Issuu on Google+

Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

    Essay One  CCDN371  Anne Galloway  21 March 2011 


Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

Which three cultural values do you see having the greatest impact on  professional design today? (Do you agree with them? Why or why not?)  What cultural values inform your personal design ethos?    The three cultural values I see having the greatest impact on professional design  today are modernization, high technology and consumption.   I believe that modernization, technology and consumerism are all important  values for design and society. To support this argument I will discuss the role of  the designer and their efforts to uphold these values most important within the  realm of professional design. I will describe the positive effects of designed  technologies on global culture. I will also highlight the unique difficulty created  by the professional design process to solve problems without creating new  problems. I will finish by discussing these values and their importance to my  own design ethos.   I believe that modernization is a constant influence on professional design as it  strives to prevent “cultural stagnation” (Wylant, 2010). To achieve this  professional designers create new objects and experiences that confront  traditionalism (ibid.). Design and its “wilful drive to create, in spite of any  oppositional condition” (ibid.) provokes consumer activity and cultural diversity  as a bi‐product of the innovation process (Anne Balsamo, 2010). Fashion is a  good example of design modernization and its ability to create diverse cultures  through its constant aesthetic evolution. The professional designer achieves this  by thinking solely about the object rather than its relationship to the world  (Gasparski, 2003). However, this ambitious design process often draws criticism  for being socially irresponsible and not considering the “well‐being of  people(Redstrom, 2006).  For the most part I disagree with these critics because  most of the time new products are just replacing older ones in a new form such 


Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

as pre‐packaged frozen vegetables. This criticism can be more extreme when  introducing products with no known practical use such as television that will  later become commonplace our everyday lives (Pantzar, 1997).  For these reasons I believe modernization is very important for the future of  both professional design and society yet, must be applied sparingly.   Technology is another factor that impacts professional design today and works  hand in hand with modernism. Technology often acts as a link between a  designers ideas and their reality (Balsamo, 2010). The potential of new  technology is often only discovered once it is in product form (Pantzar, 2000)  “Designers work the scene of technological emergence; they hack the present to  create the conditions of the future” (Balsamo). The role of the professional  designer is often to domesticate innovative technology for use in society.  Professional designers take new technologies and make them recognizable and  understandable yet different from what already exists (Balsamo). An example of  this is the microwave oven; the product is technology is made to look similar to a  regular oven yet is far more efficient. The design of technology plays an  important part in the modernization of society by enabling things like global  communication and trade. However, the very concept of modernization is self  destructive as demonstrated by the rapid rate in which consumer electronics are  surpassed by new models (Wylant, 2010). Whilst companies might think this is  great for their profit it is creating a new challenge for designers in the form of  electronic waste or E‐waste (The Cradle to Cradle Portal website, 2011). I believe  this challenge creates new opportunities for amateur designers to repurpose 


Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

these old technologies gaining vital experience for becoming professional  designers (Cross, 2004).  Another major impact on professional design is consumerism. The professional  designer not only designs new objects and experiences they foster relationships  between their commodities and the consumer (Pantzar, 2000). The novelty of a  new product or experience is usually enough to spark this relationship for  instance the Apple iPad. But, over time this novelty wears off and the user  becomes more critical of a products function and reliability. A good product must  then perform to the expectations of its user to avoid them questioning their  dependency and subsequent lifestyle the product has fashioned (ibid.). The  balance of this novelty and functional dependence is an important design factor  for this creates a socio‐cultural atmosphere that also serves as the products  lifecycle (ibid.). As the products of design evolve so do their consumers; their  wants and needs are constantly changing. The professional designer therefore  must be an expert of “consumer configuration” (Pantzar) in order to produce  successful innovations (Pantzar). Effectively a professional designer creates “new  uses and new users”(ibid.) by ignoring existing consumers to create new needs  and a reason to make future of objects and experiences. However, this area of the  professional design process receiving growing criticism for being market‐ centered as opposed to user‐centered. This criticism is exposing the gaps in the  professional designers identity and their purpose in today’s society. A common  professional designed object known as the sports utility vehicle or SUV is an  example of design creating a new user and subsequent culture. This culture is  known as the ‘school run’ and involves the collection and transportation of 


Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

children to and from their school. Yet, some people question the need and  function of the large SUV for such task in a dense urban environment. This  demonstrates the complex relationship design has with the consumer and its  impact on society. I think it would be beneficial to professional design to be  flexible from the constraints of the commercial market in order to discover a  better purpose than generating profit for brands and companies (Ilstedt Hjelm, 2005).     Whilst I agree with these cultural values being the greatest impact on  professional design today I think it is important to question the extent to which  they are used within design. I believe it is important for designers to use these  values in moderation to prevent the isolation of design from society. Design to  me should be a benefit not a burden to society for example E‐waste a bi‐product  of technological innovation. However, problems such as E‐waste could be unique  to design due to the design process itself (Cross, 2004). This is because expert  designers often try to define problems with iterative solutions rather than first  understanding the problem fully (Ibid.). In society this process is represented by  many variations of the same product that all have a common goal for example  the household vacuum cleaner. Designers created vacuum cleaners to help create  a cleaner home environment. But, does the vacuum cleaner really solve the  problem? If so, why the need for additional filters and brushes for the removal of  pet hair and other allergens? This indicates a potential oversight into the  exploration and definition of the original problem.   In conclusion I have discussed the impact of modernization, technology and 


Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

consumerism on professional design today. I to achieve this I described their  mostly positive effects on society and culture. I have also talked about some of  the unique problems that face the professional designer such as their design  process and role in society. I also described my personal design ethos and its  shared values and areas in which I believe professional design needs to define or  be changed.    


Matthew McCallum CCDN371 

 

Bibliography  Balsamo, A. (2010). Design. !International Journal of Learning and Media , 1 (4), 1‐ 10.  Cross, N. (2004). Expertise in design: an overview. Design Studies , 25 (5), 427‐ 441.  Gasparski, W. W. (2003). Designer’s responsibility: methodological and ethical  dimensions. Design e­ducation: Connecting the Real and the Virtual , 12 (6), 635‐ 640.  Ilstedt Hjelm, S. (2005). Visualizing the Vague: Invisible Computers in  Contemporary Design. Design Issues , 21 (2), 71‐78.  Pantzar, M. (1997). Domestication of Everyday Life Technology: Dynamic Views  on the Social Histories ofArtifacts. Design Issues , 13 (3), 52‐65.  Pantzar, M. (2000). Consumption as Work, Play, and Art: Representation of the  Consumer in Future Scenarios. Design Issues , 16 (3), 3‐4.  Redstrom, J. (2006). Towards user design? On the shift from object to user as the  subject of design. Design Studies, , 27 (2), 123‐139.  The Cradle to Cradle Portal website. (2011, February 19). EPA E­Waste Bust;  Responsibility, Design and Laws To Blame. Retrieved March 16, 2011, from The  Cradle to Cradle Portal: http://www.c2cportal.net/2011/02/epa‐e‐waste‐bust‐ responsibility‐design.html  Wylant, B. (2010). Design Thinking and the Question of Modernity. The Design  Journal , 13 (2), 217‐231.   


The impact of cultural values on professional design today