypher in which the group formed a circle and the boys took turns dancing in and out as the rest of the group cheered him on. I cried tears of joy as I watched our first cypher, for the pure excitement on the boys’ faces as well as for the masculine energy that the activity generated. It is indeed time well spent when we meet and connect with boys as they begin their middle school years. Our goals are to offer positive male role modeling, give engaging and motivating activities, and create bonds and aspirations that will serve the students well into the future. Based on the response thus far, there is talk of creating a second BAM team to work with the boys as 7th graders. As they run parallel in our schools, Lady Lead and Boys Arts Mentoring are truly influencing each other, and the lessons learned in each will shape the other. They are extraordinary examples of the power of arts—the power to bend around corners and reach into the hearts and minds of students in ways that other means cannot. Our aim is to empower and uplift with the arts as our vehicle. We are helping girls and boys to realize how precious and valuable they are and to recognize the many ways they can succeed. We are providing hope and an orientation of the spirit everywhere we go. I am so grateful that PSUSD has a team of artists who care so much for young people and their futures, as they bring their brilliance to bear on local education.


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19 AY ‘ M TW ‘18 R FIRS E ON RATI EMB B V E L O N PS CE N HO IDAY ‘ L G O WIN 18 H .19 S 12.7. 2 . 2 T VAL AL REE RK ESTI 8 ST STIV F 1 E E PA . F R 2 H . E L T L 11 W IN WE LO ERTS LIVE ILDF C 9 W 1 N . 9 O 5 1. 9C 3. 2 . 1 5.2.1 X T : ESER D FOR 9 NS 1 . T 6 R . 4 TISA SE ND EEKE

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ART EVENT

ART PALM SPRINGS Opens February 14, 2019

Art Palm Springs has delighted art patrons for the past seven years. The 2018 edition was one of the most successful in the art fair’s history. This year galleries from around the world are preparing to impress. 32

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Nancy Hoffman Gallery will feature Joan Bankemper, Joseph Raffael, Hung Liu, and Nicolas Africano, among others. Learn more at NancyHoffmanGallery.com. Joan Bankemper Pimlico, 2018 (back) ceramic 41 1/2 x 37 x 10 inches


Among others, Hohmann Gallery will feature two artists that have major public installations in downtown Palm Springs. Julian Voss-Andreae with “Isabelle” (shown above with Clean) and David Cerny with the “Palm Springs Babies.” Hohmann will also be featuring Roger Reutimann (shown below with Uovum, latin for egg, symbolizes the beginning of mankind). Learn more at HohmannFineArt.com.

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Art Palm Springs has announced that it will honor Charles Arnoldi as its Artist of the Year. A nationally renowned painter and sculptor based in Los Angeles, Arnoldi is one of Southern California’s most prominent contemporary artists. Throughout his long career he has been fascinated with shape and pattern as they apply to advanced formal concerns, from his 1970s paintings involving natural forms to his current geometric work. Arnoldi will be represented by Charlotte Jackson Fine Art of Santa Fe. Art Palm Springs will also honor Marilyn Pearl Loesberg as Arts Patron of the Year. A graduate of Columbia University, where she also earned a Master’s degree, Loesberg opened her first gallery, the Marilyn Pearl Gallery, in New York City. She had actually begun collecting a few years before, but it was only after she closed the gallery that she began concentrating on her collection. She has been on the Board of the Palm Springs museum for 10 years and is Chair of the Collections Committee. In addition, she is the Director of the Clinton Hill Foundation, which awards grants to museums for special exhibits relating to the art and artistic concerns of Clinton Hill. Opening Night Preview Thursday, February 14 | 5-9 pm VIP Ticket Holders Only A benefit for The Palm Springs Art Museum General Admission Friday, February 15 | 11-7 pm Saturday, February 16 | 11-7 pm Sunday, February 17 | 11-6 pm Monday, February 18 | 12-5 pm

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Nancy Hoffman Gallery, Nicolas Africano Untitled 2009/10, cast glass 20 1/2 x 7 1/2 x 7 inches


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Come visit us in Newport Beach

ETHOS CONTEMPORARY ART 3405 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach, CA 92663 949 791 8917

ETHOSCONTEMPORARYART.COM ______________________________ Call ahead for free VIP parking. Located in the first block of the Balboa Peninsula across from the new Lido House hotel. 36

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ART EXHIBIT

Building an Art Collection written by Michael McCall

N

ewly arrived in our nation’s capital in 1978, I quickly found my life’s trajectory shaped by a fortunate meeting with famed art curator Walter Hopps. The meeting occurred during an event Hopps held at the Museum of Temporary Art on G Street NW, where he stood at the door and received any and all artwork presented to him for the duration of 36 Hours. He was fishing for new artists. That evening, our three-decade-long friendship commenced, and for me, an initiation into the machinations of the art world began. Mysterious and infamously known for showing up late or simply disappearing, Hopps died in 2005, but he remains present in my life. Four years ago, I was handed a brown paper bag of envelopes containing bank notes and coins from Europe. The bag had been owned by Hopps, and the money inside had become worthless after 2002 when the euro became the new legal tender of the European Union. Each envelope was inscribed with Hopps’ handwriting detailing the country of origin. Evidently, he would exchange his US dollars in the country through which he was traveling while on assignment from the Menil Collection or the Guggenheim Museum. Although I admired the quality of the engraving on the bank notes, I wondered why I had possession of them. The reason became clear through a series of events the following month, when an LA art dealer challenged me to take part in Basel Week in Miami. He offered me the opportunity to perform at the Aqua Art Fair, in the courtyard of the Aqua Hotel on Key Biscayne, suggesting that I trade my newly acquired bank notes to artists for their work. I accepted the challenge. To establish a backstory for this performance, I wrote a humorous piece partially based on a vision Walter shared with me just after his near-fatal aneurism in 1994. It involved his friend Ed Kienholz and the 1939 Packard automobile in which Kienholz had been buried earlier that year. In the vision, Kienholz drove up to Hopps standing on a sidewalk, opened the car door and told him to get in. Walter walked over to the car, slammed the door and told Ed, “I’m not done here yet.” Miraculously, he went on to live for another 11 years and curated some of his best shows. With his vision woven into my fictitious story, I detailed how God had hired Hopps to help build an art collection. It seems God has a really lousy one, thanks to being swindled by everyone over the centuries, and has realized that Hopps might be able to “go back down there” and find better art for the Halls of Heaven. Satisfied with my preposterous story, I next cleaned, pressed, photographed

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and stamped the bills “HOPPSMONEY.“ My goal was to approach this in the manner Hopps himself would curate an exhibition—by looking at everything in an equitable way, making deals and building the show. Coincidentally, the same evening the money was put into my hands, so were Hopps’ dress suits, one of which I had tailored as I prepared for Miami. My fantasy was to build a collection of contemporary art and eventually exhibit it while paying tribute to my friend. On the night of December 3, 2014, I drove to the Aqua Hotel, totally in character, wearing Hopps’ suit and carrying the briefcase with HOPPSMONEY. Four trades took place that night— three live and one conducted through a FaceTime iPhone process. That particular work had been delivered to the hotel by courier just prior to my performance. During those initial transactions, Hopps was at my side, watching every move— or so it seemed. This project asks artists and viewers to consider how we place value on things. Is it all about the money? And what is money? Is it just paper (backed by what?), or is it power and freedom? The big question for the artists involved is how they place value on their artwork, monetary or otherwise. I’m essentially asking them to participate in an event in which their reward is unknown. For the next few years after the Aqua Hotel performance, I invited many artists to be part of this project, completing trades with 50 individuals who accepted. On November 3, 2018, the world premiere of the Pearly Gates Collection was be presented to the public. The exhibition was held at the Yucca Valley Visual & Performing Arts Center. For more information visit hidesertculturalcenter.org A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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41801 Corporate Way #2 Palm Desert, CA 92260 760.674.8786 info@desertwolff.com

www.DesertWolff.com

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Jake Dent Gallery

featuring Mark Wade - Sculptor of Large Ceramic Sculpture & Vessels | Bill Anson - Sculpture Stanton Schmid - Contemporary Painter | Dean Dennis - Metal Work, Enamels on Copper

24th year at The Art Place! 41801 Corporate Way, Unit 4, Palm Desert, CA 92260 Jakedentgallery.com Sculpturemw@gmail.com (760) 776-8051

Turry Lindstrom Metal Art

Fine Metal Sculpture and Custom Fabricated Designs

The Art Place 41801 Corporate Way, Palm Desert, CA 92260 www.artplacepd.com/shops/turry-lindstrom-metal-art (423) 718-5432 A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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ART COLLECTION

Home Is Where the Art Is The Heartfelt Collection of Tracy & Chris Keys written by Liz Goldner photographed by Tom Lamb

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The pristine Laguna Beach home of Tracy and Chris Keys has the ambiance of an art gallery. From its polished wood floors to its cleanly painted walls, spare contemporary furnishings and effective lighting, their home is designed to display their diverse collection of paintings, photographs and sculptures. A number of the works have contemporary themes, from alienation to personal sorrow and racial discrimination. And while some were completed early in their careers by artists who went on to great success, others were painted or sculpted by lesser-known figures. Tracy began assembling their collection, which today numbers about 68 pieces, while working at the former Newport Harbor Art Museum (today the Orange County Museum of Art) as Membership Chairman in the early 1990s. Upon entering their home, Tracy points to the large oil painting Heaviness by L.A.-based Enrique Martínez Celaya. Showing two small birds that are unable to connect, it expresses humanity’s alienation, she explains, adding that Martínez Celaya is “the most important living artist in our collection.” One of Tracy’s favorite painters is Orange Countian Paul Bond, a longtime Festival of Arts exhibitor. The couple’s collection includes four humorous oils from Bond’s brush. Piglet’s First Beauty Pageant depicts a pig wearing a medal, Birthday Party features a cat on a pedestal wearing a party hat, Portrait of a 19th Century Industrialist shows another cat with a monocle, and The Emissaries features a dog. “Paul is all about magical realism,” Tracy says, adding that he is influenced by René Magritte. A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Above Chris and Tracy’s dining room table are two large expressive photographs of faces by young Argentinian Flavia Da Rin. The untitled images depict a young woman and a young man with a cat on his shoulder. “The artist digitally manipulates the images to express a vision of her world and to distort perceptions,” Tracy explains, “as others never see us the way we see ourselves.” Hanging in the kitchen is Kim Abeles’s image of one of the country’s recent Presidents, George Bush in 30 Days of Smog, created with smog on a glass plate. In the living room are two sculptures by Joe Brubaker. Captain Charles features a head reaching backwards with its face screaming, while Jacques has a more somber face, looking forward. Equally somber are the faces depicted in the oil Manet’s Olympia by Anna Baranda, who was 16 when she created it. The scene, which is copied from Édouard Manet’s original 19th century painting, shows a naked woman lying on a bed with a black servant behind her. Oscar Magallanes’s Alta California illustrates a more current aspect of racial discrimination. In this painting, a young Latino pushes a flag-draped cart past a wall dividing him from the more affluent world. Equally political is Sandow Birk’s large acrylic on Masonite, Mundaka, a comment on the Basque separatist group ETA in Spain. Deborah Davidson’s two oil paintings of empty chairs are part of her “Chair” series. 46

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“These works are about the artist facing her own mortality,” Tracy says. “In 1982, she was given six months to live after being diagnosed with malignant melanoma. But she is alive today and is still making stunning paintings.” The oldest work in the home is the 1961 black and white photograph Mirror Times Square, depicting a young woman in a crowded outdoor setting. It was taken by William Klein, “a self-exiled American who adopted Paris as his home,” Tracy points out. While many more significant artists, including Lucy Gaylord, Tom LaDuke, Oz Ortega, Olga Sinclair and Terry Turrell, are represented in Tracy and Chris’s collection, one is worth special mention. About William Pérez’s There Is Always a Place, Tracy explains, “The colored pencil on paper in a Plexiglas box is an exploration of home and belonging. The artist’s father had taken him to see colonial homes on the coast in Cuba, which were later demolished.” She adds that “William agreed to make one more heart piece for our friend who was dying of cancer. He was selecting the art for an auction to be held after his death. This is a very special piece to us.”


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ARTIST PROFILE

FRUIT of the LOOM Nettie Peña Chronicles the Vibrant Story of Mayan Weaving written by Catherine Tramell

Palm Springs photographer Nettie Peña’s love affair with Mayan weaving started in 2002, when a woman and her 5-year-old daughter making textiles on a small loom caught her eye in the Guatemalan village of San Juan. 50

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“I was amazed how this woman could create such beautiful textiles from that little loom,” Peña recalls. “I learned that she sat there for hours weaving, day after day, just like her ancestors had done over 2000 years ago. This was truly a labor of love and preservation of her culture.” That first glimpse of still-vibrant Mayan weaving culture never left Peña’s mind, and the urge to capture it is what finally brought her back to Guatemala in 2016. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Peña marveled at the world from a very young age—and wanted to capture what she saw. Her passion led her to UCLA, where she received her Master of Fine Arts. Her student films garnered acclaim and awards, and her photography captured many of music’s greats of the time, such as the Doors. “Jim Morrison and I were friends in film school. He was charismatic,” Peña says. “Jim asked me to come and take pictures at their first gig. I knew they would be important— that’s why I saved everything.” Peña’s Doors photos were recently released by the Doors Management, and she is planning an upcoming exhibition of them. But her catalogue has expanded far beyond rock and roll. After college, Peña’s film work for the Soka Gakkai International Buddhist organization opened her eyes and mind to the rich diversity of the world, prompting her to travel to Japan several times and to film in Mexico, Panama, Peru, Brazil, Puerto Rico and throughout the United States. Her latest series, “Mayan Women Weavers,” is an ongoing photographic essay that includes hundreds of photographs, each with as much depth and texture as the weavings created on their ancient looms. “The beauty and basic living style of the Mayans is to be admired,” Peña explains. “Each indigenous Mayan group has its own traditional story to tell. It’s like being in another century.” And so Peña set out to help tell that story through the power of her lens. In November of 2017, she visited the Guatemalan village of San Antonio to photograph its weavers. Intrigued by their attention to detail, Peña marveled at the importance of each stroke within the intended design. With no written instructions or diagrams on how to use the looms she saw in use, she sought to capture the Mayans’ weaving culture, as primal as an instinct and as distinctive to each community as a fingerprint. “All the patterns and designs are inside the minds of these Mayan women,” Peña says. “They grow their own cotton to produce the cotton threads. All the dyes come from home-grown plants, bark and flowers.” In January 2018 Peña returned to see if a master weaver in San Antonio she had been documenting in November had completed her piece. More than a textile, the weaving tells a story, she explains, and is now part of Peña’s collection. “What a story she had woven,” Peña continues—a silent one “that represents the universe, their history, their status, nature and family. What is amazing to me is how they can see all these patterns in their heads and everything comes out perfect.” 52

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Art Workshops in Laguna Beach

Painting classes led by LOCA and LPAPA artists Adults: January 19, February 2, March 11, April 1 Adults and Families: February 9, March 9, April 14, May 12 Check out our website for these and other workshops LOCAarts.org • loca@locaarts.org • (949 363-4700

Last June, the Volcán de Fuego erupted, killing over a hundred Mayans, leaving thousands homeless and covering San Antonio with ash. Peña plans to return in November to see how the weavers were affected and to continue her essay chronicling their work. “I called my Mayan contact who lives there,” Peña says. “He said they were in a massive cleanup mode. His voice sounded positive.” Though most of her career has been spent as a documentary filmmaker, Peña remains passionate about her still photography. It’s a quality that’s palpable in “Mayan Women Weavers,” with each photo telling a story as colorful and vibrant as the ancient tradition living on through the weaver’s looms. “We have so much to learn from these women about perseverance and never giving up,” Peña points out. “The series reflects on the past to make sense of the present.” Learn more about Nettie Peña’s work at nettie-pena.pixels.com

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ARTIST PROFILE

THE GIFT

of Being an Artist Lauretta Lowell’s Whimsical Assemblages written by Judy Nemer Sklar

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Wildly imaginative, passionately creative, intellectually curious … Throw in touches of fantasy and whimsy, and you have La Quinta-based assemblage artist Lauretta Lowell, a creative life force whose artistic success was not fully realized until after a plane crash, a head injury and a miraculous recovery. Lowell’s father was in the military, and his career took the family overseas, contributing to his daughter’s imaginative personality and her love of travel. She was raised in Japan, and that country’s beauty and vibrant imagery would be another early creative influence. She says she inherited her artistic spirit from her stay-at-home mother, who was an accomplished artist and fashion designer. “As a young girl, I knew I wanted to be an artist like my mother,” Lowell recalls, “but I never felt I had that gift.” What she did have, however, was a passion for treasure hunting and collecting unusual


“Desert Extremities” Oil on Canvas, 29”x39”, Paul Grimm, 1891-1974, Palm Springs, CA.

An Open Letter to All Art Lovers

Allan Pitchko Galleries is not your typical art gallery. What you will find here is a wide variety of museum quality pieces of fine art and antiques, all of the secondary market. From paintings to sculptures, glass and bronze, contemporary, art deco, art nouveau, victorian and beyond. Encompassing 12,000 sq. ft., this showroom is a visual adventure. The majority of our inventory comes from estates in Los Angeles and Beverly Hills. You will find many pieces from celebrities, the likes of Aaron & Candy Spelling, Larry Hagman, Carrol O’Conner, Ronald Reagan, Jane Wyman, and many more. One of a kind pieces that could be treasured for years to come. Do yourself a favor, come take a look. You don’t have to buy, just enjoy!

Allan Pitchko Galleries, one of the Desert’s Hidden treasures

objects, an obsession that would remain with her throughout her life. When Lowell was thirteen, the family moved to Hawaii, where the culture of folklore, spirituality and superstitions would profoundly influence her art and her personal life. It instilled within her empathy, a strong spiritual sensitivity, and an ability to sense the emotional and mental states of others. At twenty-six, Lowell moved to California and made Santa Barbara her home. She embarked upon a career in marketing that would take her to Mexico, Peru and the Channel Islands, and she immersed herself in the magic and mystery of these diverse cultures. But a plane accident a few years later would change the trajectory of her life. After taking off over the desert mountains, a private plane piloted by her husband and carrying Lowell and her son as passengers stalled in midair and dropped fifty feet. Fortunately, everyone survived, but Lowell had hit her head and sustained severe nerve damage to her face. Over the next several years, Lowell suffered challenging symptoms—the loss of cognitive abilities such as writing,

“Street Scene,” Oil on Canvas, 26” x 32,” Arbit Nicolai Blatas, 1908-1999 Provenance: Estate of Jane Wyman, Letter of Authenticity from Michael Reagan

Allan Pitchko Galleries

Open 11-5 Tuesday-Saturday 70125 Highway 111, Rancho Mirage, CA 92270

(760) 324-9595 APitchkoArtGalleries.com

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talking and understanding language, along with severe bouts of vertigo. Despite her search for the cause of these symptoms, it was not until she suffered several small strokes that a definitive diagnosis was made. Doctors discovered a slow-growing brain tumor in the same area where Lowell had hit her head. The tumor was inoperable, but after she underwent radiation therapy and extensive rehabilitation, her cognitive abilities improved and her vertigo subsided. Lowell describes her recovery as “dramatic,” adding that she felt as if her brain had shifted. “I had become a right brain thinker,” she explains, “and suddenly everything became a picture to me.” As her health progressed, Lowell returned to collecting oddities. She began making art, first collage and then assemblage art. On a visit to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, she was introduced to the work of Joseph Cornell (1903-1972), a self-taught artist and pioneer of assemblage. She felt an immediate connection to this selfdescribed magician and collector who combed through flea markets in search of unusual objects for his famous boxes. His pieces inspired her greatly, and with the constraints of her trauma behind her and with a new sense of freedom, Lowell committed to becoming an assemblage artist: “I felt like I was hit with a magic stick. It was the gift I had always wanted—the gift of being an artist!” The cupboards and shelves in Lowell’s La Quinta

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studio are lined with bottles and jars of assorted sizes, each containing unusual objects: metal workings, dolls’ heads and antique this’s and that’s. On her workbench are the welding equipment and other tools she uses in creating her art. Some works contain birds, a reference to her free spirit and an homage to Cornell, who was obsessed with them. Other pieces display attributes associated with magic and storytelling. Colorful and often humorous works-in-progress are placed here and there, and completed assemblages, which the artist calls “whimsical curiosities,” are ready for delivery to the galleries. Of all her pieces, the assemblage Bessy Mae Mucho means the most to her; it is a vibrant representation of a woman with a collage map of France on her thighs and a colorful heart in her hand. She is the world traveler, a woman whose exposed heart reveals her colorful personality; a woman who, after a long and difficult struggle, and with courage and determination, has finally found the ability to reveal herself. Lauretta Lowell has found her gift. Lauretta Lowell is represented by Coda Gallery in Palm Desert and the Vault Gallery in Cambria. You can visit her website at www.whimsicalcuriosities.com and read a full interview with her on the author’s website at www.artistsnarratives.com or www.judynemersklar.com.

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ARTIST PROFILE

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Artist Profile: TIM SHOCKLEY Organic Surrealism in the Desert written by Denise Tanguay

1063 North Palm Canyon Dr. Palm Springs www.readbrownhairsalon.com

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If you have cruised the luxurious shopping area of El Paseo Drive in Palm Desert, you may have noticed some intriguing artworks along the road. Every two years, artists can apply to install pieces there as part of the city’s public art program. Tim Shockley is one of these artists, and his sculpture Taming the Wild West II is on exhibit on El Paseo through November. But don’t worry if you haven’t seen it yet—you’ve got time. The city has purchased the piece for its permanent collection and will relocate it to the corner of Portola and Haystack roads near the Living Desert Reserve— one of Shockley’s favorite places and his hometown source of inspiration. Part of Shockley’s “Taming the Wild West” series, the sculpture features steel and powder-coated barbed wire tumbleweeds enclosed in large cages and stacked on top of each other. The tumbleweeds look organic, although they are completely (and very carefully) made by Shockley, who calls his work “organic surrealism.” The term, says the sculptor, “speaks to our mindset of trying to control nature, which finds a way to break free but we’re always trying to contain it. Putting tumbleweeds in a cage tweaks the idea of what a tumbleweed should be doing.” Shockley has always been influenced by organic creatures and surroundings. He grew up in Palm Desert and Laguna, in the latter of which he spent time with his grandfather smashing snails in the garden to keep them from devouring the plants. Later he immortalized the creatures in bronze as part of his “Small Reminders” series. “Growing up in the desert and near the ocean gives my work an organic infusion,” says Shockley, who is an expert at tweaking the perspective of ordinary objects. “My past knowledge and memories help me pose things into organic shapes.” Shockley’s most recent works have an organic surreal vibe while also paying homage to Andy Warhol. He has re-created one of those iconic Campbell’s Soup cans, but in this case it’s expired mushroom soup and cast-metal mushrooms are

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More information: www.CasaRomantica.org A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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bursting out of its seams. The first one he made sold fast and patrons are asking for more. Shockley is influenced by what he calls the “subtle surrealism” of artists René Magritte and Man Ray. He loves Marcel Duchamp’s work due to its timeless originality that is not mass produced. “My aim is to create art that withstands the test of time and trends,” he explains. “If I have a so-so idea, it’s not going to happen. But if I’ve never seen it, I’ll do it.” To create his barbed wire tumbleweeds, Shockley dons his goggles and gloves to manipulate the wire. He starts cutting it into little pieces, bending, welding, wrapping and winding them to make them look like an organic branch. “It required a vicious circle of thinking to figure out how to do it,” he says. The caged tumbleweed may become Shockley’s signature art concept—he’s developed a proposal to create a giant 30foot example for a company in Texas. At the same time he’s expanding on his “Taming the Wild West” and “Big Picture” series. He’s breaking out of his comfort zone and creating larger pieces for future public art installations. Taming the Wild West II was his fourth such installation. “I’ll do whatever it takes bring a good concept to fruition,” Shockley declares. “I never want to compromise the integrity of an idea due to lack of knowledge about materials or how to work with them. Once you start the idea, more ideas come.” Over the years, the sculptor has learned how to be an expert at woodworking, casting, welding and metalwork. And he’s not afraid to share ideas with other artists who are calling him with questions about his process. Tim Shockley is all about ideas. “The most exciting part of creating is stepping back and seeing that the idea that was strong in your mind has worked,” he says. “When it all comes together, it is such a satisfying feeling. I wish everyone could experience that.” Learn more about Tim Shockley at www.TimShockley.com. You can also see Shockley’s work at the inaugural Indio public art exhibition founded by the Indio Public Arts and Historic Preservation Commission. Shockley’s work can be seen in downtown Indio alongside Marnie Navarro, Delos Van Earl, Chris Sanchez, and Cathy Allen through April 29, 2019. 60

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ARTIST PROFILE

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LARRY HEMMERICH

Renewing the Artistic Landscape written by Denise Tanguay

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The premier art event in the leading destination and community of fine art galleries. SAVE THESE DATES THURSDAY | NOVEMBER 1ST | 2018

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Join our member galleries throughout Laguna Beach on the first Thursday of every month from 6 - 9 pm for an art-filled evening. F I R S T T H U R S D A Y S A R T W A L K . O R G

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Larry Hemmerich always knew that when he got closer to retirement, he would return to art. He had put his fine art education on the back burner after college to focus on making a living in advertising and sales. But luckily his work pace changed in 2013 and he moved to the desert to renew his life at age 62. As his recent exhibitions and sales make clear, he made the right choice to reinvest in his artistic talent. Now he lives in Palm Springs and has developed a following of patrons and peers who are enthusiastically embracing his desert landscape pastel drawings and paintings. “I have an art background, but didn’t take it seriously,” says Hemmerich, who is now a member of the California Art Club and Palm Springs Arts Council. “Over the last few years, it all fell into place. I got into the right universe and everything started to align.” The alignment Hemmerich is referring to began in December 2017 when he rented space in photographer Stephen Baumbach’s gallery and sold two pieces on opening night. After that, he launched the Larry Hemmerich Pastels Facebook page and immediately sold one more piece. “Selling three works in one month gave me lots of confidence!” Hemmerich exclaims. “In January 2018 I walked El Paseo Street in Palm Desert to research galleries where I could show my art and found D Gallery. I exhibited there from February through June and sold more work.” Hemmerich’s style and subject matter have earned him the right to be called a “desert artist.” He uses a rich palette of pastels to draw and “paint” landscapes that he has personally experienced while hiking in the Palm Springs area. He works from photographs taken on those hikes, which are usually off-trail and often dangerous. “When you look at my work, it isn’t broad landscapes,” Hemmerich points out. “Because of my hiking, I capture in my art what I see close-up. I want to share what I’ve seen in places that most people will never experience.” His work Rocks of Ages, a pastel drawing of boulders


intermixed with grasses, is one example of what Hemmerich experiences when he spends “so much time climbing over the rocks.” A similar landscape, Vortex Sunset, was recently shown at the Joshua Tree National Park (JTNP) art exhibition held at the 29 Palms Art Gallery in September. The work was one of 58 chosen from 310 submissions by 121 artists from across the desert, California and the U.S. It was Hemmerich’s first time competing in a juried show. Hemmerich spent some time in the national park after the JTNP exhibition and immediately began his latest piece, a 12”x9” pastel on canvas based on a photo of a rock formation he took while on a hike there. “My inspiration is always the desert,” he explains. Hemmerich also found inspiration this year at a plein air workshop that he attended in the Highland Springs Resort’s lavender fields in Beaumont. Although most of his works look as if he created them en plein air, he has actually worked primarily from photographs. “Experiencing plein air affected how I look at light and contrast,” Hemmerich recalls. “It forces you to see things differently.” He applied the technique to his Lost in Mecca Hills piece and says that it “made the painting much better as a result.” Currently, Hemmerich is applying to other juried art shows and working on three commissioned pieces, one of which is based on a palm tree landscape drawing he recently sold titled Fly Over. The inspiration for the work was a photo Hemmerich shot while looking up at the sky from a lounge chair in his backyard. It’s a common scene in Palm Springs—tall palms stretching up into a big sky punctuated with a distant airplane—but Hemmerich’s painting reveals how such a common scene can be a beautiful thing. Learn more about Larry Hemmerich and his work at www.larryhemmerich.com.

Trenz Gallery

www.trenzgallery.com

68845 Perez Raod, Suite H-15, Cathedral City, CA 92234 (760)202-8769 A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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ARTISTS RESIDENCE

Synergy in Action

Emerging Artists Intersect at Joshua Tree Highlands Artists Residence written by Barbara Gothard

Dennis Buck

Dennis Buck

Converging in Joshua Tree, four emerging artists from Germany, Maryland, North Carolina and Pennsylvania were faced with challenges and opportunities in this unfamiliar desert environment. Their task was to create artworks independently, then collaborate on developing a cohesive exhibit of their diverse output. Dennis Buck (visual artist), Emily Quinn (painter/photographer), Dimitri Staszewski (filmmaker/ photographer) and Chris Zickefoose (sculptor) were awarded seven-week residencies at Joshua Tree Highlands Artists Residence (JTHAR) during the summer of 2018. Their individual and collective experience would give them what art critic Henri Neuendorf describes as the benefits of a residency: time to reflect, to do research and/or produce work outside of their usual environments with potential long-term effects on both their art and their lives. Developing a unique theme that these artists could write about in a thoughtful manner was paramount, and this step became the catalyst for their collaboration. Equally important was determining how each of their specific genres would complement the others’ works in terms of the theme they chose—Optical Instruments. Buck kicked off the weekly potluck sessions at their respective Joshua Tree residences. Long conversations followed a formula of sharing updates on their work sessions, critiquing each other’s works, brainstorming exhibition titles, discussing art making and art history, and marketing and promoting their work. An unanticipated benefit of these sessions was the recognition that although each created works based on an interior “monologue,” the feedback from the other artists proved to be not only valuable but also resulted in changes to their individual works. Buck’s process involved collaborating with rabbits, the rain and, most profoundly, the heat of the sun (this last in stark contrast to his native Berlin), demonstrating how the elements affect a variety of fabrics and produce paintings without paint or brushes. His work focuses on the act of signing and dating— name, initial and year are the objects of the image. Numbers and letters are obscured into an abstraction of color, line and form. Displaying the power of the desert sun, H.M.2018 pays homage to Matisse’s late scissor cuts. UVresistant materials were cut and arranged on the textiles to allow the sun and rain to bleach the canvases. In his works, Buck observed the outcomes of transparency. The layering of vitreous and translucent 66

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Celebrating 40 Years of Wyland Galleries

Emily Quinn

materials allowed the image to exist within the painting rather than on its surface, shifting fluently between painting and sculpture. Quinn’s realistic oil paintings of domestic objects and spaces were inspired by the aesthetics, forms and concepts of Noah Purifoy’s sculptures at the Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum. Focused on domesticity, the objects, textures and compositions she chose are the result of her viewing Purifoy’s works. Like the older artist, she grew up in Alabama, uses found objects in her artistic practice, and believes art can be an effective vehicle for social change. Quinn’s feminism and concerns regarding women’s roles in the home lead her to paint the domestic sphere in order to elucidate certain psychoanalytic assumptions about female character. For her, a house is a fitting way to represent the psyche, because one’s home is an extension of oneself. No other type of building embodies such symbiotic association between occupant and object. Quinn critiques an overly glorified or sentimentalized view of the home using a muted color palette, dramatic perspective and an atmosphere of stillness and expectation. Her work displays a different side of the American experience than Purifoy’s, but she shares his interest in silence, whimsy and horror. Her paintings demonstrate how silence can be comforting in one moment but deafening in the next. Unbeknownst to the viewer, Quinn creates small dioramas with her found objects before she executes a work. She paints these white, exaggerating the shadows and creating an eerie atmosphere. For her, the interaction with the other JTHAR artists enabled her to move outside of her Southern conservative background to see her

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Chris Zickefoose

Ed Keesling Clayworks Pottery, Ceramic Murals, Scupture

Wholesale, Retail, Commission Yucca Valley, CA www.edsclayworks.com ededkeesling@aol.com 68

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Dimitri Staszewski

own work differently. Not surprisingly, her influences include Edward Hopper (as master of melancholy), Michael Borman and Stockholm-based Mamma Andersson (for her treatment of domestic space). She explains that she is inspired by a remark from a worker at the National Chloride Mine of America in the Mojave Desert community of Amboy: “This land here, people don’t stop. They just go through it.” Staszewski’s photos examine the order and chaos of the desert, a barren and fragile ecosystem in which humans nevertheless make their presence felt. He stepped away from the paths, trails and roads of the Morongo Basin to create images that preserve the feelings that this dystopian landscape elicits. A chloride mine, for instance, rips a seam through the Earth as visitors trample delicate desert plants. We associate palm tree with Hollywood, but Staszewski discovered that the process of growing these American symbols of success has been overlooked. Driving alongside the Salton Sea towards Slab City, he passed farms growing row after row of palms, revealing the trees as wholly manufactured symbols, while desert flowers burst forth regardless of who is watching. As an overlooked enclave of Southern California, the Morongo Basin is alive with a feeling of transformation, and preservation seems necessary. While tension exists and the future remains unclear, Staszewski’s images show a reverence for the ways in which the natural and human worlds exist as mirrors of each other, in effect paying homage to their collaborative efforts while acknowledging that drastic change may be on the way. Zickefoose’s work is closely aligned with and determined by his environment, and he utilizes materials that are readily available. His goal for his residency was to determine the ways in which a drastic change in environment, from Maryland to the California desert, would alter the methods and materials he uses. Intrigued by the abundance of life that persists in the desert, he found a transformation occurring, with aging homestead cabins demolished or renovated to accommodate a


Lily Lih-Ting Li Kostrzewa Artist

help support the “99-Sheep” project

www.lilykostrzewa.com 99-Sheep - magic (8) 36”h x 48” w

growing desire on the part of individuals to occupy the Joshua Tree area. Old roof tiles, support struts, siding, fence posts and other architectural debris pile up on such redeveloped properties. Zickefoose’s work encapsulates these fragments, paying homage to the past while also welcoming the future. Removed from their context and allowed to transcend themselves, these otherwise useless materials take on a metaphysical utility. The sculptor’s work challenge how we assign meaning and value to the physical world. In addition, Zickefoose’s work is deceiving. On first look, the viewer assumes that the objects are painted on the canvas, but upon closer examination, it’s apparent that the found objects are masterfully embedded in the canvas. In fact, the reverse sides of Zickefoose’s constructions are as striking as their fronts. According to the Guardian’s Matthew Caines, “No matter what they look like, at the heart of all artist-in-residence programs is a relationship between practitioner and venue … residencies can have huge benefits for both tenant and landlord.” Established in 2007, JTHAR awards artists the gifts of time and space. As Quinn points out, the result is an atmosphere that makes his work so much stronger, thanks to the collaboration of his fellow artists and the mentoring of JTHAR’s board members, many of whom are artists themselves. JTHAR’s goal of fostering creativity through opportunities for exploring, experimenting, reflecting, engaging and exchanging with the vibrant local artistic community is evident in the works that Quinn and her fellow artists have exhibited in Optical Instruments. “We establish spaces where inspiration happens on a daily basis,” points out JTHAR co-founder Frederick Fulmer. Its residents innovate while they change the cultural landscape, and their fresh approach in connecting with each other is evident in the ways in which they have continued to communicate regularly with each other after their residencies ended.

Barbara GOTHARD

Contemporary Surrealism: Digital and Oil Paintings

barbaragothard.com saatchiart.com/barbara.gothard #barbaragothardart gothardfineart@me.com Palm Springs, CA 832.993.0290

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ARTFUL DESIGN

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A Visual Symphony by Vance Burke Fabrics, Furnishings and Art Create this Classic Palm Springs Home written by Liz Goldner

Just as a conductor is well-versed in the many musical parts of a symphony, and as she or he unifies the entire orchestra, Vance Burke Design Inc., a Los Angeles/Palm Springs firm, orchestrates the design components of luxury homes. Burke and his collaborator and business partner Todd Peter create the furnishings, fashion the upholstery, incorporate color schemes, map out the floor plans, select rare art pieces and even work with the architecture. “Many people have a difficult time understanding what we do, as we create complete and unique environments,” Burke explains. This holistic approach is based in part on Burke’s educational background. He graduated from New York City’s Parsons School of Design with a degree in Environmental Design, having completed courses in art history, decorative arts, and interior and product design, all of which prepared him to undertake the broad range of projects that he engages in today. Early in his career, Burke took positions with the international firms Donghia Associates, Jed Johnson Associates and Parish Hadley, creating luxurious interior environments. He moved to Los Angeles in 1997 to work on his own, soon attracting high-end clients and teaming up with Peter. As the quieter member of the firm, Peter brings a background in fashion design and a refined sense of color, both of which he applies to their current projects. Discussing

Opposite Page: COURTYARD ENTRY The sculptural Bertoia Diamond Chair from 1952 features geometric lines which contrast a white lacquered rock table and a modern Italian resin “Totem” lamp. This Page: DESIGNER: Vance Burke ARCHITECT: Richard Harrison Circa 1962

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Opposite Page: MEDIA ROOM A Robert Kuo Drum table, Custom Pieced Cowhide Rug from Argentina Italian Resin Totem Lamp, Pillow Fabric: Vintage Verner Panton for Maharam COSMOS”, 2014, JAMES NARES, Orange Cashmere Throw: Pratesi Custom Upholstery by Vance Burke Design Inc., Yellow Mohair: Brunschwig and Fils KITCHEN Cabinets wire brushed white rift oak in Driftwood finish Oval Dining Table: Custom Vance Burke Design Inc. COURTYARD ENTRY Textural contrasts Rough Elephant Grey chiseled limestone walls and polished black and white terrazzo floors, Courtyard upholstery by David Sutherland This Page: LIVING ROOM “PLYMOUTH”, 2014, Mark Sheinkman, Oil and Graphite on Linen A pair of early 1960’s Martz Glazed Ceramic Lamps, Carrara Marble Cocktail Table by Pierre Charpin, Yellow and Black Ikat Pillow fabric by Dedar, available at Kneedler Faucher 72

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the Palm Springs residence featured in this article, he points out that “the interplay of textured walls within a neutral palette adds sophistication and interest to the main area of the home as well as the master suite. With the space having an abundance of natural light and gallery-sized walls, the client was enthusiastic to add art that was simultaneously peaceful and dynamic.” Burke conducts a tour of this classic mid-century modernist home, designed by architect Richard Harrison, built around 1962 and recently decorated by Vance Burke. “First,” he says, “we created the floor plan for this home with its slightly retro vibe. We also fashioned the upholstery and then sat in the furnishings many times to make sure that they are comfortable. “The courtyard entry,” he continues, “is a palette of surfaces, and features black and white terrazzo stone tiles, which we also used throughout the home.” One of the few pieces of furniture in the home not created by Burke and Peter is the classic 1952 Bertoia Diamond Chair in the entryway. The media and living rooms, Burke points out, contain upholstered furniture designed by the pair. The array includes modern-style yellow chairs and sofas with natural heathered fabric. The two also fashioned the coffee and end tables and many of the rugs scattered throughout the home. Even the kitchen has custom cabinetry designed by Vance Burke, along with a banquette that they covered with A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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Opposite Page: LIVING ROOM DETAIL A Salvador Dali Pate de Verre Sculpture by Daum and Italian Glass This Page: GUEST BEDROOM “HIGH ROLLER”, 2012 by Heidi Spector Red Lacquer stool from Robert Kuo Custom Upholstery Fabrics from Schumacher, Knoll, and Perrenial MASTER BEDROOM “PSALM EXAUDI DOMAINE”, 2009, Damien Hirst Cabinet - White Laquer and Rift Oak, Custom Vance Burke Design Inc.

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custom fabrics similar to those used throughout the home. Among the few pieces that the partners did not design are the carefully chosen lamps, some from the midtwentieth century, and the Argentine cowhide rug in the media room. Yet the Japanese vases wired as lamps in the master bedroom are their own concepts, and they created many of the bedroom linens as well. To select the art for the homes they decorate, Burke and Peter often visit art fairs and exhibitions in the United States and Europe, noting and photographing pieces that clients might enjoy. Cosmos, an abstract burnished red print, adorns one wall of the media room in this featured Palm Springs home, while a pâte de verre sculpture by Daum in the living room has a Salvador Dali profile. Other art pieces include the abstract multi-colored painting Heart above Head by Tim Bavington in the living room and the oil-and-graphite-on-linen painting Plymouth by Mark Sheinkman, a swirl of grays and whites evoking smoke. With many more custom-made and chosen treasures and its magnificent view of the mountains beyond, this elegant home is a large, flowing art installation. Add its subtly nuanced ambiance —created through the use of custom fabrics, carefully arranged lighting, harmonious placement of furnishings and accessories, and balanced use of colors—and the result is a Palm Springs home that is inviting to all and eminently livable for its owners. Learn more at vanceburke.com.

Reginald M. Pollack 1924-2001

Fantastic Tale, 1972 24x24, Oil on Panel

Memory, 1988/1996 24x24, Oil on Panel

The Ascension of the Golden Triangle, 1977 24x24, Oil on Panel

Included in prominent museums and private collections; including: Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vincent Price Gallery & Art Museum, Museum of Modem Art, and Palm Springs Art Museum. Oceans Restaurant in Cathedral City has 16 Reginald Pollack paintings on permanent display. Designworks Talent at 333 N. Palm Canyon Dr has seven paintings on permanent display.

www.reginaldpollackpainting.com • 760-320-1424

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ROBERT MERRITT

16

ARTISTS

to Know in 2019

WWW.ROCANVAS.COM

ROCANVAS1978@GMAIL.COM

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LINDA SCHROETER

REINDER OLDENBURGER

www.lindaschroeter.com ljsdesign1@mac.com

www.reinderoldenburger.com

contact@reinderoldenburger.com

Gallery Affiliation: Laguna Art Gallery

RON KINGSBURY

ImpressionisticArtist.com R6514@aol.com (781) 724-5764 A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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JEROME WRIGHT

ROXANNE ROSSI

JOHN TRINH

Flip-Flops, A New Coral Species

The Sea, 2018

Cityscape--Wired

jjjjh777@hotmail.com (717) 454-6095 Abstract, Figurative, Nudes, Sacred, Jazz, accepting commissions and portrait requests 78

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www.roxannerossi.com/ roxanne@roxannerossi.com

https://www.behance.net/JohnTrinh https://www.facebook.com/JohnTrinhArtwork/ https://www.facebook.com/AO30YRSLATER/ http://johntrinh18.wixsite.com/agentorangefilm/home


METIN TUTUN

MICHAEL PANETTA

metintutun.com

Ocean Earth Glass

Facebook metintutunart Instagram metintutun

Artist/Designer

WWW.OCEANEARTHGLASS.COM

MICHAEL@OCEANEARTHGLASS.COM 2955 Laguna Canyon Rd. Laguna Beach, CA 92651 (949) 874-8466

JUAN EMILIO CHECA QUEVEDO

Wabisabiconmojo@gmail.com

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JANET MULLER

CLAUDIA CAMPBELL

WWW.JANETMULLER.COM

WWW.CLOARTISTE.COM INFO@CLOARTISTE.COM


MEGHAN STARLING

meghanstarlingart.com meghan_starling

KIM MANFREDI

www.kimmanfredi.com

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Celebrating 5 years in business with current

SALVADOR DALI exhibit at Elena Bulatova Fine Art galleries. For details and directions call 844-Elena-00

Welcome to the colorful world of Elena Bulatova Fine Art! It is a known fact that exceptional art dealers must be intelligent, knowledgeable, intuitive, educated, and business oriented - and that’s just scratching the surface. As artists themselves, art dealers, and gallerists, Elena Bulatova and Efi Mashiah fit the role on all accounts. After building a chain of art galleries on the west coast they are expanding now to Sarasota, Florida. Elena Bulatova is well recognized around the worked for her bright melting lollipops and popsicles series and colorful abstracts. Efi Mashiah is making amazing 3D screw art and brush paintings. Creating paintings and sculptures, exhibiting and helping collectors to find their favorite pieces is the biggest passion of Elena and Efi. Visit their galleries, Elena Bulatova Fine Art in Las Vegas, Laguna Beach, Palm Springs,or Palm Desert and your will fall in love with art!

Laguna Beach - Las Vegas Palm Desert - Palm Springs - Saratoga

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www.ElenaBulatovaFineArt.com or call 844-Elena-00 A R T PAT R O N M A G A Z I N E . C O M

Profile for Art Patron Magazine

Palm Springs Art Patron Winter 2019