Page 1

f17 PORTFOLIO

[Lawson Spencer]//fall_17

edition: greyscale

...a collection of architecturally inspired pieces as of 2017.

CO NT E N T p_02

e

device

performance the flour sifter is reinterpreted as device emulates similar praxis p_10

field [] alley way is realized through the utilization of the moirĂŠ effect

p_12

buildAid a response to the non-nuclear WW3 as cities recover in a unified restructuring

p_16

denverCinema.center opposing theaters demonstrate possible social developments

p_24

ovum/avum explores sheet model folding techniques through the guller pouch and subcutaneous air sacs of the pelican

p_30

typology_BANK banking typology is challenged as the project becomes the derivative of the social situation

p_38

induciveDevices searches and maps devices in the Lubbock downtown region that invoke interaction

p_42

RESUME & CONTACT

end

back

Cover Letter


e

device //oscillation's nest study: course: professor: program: size:

/DIAGNOSTIC + MAPS: Oscillation’s Nest is a device that is the resulting construct (fig. 01a.09) from a systematized patterning of liquid interaction which is initiated by their passage through the flour a sifter (fig. 01a.01-03), a kitchen devices used to remove clumps from flour. Each liquid (ink, soap, and wax) has its own viscosity which is made explicit as the liquids interact with each other and the paper. The spatial patterning of the liquid as it hits the paper in the diagnostic (fig. 01a.04) is understood as four territories with the final territory being the terminus. The final territory was analyzed in the mapping studies (fig. 01a.05, 06, 07) with the three territories, but was excluded from the diagrammatic modeling process because final territory was perpendicular to the poor rather than parallel. This resulted in a field whose generation was nearly alien to the field occupied by the prior territories. The three territories studied were in parallel position to the direction of the pour. The synthesis map (fig. 01a.08) is a hybrid of the three previous maps where the informations of matter, substrate, and tempo are synthesized together through a graphic hierarchy which constructs a two dimensional position for the diagrammatic process to react to.

Diagnostic Mapping ARCH 2502 Mari Michael Glassell Flour Sifter + Matter 049.72803" Flour is inserted into the flour bin

HANDLE

TOP RIM

5⁄16” SIFTING SCREEN

TOP RIM

4 5⁄16”

STEEL AGITATOR

steel rod that passes along the sifting screen to mill objects through the apertures

SCREEN CLAMP

3 15⁄16”

SCREEN CLAMP

securely holds the sifting screen in place

1 1⁄8”

FLOUR BIN

SIFTING SCREEN

handle is welded to the flour bin

1 5⁄8”

HANDLE

CRANK HANDLE

1 9⁄16”

tightly woven strands of steel

1⁄8”

TOP RIM

5⁄16”

rolled metal

1⁄4”

1⁄8”

BOTTOM RIM

rolled metal

1⁄2”

7⁄16” AMOUNT MARKERS

15⁄16”

corrugated aluminum to prevent denting

steel agitator is welded to the floor bin

FLOUR BIN

AMOUNT MARKERS

cylindrical in shape and holds the flour

corrugated aluminum to prevent denting

5 3⁄4”

1⁄16”

1”

6” 3⁄16”

5”

4 3⁄8”

3 1⁄8” 3 5⁄8”

CRANK LEVER

2 1⁄2”

3⁄16”

CRANK HANDLE

13⁄16” 1⁄4”

5⁄8”

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

15⁄16”

7⁄16”

a washer is attached to the crank lever to hold the wooden crank handle in place, but allows for its rotation

CRANK LEVER

3⁄8” CRANK HANDLE

13⁄16”

the only piece made in wood

1⁄4”

1⁄16”

CRANK HANDLE CRANK LEVER

CRANK LEVER

STEEL AGITATOR BOTTOM RIM

BOTTOM RIM

1⁄16”

HANDLE

1⁄4”

5⁄8”

The flour is ground through the sifting screen and falls through the bottom of the flour bin

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

location were human interaction steadies the device - corrugation is for durability

1 7⁄16”

4 1⁄16”

1⁄4”

4 3⁄16”

1⁄16” 1 1⁄8”

1⁄2”

15⁄16” 1 3⁄8”

fig. 01a.01: side.elevation

Flour is inserted into the flour bin

HANDLE

TOP RIM

/DIAGRAMMING: The Diagrammatic process denotes the trajectory of each splatter. As various trajectories cross and form singular paths, controlled interaction is understood, thus the variants as well. Both the variable and the controlled are modeled as system of linear elements in order to demonstrate the point of impact and force within each territory. Controlled interaction was networked through planar elements while the variable liquids are networked through the employment of linear elements. All the while, this process of diagramming attempts to evolve the datum (from the 2D drawing) in a spacial field of disruptions afforded by the line. The two systems of networking interact with each other in such a way, so as to form opposing implicit masses within their own territory. As the process progressed, planes defined the masses and entire model begins its own autonomy. Within the interior of the device the vertices of each mass form a new system of networking within and among each territory through the use of piano wire. As the liquid(s) passes through the first territory, it is forced to rotate in one direction thus triggering the following two territories swing in the same direction and then back to stasis. The resulting back and forth motion demonstrates the oscillating pattern of liquid splattering seen in the diagnostic.

5⁄16” SIFTING SCREEN

TOP RIM

4 5⁄16”

STEEL AGITATOR

steel rod that passes along the sifting screen to mill objects through the apertures

AMOUNT MARKERS

1⁄16”

5”

4 3⁄8”

corrugated aluminum to prevent denting

1”

tightly woven strands of steel

1⁄8”

TOP RIM

5⁄16”

rolled metal

1⁄8”

BOTTOM RIM

rolled metal

steel agitator is welded to the floor bin

FLOUR BIN

AMOUNT MARKERS

cylindrical in shape and holds the flour

corrugated aluminum to prevent denting

5 3⁄4”

6”

3⁄16”

3 1⁄8” 3 5⁄8”

CRANK LEVER

2 1⁄2”

CRANK HANDLE

1 9⁄16”

SIFTING SCREEN

1⁄4”

7⁄16”

15⁄16”

securely holds the sifting screen in place

handle is welded to the flour bin

1 5⁄8”

1⁄2”

SCREEN CLAMP

1 1⁄8”

FLOUR BIN

HANDLE

SCREEN CLAMP

3 15⁄16”

3⁄16”

CRANK HANDLE

13⁄16”

1⁄4”

5⁄8”

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

15⁄16”

7⁄16”

BOTTOM RIM

the only piece made in wood

1⁄4”

5⁄8”

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

CRANK HANDLE CRANK LEVER

CRANK LEVER

STEEL AGITATOR BOTTOM RIM

1⁄16”

The flour is ground through the sifting screen and falls through the bottom of the flour bin

HANDLE

1⁄4”

location were human interaction steadies the device - corrugation is for durability

1 7⁄16”

4 1⁄16”

1⁄4”

4 3⁄16”

TOP RIM

CRANK LEVER

CRANK HANDLE

13⁄16”

1⁄16”

flour bin

a washer is attached to the crank lever to hold the wooden crank handle in place, but allows for its rotation

3⁄8”

1⁄16”

1⁄2”

1 1⁄8”

15⁄16” 1 3⁄8”

fig. 01a.02: front.elevation HANDLE

5⁄16”

SIFTING SCREEN

TOP RIM

STEEL AGITATOR

steel rod that passes along the sifting screen to mill objects through the apertures

SCREEN CLAMP

3 15⁄16”

SCREEN CLAMP

securely holds the sifting screen in place

1 1⁄8”

SIFTING SCREEN

handle is welded to the flour bin

1 5⁄8”

CRANK HANDLE

1 9⁄16”

tightly woven strands of steel

1⁄8”

TOP RIM

5⁄16”

rolled metal

1⁄4”

1⁄8”

BOTTOM RIM

rolled metal

1”

/CONCLUSION: The final construct is the resultant of a phantom mapping process. Phantom mapping is a particular type of process that systematically transitions from a formal map to a diagram. Here, Oscillation’s Nest is that diagram.

AMOUNT MARKERS

15⁄16”

corrugated aluminum to prevent denting

6”

FLOUR BIN

AMOUNT MARKERS

cylindrical in shape and holds the flour

corrugated aluminum to prevent denting

steel agitator is welded to the floor bin

5 3⁄4”

3⁄16”

13⁄16”

1⁄4”

3 1⁄8”

3⁄16”

3 5⁄8”

5⁄8”

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

15⁄16”

a washer is attached to the crank lever to hold the wooden crank handle in place, but allows for its rotation

CRANK LEVER

CRANK HANDLE

13⁄16”

the only piece made in wood

1⁄4”

1⁄16”

aperture location were objects may pass through the device

CRANK HANDLE CRANK LEVER

CRANK LEVER

STEEL AGITATOR BOTTOM RIM

BOTTOM RIM HANDLE

The flour is ground through the sifting screen and falls through the bottom of the flour bin

1 7⁄16”

location were human interaction steadies the device - corrugation is for durability

1⁄4”

1⁄16” 1 1⁄8”

1⁄2”

15⁄16” 1 3⁄8”

fig. 01a.04: diagnostic

fig. 01a.03: top.elevation

02

project_01a

e

device //oscillation's nest

fig. 01a.05: matter.map

fig. 01a.06: substrate.map

fig. 01a.07: tempo.map

03


04 1 1⁄8”

1⁄4”

project_01a e

device //oscillation's nest

T_02

TRANSITION O1

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map [f]

TRANSITION O1

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map [e]

T_03

TERRITORY O2

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map [d]

TERRITORY O2

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map [c]

T_01 T_01 T_02 T_03

TRANSITION O1

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map [b]

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map [a]

T_02 T_03

BOTTOM RIM

BOTTOM RIM

1 1⁄8”

T_01 T_02 cylindrical in shape and holds the flour

frequency of absence

softEdges

intersection

TERRITORY O3

fig. 01a.08: synthesis.map

05

frequency of absence

paintHeight

paintSpeed

materialForce

soapSpeed

softEdges

softEdges

soapSpeed

glueSpeed

constant(s)

paintHeight

constant(s)

frequency of absence paintSpeed

materialForce

intersection

paintHeight

proximal networks

paintSpeed

softEdges intersection materialForce soapSpeed

proximal networks

soapHeight

glueSpeed

glueHeight

soapHeight

glueHeight

frequency of absence

constant(s)

glueSpeed

paintHeight

paintSpeed

cylindrical in shape and holds the flour materialForce

FLOUR BIN

the only piece made in wood

CRANK LEVER CRANK HANDLE

FLOUR BIN

TERRITORY O3 T

TERRITORY O2

009.22 003.64

017.92

008.91

003.41

017.43

003.41

008.91

008.91 017.43

003.00

003.41

008.00

016.00 003.00

008.00

016.00 017.43


fig. 01a.09: section(s)

06

project_01a

e

device //oscillation's nest

07


on he

field [] //vacillating plates location: course: professor: program: footprint:

Lubbock, TX ARCH 3502 Mari Michael Glassell Alley Installation changing....growing_

/DESCRIPTION: Vacillating Plates is an installation that fluctuates as participants activate its being. The installation embraces the linearity of the site (alley) through its tensile adaptation. The adaptation is exhibited by the formal nature of the pipes supporting the fragmented plates and through the forces inherent to the materiality of the plates. Though these plates are objects in a field, their inconsistencies, and systematic organizations evolve from the site’s field conditions (fig. 01b.02). The site exhibits a field of linear multiplicities amongst visual mass and selective depreciation. Visual mass can be seen through the cluster of linear elements that presently manifests itself as values within the field. Though the objects by themselves do not have significant amounts of mass, the way in which they are clustered together do. Vacillating Plates understands this particular field condition as reinforces that nature of being with the implementation of its own clustering of linear elements. /MAPPING: The operation mapping studies from Oscillation’s Nest (project 01a) where superimposed on to the field conditions observed (fig. 01b.03) at the Broadway and Avenue J site (the location for Vacillating Plates). Field conditions are a series of physical elements that are indicative of the sites physical, social, and political contexts. Field conditions are only realized through multiplicity. The superimposition of two similar fields is known as the moiré effect. The utilization of the moiré effect created Vacillation’s Plates through adaptation techniques of stretch, scale, and reflect. /SECTION: As the project is realized in the z direction through the adaptation techniques above, stages of connection, edge, operation, transition and event are realized and separated into a series of devisal assemblages (fig. 01b.15), also called follies. /CONCLUSION: The installation will continue to integrate and morph itself beyond the site as the being becomes activated. As the installation encounters more participants, it gains more information and broader experiences of the milieu that it negotiates with. Through such, the installation continues to adapt and morph with the evolution of its field forcing a new typology for the alley. Vacillating Plates are always adapting and then readapting as its metabolic rate of consumption is always increasing. Thus, the field and the installation is in a constant stage of expansion.

fig. 01b.01: persective

fig. 01b.02: fieldConditions

fig. 01b.03: siteMap

08

project_01b

field [] //vacillating plates

09


+40’ +30’ +20’ +10’ A -10’

fig. 01b.04: studyModel photo //process model

fig. 01.09: section_A

demonstrating the vacillation of the plates

+40’ +30’ +20’ +10’ B -10’ fig. 01b.05: sketchModel photo fig. 01.10: section_B

+40’ +30’ +20’ +10’ C fig. 01b.06: sketchModel photo

-10’

fig. 01.11: section_C

+40’ +30’ +20’ +10’ D -10’ fig. 01b.07: sketchModel photo fig. 01.12: section_D

+40’ +30’ +20’ +10’ E -10’

fig. 01.13: section_E

A B C D E

fig. 01b.08: sketchModel photo

10

fig. 01b.15: siteMap

fig. 01.14: sitePlan

project_01b

field [] //vacillating plates

11


[

REHABILITATION TIMELINE global scale

buildAid //adaptive tissue Concept_(versatile) Dean's Cup 2016 Runner Up Geoffrey Ford + Dianze Wu

/BRIEF: The 72 hour competition is formulated from Wolrd War 3 catastrophe in which nuclear weapons and biological weapons are not used but rather bombing tactics and destructions similar to those of World War 2. And this is observed through a short film. Participants are then tasked with providing a solution to the devistation as a medium to fix...

All nations are in economic and social termiol

]

SUSTAINING PHASE: stage Fi

stage 03

stage 02

World War 3

RECOVERY PHASE:

location: competition: place: partners:

stage 01

STRUCTURE // unsupported buildings are reinforced as the search for iron mines progresses SCRAPE // all living organisms scavenge for food and shelter

stage 04

stage 05

SKIN // final layering

ESSENTIALS // the neccesities of living are provided for HABITATION // communities began to form as cities near social stability

MINGLING // exterior structures are activated as bridging become new civic centers

area[00]: area[01]:

area[04]: Entire cities begin to take on a new form, a new society, and new lifestyles. Reflecting on those before the War, as Adaptive Tissues propell into the NEW normal of urban design. Cities are rebuilt in-whole and Adaptive Tissues becomes a symbol of a new, experienced, society.

/OBSERVATION: The aftermath of war is significant. Disaster has stricken all nations. The planet has not been this dark since birth. No one knows where or how, but someone, somewhere has impaired satellite communication, and disengaged all nuclear power. For the past couple of years unmarked planes clutter the skies with their missiles and bombs. Is it a single organization? Or is it multiple? What if the cause isn’t from here? What if the cause is another life form? If it was then nation blaming one another and attacking each other is unwarranted. No, there is a greater war to be won! We may not know with whom. We may not where, but being defenseless, unarmed, terrified and divided needs a solution. We must come together as a unified people! We must rebuild our cities, or rather re-purpose the ones that do exist.

As the proccesses of society re-building continues, the memories of World War III still motivates society to implement Adaptive Tissues as a tool for rebuilding.

area[02]: area[03]: A new society, still remembering the destruction in World War III, pushes Adaptive Tissue Technology to generate new practices in society. The feeling of security begins to sink in, and new from is generated.

Witnessing the success of Adaptive Tissues initiates a newly generated form, the sky-garden. Allowing for the new to be self-reliant.

Soon after the end of World War III, the initial area selected to re-habilitate and initiate Adaptive Tissues becomes the precedent for the evolution of society.

/TOOL: Adaptive Tissue is not merely just an architecture, but rather a tool (fig. 02.03). The physical bombings have nearly destroyed the physicality of the urban context, while the social constructs exist only in threads. There needs to be unity. There needs to be organization. There needs to be structure. /POSITION: Let society begin by first utilizing or re-purpose the materials that are available forcing communities to organize themselves through the controlled restructuring (fig. 02.02) of the war shattered buildings. This will bring a physical stability to the communities, so that the spaces derived can be habitable. As the communities begin to grow in health and number back to their original populations, habitable spaces will become more than just the bare essential. They will become organized programs. Though the war has brought great turmoil it is to never be forgotten; it is to be embraced. The new structures and programs will evolve out of the old ones. New civic centers will be grow and evolve with program, so as to enhance the previous urban fabrics (fig. 02.04).

fig. 02.01: persective

fig. 02.02: section

fig. 02.03: rehabilitationTimeline

12

project_02

buildAid //adaptive tissue

13


/STRUCTURING: Essential during the initial stages of the build-aid is the analysis of the existing structural organization systems (fig. 02.06). The focus of the first stage is to rehabilitate existing damaged structures to ensure the safety of its future inhabitants. Without manipulating the existing structure, diagrid like components are inserted (not integrated, in order to preserve cultural identities) into the remaining structural grid. Stitched from core to core, the structure of one building transfer lateral loads across the bridge to the next building, so that each building is reliant upon its adjacency to surronding structures. /DERIVATIVE: Horizontal and Vertical circulations then become secure as new spaces are habitable within the structure, sympathizing to the traumas of the society faces following the conclusion of the War. Recycled materials and scraps then perform as a “scab� to provide protection from the external conditions and allow society to activate program as desired. Different programmatic constructs such as living spaces, cultivating spaces, and public recreation, begin to generate a new envelope that attaches to the resilient while acting of as sign for a developed society while still reminiscent of the past.

A

B

Stage 01: damaged postwar buildings

[pre]WW3: undamaged prewar buildings

P1

P3 P2

Stage 02: increase stability of facing buildings

Stage 02: preparing to fix damaged buildings based on remaining structure

fig. 04.05: perspective forces are transfered to the core calculation of bridge span potential bridge connection in:habit + adapt piping carries essentials - water, electrical, & plumbing - between structures

ec

ti

on

]

Stage 04: alternative structure develops new spaces for rehabilitation

[s

Stage 03: resulting bridging provides essential living shelter

Stage 05: bridging structure impact social strata as new spaces evolve

Stage Fi: skin forms in accordance to the needs of resulting structures

fig. 02.04: narrativeMap

14

fig. 02.06: floorPlan

project_02

buildAid //adaptive tissue

15


denverCinema.center //dFF location: course: professor: program: footprint:

Denver, CO ARCH 3501 Kuhn Park Cinema Center 40,000 sq. ft.

/OBSERVATION: The Denver Cinema Center (fig. 03.03) will be home to one of the four venues at the annual Denver Film Festival. The site is situated in the lower downtown district (LoDo) of Denver (fig. 03.04). Since the installment of the 16th street mall in 1982, the LoDo region has been on an economic and social incline. However, recent decisions by the political sector were accompanied with an increase in poverty, homeless population and inward migration. This project does not suggest that the political decisions are the cause of decrease in social structure, but recognizes that these trends in events could lead to a similar social and economic situation before LoDo was revitalized. /LOCATION: The site is two blocks southwest of Coors Field (fig. 03.01). The stadium is home to the Colorado Rockies. The viewer/spectator environment inherent to the Colorado Rockies has made this part of the LoDo area, a popular place for bars, restaurants, and small clubs. The site is seen as a gateway in and out for this particular demographic. It was apparent that resulting piece held an enormous potential to attraction for those heading to the bars and restaurants, while still advertising cinema to those leaving the Rockies’ game or wishing an alternative means of viewing. /PROGRAM: Due to the fact that there is a higher density of population observed leaving the games (fig. 03.02) as compared to going to the games, it was appropriate to place the large theater at the northeast end of the site. The southwest end became the recipient of the small theater. Because of the same observation, the larger theater became the outdoor theater and the smaller theater would be used for indoor seating.

fig. 03.01: siteAxonometric

fig. 03.03: perspective

fig. 03.02: siteMap [ROBSHON ART GALLERY]

[SITE: 1801 MARKET ST.]

[UNION STATION]

16

project_03

denverCinema.center //dff

17


2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

5400 5200

626% growth

5055

5000 4800 4600 4400 4200 4000 3800 3600

homeless contacts (denver) poverty (denver)

3400 3200 3000 2800 2600 2400 2200

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER

2000 1.5 east high school

1800

1.6 sie film center

1600

crime (LoDo)

1400 1200 1000

807

history of colorado museum redline

ua pavilions colorado state capitol byers evans house clyfford still museum denver art museum denver public library

site: 1801 market st. coors field 16th street mall the denver fire fighters museum lindsey flanigan courthouse

the jones boettcher concert hall the garner galleria theatre robshon art gallery buell theatre

union station

museum of contemporary art

pepsi center

elitch gardens

downtown aquarium

sports authority center

north high school

0800 0600 0400 0200 0000

Colorado Admendment 64

fig. 03.04: LoDo map

/OBSERVATION: “I observed a quite lively culture as the presumed ‘homeless’ made easy conversation with those living in Denver, although it seemed as though their numbers were significantly more when compared to my past observations in other cities. Rarely was there any observation of people asking for money. The vast majority of the culture seemed to be in very good physical shape, while a small minority made their presence clear through a distaste in others. This was my observation in LoDo." (2015.10.09)

18

first year of implementation

population

2010

(LoDo) (denver) 3,749 604,414

2011

4,310

2012

4,483 634,265

2013

4,575 649,495

619,968

2014

4,681 663,862

2015

4,991 682,545

2016

5,216 693,060

fig. 03.05: siteObservation

project_03

denverCinema.center //dff

19


/THEATER & CINEMA: In addition to being an attraction for the demographic at present, it was imperative the theater be a symbol or a warning to the LoDo region of their potential return to their past before the implementation of the 16th street mall. The two theaters are made to face one another. This allows for entrance off of opposite ends of the block, while providing a unique opportunity to compare the programs of theatre and cinema. By facing the two theaters towards one another (fig. 03.07), the outdoor theater becomes the stage for the indoor theater; simultaneously, the indoor theater is the stage for the outdoor theater. This type of interaction is realized at the conclusion of the cinema presentation when the curtain/screen rises and each theater looks out to the other. Large columns are used to suspend the outdoor theater screen, which can be stored into the ground beneath following a movie. A tension cable system for the glazing was implemented so that the indoor theater could look out to the outdoor theater with little obstruction to the viewers’ perception. With the two theaters facing one another, their respective stages become animated with the activity of those attending the cinema center. /ETHICS: The indoor theater becomes a beacon of the ‘ideal’ through its purity in form and abstraction of structural elements. The indoor theater is a ‘box of light’ in contrast to the unorganized and irregular geometries of the outdoor theater. With the outdoor theater as a convenient, primary entrance into the complex, while the indoor theater is patrolled through a ticketing system and garage parking. It is expected that each theatre will attract different social classes (fig 03.07). The economically stable social class attending the indoor theater have the opportunity to observe and scoff at the activities of the less fortunate social class that is restrained to the outdoor theater. Simultaneously, the viewers within the outdoor theater will look at the indoor theater with either resentment or inspiration. The imposed social activities are a warning to the LoDo population and those affected.

[volume] (volume of space) ....called site

recipe_01 volumes are seperated to form theaters and screens are implemented to orient audience

recipe_02 intermediary volume is inserted to seperate theaters

recipe_03 theaters are resized to illustrate the significant pedestrian traffic

entrance

exit

recipe_04 seating for the theaters is understood for anamorphic screen

recipe_05 parking is inserted into the site

recipe_06 all lots in the LoDo district are superimposed ....then scaled to fit outdoor theater

recipe_07 superimpostion becomes a design tool to form seeting and stepping in outdoor theater

recipe_08 geometeries generated for outdoor theater give definition to intermediary volume

recipe_09 definition of intermediary volume dictates pathways for vertical and horizontal circulation

fig. 03.06: narrativeMap

20

fig. 03.07: collage

project_03

denverCinema.center //dff

21


STEEL BEAM: I-beam [W18x50]

Building Height 25’-0”

SUSPENDED CURTAIN WALL: Frosted Glazing [d=2.25”] Spider Bracket [3’x8’] Tension Cable System [refer detail 1]

STEEL TRUSS: Warren Truss 11 Panel [d=8’]

STEEL BEAM: I-beam [W12x26]

SUSPENDED CURTAIN WALL: Clear Glazing [d=2.5”] Spider Bracket [5’x2.5’] Tension Cable System [refer detail 1] Motorized Solar Control Shades

OUTDOOR ANAMORPHIC SCREEN: draper down screen is raised/lowered by hydraulic suspension system

STEEL Column: HSS [5”x2.5”]

FLOOR: Grass [d=2] Earth [d=6”] Sand [d=2”] Membrane Steel Deck [2”x”] Two-Way Flat Plate Post-tensioned Concrete [d=12”]

STEEL Column: HSS [5”x5”] FROSTED GLAZING: Fireproofed [d=2.25”]

Ground Level 0’-0”

Balcony -12’-0” Parking Deck 1 14

-16’-0”

14

1

1

FLOOR: Two-Way Flat Slab Post-tensioned Concrete [d=12”]

-23’-0”

CONCRETE BEAM: Precast-Single Tee Post-tensioned [8’x18”]

CONCRETE WAFFLE SLAB: Post-tensioned [12”x20”domes]

20

Parking Deck 2 -29’-0”

20

1

1

-34’-0”

Parking Deck 3 -45’-0”

fig. 03.07: buildingSection

a

fig. 03.08: perspective

22

c

b

fig. 03.09: perspective

project_03

denverCinema.center //dff

fig. 03.10: perspective

23


ovum/avum //sheet metal dive location: course: professor:

Ithaca, NY ARCH 5101 Aleksandr Mergold + Sasa Zivkovic [material study]

program:

/INTENTIONS: This project explores the correlation between metal folding techniques and the dive of the brown Pelican. In order to understand the material properties of the sheet metal many tests were preformed with the intent to fabricate an ovum or sphere from a single sheet of 24" x 36" sheet metal. The sheet metal could range in guage and metal type. In order to utilize the entirety of the sheet kiri-gami tactics of folding and cutting were explored with both paper and tin (fig. 04.02). Initial studies noticed the difference in material memory differences between paper and tin. With this understanding paper was a quick medium to test various folding and cutting techniques, while glue forced paper into a moment of stasis that the metals would also exhibit. /OCCIDENTALIS: The brown pelican is local to the western hemisphere in warm coastal climates near the equator (fig. 04.01). The brown is a particularly fascinating bird because it is part of one of three families of bird that 'dive bombs' in order to feed itself (fig. 04.04). The brown pelican can dive from up to 100' in the air with an average wing span of 7.5'. The bird will soar in search of its target then as it descends its wings fold behind its back and bird rotates towards its left an enters the water on its back. As the bird enters the water its guller pouch opens as an impact parachute and the subcutaneous air sacs in and around its breast inflate in order to protect the bird from the impact of the dive (fig. 04.06). Naturally the guller pouch allows the bird to more easily catch its prey with which it consumes immediately. /FABRICATION: The final sphere learns from theses tactics of dive bombing and inflation in order to develop an extension to previous kirigami tactics that are specific to metal's memory (fig. 04.05). Combined with folding the roll is employed to flatten fold to a mini pleat. When joined with perpendicular cuts, the pleat no longer preforms as a ray of structure across the sheet metal but terminates into the cut, thus becoming a segment (fig. 04.07). This allowed the entire 24" x 36" to fold into a singular rigid ovum (fig. 04.03).

pelicaniforms (order)

phaethontes

phaethontidae - tropic birds

(suborder)

(family)

fregatae

fegatidae - frigate birds

(suborder)

(family)

pelecani

sulidae - boobies

(suborder)

(family)

pelecanus (genus)

pelicanidae - pelicans (family)

phalacrocoracidae - cormorants (family)

anhingidae - anhingas or darters (family)

occidentalis - brown pelican (species)

length: 122cm weight: 3.6kg wingspan: 2.3m lifespan: 31y

erythrorhynchos - american white pelican (species)

onocrotalus - great white pelican (species)

conspicillatus - australian pelican (species)

crispus - dalmatian pelican (species)

rufescens - pink-backed pelican (species)

philippensis - spot-billed pelican (species)

thagus - peruvian pelican (species)

fig. 04.01: avumAnalysis

fig. 04.02: studyModels

fig. 04.03: modelPhotos

24

project_04

ovum/avum //sheet metal dive

25


I. FORMING

OPEN

CLOSED

repetive folding and unfolding

II. ROTATING

planar twist and vertical curving

III. CONTRACT

IV. PINCH

V. PUNCTURE unfold to final fold

extensive folding

moment of impact

fig. 04.04: pelicanDive

26

fig. 04.05: sphereDive

project_04

ovum/avum //sheet metal dive

27


I. FOLD + CUT elevation(s)

scale = .01 : 1.00

24” • 36” sheet of 26ga zinc

initial fold lines are formed using break and are seperated at 20˚ incraments

initial fold pattern is flattened using roller excluding 6”d at center which remains 3⁄16” in depth

initial fold lines are seperated at 20˚ incraments and 10˚ from initial fold lines

primary fold lines begin 5˚ from initial fold lines along 6”d circumference and rotate across seam at 20˚ at 3⁄8” in depth

major slits cut through primary fold lines at 2” increments, while minor slits are perpendicular to major slits

major slits form fold lines to form panel, while minor slits recieve crease and roll panel to retain structural regitiy

II. ROLL + FROM elevation(s)

scale = .01 : 1.00

step_00

step_01

step_02

step_04

step_10

step_18

fig. 04.06: inflation

28

fig. 04.07: constructedDrawing

project_04

ovum/avum //sheet metal dive

29


typology_BANK //urban catalyst location: course: professor: program: footprint:

Lubbock, TX ARCH 3502 David Driskill International Bank 14,400 sq. ft.

/PROMPT: The site is at the heart of a larger urban plan for the revitalization of Lubbock’s Central Business District. Urban Tech, a design negation between Lubbock City Council and the TTU_CoA, recognizes that the Central Business District (CBD) as one of the densest neighborhoods in the city of Lubbock, yet one of the poorest, economically and is masterplanning a massive revitalization/ redevelopment of this area. According to the Urban Tech, the site is on of the core streets within the space syntax of Lubbock’s most integrated areas with close proximity to the vast majority of the cultural centers within the region (fig. 05.04). The master plan requires the site to be a midrise international bank seperate but adjacent to Lubbock National Bank (fig. 05.03). /SITUATION: As this site is a foci for urban design, it is imperative that the project articulate situation as a complexity inherent to the social synergy, a dynamic field of interrelated forces. These forces are comprised of the interaction between different social organizations of contextual history, location, time, demographic, and situation. Situation is a set of conditions related to a type of action or event that one might find oneself in. In other words, social situation is a state of circumstance. Situation is difficult to concertize because of the way in which it is to be quantified. Though social situation is informed by the interaction of the other components, it must be analyzed as a separate entity within the urban environment to fully understand its affectious nature. /TYPOLOGY: Form and program respond to the existing tempos and frequencies mapped through sound (05.05) . The organization of program is first realized as the spaces respond to the site and its relation to context. Programs expecting more activity and louder public presence are placed along Avenue J and then Main St. (fig. 05.02). As the project evolved, it challenged the bank typology through the necessity for these interior programs to interact with exterior events. The pride of the bank was in its vault as symbol strength and stability. Naturally, the architecture reflected this notion, and the bank typology was formally described as solid, heavy, monumental, and firm (fig. 05.01). This project argues that the pride of the bank is no longer in the vault, but rather in its efficiency and ability to exchange information. The thin, tectonic, and tensile components are the formal interpretation of this new pride.

fig. 05.01: bankTypology

fig. 05.03: perspective

fig. 05.02: projectPosition

site

30

present tempo

increased tempo

resulting program

project_05

typology_BANK //urban catalyst

31


08

06 07

$

09

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82 02

0:08.00

03

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04

27 01

$ 1 MILE

$

$

$

$

84

$

$

$

$

62

dB

3

9 15 15 9 3

Hz 01

texas tech university

01 06

mackenzie park

02

lucca arts district

07

aztlan park

03

lubbock memorial civic center

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canyon rim

04

mahon public library

09

yellow house draw

05

meadowbrook golf course

-

-

-

-

-

4k2k1k-

fig. 05.04: siteMap

fig. 05.05: mappingTechnique

/SOUND: Our urban environments are a composition of sounds. Inherent to those sounds is a type of structure (urban DNA) that describes the activities taking place. Thus there is an inherent structure to the sounds of our cities, similar to that of music composition. Thus the city can be described through all the same constructs used in music composition. Here, sound is used as a measuring device to articulate the social synergy of the area surrounding the site. Artifacts such as tempo (a measurement over the course of a few minutes) and rhythm (a measurement over the course of a day) can attest to the social “vibrancy” within its context. Example: [someone walking on the street in New York City will be walking a faster pace (tempo) than someone in rural Illinois, and over the course of a day, New York City will have a greater “vibrancy” (amplitude) than rural Illinois]. This project is part of a greater urban revitalization plan, it is the expectation of this project to be a driving force in the revitalization as it enhances the social autonomy through the acceleration of tempo in the social situation. Ultimately, the project will change the rhythm within the present urban fabric.

32

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10k8k6k-

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fig. 05.06: floorPlan

project_05

//level 01

typology_BANK //urban catalyst

fig. 05.07: floorPlan

//level 02

fig. 05.08: floorPlan

//level 04

33


06 A501

Level 4 46' - 0"

section: slice_01

05 A501

fig. 05.10: sketchModel photo

Level 3 32' - 0"

section: slice_02

Level 2 18' - 0"

fig. 05.11: sketchModel photo

section: slice_03 04 A501

Level 1 0' - 0"

fig. 05.12: sketchModel photo fig. 05.09: sketchModel photo

fig. 02.14: wall section

section: slice_04

section: slice_05

fig. 05.13: sketchModel photo

34

fig. 05.15 + 16 + 17 + 18 + 19

project_05

typology_BANK //urban catalyst

35


fig. 05.20: buildingSection

36

project_05

typology_BANK //urban catalyst

37


a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

structured

structured

structured

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

induciveDevices //autogenetics

(un)structured

(un)structured

structured

structured

(un)structured

(un)structured

(un)structured

structured

structured

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

(in)tangible

tangible a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

(un)structured

a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.09: participationMap // a collection of the various observations described by their respective inducive devices

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

induciveDevices //autogenetics

tangible a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

project_06

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

(in)tangible

tangible

fig. 06.07: participationMap_semi-edge // artificialLight describes the process with which the occupant is drawn to the source through

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

38

a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

tangible

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

(in)tangible

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.06: participationMap_singularity // singular objects have a tendency to exclude themselves from events and active environments

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

fig. 06.08: participationMap_artificialLight // artificialLight is capable of demarcating events and therefore exhibited in more active locations

fig. 06.01: siteMap

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s) a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.05: participationMap_seat // the seat is an instrument that can a number of appendages and tend to be in more active areas

(in)tangible

tangible

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.04: participationMap_texture // texture exhibits itself in both active and passive environments and tends to be formally structured

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

(in)tangible

(un)structured

(un)structured structured

tangible

tangible a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

(in)tangible

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.03: participationMap_covering // higher than seat and table, covering tends to be a structured object

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by more precedent

(in)tangible a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.02: participationMap_chair + table //table is dependent upon the seat (a lower horizontal surface) and is to be a more structured object

/POSITION: The research recognizes that the built construct within the urban fabric is composed of a variety of social situations, each hosting a different level of human engagement when documented at a specific moment in time. It becomes the task of this research to investigate the resultant social situations, and the formal elements within them. The formal elements of the social situation are indexed into the seven discovered devices (fig. 06.02). The research optimistically assumes that these devices hold potentials to challenge the social situation and induce higher and lower levels of participation as they are the informants of the architecture(s).urban fabric. This research investigates the autogenous devices inducing different levels of participation at the micro-site.

tangible a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

a measure of more proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

/RESPONSE: With continued fascination of the potential to nearly quantify the situation as prompted by the previous project (project 05), this independent study with Mari Michael Glassell (professor) catalogues the social situations in downtown Lubbock (fig. 06.01). The research begins by series of critiques of the architectural practice and separates architecture from building. Simply, architecture is a conversation between occupant and form/space and building is the formal, utilitarian, and functionalist realization of form/space. Therefore, building is a form/space construction without any interaction, intimacy, and engagement between itself and the occupant. Thus building design is a blissful exercise of utilitarian implementation that continues to gain momentum as a professional practice with out the any social responsibility.

(in)tangible

structured

tangible

(un)structured

(in)tangible

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

Lubbock, TX ARCH 4000 Mari Michael Glassell [research] changing....growing_

a measure of less proximetry to spatial density of deisired program(s)

location: course: professor: program: footprint:

a question of object intent based upon form/space relationship determined by less precedent

fig. 06.10: socialSituations // map of the social situations

39


/MAPPING: Each selected sitiuation is numbered 1 - 24 and catalogued with respect to one another in terms of activity (occupant interaction through program), event (occupant interaction through occasion), inducive device(s) and within the nature of devices, as a series, terms of structure and tangibility (fig. 06.11). These informations allow the situations to be graphed in xy cordinates (fig. 06.02-10). Here inducive devices are networked across social situations in order to see thier relation with one another and in relation to their recognition as a type which ranges in scale of more or less structured and more or less tangible.

01

02

03

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02

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activity

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structure

/TECHNIQUE: The documentation of the situation begins by first addressing the situation through photograph. Thus, the act of photographing is a documentation of the situation as single moment of time space. Then the situation changes. The research analyzes the documentation which after photographying devolves into artifact. These artifacts are comprised of a series of forms and objects that comprise the sitiuation and with some degree of consitancy it is assumed that the forms and objects will continue to rythmatically participate in their situaion thoughout the calender year. The research then questions the form/ object type(s), its structure and tangibility. The seven different object/forms are as follows: table+chair, singularity, semi-edge, artificial light, covering, seat, and texture. Table+chair, seat, and covering are all horizontal surface, but their variance is scene in their diffientation in scale and their relation to one another. Here, structure descibes the addivitve forms that intentialize the form/objects purpose through appendages. For example, a seat can be a flat-ish surface at a range of heights. With appendages the seat becomes an office chair that demands a particular technique of use. Tangibility is the form/objects proximal location to event and activity. When the listed form/ objects are understood in this way, they are understood to have latent potentials that afford them oppertunities to be inducive as a type of device.

+

tangibility

-

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

1

2

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4

5

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fig. 06.11: mappingTechnique

40

fig. 06.12: deviceCollage

project_06

induciveDevices //autogenetics

41


resume proficiencies

education Aug. 2017 - present

Cornell University [Ithaca, NY]

Aug. 2013 - Dec. 2016

Texas Tech University [Lubbock, TX]

Master's Architecture Candidate (expected completion Dec. 2020) Texas Tech University [Lubbock, TX] Bachelor’s of Science in Architecture (December 19th)

March 2018 - present

Professor’s Research Assistant Aleksandr Mergold [8 hrs./week]

design, draw, and construct installation for American Spolia Exhibit

Jan. 2017 - Aug. 2017

Gensler_Dallas Architectural Intern [45hrs./week]

worked in the lifestyle flex studio on presentation documents, perspectives, site plans, and construction documents

Jan. 2016 - Dec. 2016

Student Assistant Architecture History II [50hrs./semester]

graded student essays and exams

Aug. 2015 - Dec. 2016

Professor’s Research Assistant Mari Michael Glassell [40hrs./semester]

researched and gathered information to develop urban information system module

Summer 2015

G.W. Mitchell Construction Field Laborer: 1 Project [16hrs./week] Project Engineer Intern: 3 Projects [32hrs./ week]

framing, installing windows and job site clean up drafting RFI’s, reviewing submittal requests, and revising“As-Built” drawings

Summer 2012-2013

Dovetail Construction Field Laborer: 3 Projects [40hrs./week]

demolition, framing, painting, interior/ exterior trim work and job site clean up

Adobe Photoshop | Adobe Illustrator | Adobe InDesign AutoCad | Revit | SketchUp | Rhinoceros | Vray for Rhinoceros | Grasshopper | Lumion

experience

recognition Fall 2017 Spring 2017 Spring 2016

Spring 2016 Spring 2016 Spring 2016

involvement Fall 2016 Fall 2015 - Present Fall 2013 - Spring 2014 Summer 2011

lawson spencer

Director's Award - recipient Two drawing exhibitions in CROP 07 by the TTU_CoA Center for Active Learning and Undergraduate Engagement

Cornell AAP //MArch 1 Candidate TTU_CoA //Bachelor of Science in Architecture T: (210)-204-5724 E: lawsonleespencer@gmail.com

Presenter at the Texas Tech University Undergraduate Research Conference abstract title: “An Architectural Process Ideology” (PUBLISHED PROCEEDING) [presentation and abstract available upon request]

DEAN'S CUP

Runner-Up in Dean’s Cup Competition 2016 (with Geoffrey Ford + Dianze Wu) proceedings exhibited in TTU_CoA's CROP 07

Chapman Harvey Architecture Scholarship - recipient Study Abroad Design Scholarship - recipient

Student Grade Appeals Committee

reviewed professor's response against students' appeal and proof

AIAS - American Institute of Architecture Students Global Art Brigades St. PJ’s Thrift Store Active Volunteer: [120hrs./Semester]

responsibilities included: assisting customers, organizing and stocking shelves, and fixing electronics

42

resume

contact

43


back

Cover Letter

lawson spencer Cornell AAP //MArch 1 Candidate TTU_CoA //Bachelor of Science in Architecture T: (210)-204-5724 E: lawsonleespencer@gmail.com in: linkedin.com/in/lawson-spencer-69b56a131/ I: @lawson_spencer

It can be understood that within every constructed assembly there are portions of architecture and portions of building that simultaneously exist together and not separately. Encompassed within the construction assembly is the notion of origin, which is the process or development that creates the constructed assembly. In the field of Architecture, success is determined by the sensory appeal or appreciation of experience and process of realization. If the architecture of a constructed assembly is the aesthetic experience and development of such, then building is the non-integrated utility. This is to say that within every building, there are certain amounts of architecture and amounts of utility existing simultaneously. However, architecture can encompass utility when utility as a design also contributes to sensory appeal or appreciation. Finally, the success of building is determined by how much architecture is present in comparison to the amount of building, and thus the overall piece can subjectively be defined as either architecture or building. Presently, my interest in architecture is two fold. The first is nearly arbitrary as I have a fascination for that which is tensile and tactile; second, I am interested in tactics that begin to computationally define society - with the understanding that this can never be fully realized. This has turned into a study of engagement of person and the form/ space relationship that invokes an engagement between the occupant

044

and the architecture in a way that is not simply based on utility. Inherent to the symbiotic nature of form and space is structure. Structure is the means of organization and systemization, and it is through these attributes that architecture is best realized as a composition of devices. Device is a system of parts accomplishing a primary, singular task. While systematized to accomplish a singular task, the device naturally performs a multitude of secondary choreographies. In this way, architecture is more than just a built construct, it is a social interaction with different levels of intimacy; it is a conversation initiated by architecture. Since architecture is a conversation between occupant and form/space, the pursuit of design ought to investigate the initiation of that conversation. For Forthese thesereason, reason,I Iam aminterested interestedininaasummer summerarchitectural architecturalinternship internship that thatchallenges challengesthe thepragmatism pragmatismofofbuilding buildingwith withthe thedesign designtactics tacticsofof architecture architecturewhich whichare arecertainly certainlydriven drivenbybysocial socialcomplexes complexesthat thatinform inform geometry, geometry,material, material,structure structureand andthe thelocation locationofofthese thesegeographically geographically and andeconomically. economically. would wouldbe bean anexcellent excellentinternship internshipopportunity opportunitybecause becauseofofthe thesimplicity simplicity ofofcritical criticaldesign designthat thatisisaugmented augmentedbybythe thedetail detailand andhumble humbleuse useofof light. light.Material Materialisisthe themedium mediumthrough throughwhich whichthe thefifirm rmniches nichesitself itselfinto into site. site.

lawsonSpencer portfolio 17  
lawsonSpencer portfolio 17  
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