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VOLUME 3, NO.1

1ST QUARTER 2013


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IN THIS ISSUE: VOLUME 3 NO. 1 1ST QUARTER 2013 PUBLISHER: MARK KERN LAWRENCE BUSINESS MAGAZINE, LLC

FEATURES: WHERE TO START A BUSINESS. 22 KU SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 24

INSTRUMENTS TO SUCCESS

30

THE BUSINESS OF FARMING

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NON PROFIT: MIDNIGHT FARM

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ACTIVE RETIREMENT IN LAWRENCE

MANAGING EDITOR: ANN FRAME HERTZOG CREATIVE EDITOR: ANN FRAME HERTZOG ART DIRECTOR: RORY HARMS DESIGNER: CHARLES LEWER BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT:

ON THE COVER:

40 COMMUNITY BANKING

JOE RYAN, CLAY WESTERLUND FEATURE WRITERS: ANNE BROCKHOFF,

MARK FAGAN, DEREK HELMS, EMILY MULLIGAN, DAISY WAKEFIELD

CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: STEVEN HERTZOG

TREANOR

48 DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTS PHOG ALLEN’S 86 YEAR LEGACY 56 KANSAS RELAYS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: JACKIE EVANS, STEPHANIE DOWNS, MEGAN GILLILAND, GENE MEYER, JOE MONACO, GREG WILLIAMS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER: PATRICK CONNER

WHY LOCAL

52 ONLINE VS RELATIONSHIPS SPACES 64 LOCAL WATERING HOLES

IN THIS ISSUE:

INQUIRIES & ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT:

info@lawrencebusinessmagazine.com www.LawrenceBusinessMagazine.com Lawrence Business Magazine 1617 St. Andrews Drive Lawrence, KS 66047 785.856.1990 (P) 785.856.1995 (F)

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DOWNTOWN IN FOCUS BUSINESS ON THE HILL PROFESSIONAL SPOTLIGHT

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CITY OF LAWRENCE

ON THE COVER: LEFT TO RIGHT:

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MANAGEMENT

TED HAGGART & LES DREILING photo by Steven Hertzog

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with special acknowledgement to Jay Hauptli 71

FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: LAWRENCEBUSINESSMAGAZINE.COM/SUBSCRIBE Lawrence Business Magazine, is published quarterly by Lawrence Business Magazine, LLC and is distributed by direct mail to over 3000 businesses in the Lawrence & Douglas County Community. It is also distributed at key retail locations throughout the area and mailed to individual subscribers. All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reprinted or reproduced without the publisher’s permission. Lawrence Business Magazine, LLC assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. Statements and opinions printed in the Lawrence Business Magazine are the those of the author or advertiser and are not necessarily the opinion of Lawrence Business Magazine.

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SCHOOLS: RAINTREE LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL LOCAL SCENE NEWSMAKERS

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DOWNTOWN IN FOCUS by DEREK HELMS photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

David Milstein is proud of Liberty Hall. As the tall, bearded Milstein sits in a casual conference room on the second floor of the iconic Lawrence venue, he smiles a lot. He says he likes thinking about the history of the building. “We take a lot of pride in this building,” Milstein confesses. “It took a lot of work, but its all been worth it.” In the mid-1980s Milstein had sold a large share of his surplus store, Sunflower (now Sunflower Outdoor and Bike) and he was looking for a project. A contractor by trade, he was actively searching for a project that could fulfill his desire to work with his hands. Walking into the main theater area of Liberty Hall, it’s hard to picture the structure the way it was when Milstein bought it in 1985. According to him, it’s almost a totally different venue now. He had noticed a small classified ad for a “building for sale on Massachu-

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DOWNTOWN IN FOCUS

setts Street.” Milstein called the listed number and met an agent a day later. “Oh, it was rough,” Milstein says with an exhale. He leans back in his chair, looks to the ceiling, scratches his rough beard and shakes his head. “The first thing I noticed was the strong smell of stale beer, which wasn’t surprising considering the floor was covered with empty beer cans and bottles. A boxing ring was in the middle of the floor because apparently the night before a fraternity had hosted some boxing matches. The walls were painted black and the place was just in really bad shape.” Most young entrepreneurs might have seen the condition of the building and have only seen the amount of money needed to invest. Not Milstein. “Well,” he says as if he’s never thought about it before. “I guess


IN THE BOARDROOM OR ON THE

FIELD

BRAND YOUR TEAM

FOR SUCCESS


when I saw the building, I felt like I was looking at my future. I saw a way to calm my need to work with my hands and help revive a great structure.” Purchasing the building was a project in its own right. The previous owners had fallen on rough economic times and the building had multiple leans filed against it. Milstein worked with Charlie Oldfather to clear the leans and secure financing for the purchase. Then he got to work. “I knew it was a project, but that was part of the draw,” Milstein says. Renovation work was extensive and time consuming. Milstein estimates the work took 14 months to complete. Floors, walls, fixtures and electrical work were all replaced. The hall became, essentially, a brand new building. The huge murals that border each side of the stage were painted by friends in an effort to ground the building. “We put the stars on the ceiling and the artists painted from the top down,” Milstein says. “Those pieces of art show the connection from the sky down to the earth. I think we get as many compliments on those as anything else we’ve done.” The first event the new Liberty Hall hosted was memorable.“It was the Brazilian club from KU,” Milstein recalls with a smile. “I’ll never forget it. They served passion punch, which was purple. We had brand new floors and carpet and all. I learned quickly the frustrations that come with running an event space.” Milstein’s goal was always to make the hall a movie theater and live event space, but he never anticipated how tough things would be in the beginning. Profits were few and far between in the first few years of operation, but that never seemed to bother him. “I used to say, ‘well, it can’t get worse,” he says with a loud laugh. “I guess it was just cock-eyed optimism, but I never doubted this would be a success.” It soon became clear that independent movies and the occasional concert weren’t going to financially sustain the building. Milstein renovated what was an old bus depot

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into Free State Brewery and La Prima Tazza coffee shop (the coffee shop is part of the Liberty Hall property). He added the video store and began renting remaining retail space (now housing Lucky Paws Bakery and Be Moved Yoga Studio). Twenty-eight years after purchasing the run down building, Milstein is proud of the bustling business. Despite the constant worry that something could go wrong with the building, he says profits are spread across all aspects of Liberty Hall, so no one aspect is pressured to cover another. “By volume, the coffee shop produces the most profit,” Milstein explains. “Movie revenue and concessions make up a good portion of profits followed by video and movie rentals.” Despite being lauded as one of the best venues for live music in the region, Milstein explains that concerts really don’t produce much profit.

great). In fact, he hardly ever attends events, especially movies. “The last movie I saw here was about 20 years ago,” he says. “I couldn’t concentrate on the film because I was thinking about all the aspects of showing the movie.” What David and wife Susan are most proud of are the people. Susan estimates they write 40-50 paychecks every pay period, mostly to part-time employees. “But some of those people have worked here for 10 years or more,” she says with a broad smile. Though not directly involved in the day-to-day operations of the venue, Milstein still works everyday. “I’m more of a supervisor now,” he says. “I can’t not be involved. I care to much about this building and all the people working here.” ■

“We rent the hall out about 120 nights a year, for various events,” he says. “If there is a performance, we get a set hall-rental price and the take from concession and alcohol sales.” Milstein says it hard for him to pick a favorite event Liberty Hall has hosted (when pressured, he says the Joan Baez shows have been

DOWNTOWN IN FOCUS

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BUSINESS O N T H E H I L L HEART OF KU CAMPUS DESIGNATED HISTORIC DISTRICT by JOE MONACO, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

The history of the University of Kansas’ Lawrence Campus is being recognized and preserved by the creation of a historic district. The Kansas Historical Society’s Historic Sites Board of Review voted to create a historic district comprising the heart of the Lawrence campus. The district is now listed in the Register of Historic Kansas Places and has been forwarded to the National Park Service for consideration for the National Register of Historic Places. “The beauty of our campus doesn’t come from any one building or place, but rather from the whole environment that has been created on Mount Oread,” Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little said. “This district will help us preserve that environment so future Jayhawks may enjoy the same beautiful, historic campus as their predecessors.” The University of Kansas Historic District covers the period of 1863-1951 and comprises 52 resources—buildings, landmarks and landscapes. Twenty-six of those are considered contributing resources, and six others are already listed individually in the National Register of Historic Places. Gaining new recognition through inclusion in the district are buildings such as Watson Library, landmarks such as the World War II Memorial Campanile and landscapes such as The Hill, which graduates walk down during Commencement. The district was created with support from the Historic Mount Oread Friends, which provided $21,000 in funding for the drafting of the nomination. Members of the organization worked with the Campus Historic Preservation and Heritage Advisory boards to define the district in consultation with Rosin Preservation, Treanor Architects and landscape historian Carol Grove. “The Historic Mount Oread Friends are loyal supporters of our university. Their dedication and generosity will help preserve the beauty of our campus for generations to come,” Gray-Little said. Creation of the district builds on the work undertaken through a 2006 grant from the J. Paul Getty Trust to create a preservation master plan to guide the future preservation and development of

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BUSINESS ON THE HILL

the campus. To be eligible for inclusion in the state or federal registers, properties must generally retain their historic appearance, be at least 50 years old and have demonstrated significance, either historically or architecturally. Historic districts generally must be contiguous. Inclusion in the registers makes properties eligible for state and federal financial incentives, such as tax credits. The National Register of Historic Places is the country’s official list of historically significant properties, while the Register of Historic Kansas Places performs the same role at the state level. Properties included in the National Register are automatically listed in the State Register; however, not all properties listed in the State Register are included in the National Register.

KU BIODIVERSITY INSTITUTE RENOVATION COMPLETED The KU Biodiversity Institute has announced completion of a twoyear, $3.5 million renovation that has modernized the laboratories in 110-year-old Dyche Hall for 21st century research and student training about the life of the planet. In the new facilities, KU faculty, staff, students, and visiting scholars will be able to conduct innovative research in biodiversity science, from discovering and documenting the diversity of the world’s plants and animals; to exploring their genetics, anatomy and evolution; to forecasting the potential spread of diseases and harmful invasive species; to investigating the environmental consequences of decreasing water on the Great Plains.  Through a partnership of federal, state and private resources, the Biodiversity Institute created eight new laboratory spaces that will greatly increase the research capacity and capabilities of the institute. The National Science Foundation awarded the Biodiversity Institute $1.5 million for the project through a program titled Academic Research Infrastructure: Repair and Renovation. The institute was the nation’s only university biodiversity organization chosen for such a project; to qualify, an organization had to demonstrate its research excellence, and its potential for increasing that excellence by replacing antiquated or outmoded laboratories. In Dyche


Hall, some of these facilities were more than 45 years old. Major state investments in the project allocated by the university included almost $2 million for electrical, HVAC and cyber connectivity. In addition, private funding helped equip the laboratories and create new spaces to accommodate graduate-student research.

Previous to the improvements, cyber bandwidth was insufficient for large-scale data access, complex geographic and modeling analyses, or research networking within KU and externally. Outmoded electrical transformers and overloaded circuits caused power outages and shutdowns of critical equipment needed to preserve animal and plant tissues, and to archive and serve data to institute and global community networks. Many of the institute’s


THE DYCHE HALL

RENOVATION

INTEGRATED FIVE-LABORATORY COMPLEX

❆ LIQUID NITROGEN CRYOGENIC FACILITY

TWO NEW BIOTIC ANALYSIS LABS

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS LAB

FIVEFOLD-LARGER DATA SERVER ROOM

research and training laboratories had crowded, makeshift bench space and substandard fume hoods and sinks. “This antiquated research infrastructure kept the Biodiversity Institute from advancing its national and international leadership and innovation in biodiversity research, informatics and researchtraining particularly at a time when biodiversity science is recognized as one of society’s grand challenge research imperatives of the 21st century,” said Leonard Krishtalka, Director and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Eiology. “This federal, state and private investment in our scientists and students will enable us to tackle more complex research problems facing science and society, from discovering the diversity of Earth’s animals and plants, to forecasting the effects of climate change on this biodiversity, to informing its conservation and wise use.” In partnership with five KU academic departments, the Biodiversity Institute is a global leader in the research and training of biodiversity scientists, with 50–60 graduate students in residence annually. The Biodiversity Institute is spread across seven buildings on the KU campus and is home to research collections of more than 9 million specimens and tissues of plants, animals and fossils

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BUSINESS ON THE HILL

Students and faculty can extract and sequence genetic material in a clean, secure environment, and clone ancient DNA from the institute’s vast historical collections of animals and plants. Preserves the institute’s irreplaceable and growing collection of tissues of worldwide animals and plants for genetic research.

Scientists and students can study and analyze an animal’s external, internal and skeletal anatomy with the most modern tools. Modeling and forecasting environmental phenomena, such as the potential spread of diseases and pests, and the effects of climate change on animals, plants and ecosystems, both past and present. Provides secure storage, computational analysis and global access to terabytes of biodiversity information.

as well as 1.2 million archaeological artifacts. The institute also includes the KU Natural History Museum, which brings biodiversity research to the public through exhibits and education programs.

KU spinout HylaPharm begins producing cancer drug delivery technology A University of Kansas startup company has begun producing a new drug delivery technology that could make cancer treatments safer and more effective. HylaPharm, a drug delivery company founded in 2010 by a team of KU faculty, is now producing its patented HylaPlat technology, which delivers chemotherapy drugs directly to cancer cells in tumors and nearby lymph nodes while limiting drug exposure in kidneys, nerves and auditory organs. By limiting exposure in these surrounding areas, HylaPlat enables targeted treatments with fewer side effects for patients. “For most drugs, there’s a trade-off between side effects and efficacy,” said Dr. Daniel Aires, HylaPharm President and CEO and KU Medical Center Director of Dermatology. “But for patients


with certain kinds of cancer, our new technology has the potential to be both safer and stronger. That makes it especially exciting.” HylaPharm is led by Aires and KU pharmaceutical chemist Laird Forrest, who serves as chief science officer and chief operating officer. The company is located in the Bioscience and Technology Business Center Expansion Facility and in January was awarded a $200,000 development grant by the Kansas Bioscience Authority for upcoming animal trials. HylaPlat may have extra advantages for treating cancers that metastasize through lymph nodes. This category includes 85 percent of cancers, including breast, colon, lung and ovarian cancer. Current treatments for cancers that have gone to lymph nodes include surgery and radiation, which can cause tremendous damage and often fail to remove all the cancer. Meanwhile, standard intravenous chemotherapy does not get into lymph nodes at high levels, resulting in greater risk of relapse. HylaPlat addresses this issue by attaching chemotherapy drugs to nano-sized particles of hyaluronan, a natural polymer found in the body. Once injected near the

tumor site, these nanoparticles will attack the tumor and then spread to the lymph nodes, reaching areas where local metastatic disease can hide. The size of the drug is ideal for getting into and then staying in the nearby lymph nodes, said Forrest, an assistant professor of pharmaceutical chemistry in the KU School of Pharmacy. “Injecting it directly into the main cancer lesion results in a very high drug level compared to normal injections into the veins,” Aires said. “Furthermore, most cancer cells have a receptor on their surface that grabs onto hyaluronan. In general, more aggressive cancers and the hard-to-treat cancer stem cells have more of these receptors. This is another factor that can help target the drug to cancer cells.” So far, HylaPlat has proven effective in animal models, and larger animal trials for submission to the Federal Drug Administration are under way. The company will pursue the next step, a Phase I human trial, after discussions with the FDA, possibly within two years.

Dr. DANIEL AIRES

LAIRD FORREST

HylaPharm is one of 24 active KU startup companies. “HylaPlat was invented, patented and developed at KU,” Forrest said. “It reflects the outstanding science that is supported and conducted at this university.”

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KU PSYCHOLOGY CLINIC IMPACTS ECONOMIC WELL-BEING OF THE COMMUNITY by Stephanie Downes

A high standard for mental health care with the opportunity for doctoral students to get invaluable hands-on training only begins to describe what the University of Kansas Child and Family Services Clinic offers the Lawrence community. “We are providing families with services that meet their mental health needs, enabling the people of Lawrence to better contribute to the community as employers, employees and consumers,� said Ric Steele, director of the Clinical Child Psychology Program at KU and a supervisor at the Child and Family Services Clinic

The Child and Family Services Clinic functions as the training facility for doctoral students in the Clinical Child Psychology Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Accredited by the American Psychological Association, it is one of the few university clinics in the country that specializes in children. Doctoral students staff the clinic under the supervision of licensed psychologists, a majority of whom are board certified in clinical child and adolescent psychology. The clinic serves children, adolescents and families. Additionally, KU students and community members can receive assessments and services. The clinic offers an array of developmental and psychological assessments for children and adults, conducted by the therapists in training. These assessments address learning problems, developmental delay, emotional and behavioral concerns, Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder, as well as mental disorders.

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In addition to these assessments, the clinic provides individual therapy, family therapy, parent education, school consultation and group therapy. As a provider of continuing education for psychologists, the clinic is committed to providing the most upto-date and evidence-based services available to its clients.

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Working for the community The clinic has formed close ties to the Lawrence community in its two decades in operation. It collaborates with the Lawrence School District and the Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center to expand its assessments and treatments for children. Practicum sites on location at Lawrence schools provide students with access to the clinic’s services, expanding the reach of the clinic. Based on a sliding fee scale, the clinic is able to accommodate uninsured or low-income families in need of services and assessments. “Unmet mental needs can be a drain on the economy,” Steele said. “If parents are worried about their kids, they are less productive workers.” Steele stressed that unmet health and behavioral health problems are a significant contributor to a loss in job productivity due to absences and stresses at home. A parent of a son with ADHA had this to say about her family’s experience. “When we first walked into the clinic, we were really struggling as a family. The staff at the clinic has given my son tools to deal with some of his uncontrollable urges and my husband and I tools to parent him with more patience and understanding.  It’s been life changing.” The clinic provides hands on experience for the graduate students who staff it, adding to the prestige of the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Since the first graduate students entered the program in 1992, it has produced more than 65 graduates who have gone on to become professionals in the field. ■ For additional information about the University of Kansas Child and Family Services Clinic, visit http://www2.ku.edu/~kuclinic/ or call (785) 864-4416.

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P R OFES S I ONA L SPOTLIGHT Cindy Yulich M AR K ET P R ES ID ENT L AWRENCE, EMP RISE BANK

How many people does your business employ? Live in Lawrence? At present, Emprise employees 434 people statewide with 13 of those in Lawrence. We are a family-owned bank located in 23 communities throughout Kansas. We encourage our employees to live in the communities we serve as we feel it helps our employees better understand our customers and their challenges. It also provides a better opportunity for our employees to be involved in all aspects of the community.

How does your business make a positive impact on the Lawrence community?

Our most important commodity is the service our employees provide to our customers. We strive to deliver a superior customer experience by offering services and trusted advice that, together, create extraordinary value.

Emprise has always encouraged community involvement and that is especially true in Lawrence. Presently, we have employees serving on boards at LMH, the Lawrence Arts Center, and the Boys and Girls Club. Other involvements includes the USD497 LEAP partnership, school site councils and other USD497 efforts, Kiwanis, Rotary, Leadership Lawrence, JustFood, the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce and many others. We absolutely believe that supporting the community is vitally important and that it takes a partnership of business, government, and academia to allow a community to thrive.

Other than monetary, what is your company’s most important priority?

What is your (the bank’s) responsibility to the community?

Again, this goes back to service. We believe maintaining a high level of integrity, passion and leadership at all levels of our organization results in the success of our customers, our employees, and our shareholders.

Our responsibility is to provide banking services to the community but also give of our times and talents to benefit the community.

What is your company’s most important commodity or service?

What has been some of the most important aspects of your success? Developing relationships with customers that results in them viewing Emprise Bank as a trusted advisor is the single most important aspect. To have that level of a relationship, the customer must have confidence in the bank’s ability to meet their needs.

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What would you change about doing business in Lawrence? Specifically in Lawrence, and we’re making strides in this area, I’d like to see improvement in how all aspects of the community work together to make progress. Business, government, academia, non-profits can all do so much to make Lawrence an even better place to live – pulling together and finding common ground we can all agree upon will get us much further than being at odds with each other or focusing on our differences.


You operate in a very competitive industry. How have you managed to remain relevant and profitable? We are fortunate that we have tremendous leadership in our company that is consistently focused on doing things better and smarter. Competition and an ever-changing regulatory environment is forcing our industry to re-think the best way we deliver goods and services while still maintaining a fair return for our ownership. Once again, we think the best edge we have lies within our people – employees, leadership and ownership.

How do you manage your day-to-day stress of business? Some days I manage it better than others. Just lean forward and get it done.

How do you reward excellent work performance? Emprise has an excellent incentive compensation program that establishes goals and rewards performance. There is also reward in taking care of the customer and developing a relationship that

causes them to think of Emprise as “their bank”. That’s the best reward!

How do you manage poor performance? Primarily on-the-spot coaching. We have a variety of training opportunities within the bank as well but leading by example and helping our employees deal with daily challenges is most effective.

What is the biggest challenge you feel your company faces? Banking has always been challenged with maintaining high expectations/standards in the face of competitive pressure. There is a constant balance between being flexible enough to meet your customer’s needs while also maintaining standards that are good for not only the bank but our customers. The single greatest challenge at this point in time is probably regulatory. There is an absolute need for strong, reasonable regulation but there is a tendency to “punish all for the sins of the few” or go overboard by imposing regulations that don’t result in better outcomes – only higher costs for business owners and consumers. The other challenge would be one facing many businesses today – the aging of the baby boomers that make up a good portion of


the management of our company. Gen X’rs and Gen Y’rs think, work and manage differently and we must adapt to that changing dynamic.

Over the course of your career, what has been the single largest change in the Lawrence business environment? I’ve been in Lawrence 21 years and in banking 31 years. Certainly there has been a good deal of change on any number of levels. I think what impresses me most is the evolution to where we are today as a community. I see a real desire for business, non-profits, our school district, our city and county governments and the University of Kansas and Haskell to work together to bring Lawrence to the “next level”.

What do you foresee as being the biggest challenge to the banking business? On a local level? On a national level? The challenges lie within all of the issues we’ve discussed above. Adapting to changing employees, regulations, competition and customer expectations. That’s true locally and nationally. ■

PROFESSIONAL SPOTLIGHT


FINANCIAL

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PROGRESS AHEAD: SUMMER STREET IMPROVEMENTS by MEGAN GILLILAND, COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

Since 2005, the City of Lawrence has applied millions of dollars toward street maintenance and infrastructure. On average, more than $5 million in city funding is provided annually to projects that address street conditions, including milling and overlay, road reconstruction, microsurfacing and curb and gutter replacement. In 2013 alone, the city will use a combination of municipal bonds, sales tax funds, state and federal funding, benefit district funds, city ad valorem taxes and other city-specific funds to complete more than $22.3 million in street maintenance and infrastructure projects.

economic impact for the State of Kansas. To calculate overall economic impact, KDOT uses a formula that takes into consideration new development that will occur due to better access, value of travel time and costs saved, value of crashes avoided and business productivity gains resulting from more reliable travel. 

Lawrence residents have rated street maintenance and quality infrastructure as the top priority, and the city has listened. Every year, the Public Works Department sets out a program for maintenance that uses a combination of tools to prevent and slow further deterioration of roadways. The program has been successful. Data from the Pavement Condition Index reports overall positive movement across the city’s 812-lane miles. “Quality roads are important to our current and future residents,” Mayor Bob Schumm says. “As we work to bring more primary jobs to Lawrence and make our community more attractive to businesses looking to relocate or expand, infrastructure plays a key role in these decisions.”

Summer 2013 Impact

The city isn’t the only organization attuned to the benefits of enhanced infrastructure. The long-awaited South Lawrence Trafficway (SLT) is set to begin construction in late 2013 (completion is projected for 2016) and is projected to create $3.71 billion in

The SLT was funded as part of KDOT’s 2010 T-WORKS transportation program and was identified as the number one priority for the state of Kansas and has the highest economic benefit of all the projects in the T-WORKS program.

This summer, motorists in Lawrence will experience major inconveniences due to construction. The project that will affect most people is the reconstruction of Iowa Street from Harvard to the Irving Hill Overpass. The city will reconstruct the entire roadway, including the intersection of 15th/Bob Billings Parkway (BBP) and Iowa Street this summer. The intersection of 15th/BBP and Iowa will be closed to all east/west traffic after commencement ceremonies at the University of Kansas and will not re-open until


mid-August. North/south traffic will be allowed on Iowa Street but traffic will be down to one lane at times with shifting lane patterns. A center turn lane will be added on Iowa Street, from Harvard to the Irving Hill Overpass. This is a $6.6 million project that is paid for using KDOT Highway Safety funding, KDOT Surface Transportation Program funding and city sales tax. Additionally, the City of Lawrence will perform pavement reconstruction on eastbound lanes of Bob Billings Parkway from Kasold to Crestline. A shared use path will be added from Crestline to Kasold to allow for walking/biking on the south side of the roadway. This project is coordinated with the Iowa Street Reconstruction project. Traffic will not be allowed at times on eastbound lanes since the intersection at Iowa and 15th Street will be closed to east/west traffic. This is a $1.2 million project also this summer, the city will construct a dedicated westbound left turn lane for traffic travelling south to Iowa Street from 6th Street. Traffic will be carried with two east/westbound lanes throughout most of the project. Sidewalks will be added along 6th Street on the south side of the street. This project will also include the addition of new signals at the intersection. The roadway will be milled and overlaid after reconstruction. The entire project cost is $900,000. The city will continue to improve access to downtown by adding a two-way center turn lane on 9th Street between Tennessee and Kentucky. In addition, the signals at 9th & Tennessee will be replaced to accommodate the new lane configuration. A major mill and overlay project will occur on Iowa Street, south of 29th Street to the city limits this summer. One lane of roadway, both north and south, will be open to motorists throughout the project. Single, one-lane closures causing delays are expected. On the west edge of town, Wakarusa north and south of the intersection of Bob Billings Parkway will be reconstructed as part of this project. The roadway will be widened and bike lanes added. The Wakarusa and BBP intersection will be closed to north/

southbound traffic. East/westbound traffic will be maintained on BBP through the intersection for the duration of the project. When the city acquired the former Farmland nitrogen fertilizer plant on the east edge of Lawrence in 2009, plans were set into motion to develop the 400-plus acre site into an industrial park. This year, the city will start to install infrastructure – roadways, a storm water detention pond, and sewer and water lines – to bolster the site’s ability to attract new development. The city will add a traffic signal at 23rd Street and O’Connell Road to increase safety and ease of access to the Farmland site. The project also includes geometric improvements at the intersection including a westbound left turn lane and adding turn lanes on the north approach to the intersection. Two lanes of east/west traffic will be available at all times for travel during construction. ■ For additional information on city construction projects, visit www.lawrenceks.org/construction.


W H ERE TO START A BUSINESS KU SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICE by DEREK HELMS photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

Starting a business is hard. Starting a business without any help is damn near impossible. Will Katz understands that. “Well, I wouldn’t say a new entrepreneur has to talk with us,” Katz, Regional Director of the University of Kansas Small Business Development Center, says with a smile. “But I certainly think we can do a young business a lot of good.” What Katz means is the KUSBDC will help an entrepreneur wade his or her way through every aspect of starting a business. From conception to developing an exit plan after selling the business, Katz and his crew will do everything in their power to help a new business succeed. Sound like a good consulting service? Well, considering their fees, it’s hard to find a better deal. All services provided by the KUSBDC are free. No strings attached.

“Our purpose is to help establish and support small businesses in the state of Kansas,” “Our purpose is to help establish and support small businesses in the state of Kansas,” Katz says succinctly. The University of Kansas office, located downtown in the Chamber of Commerce office, is one of eight regional offices, each an equal part of the Kansas Small Business Development Center (KSBDC). The KSBDC is a partnership program with the United States Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Kansas Department of Commerce. The KSBDC is partially funded by the US Small Business Administration. SBA’s funding is not an endorsement of any products, opinions, or services. SBA funded programs are

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WHERE TO START A BUSINESS

Will Katz, Regional Director of the University of Kansas Small Business Development Center

extended to the public on a nondiscriminatory basis. The Lawrence office also receives limited funding from the University Of Kansas School Of Business, the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce and various small grants. No client fees are charged. Katz says the center guides between 40-50 new business developments each year. That number doesn’t include the one-off meetings to answer a quick question or clarify a licensing issue. “We really see all kinds of businesses,” Katz explains. “I meet with entrepreneurs ranging from a young guy thinking of starting a lawn care business to multi-million dollar companies looking for some help with hiring practices. The variety of ideas and challenges we see here keeps the job interesting.” The most common questions the center receives relates to business plans. What is a business plan? Do I need one? Is this business even feasible? “I don’t even know how many business plans I’ve personally helped write,” Katz says with a laugh. “We help with all stages of the planning. A lot of people come in with a specific, detailed question in regards to their plan. Others set an appointment and the meeting starts with ‘So, I have an idea.’ We flush it out from there.”


FRANK DORSEY, OWNER FRANK’S NORTH STAR TAVERN

Purviz Birdie, owner of Lawrence Montessori School, met with Katz early in the process of planning her business. “Will and everyone at the Center are invaluable,” Birdie says without hesitation. “I met Will at one of their Information for Entrepreneurs presentations. That was years before we opened and I still call him to ask advice on decisions we make as a business.” Birdie says the Center has a fantastic rapport with clients and do all they can to help her business in any way they can. “They’ve helped with almost every aspect of our success, on the business side,” Birdie says. “We had funding, but they helped with our business plan and initial launch. Recently they’ve help guide us through some human resource questions.” Birdie and Lawrence Montessori School utilized almost all of what the center offers. Frank Dorsey, owner of Frank’s North Star Tavern, had a more specific question. “Will helped me nail down my cash-flow analysis,” Frank explains. “I’ve worked in bars and restaurants for years, and had been developing a solid business plan for a long time. I couldn’t figure out the exact numbers for projected cash flow. Will was great at offering a few different perspectives.” With years of new-business consulting under his belt, Katz thinks he knows what makes a solid business. Kind of.

“There have been what I thought where no-brainer, great business ideas that flopped,” he says. “And there have been plans I thought had no chance of working that are now in their third or fourth or seventh year of business. That goes to show that the variables can’t be predicted. In general I know we have a great track record of helping small business establish them and grow.”


As James Hanson sits behind the worn workbench in the back of Beautiful Music Violin Shop, it becomes clear that his calling isn’t as a businessman. His old metal desk is covered with the tools of a woodworker. Dowels and blades and chisels are laid across a thin rubber mat. Hanson, with his worn and stained apron, diligently rehairs a violin bow. The work is detailed and Hanson’s thick hands make precise movements, cuts and adjustments.

“With enough money for two months rent and deposit, along with tools I had been collecting and a good reputation, I opened my doors,”

James Hanson, the shop’s owner, loves working on violins, violas, cellos and basses. His quaint shop is bursting with instruments. Nearly all floor and wall space is filled with instruments available for purchase and rent. Speakers play a steady mix of classical, folk and bluegrass music. One corner of the shop has a display of CDs for sale, another boast stacks of sheet music. The smell of aged wood is omnipresent. While in the shop, James may be at one of three workbenches working on a restoration, rehair or restringing. He could be making phone calls to clients or readying packages for the mail or negotiating supply purchases. He is not, however, resting.

While he rehairs bows, James Hanson isn’t a businessman. He is an artist.

“I am a huge believer in the ‘vibe’ of a music store,” Hanson says. “When someone walks into a music store, the environment has to be inspiring. I have been utilizing 800 square feet of shop space to the fullest. The instant someone enters Beautiful Music Violin Shop, there seems to be a look of amazement and inspiration.”

The success of Beautiful Music Violin Shop, tucked inside the strip mall at 9th and Iowa in central Lawrence, is a testament to two of the oldest pieces of business advice: fill a need and do what you love.

Violinist, and shop manager, Jill Woodhouse felt at home the first time she walked into the store. “I started playing violin when I was five,” Woodhouse says. “I grew up in and around shops most of my life. The first time I walked into Beautiful Music

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INSTRUMENTS TO SUCCESS


THE INSTRUMENTS T0

Success by DEREK HELMS photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

I knew it was a special place. It was clear immediately that James knew what he was doing here.”

“The closest thing I could find was to work for Reuter Organ Company,” Hanson says. “But I took it and I worked hard.”

Hanson didn’t always dream of running a business, but music was his first passion. After high school in Lawrence he played in various bluegrass bands and worked odd jobs, trying to figure out what he wanted to do. Eventually, the lure of the violin drew him in, despite the fact that he’d never played the instrument.

Not long after beginning at the organ company, Hanson’s networking paid off. An orchestra teacher from the Lawrence school system gave him the chance to prove his work on a school violin. The teacher was so pleased with his work that she began referring everyone he knew to Hanson. Soon Hanson’s small house was filled with violins, violas, cellos and basses.

In 1993, Hanson headed north to Minnesota, enrolled in Red Wing Technical College and began their Violin Repair program. “Something clicked while attending the violin restoration program,” Hanson says. “My instructor said I took to Bow Rehairing like a fish takes to water. At that point I started investing myself completely into restoring all violin family instruments. The fact that I was not a violin player did not discourage me at all. Some of the finest violin technicians who walked the earth had never played a note.” When Hanson completed the program, he moved back to Lawrence, looking for a way to support himself with his newfound skills. Not surprisingly, there were not a lot of Help Wanted ads for violin repairman.

Hanson’s days were spent at Reuter Organ Company and his nights and weekends were devoted to restoring, fixing and rehairing the steady stream of stringed instruments that found their way to his door. By 1999 he had left the organ company and had taken root at the now-defunct Hume Music, handling all of their orchestral instruments. “The folks at Hume were really great to work with,” Hanson says. “They appreciated music and quality instruments. I learned a lot about customer service working there. That time gave me an opportunity to hone my skills by doing professional, quality work on student instruments as well as developing a loyal clientele and collecting notes on how I could do things differently.”

INSTRUMENTS TO SUCCESS

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Hanson was ready to go on his own. With a small inheritance from his grandfather, he took the leap to self-employment and in February 2008 he opened Beautiful Music Violin Shop. “With enough money for two months rent and deposit, along with tools I had been collecting and a good reputation, I opened my doors,” Hanson recalls. “I didn’t know if it would work out, but I knew that it would always haunt me if I didn’t take the chance.” For six months, Beautiful Music was a one-man shop with revenue primarily being drawn by repairs and consignment instrument sales. Though Hanson started his business in the midst of the economic downturn, he didn’t take any loans in an attempt to keep overhead as low as possible. “I had a lot of support from other local music stores and returned the favor any chance I could get, realizing it was best to fulfill a niche and be less of a competitor.”

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Hanson says. “I always felt that working together and networking with local music stores was going to be advantageous for everyone.” Hanson works hard and keeps his business goals simple: provide an honest, excellent service with good products, hire a trustworthy accountant and pay all your taxes. As is par for the course, Hanson managed to “survive” the first few years of business. By 2011, he seemed to get the hang of it.


“By my third year, I was just starting to stand on solid ground,” Hanson says. “I expanded my retail, employed only professional orchestral musicians who understood the instruments, and offered a rental instrument program and in-house teachers. I try my best to generate as much revenue as I can in our small space so that we can make enough to stay in business. The store basically operates on a general 40% profit margin. Some items less, some items more. I determine the price of retail items by an average of local market price, internet price and my cost. The days of making 50-100% profit margins are long-gone. According to our latest profit and loss, 50% of revenue is generated by retail sales, 28% rental income, and 22% in repair income. There was a steady 80% increase for the first 3 years and 30% increase for the past two years.” The store’s rental program is how many are introduced to the business. Essentially anyone can rent an instrument for $10-$20 a month, with no commitment required. Every dollar spent renting an instrument is then credited to the customer’s account, good toward future purchases. “We don’t make a lot of money on the rentals,” Hanson admits. “But we do get a lot of traffic.” The bulk of business is rehairing bows and repairing instruments. An average rehair takes between 30-45 minutes and costs $45-$55 dollars. That’s good money, Hanson admits, but it isn’t something you can do all day. Hanson says rehairing is a trade that needs mas-

tering, and serious players are very particular about who works on their bows. Betse Ellis is a serious player. The touring fiddler was apprehensive about having James rehair her bow. “He was recommended by Mike at Mass Street Music,” Ellis says lightheartedly. “I hadn’t used James before, but I gave him a shot. That was years ago and now I won’t let anyone else touch my bows. The work James does really shows a passion for his craft and a great respect for both the instruments and the artists.” That attention to detail and customer service is the keys to success for Beautiful Music. “The service is the only thing that makes this business unique,” Hanson admits. “The internet will never be able to provide the quality of work and service that we offer. I am careful to not take on so much work that it compromises the service, and to only hire qualified people that meet my high expectations. Since I opened, I have hired two part-time employees that fill a 40-plus hour retail position, and three luthiers that operate on commission. I cannot put a finger on what exactly makes this business work, and there is always room for efficiency, but it works.” ■

What is your growth potential? Find out in Lawrence. From start-up to established, Lawrence has options for every entrepreneur. We’re open for business. www.lawrenceks.org | (785) 832-3400


THE BUSINESS OF

Farming by ANNE BROCKHOFF photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

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Change is the only constant in agriculture, and Karen and John Pendleton of Pendleton’s Kaw Valley Country Market have seen plenty of it in their 34 years of farming. From the farm crisis of the 1980s to calamitous weather and shifting consumer trends, they’ve thrived by adapting. “We have a business plan, but things happen,” Karen says. “There’s a lot of variability in what we’re doing, so staying flexible has been important.” The Pendletons’ operation two miles east of Lawrence is among the 1,040 Douglas County farms that together generated $41.2 million in agricultural sales in 2007, according to the most recent USDA Census of Agriculture. Soybeans, corn and other commodity crops account for more than half that figure, just as they did when the Pendletons began farming. Theirs is a second-generation family farm, and the couple moved back after college to help John’s parents manage a cattle feedlot and about 1,000 mostly rented acres of row crops. The timing seemed perfect.

“It was devastating, and we’re still crawling out from it,” Karen says. “But we had all these people come out. How could we tell them we were stopping? We couldn’t.” The Pendletons rebuilt, and their farm now features a succession of edibles and ornamentals that changes every three to five weeks. January, February and March are spent planting and transplanting seedlings in the greenhouse, digging asparagus crowns to sell and catching up on paperwork and maintenance. Some of their 15 employees begin in March, others in April and most stay through Thanksgiving. Five volunteers each work one day a week during the season. The farm store opens April 1, and it stays open seven days a week through April and May. Those two months generate about 35 percent of the farm’s annual sales, John says.

“1979 had unbelievable crops, unbelievable weather and unbelievable prices,” Karen says. “Farming was fantastic.” But the next decade wasn’t. Drought shriveled grain yields, interest rates spiked and grain exports to the former Soviet Union were embargoed. Thousands of families across the U.S. lost their farms. The Pendletons planted one-half acre of asparagus to diversify their income. It went so well that they added hydroponic tomatoes and rhubarb. When customers asked for bedding plants, they started growing those, too.

“What other communities wish they had is what we have—the camaraderie between growers,”

By the 1990s, they’d cut down on rented crop ground and closed the feedlot to grow more vegetables, bedding plants, flowers and perennials for their on-farm store and the Lawrence Farmers’ Market.

Spinach is the first crop harvested, but ready-picked and pick yourown asparagus becomes the main draw in mid-April. The Pendletons would like to expand their now 20 acres of asparagus to meet growing demand, but it’s too labor-intensive.

Karen and John were gearing up for the season in March 2006 when a powerful microburst leveled two silos and destroyed or damaged almost every building, vehicle and piece of equipment.

“We need more asparagus, but I can’t manage more asparagus,” John says.

They considered quitting, Karen admits, but then some 300 people arrived to help clean up. Neighbors brought casseroles, friends salvaged seedlings and garden centers sent supplies. School kids, churches, customers and strangers all pitched in.

Spring is prime time for bedding and potted plants, as well as greenhouse-grown hydroponic tomatoes and other early crops. Peonies bloom in May, marking the start of flower and wedding season.

THE BUSINESS OF FARMING

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Cut flowers are a farm staple, and Karen has designed dried floral arrangements since the 1980s. Those skills transferred readily to wedding flowers, and the business has steadily grown through word-of-mouth. She now does three to five weddings a weekend during peak months, generating about half the farm’s summer sales. There are more budget-conscious brides these days, but Karen’s as happy selling flowers to do-it-yourselfers as she is creating arrangements for pick-up or providing a complete floral design, delivery and set-up service. “We’re flexible,” she says. “Because we’re flower growers, I don’t really have a problem selling them just flowers.” The Pendletons also sell bouquets at the store and the farmers’ market. They even offer a punch card that allows customers to pay $60 in advance and then redeem that value in blooms whenever the mood strikes them. The card’s been so successful that the Pendletons included a simi-

lar option when they launched their Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program in 2011 in partnership with the Douglas County Child Development Association. About a third of their CSA members buy a $60 punch card that can be used at the Pendletons’ store or farmers’ market stall. The remaining CSA members buy a farm share in early spring, and then pick up a weekly bag of produce at one of several area childcare centers. The Pendletons plan to add a CSA for Douglas County employees this year. Strong CSA participation means they can now skip the Tuesday and Thursday farmers’ markets, but the Saturday market remains an essential outlet. Sales have slipped slightly in recent years due to the weak economy and an influx of new market farmers, but it’s still the best place to showcase the farm’s harvest and reach new customers. Surprisingly, there’s little overlap between farm store and farmers’ market shoppers, Karen says. “Our farmers’ market people are farmers’ market people. Our people who come to the farm come to the farm. It’s so segmented,” says Karen, who communicates with them all via a 3,000-member email list, the farm’s web site and Facebook. About three-quarters of Pendletons’ farm store customers drive over from Johnson County, often several times a week. John credits the trendiness of local produce, which is what most come to buy. “The idea of locally grown food is big,” he says. “That has been our biggest change the last three years, to get back into the vegetable business with both feet.”


By the time the six-week asparagus run ends in May, there are peas, greens and radishes. Farm hours drop to six days a week in June as tomatoes from the high tunnel, potatoes and green beans ripen. July brings corn, melons, and outdoor tomatoes. Heat lovers like melons, okra and eggplant come on in August. That’s also when the butterfly bio-villa, which showcases native butterflies’ role in pollinating local crops, opens. Visitors and school groups can tour the bio-villa until midOctober, and there’s a nearby play area. Customers pick pumpkins and dig sweet potatoes in the fall. The Pendletons host two open houses in November and December and participate in the Lawrence Farmers’ Market’s holiday market. Then, Pendleton’s closes for winter. It must, according to the terms of the seasonal use permit it operates under. The farm is within Lawrence’s urban growth area, so it must also comply with city codes. Highway rules dictate what its roadside signs can say.

“The idea of LOCALLY GROWN FOOD is big,” he says. “That has been our biggest change the last three years, to get

BACK INTO THE VEGETABLE BUSINESS WITH both feet.”

And then there are the licenses—a retail food store license, two live plant dealers licenses (one for the farm

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and one for the farmers’ market) and a license to sell asparagus crowns across state lines. Paperwork and fees add up to countless hours and thousands of dollars, Karen says. Market scales must also be certified annually by the Kansas Department of Agriculture, so area farmers host a “scale party” to share the cost—an example of what Karen calls “coopetition.” Kaw Valley farmers are unique, she says, in their willingness to share resources, network through organizations like Growing Lawrence (www. growinglawrence.org), volunteer on farmers’ market committees and support events like the Kaw Valley Farm Tour. The result? A stronger local farm economy that benefits everyone. “What other communities wish they had is what we have—the camaraderie between growers,” Karen says. “We’re all working so hard, let’s at least help each other. Nobody’s working any harder than anybody else.” ■ Pendleton’s Kaw Valley Country Market 1446 E. 1850 Rd. Lawrence, KS 66046 (785) 843-1409 www.pendletons.com


NON-PROFIT:

MIDNIGHT FARM IS A MODEL OF MULTIPLICITY by DAISY WAKEFIELD photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

By most accounts, a 40-acre tract of land that sits between Eudora and Baldwin City shouldn’t be seeing much traffic coming through its gates. But from morning till evening of most days, Midnight Farm is host to constantly revolving groups of people, some as near as the house just up the path, and some as far away as Japan. Midnight Farm, an offspring of Community Living Opportunities (CLO), is a multi-purpose facility that serves the clients of CLO and individuals with developmental disabilities. Although there are numerous uses for the Farm, the therapeutic horse riding program for children and adults with special needs is the most visible, operating out of a stable and arena that is attached to the main facility. The eight or so horses stabled at the barn are acquired through donation or purchase. The riding program is accredited by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH), and trainers and horses go through a continual regimen of training to be able to work with the special-needs population and equine. Horses that cannot be trained or who develop medical issues are re-homed, as Midnight Farm cannot maintain more than a few horses. “Our animals must be very calm and unexcitable,” says Colleen Baker, Director of Midnight Farm. “They must tolerate sporadic, uncoordinated movements, a rider’s unequal balance, and careless excitement of riders in the walkways and stalls. For the safety of riders, the horses must be relatively shy-proof and indifferent towards objects moving nearby, overhead or touching them.” For the children and adults who ride the horses at Midnight Farm,

the weekly outing is a delight. Some of the riders are non-ambulatory, spending most of their time looking up from a wheelchair. For them, the experience of being mounted on a horse allows them to see the world from an exhilarating angle. Other riders are nonverbal, but have been able to express their first speech when they command their horse to walk or to trot. Volunteers lead the horses, as well as walk along the sides, providing safety on three sides of each rider.

Midnight Farm was built from a desire to have a rural setting as an option for children and adults to live in, work in, or just experience. The dream of the Farm involved horses, so Michael Strouse, CLO CEO, toured numerous therapeutic riding facilities around the country in order to learn from their successes and challenges. What he learned was that therapeutic riding programs are often in the red, as it is difficult to sustain the cost of a standalone riding program. When CLO purchased the 40 acres in 2005, Strouse and CLO’s Board designed a plan for Midnight Farm that would layer multiple business plans together in order to make the Farm sustainable. Besides the riding program, the Farm is home to three, soon to be four, of CLO’s residences. These house two to three adults with developmental disabilities, along with their extended family teaching caretakers. CLO has numerous of these residences in Douglas and Johnson Counties, but the ones on the Farm are always in high demand.


“A lot of Kansans grew up rurally,” says Strouse, “And when they had kids with special needs, they ended up having to move to town to access services. Midnight Farm gives options to people who want to be in a rural setting. Some people want to live here, some want to work here, and some want to just have a piece of it every so often. We have a menagerie of options.” That menagerie of options includes day services, with daily classes and activities for adults with special needs. These, along with the residence services, are billable to Medicaid, providing much of the Farm’s income. However, Kansas Medicaid pays average state costs, and costs in Douglas and Johnson Counties, where CLO serves, are consistently higher. Midnight Farm is also dependent on grants and donations, which they used to build the initial main facility and barn. Other operations at the farm are being created or expanded in order to make them income contributors. Clients produce some plant products in a greenhouse, which are currently sold mainly at fundraising events on the Farm. While these provide activities for CLO clients, they do not generate much income. Strouse hopes this will change with the hiring of a consultant to identify product lines that can eventually be marketed at farmer’s markets and to landscaping clients. A variety of vegetables will be sold at the town farmer’s markets, and half-whiskey barrels filled with flowers will be sold to landscapers. Plans are in place to build high tunnels on the grounds, extending the growing season with less need for herbicides and pesticides. Besides a heftier income stream, developing the garden-to-market lines will also create supported jobs and activities for CLO clients.

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Other activities that also add to the Farm’s strata of incomes include field trips, fundraisers, summer horse camps, and special events, including Midnight Farm’s first wedding. Though Midnight Farm currently receives mostly planned visitors through clients, field trips, and fundraisers, Strouse envisions a day when it will serve as a common destination outing. People might see a play at the rustic amphitheater that is currently on the drawing board, and then browse the greenhouse and pottery barn, and then take a ride in the wagon pulled by Ricky, the massive Belgian draft horse. He wants people to recognize the connection between Midnight Farm, the products they produce, and the clients that produce them. This makes for busy days and nights at an otherwise bucolic piece of property. But the multiple income streams make Midnight Farm sustainable, and enviable. Organizations in other states and other countries are coming to look at CLO and Midnight Farm as a model. “What differentiates Midnight Farm as a model is that we have 40 acres of land and multiple activities that make it sustainable, versus having just a therapeutic riding program,” Strouse says. “Midnight Farm is a hodge podge of funding strategies because that’s what works. We visited a lot of therapeutic riding programs before building ours, and we found that if you do any one thing, it’s not going to support it. But if you do six things, it’s financially viable, and it’s also fun.” ■

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ACTIVE RETIREMENT IN LAWRENCE by DAISY WAKEFIELD photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

Every 8 seconds for the past two years, a person from the Baby Boomer generation has turned 65. This continues until the year 2030, when the 79 million Boomers will all cross the threshold of retirement age. They will comprise 1 in 5 Americans, an unprecedented number of retirees in US history. The Boomers are a new breed of retirees, not looking to fade away in a corner of Florida. They want to remain connected in multi-generational relationships, engaging with both peers and younger people, and perhaps active in their grandchildren’s upbringing. They are health-conscious, looking to live near green spaces and in walkable communities, and wanting to remain physically active in daily life. They might continue to work to some degree, in part-time or consulting-based employment, or even start an encore career out of a hobby or entrepreneurial venture. They want to be active in their communities, sharing their wisdom, experiences, and time in volunteerism, board membership, or civic engagement. In other words, Boomers have more giddy-up than any preceding generation of retirees. They don’t want to be put out to pasture, spending their remaining years in a gradual decline. They intend to continue to live a vibrant life, with adjustments as necessary.

Lawrence is retiree-friendly. In an extensive study done by the Milken Institute on Best Cities for Successful Aging, 259 small metros were ranked in order of being retiree-friendly cities. Several indicators factored into the rankings: General, Healthcare, Wellness, Financial, Living Arrangement, Employment, Transportation, and Community. For ages 65-79, Lawrence ranks 33 among the 259. For ages 80+, Lawrence ranks 123. Overall, Lawrence ranks 57. This differentiation of early retirement - ages 65 to 79, and later retirement - ages 80+, is necessary as people are living longer and more active lives. In early retirement, people generally continue to do as they have done before - drive, live independently, walk without limitation. Age 80 is a new frontier as retirees begin to deal with impairments and illnesses and reduced mobility. “Most of these limits don’t stop people from being active given ‘op-

tions’ to sustain access to what is needed, enjoyed or wanted,” says Jim Courtney, Director of Mr. Goodcents Foundation For Senior Independence. “Plus, the hypothesis is that active and engaged people delay (maybe for a lifetime) significant life limitations given mobility, transportation and housing options that remove barriers to access and life. Being an ‘attractive destination place’ to live and age requires communities to look at what people will need over a 20 to 30 year lifespan.”

Why do we want to be retiree-friendly? The sheer number of Boomers, close to 80 million, offers astounding opportunities for businesses and cities looking to woo this burgeoning sector of American population. The Boomers hold 50-70% of US wealth, account for 50% of consumer demand, and are set to gain over $11 trillion in inheritances. Their astounding size wields massive fiscal power. When a retiree couple moves to Lawrence, they contribute to the economy in direct ways by depositing their wealth in area banks, spending their money locally, and contributing philanthropically. And they bring in jobs. For every retiree couple that moves into town, 1.2 jobs are created. The City of Lawrence has leapt to the task of determining what would attract retirees here. A 12-member Retiree Attraction and Retention Task Force was appointed in 2011 to explore the germane issues and presented their recommendations in mid-2012. Work is continuing from that task force in the form of the board of advisors at Douglas County Senior Services.

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Lawrence looks good from this angle. Where Lawrence excels among small metros is in health care, a top consideration for retirees in deciding on a retirement destination. Lawrence ranks number one in the Milken Institute’s study for small metros with hospitals accredited by the Joint Commission. With acclaimed cardiology and oncology services, Lawrence Memorial Hospital has become an anchor for attracting seniors to Lawrence. Proximity to KU Medical Center and other Kansas Citybased resources are an added boost for retirees looking to be near premier health care facilities. The University of Kansas is another major attraction with sports, arts, cultural, and continuing education amenities. Retirees looking for continuing educational opportunities can take classes in Lawrence at KU’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, which offers classes specifically designed for people over 50. The Douglas County Senior Services provides support for seniors, with classes, meals, and social services. Seniors can participate in exercise, art, music, and games of pool at the center, as well as find peer support. Douglas County Senior Services also offers rides for a small fee to seniors who are no longer able to drive. In community engagement, Lawrence seniors tend to be very actively involved in civic and organizational volunteerism.

‘We have 800 volunteers at LMH, and half of those are in the senior age group,” Kathy Clausing-Willis, Vice President of Lawrence Memorial Hospital and Retiree Task Force member, says. “People who work as volunteers are no longer content to work in a small room folding newsletters. The volunteers here talk with physicians, comfort patients, do real work.”

Lawrence also faces challenges. Housing has risen to the top as Lawrence’s most challenging factor in attracting and keeping seniors. A polarization currently exists, with high-end and lower-income housing available, but a gap in the middle. Not enough houses are being built, or can be easily retrofitted, to accommodate the needs of aging in place, rather than making several moves from independent living to end-of-life care. “Housing is the most significant challenge that we face for attracting retirees to Lawrence,” says Hugh Carter, City Commissioner and Task Force Co-Chair. “Frankly, I’m surprised to see that builders haven’t built more things that would attract retirees.” To that end, Carter is working with KU’s New Cities Initiative and Dennis Domer, former associate dean of the KU School of Architecture and Urban Planning, to plan a living development called The Campus VillAGE. The VillAGE would be an intergenerational


housing development for everyone from young families to older retirees, built intentionally to cultivate community between generations and aging in place. Transportation is another challenge. Lawrence has a handful of organizations that offer public transport or specific rides to seniors, but the overall effect has overlaps and gaps. The Lawrence Douglas County Metropolitan Planning Organization, along with KU Transportation Center and KU Transportation Research Institute, are working to consolidate and synchronize transport in Lawrence and to make it friendly to all manner of transport, including use of wheeled devices such as motorized wheelchairs or Segways. Another weak spot is Lawrence’s comparably high tax rate. According to Tax Foundation, Kansas ranked 22nd highest in state and local tax burden in 2010, with a combined 9.7% tax rate. Lawrence’s sales tax rate is the highest of all Big 12 cities. And pensions, including out-of-state pensions, are taxable in Kansas. Social Security income is exempt from state income tax when the federal adjusted gross income is $75k or less. This is likely the hardest part to mitigate for retirees. What did the Retiree Attraction Task Force accomplish? The three immediate action steps of the task force’s report have

already been implemented, the first being to create a single point of access for all needed resources for seniors and those who care for them. The Douglas County Senior Services is expanding its director position to encompass that need, and the organization will act as a portal for seniors into all needed resources. The second action step is to create an advisory board to carry out the recommendations of the task force, which is also being enfolded into the board of the Douglas County Senior Services. “We have an agreement with the city and the county to create a new, larger advisory board that they appoint,” says Mike Wildgen, Interim Executive Director of the Douglas County Senior Services. “This position [of Executive Director] has the capacity to work on a number of the work items that came out of the Task Force’s report. We already have a situation set up to do this — why replicate it?” Another action point, to create a marketing plan for Lawrence as an attractive retirement destination, has been started with Kern Marketing Group. Whether retirees are attracted to Lawrence as a new city to live, or whether just the existing boomers-turning-retirees stay in Lawrence, they are coming. “With the Boomers,” says Carter, “They’re going to demand options. Let’s get in front of this, instead of just reacting.” ■


Does George Bailey Still Exist? CO MM UN I TY BA N KS CO NTI NU E TO I NV EST LO CALLY KE E PI N G DO LLAR S I N LAWR ENC E AND O UR COM M UN I T Y “WO NDER FU L” by ANNE BROCKHOFF photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

When it comes to banks, Lawrence is spoiled for released by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in Decemchoice. Some 20 banks operate here, offering every ber 2012, true community banks are locally controlled, emphasize traditional banking activities in a limited market area and prioriservice a customer might want. tize long-term customer relationships. 

All of them are clearly part of the community, especially when it comes to supporting local non-profits, organizations and events. But are they true “community” banks of the sort It’s a Wonderful Life’s George Bailey might have recognized? Answering that question is harder than you might think. Size is the easiest way to define a community bank, and many industry analysts say any bank with less than $1 billion in total assets qualifies. Size doesn’t tell the whole story, though. How a bank does business is just as important, and not only when it comes to classic films. According to a community banking study

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In other words, they keep decisions and dollars at home - something the FDIC study says is undeniably good for local economies. “Community banks foster economic growth and help to ensure that the financial resources of the local community are put to work on its behalf,” the study says. Among Lawrence’s banks, four are based here: Douglas County Bank, Lawrence Bank, Peoples Bank and The University National Bank.


-George Bailey, Bedford Falls 1946

Their corporate address is part of what helps keep these banks’ focus on the community, says Ted Haggart, president and chief executive of Douglas County Bank, which has total assets of $285 million. “This is where our interests lie,” Haggart says. “Our employees and their families live here, their kids go to the schools and they take part in so much community service.” In the case of Douglas County Bank, that adds up to 82 employees, a dozen board members and its owner—the Beach family of Lawrence. The bank does about 90 percent of its business within the county, with six Lawrence locations and one in Eudora. Lawrence Bank is also headquartered in Lawrence, and its six directors and its holding company’s shareholders all have ties to the city, bank president Les Dreiling says. It operates two locations with

18 employees and has total assets of $69.7 million. Peoples Bank has nine Kansas branches and seven in New Mexico, but the ownership and corporate office is in Lawrence. The Winter family controls 95 percent of the bank, which has total assets of $441 million, according to fourth-generation Lawrence resident, board chairman and chief executive Wint Winter Jr. The University National Bank, which has one location and total assets of $69.5 million, is also locally owned, according to its web site (UNB president Todd Sutherland did not respond to requests for an interview). Together, these banks contribute directly to the Lawrence economy by keeping jobs, executive opportunities, shareholder profits and bank earnings in the community.

COMMUNITY BANKING

41


If an applicant doesn’t qualify, the bank works with them to get to that “yes.” Loan officers help them refine their business plans, seek alternative financing like Small Business Administration loans or match them with advisors like those at Lawrence’s Small Business De“Sometimes when something doesn’t fit the mold or general guidelines, velopment Center. we’re able to say yes,” Haggart says. “There may be a special reason to We’re our own little engine in that way,” says Tim Metz, vice president of loan services for Douglas County Bank.

make the loan, and knowing the character and financial background of our customers helps us do that.” Perhaps even more important, though, is how local control impacts decision-making. Take the loan process at Douglas County Bank. When an applicant approaches the bank, she first meets with a local advisor to discuss the loan’s details. The typical loan is then considered by an in-house loan department; larger loans are reviewed on-site by a loan committee. The largest loan requests are evaluated by another loan committee comprised of board directors. Because all the decision-makers are in Lawrence, the bank often has more flexibility when considering what Haggart calls unique loan opportunities. “Sometimes when something doesn’t fit the mold or general guidelines, we’re able to say yes,” Haggart says. “There may be a special reason to make the loan, and knowing the character and financial background of our customers helps us do that.”

“Most often, loans are not so much denied but we ask ‘have you thought about doing it this way?” Haggart says. “We counsel (applicants) and help them find alternatives or levels of loans that work for them.” When that happens, small business customers often return when they need a home loan or other services. “There’s a kind of loyalty that develops there,” Haggart says. “That’s really important in community banking.” All bankers work hard to understand their local economies and customers. The difference between community banks and their larger competitors is that they tend to give that specialized knowledge greater weight when making lending decisions, the study says. Known as relationship banking, it’s a hallmark of community banks, Dreiling says. “We probably know the local economy better because we’re involved in the local economy,” he says. “It helps being a local bank, having local board members and having local people who understand the community you’re involved with.” That approach clearly benefits entrepreneurs. In 2011, community banks held only 14 percent of total U.S. banking assets, yet they generated 46 percent of all small loans to farms and businesses, the FDIC study says. Building relationships yields another benefit for community banks: fewer bad loans. Community banks consistently reported lower average loss rates in residential real estate loans and loans to individuals from 1991 through 2011, according to the FDIC study. That was partly due to their emphasis on relationship banking, especially during economic downturns. That’s not to say the current recession skipped Lawrence banks. Peoples Bank, which last year closed mortgages in all 50 states, suffered what Winter calls a “massive credit loss” in 2009.


WHAT’S A COMMUNITY BANK? “When the bottom dropped out of the real estate market, we took a good, big hit,” he says. The bank is now experiencing a turnaround, and in 2012 further reduced its bad asset levels, increased its capital and generated net income of nearly $5.5 million. Even banks that didn’t suffer credit losses found conditions challenging. While community banks saw a jump in deposits as customers sought so-called “safe havens,” historically low interest rates prevented that growth from translating into profit.

-Total assets of less than $1 billion -Local ownership, management and decision-making -Focus on traditional

That’s because low rates reduce net interest income, or the difference between the interest rate a bank charges on loans and how much it pays on deposits. Community banks especially felt the squeeze, because net interest income typically accounts for about 80 percent of their revenue, compared to two-thirds of revenue at non-community banks, the FDIC study says. And while a bump in deposits meant community banks had more funds available to lend, the slow economy slashed loan demand. There were simply fewer people buying or building homes, and fewer businesses opening or expanding. “If you don’t have new business and industry opening up, you don’t have the opportunities to make loans,” Dreiling says. The University of Kansas proved a stabilizing force on both jobs and real estate, but growth in Lawrence has stagnated in recent years. That may be changing, however. Haggart, Winter and other local bankers are cautiously optimistic about an uptick in home sales and both residential and commercial construction. More entrepreneurs are seeking loans for new businesses, Dreiling says. “We’ve handled probably half a dozen small business loans in the last six months on start-ups, primarily in Downtown,” he says. Even after Lawrence’s economy rebounds, community banks will still face other pressures, especially on the regulatory front. “The amount of regulatory burden coming out of D.C. and toward our community banks is absolutely staggering,” says Shawn Mitchell, president and chief executive of the Community Bankers Association of Kansas. The passage in 2010 of the DoddFrank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, along with the controversial formation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, means new regulations for banks. Basel III,

deposit-gathering and lending activities in their local communities -Operates within a limited market area -Engages in relationship banking


which is meant to globally standardize bank capital and other requirements, is also expected to impact current rules. Proponents say the changes are necessary to protect consumers. Critics counter that reforms address businesses and practices that aren’t relevant for community banks, ignore their unique structure and saddle them COMMUNITY BANKS with an undue regulatory HEADQUARTERED burden.

IN LAWRENCE:

Douglas County Bank www.douglascountybank.com Lawrence Bank www.lawrencebank.com Peoples Bank www.bankingunusual.com The University National Bank www.unbank.com

Either way, change is inevitable, and figuring out how to manage the new regulations and putting the information technology systems in place to do it will cost banks time and money. “IT and compliance are some of the fastest-growing costs we have,” Dreiling says. Like many community

banks, The Lawrence Bank is too small to warrant its own IT department. Instead, a designated employee handles some issues inhouse and the bank contracts with Sanders Software Consulting in Lawrence to oversee others. It also shares compliance personnel with Great American Bank of De Soto; the two banks are both owned by holding company First Financial Bancshares. So, what about the rest of the town’s banks? There are others that count as community banks, even though Lawrence isn’t their home community. “It goes to the mentality of the bank, not the location,” the CBAK’s Mitchell says. “Even if they’re branched in other towns, they can be just as loyal to those towns as they are to their own.” Central National Bank of Junction City is that kind of bank, says Jay Smith, the bank’s Lawrence market president. The familyowned bank dates back to 1884; it now operates in 22 communities and has total assets of $858 million. “We’re an in-state owned bank that really understands Kansas,” Smith says. “We’re in places like Tipton, White City, Glen Elder and Hillsboro. Those aren’t the profit centers larger banks go after.”


Community banks are often the only banks in small, rural towns, the FDIC says, and they hold a majority of banking deposits in rural counties and micropolitan areas with an urban core population of between 10,000 and 50,000. Lawrence has plenty of other out-of-towners, too, including the $228 million First State Bank & Trust of Tonganoxie and Capital City Bank of Topeka, which has total assets of $410 million. There’s the publicly traded Landmark Bank, small specialists with mortgage production offices in Lawrence, regional bank outposts and branches of some of the country’s largest financial institutions. They all bring something unique to the table, and Lawrence’s locally owned community banks welcome the competition. “A good, healthy banking environment with competition helps everybody,” Lawrence Banks’ Dreiling says. “It keeps banks competitive and allows the customers to have the opportunity to get the best deal.” ■

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DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTS by EMILY MULLIGAN photo by STEVEN HERTZOG

Treanor Architects’ newly renovated building at 1040 Vermont St. makes the firm more visible downtown and consolidates its 47 Lawrence employees under one roof. From East Hills Business Park and the Douglas County Jail to Corpus Christi Catholic Church and Free State High School, the fruits of Treanor Architects’ labor are everywhere in Lawrence. Or, Lawrence is everywhere in the fruits of Treanor Architects’ labor. Either way, it is difficult to disentangle the 64-person, 32-year-old firm’s presence from the city it always has called home. But who would want to? Treanor’s renovation and restoration of the former Buick dealership on Vermont St. into an 18,000-square-foot tracking LEED Gold sustainable office building marks the first time that all of the

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DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTS

firm’s Lawrence employees are under the same roof, since Treanor acquired Lawrence-based GLPM Architects in 2008. Although the company has been settled in its new digs since last fall, the building’s two-story glass-and-brick façade surrounded by new concrete sidewalks still reflects a fresh vision on Vermont St. – and that is no accident. “Each time we do a project, it makes the fabric of the community better,” says founder and Chairman of the Board Mike Treanor. “Buildings are important – you have to live in and around them. That’s a responsibility we have.” Though based in Lawrence, Treanor Architects, which has an ownership group of 16 people, including Mike Treanor, and a board of directors, is far from just a local firm: It designs buildings all


TREANOR ARCHITECTS Founded: 1981

over the United States and overseas in places like Qatar.

more work than I could do on my own, so I hired some others,” Treanor says.

Total employees: 64

The firm’s projects center on five market sectors, which it has developed through a concentrated strategic planning effort: Justice – courthouses, jails, juvenile crime centers Student life – at KU and many other colleges and universities, residence halls, classroom buildings, student unions Science and technology – laboratories, teaching facilities, animal health Historic preservation – renovations, restorations of buildings and landmarks that are at least 50 years old

As the firm grew, Treanor says he began developing relationships with contractors and developers, thinking more strategically about the types of projects that would continue to be successful. Treanor Architects continued to design large homes and developments, and then, as the economy strengthened, expanded to different types of clients, particularly from the public sector, including schools and the state.

Lawrence architects: 13 licensed,

Development – planning and community architecture “We wouldn’t have been as successful through the recession and be in the place we are today if we wouldn’t have been so focused,” Treanor says. “We’re really fortunate and grateful for the opportunities we’ve been given.” When Mike Treanor started working out of his house in Lawrence custom designing large homes during the recession of 1981, he was not calculating the long-term future of the firm. He was just trying to stay afloat among ballooning interest rates. “Then the economy started picking up, and pretty quickly I had

By the time the company began strategic planning sessions in 1997, arriving at the company’s laser-like focus on its key market sectors was no easy feat.

Lawrence office employees: 47

15 in various stages of obtaining architectural licenses Other offices: Kansas City, Topeka, St. Louis, Dallas www.treanorarchitects.com

LOCAL PROJECTS: Free State High School Lawrence Arts Center Douglas County Jail

“We got it down to about 15 specialties and thought we were doing well. But that wasn’t focused enough. We had to get focused and get everyone on board,” says Deb Renick, Director of Marketing. Justice and student life emerged most strongly from the initial strategic planning and have continued to be important business drivers for Treanor. Most of the justice projects have been regional, including jails and county courthouses all over Kansas and Mis-

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souri. Treanor continues to be a national leader in the student life sector, from local projects like renovating KU’s Hashinger Hall and Delta Chi fraternity house to the Emporia State University student union and forthcoming Texas A&M University student union. Being located in Lawrence was instrumental in catapulting the firm’s expertise in student life beyond the immediate area – and eventually internationally. Partnering with KU led to relationships with schools like the University of Missouri and Benedictine College, where Treanor Architects has done many student life projects, and now Treanor Architects is considered one of the nation’s “thought leaders” in the student life sector. In recent years, science and technology have become important industries in the region, with the emphasis on bioscience and the cultivation of the animal health corridor around I-70 between Kansas State University and St. Louis. According to the Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute, the number of life science companies in the region has grown by 17 percent since 2009. “For that market sector to grow during a time that the balance of the economy was shrinking is a testament to the strength of the industry,” says Eric Danielson, Business Development Director. The passage of time and aging of infrastructure have given rise to Treanor Architects’ success and the demand for its services for historic preservation and community architecture. The significant renovation of the Kansas Statehouse stands out as a recent example of that team’s work. “The most sustainable construction is maintaining and restoring, as opposed to building something new,” says Danielson. “Many of the 60s-era buildings coming of age to be considered ‘historic’ right now are on campuses or are courthouses.”

As distinct as these market sectors seem, it’s how they overlap that really has given Treanor an advantage. Often, renovations and additions to courthouses involve historic preservation, or classroom buildings need to incorporate laboratories with either scientific or technological capabilities. This combination of disciplines and intersection of market sectors circle back to the very reason for the company’s new headquarters building on Vermont St. having all of the work groups under the same roof, with the ability to meet and work together. “The new space is comparable to the way we do business with our clients: We collaborate. The way that we work is being reflected in our space, with a team effort and constant meetings in our conference rooms and breakout rooms,” Danielson says.


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have stayed here – that is something special for us,” Johnson says. The firm and its employees also stay active in the community with causes such as Big Brothers-Big Sisters of Lawrence and have designed and built houses for Habitat for Humanity. Many employees serve on local boards of directors, often lending professional expertise to building committees. What are the blueprints for the future of Treanor Architects? Mike Treanor says that he foresees more mixed-use opportunities in college towns like the new 901 New Hampshire building and proposed hotel, retail and residential district at 9th and New Hampshire on which the firm is now working.

Sean Johnson, the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Development Projects Manager, says Treanor Architects’ move to downtown helps many local businesses in the community. But most importantly, the move communicates the commitment the firm has to Lawrence. “We are thankful that as they have grown, they have continued to be dedicated to Lawrence. They have an international reach but

Also, the firm opened a Dallas office two years ago, in addition to its Kansas City, Topeka and St. Louis offices, and plans to establish itself further in Texas, where its student life and science and technology market sectors both are flourishing. But everyone at Treanor agrees that there is no place like home. “Lawrence is special. It’s a fun place to go to school, raise a family and grow a firm,” says Mike Treanor. “I do step back once in a while and think about the growth we’ve had, because it has gone quickly. It’s been exciting.” ■

DOWNTOWN ARCHITECTS

51


WHY LOCAL? FROM HANDSHAKES TO HASHTAGS, BANKING STILL DRAWS ON RELATIONSHIPS by Mark Fagan photo by Steven Hertzog

Community banking is the biggest it’s ever been — everyone, everywhere, all the time — and that makes building relationships more important than ever. “Before, everything was all in person: a handshake and a signature. Your statements were always delivered by mail, unless you stopped by to pick it up in person — and we had a lot of small-business people who did that,” Haggart says, recalling his earliest banking days that continued into his early tenure as president and CEO of Douglas County Bank in Lawrence. “Now we have the best of both worlds: You can have all the Internet services you want, but when you have a question — you need additional advice on the lending side, or even if you don’t know how to use or are not familiar with all of the services available on the Internet — we have people you can talk to. “Our ‘in the door’ service is extremely important. We have someone right here: Someone you trust, someone you have a relationship with.” Emphasizing the people-first nature of the financial industry is nothing new, but these days a personal approach provides the strongest differentiator for steadfast local banks going up against national lenders and dozens of Internet-only competitors that have popped up in recent years.

Cam Fine, president and CEO of Independent Community Bankers of America, which represents and advocates on behalf of 7,000 community banks nationwide, has emphasized the importance of relationships that includes making donations for everything from youth baseball uniforms to vans for veterans, but reaches beyond: “Our business depends on building and maintaining personal relationships with our customers, supporting other small businesses that in turn provide jobs and services, and helping our communities.” Local banks make a difference in the economy, too. They make loans to local businesses, which provide products and services throughout the area. They employ local residents, whose duties include answering questions, addressing concerns and outlining opportunities for customers. And, unlike major online-only operations that run on out-of-town servers, Lawrence-based banks keep revenues in town to continue circulating throughout the community. It’s a business relationship that continues to thrive in Lawrence. For years the town’s locals — like thousands of their community-banking colleagues elsewhere — have run branches, loaned money and generated interest following a traditional path: longtime stability, local knowledge, market savvy and, yes, personal connections. And rather than run from space-shrinking technology that has fu-


eled outside competition, the locals have embraced it. Secure Internet connections empower customer conveniences that include direct deposits, online bill payments, email account alerts and an expanding list of capabilities that give business- and personalbanking customers all the conveniences they want — and all the choices they could imagine. It’s the people that make a difference. “You can open an account without ever walking into a bank,” says Mark Gonzales, regional senior executive vice president and Lawrence market president for Capital City Bank. “You can close your account online and open another account online without ever talking with a person. “But it’s still important for us today to be in touch with every customer. We like to know all of our customers. They’re not just a number. That’s the difference between a hometown bank and a big bank: You’re not just a number.” While most customers use some form of mobile banking many still prefer to have access to personal contacts, whether that’s to call with a question or stop by for some advice or simply to see what possibilities might be ahead as personal and business conditions change.

Maintaining a personal focus remains important through office hours, branch locations and community connections, Gonzales says, but it’s also expanding through social media. Banks can connect with customers through Facebook, on Twitter, using blogs and any number of other existing and emerging online outlets to provide knowledge, collect feedback and stay in touch. In short: Keep the conversation going. “It’s a connection,” Gonzales says.

“Our ‘in the door’ service is extremely important. We have someone right here: Someone you trust, someone you have a relationship with.” -Ted Haggart

Connections long have been key for Les Dreiling, who entered Lawrence’s banking market back in 1981. Mortgage interest rates had climbed into the high teens, and Dreiling was busy collecting loans before becoming a loan officer. Today, as president and CEO of Lawrence Bank, Dreiling counts

WHY LOCAL

53


on his personal contacts to help make a difference — both for the bank and for its customers. Knowing people’s needs and goals can lead to optimal applications of products and services. Different businesses face different challenges and opportunities, further heightening the need for person-to-person contacts. Mutual understanding, after all, offers the best chance for mutual success. “Every business is unique,” Dreiling says, noting that such differences are best discovered in person. “You can’t get that online.” Simply punching numbers into an online system doesn’t offer a full picture of a customer’s potential, he says. Dreiling, for example, wants to understand a customer’s character when considering how or whether to make business loans. He’s never seen a computer program that can gauge what’s inside a person. “Character is a big component of banking,” Dreiling says. “You want to know who you’re dealing with. How do they handle themselves? What do they do in the community?” Banking may be based on numbers, but the overall business is

about so much more. Take a simple example, Dreiling says: As winter thaws, a potential business customer gearing up to provide landscaping services seeks a business loan. A fill-in-the-blanks application might call for payments within a month, which in turn could frustrate the potential customer and cost the bank a solid partner. Reviewing options in person could lead to a deferral of payments until anticipated cash could start flowing. “You open lines of communication and see what you can do and cannot do,” he says. “We’re just as good as our customers. We have to work together. We’ll find a way to get things done.” Commercial relationships make business grow for Emprise Bank in Lawrence, says Cindy Yulich, the bank’s community bank president. About 80 percent of the bank’s business in Lawrence comes on the commercial side, and that 80 percent helps drive new retail accounts. Yulich counts on technology to help her stay in touch with her customers, for whom business isn’t always conducted from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and whose principals aren’t always in the same place. She typically gets 10 or so texts each day from folks with business on


the mind: a house closing coming up, or a contract to be signed in the morning, or a meeting that’s been set up for just before lunch. “It’s all the time, and that’s a benefit,” says Yulich, who considers texts and email crucial to her connectivity. “It’s amazing how much I can get done. If I’m in a lunch meeting, I can keep a deal going, and that’s what’s important.” Yulich started her banking career in 1981, and before moving to Lawrence to open a bank, she had a single connection in town. “The only person I knew in Lawrence was Bob Billings,” says Yulich, of the co-founder and lead developer of Alvamar Inc. “I had no idea how fortunate I was. He introduced me (to people), and it was a great way to start building relationships – relationships we still have today.” Community banks indeed regard their customers as their most valuable currency. Banks strive to meet demands for products, services and conveniences to keep account holders and loan customers happy, because that’s good business. Douglas County Bank is among those where personal service pervades the operation, in a bank where up to 70 percent of all customers make use of online or mobile banking services. And while all 79 employees are available for face-to-face contacts, nine employees in particular are assigned to meet expansive needs through Account Services — a role focused on customers’ inquiries, questions and concerns regarding online, mobile, automatic-clearinghouse and other systems whose convenience extends from computer screens to in-person communications. Relationships are important, of course, and the bank’s president wouldn’t have it any other way. “When someone has a question they want to talk to a real person,” Haggart says. “We do that. The same can’t be said for a bank that’s totally remote and totally internet. We always have someone right here for the customer to deal with.” ■

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Phog Allen, as most around these parts know, was the University of Kansas basketball coach with a stunning career and a fieldhouse dedicated to his name. Glorious though that may be, Allen’s legacy is not confined to basketball. Phog Allen is also the co-founder of the Kansas Relays, which has become a premier national star in its own right. The Kansas Relays began in 1923 in a brand new Memorial Stadium. It was modeled on the Penn Relays, the oldest and largest track meet in the United States. Over the years, thousands of high school, collegiate, and professional athletes in track and field have converged in Lawrence each April to compete.

for the Saturday competition in 2012, but a record 32,000 spectators came in 1972 to watch renowned track athlete Jim Ryun. The expenses of the Kansas Relays is offset by the registration fees from each team, with KU Athletics providing the budget for the bulk of the event. Though this is an expense for the athletic department, Track and Field coach Stanley Redwine says that it comes back to the university. “These high school students have the opportunity to see the University of Kansas and Lawrence,” Redwine says. “Even if they don’t continue to do track and field, they see the campus and consider KU as a college choice.”

“We see some of the best Midwest competition at the Kansas Relays,” says Josh Williamson, Assistant Meet Director. “We’re seeing Olympians and future Olympians, several as high school athletes. Over the span of some years, 33 athletes have competed at the Kansas Relays that were Olympic athletes.”

The athletes that descend on Lawrence also bring a host of coaches, staff and family members that fill every hotel in Lawrence, and some in Ottawa, Topeka and Kansas City. This, combined with other business brought to the city, bring a shot of significant economic benefit from hosting the Relays.

The Relays bring in approximately 5000 athletes to compete over a week’s span in April, with the bulk of the meets happening over a weekend at Memorial Stadium. The attendance varies greatly - 13,500 spectators came

In 2011, the Relays took to the streets in European fashion, and held two events downtown. Competitions for the Elite Men’s Long Jump and the Elite Men’s Shot put were held on 8th Street (between Massachusetts and New Hamp-

56


shire), marking the inaugural street meet not only for Lawrence, but for the U.S. The next year, the downtown competitions changed from Men’s to Women’s Long Jump, allowing an up front view of the strength and massiveness of male shot putters right beside the svelte skill of women long jumpers. “These events really give people the chance to see entertaining athletics in track and field, people who wouldn’t usually be track and field watchers,” says Milan Donley, Meet Director. Marketing the Relays in the distant past fell upon after-the-fact media coverage. But the street events have served as effective PR for the Relays. The downtown competitions are held earlier in the week, acting as a kick off for the weekend events. The 2011 events were well-received and created buzz for the next year’s relays. The 2012 Memorial Stadium Saturday attendance increased by 32% over 2011. The downtown events attendance jumped from 3500 to 5000 spectators for both events. The Relays also tap into other marketing, such as flotrack, an online track and field site that covers the Relays, and a partnership with Adidas to hold mile run and 100-meter dash qualifiers for for an Adidas meet in New York City. Research has been done through KU journalism students, focus groups, interviews and online surveys for more targeted advertising, especially through social media.


KANSAS RELAYS RECORDS

1967 - Mile 3:54.7 Jim Ryun (Former world record holder in several events, Olympic Silver Medalist)

1983 −3 records still stand from the USSR team that participated in the Relays 1987-Triple Jump 57-02.00 Kenny Harrison (Olympic Silver Medalist)

2003-High School 800-meter run 1:51.54 Leo Manzano (Olympic Silver Medalist)

2006 -100-Meter Dash 11.04 Allyson Felix (Four-time Olympic Gold Medalist, two-time Olympic Silver Medalist)

2010-200-Meter Dash 22.32 Veronica Campbell-Brown (3-time Olympic Gold Medalist, 2-time Olympic Silver Medalist and 3-time Olympic Bronze Medalist)

2010 -100-Meter Dash 9.95 Ivory Williams 2012 - Shot Put 71-03.50 Reese Hoffa (Olympic Bronze Medalist)

2012 − 400-Meter Dash 50.94 DeeDee Trotter (2-time Olympic Gold Medalist and one Olympic Bronze)

2012 − 400m Hurdles 48.20 Bershawn “Batman” Jackson (Olympic Bronze Medalist)


With the creation of Rock Chalk Park slated to host the 2014 Kansas Relays, this is likely the last year the event will be held at Memorial Stadium. Competitors who have previously been turned off from coming to the Relays because of Memorial Stadium’s outdated tracks may well reconsider in 2014. Still, all of the Relay’s history is held in Memorial Stadium, and there are plans to properly celebrate its last year as host.

Memories should do more than gather dust... They should gather compliments.

With a dedicated venue at Rock Chalk Park, the Kansas Relays will have options to expand, hold simultaneous events, and attract more teams with faster tracks. The venue will decrease from a 50,000 seating stadium to a 10,000 one, creating a more intimate and hopefully higher-energy atmosphere. “The ticket demand will change since we are not in a 50,000 stadium,” Williamson says, “We will really push advance online purchases of tickets. The Jayhawks are currently one of the top-ranked programs in the nation and we believe we can bring in some of the other top college programs in the nation to compete in the improved facility.” ■

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CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Winds of Change What do I mean when I say there are winds of change ahead for the economic and industrial development program in Lawrence and Douglas County? I mean there are some substantive and positive enhancements taking place in our approach to economic development. First, after more than four decades in the industrial development business, Douglas County Development Incorporated (DCDI) is changing its name to better define its mission and objectives. As the developer of East Hills Business Park on the city’s extreme east side, DCDI has had a positive impact on the region’s economy – making quality sites available to industry, facilitating the creation of new jobs and introducing millions of dollars in capital investment. The DCDI board of directors recently endorsed a proposal to change its name to The Economic Development Corporation of Lawrence and Douglas County. In January, the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce board of directors unanimously ratified that change. The organization will operate as “The EDC” and will partner with the Chamber on many new economic development initiatives, such as the implementation of an ambitious messaging program targeted at the Kansas City metropolitan area. As the president and CEO of the Chamber, I can tell you that we must do a better job of articulating the advantages of our geographic location. This is a smart place, one with outstanding attributes that businesses desire. Our message campaign into Kansas City will focus on two key messages that business decision makers need to hear. First, we are geographically situated for business expansion and second, we are open for business and prepared to advocate for good deals.

by GREG WILLIAMS, PRESIDENT/CEO LAWRENCE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

be prepared to enjoy it. For far too long, our community has been perceived as being unfriendly to business. Working with our partners in the City of Lawrence and Douglas County, we will change that perception. In a recent series of interviews with top business and professional men and women in our region, there was unanimous support for the Chamber’s current economic development plans. That’s an incredible show of support and we are humbled by their faith and confidence. Based on that support, we are considering implementing a strategic capital campaign. If approved by the Chamber’s board of directors, this campaign will allow us to develop and implement a world-class economic development program that is specific, relevant, and realistic and casts a long-term vision for what this region can become. This proposed campaign will focus on key economic development objectives, centered on existing business retention and expansion, marketing and messaging, national business development, regional economic development and entrepreneurship. Most importantly, this campaign addresses the necessity of increasing the ratio of private to public dollars in support of economic development in Lawrence and Douglas County. The City and County have been – and will continue to be – strong partners in the economic growth of our region. Now is the time for the private sector to invest in our region’s economic future. Both our public and private-sector investors will know our goals and strategies and will be updated consistently on our progress in meeting those goals. We are at a crossroads and it is time for us to take action to enhance our local economy and create good jobs for our residents. ■

The next wave of economic activity is coming, moving west out of Johnson County, and Lawrence and Douglas County need to CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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CAN YOU TRULY “MULTI-TASK”? Are you a “multi-tasker”? Let me answer that for you No, not really. Business owners and managers usually have a certain style and energy that enables them to move on multiple things seemingly simultaneously. What is actually happening is they are doing a better job of “time-splicing” than others can. They are able to shift focus quickly from topic to topic and activity to activity. Time splicing does have a useful purpose, and is pretty much needed in managerial positions. However, there are negative consequences that can start causing a reduction in productivity as well as deterioration in a person’s relationships and general sense of well-being. We are finding that we really only do one thing at a time. Some like doing one thing at a time for long periods, and some like to do many “one things at a time” transitioning to each at rapid pace. No matter how you do it, you will just be doing one thing at a time. Research is finding that those who don’t appear to be busy multi-tasking are often actually get more accomplished in a day. These non multi-task individuals are referred to as “single-minded” people. When shifting from one task to another a person will experience a loss of focus and will have to use energy to boot up on the new task even though they may have been doing the task just a few minutes ago. There is always a certain amount of refocusing that is needed as we move from one task to another, and as we get older the refocusing takes longer and is less successful. We have all had those, “I-cant-believe-I-did-that” moments. One of mine was after we had built our home. I did a lot of the work, and was pretty overwhelmed with it. I was out cutting firewood when I got called away to deal with something else. One thing led to another and it was several days later when I was outside and looked into the woods to see my chainsaw setting on a stump where I had left it days before. I completely forgot that I had been cutting wood after the series of interruptions. As a result, I had to take the saw in to have it serviced because it had sat outside in the rain. When we are stressed and overwhelmed we are more likely to make the mindless blunders like my chainsaw event, and it can start costing a business money

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MANAGEMENT

by SHANE M. JONES, L.S.C.S.W.

and time, maybe even the loss of a customer. To be mindful is to be attentive, aware and careful. A person’s job may require a higher level of shifting from task to task, or their personality may be bent that way. However, there are things that can be done to avoid much of the lost focus. To allow your transition to be a slower gives you time to feel more in control of the events. You can place an “event stamp” in your brain that helps you to retain in the front of your mind what it is you were doing and be more likely to get back to it. It really amounts to a purposeful pause before shifting to the new task, which is what they have found single-minded people do. A single-minded person tends to not lose track of the task they want to finish, so when an interruption comes they will deal with it only as much as needed and then get back to their task. However, the problem for a number of single-minded people is their resistance to changing focus at all, which will not work for them in trying to be a boss or manager; their challenge is to speed up the ability to shift tasks and not negatively reacting to those demands. I believe in making a list, but not becoming a slave to the list. Business owners and managers have to be able to deal with a high volume of disruptions; having a list of a few things that are vital for you to feel you make significant progress in a day is very helpful in keeping you going back to those things. ■


Graduation gifts and more

Haskell Gear is HERE!

Customize and purchase online!

www.Haskell.edu


photos by STEVEN HERTZOG

SPACES: LOCAL WATERING HOLES The Sandbar, West Coast Saloon and Yacht Club all have a little coastline in their themes. These three establishments have been a part of the local landscape since the 80s offering a little vacation from our Midwest winters. Take a tropical pub crawl and experience the heartland version of coastal watering holes.

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SPACES


YACHT CLUB 530 Wisconsin Street Looking for 21 brand new flat screen TVs and comfortable new seating? The Yacht Club is the place for you. Established in 1988 the 211 person bar has hosted numerous high school reunions, mom’s weekends and graduation weekend celebrations. “I love it when people choose to have personal event celebrations here,” owner, Steve Prososki explains. The Yacht Club is a family friendly bar and grill offering a lunch and dinner menu and is just the place for celebrations of 30-50 people.

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WEST COAST SALOON 2222 Iowa Street The best burger in town can be seen from the entrance of the West Coast Saloon. The burger is a black Angus 80/20, 1/3 pounder, “you see hear and smell the burger as you walk in the door” says the owner Shaun Trenholm, “even the buns are good and baked locally.” Shaun with two friends and former track athletes, Jim Groninger and Kendall Smith, opened the 200 person bar in 1981. “We were young, broke and really lucky! Owning a bar was envisioned over a beer at Johnny’s!” Shaun explains laughing, “We thought, why not!” The original theme included railroad ties and sand, becoming one of the bars signature design elements. The sand is now gone, but the spacious bar offers a great space for parties, cocktails and, of course, burgers.

BY GUEST DESIGNER JACQUELINE EVANS BA/MA Interior & Architectural Design and Owner, Designer, Artist of Evans Design Firm www.evansdesignfirm.com

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SANDBAR 17 East Eighth Street Longing for “happiness in a glass” says Sandbar partner David Johanning, try one of their 9 specialty tropical drinks adorned with toys in each “it’s our adult version of the happy meal”. The welcoming and playful staff provides a bar to dance on and costumes to wear during their signature Hurricane sing-along song. Complete with an industrial fan (for indoor hurricane theatrics) the downtown bar once known as A.J’s has been around since 1989. Peach Madl (an original owner) was a native Floridian missing the coast. She felt the tropical theme would invite the perfect patrons. The Sandbar is a quaint 49 person bar with wonderful regulars supporting an annual Birthday bash in August and the KU Relays in April. Known for closing 8th street for a beer garden and a band, the Sandbar is the place to be when longing for a tropical celebration. ■

SPACES

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6TH GRADE ENTERPRISE

CHICAGO HERE WE COME There are twenty-seven sixth-year students at Raintree Montessori School, most of whom have attended Raintree since they were three years old. They have waited a very long time to be the oldest, and taking leadership seriously makes the preteens feel important. “We are the go to people!” said Walker Koberlein. “We have to be good examples,” added fellow classmate Spencer Yost-Wolff. What responsibilities do these determined sixth-year students have? Beyond the usual academic requirements, these oldest students have additional math homework, challenging vocabulary studies, lead roles in the school play, doing on-campus community service projects, being mentors to younger students and a much-anticipated trip to Chicago. For six days and five nights in May, they travel to Chicago for a learning field trip. It is a whirlwind nonstop adventure that takes these highly motivated students to study the history of Chicago and visit such Chicago landmarks as the Museum of Science and Industry, the Shedd Aquarium, Lincoln Park Zoo, the Navy Pier, Buckingham Fountain, Grant Park, the Planetarium and the House of Blues. To help pay for the trip, the students work on several different business endeavors throughout the year developing new skills and learning how to fundraise for a shared goal.

SCHOOLS

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The most visible of the fundraisers is the renowned Raintree Coffee Cart, which is managed by two revolving sixth-year students working in teams. The students have to prepare food at home, arrive at Raintree before 7:15 in the morning, set up, choose prices, sell baked goods, make change, and clean up. They try to practice what Lleanna McReynolds, Head of the School, taught them about good service: make the customers feel welcome, establish eye contact, smile, and take customer suggestions. When asked what she thought her child learns while working Coffee Cart, Jenny Barton answered, “She learns to plan ahead and cater to what others need and want. She has learned about how price and quality affect what people are willing to buy. Also, she has learned about working with a partner.” Partners are paired from two different classrooms. If a “worker” can’t go on her appointed day, she is responsible for getting a replacement and has to call and ask another sixth-year student to substitute. Another fundraiser involves drawings to win gift baskets. Throughout the year, the students create different themed baskets according to the season or a holiday. Tickets are sold at various school events such as parent-teacher conferences, book fairs, parent afternoons, and sometimes at coffee cart. Students also create and sell their own original math game boxes. They fill plastic containers with dragon tears, six dice, a math fact cheat sheet, two decks of playing cards, a score sheet note pad, paper game boards, and directions/rules to twelve different math games. Other original products students have made over the years include a biodegradable handmade laundry detergent and repro-

ductions of famous artists’ work collectively created by the students. They advertise and sell their unique products at many of the school events throughout the school. Local Lawrence businesses such as Cici’s, Bambino’s, Orange Leaf and Wheat State Pizza offer the Raintree students additional ways to earn fundraising dollars for their Chicago trip by hosting special nights for Raintree families and giving a percentage of their profits to the Chicago Fund. The local Hy-Vee stores give a percentage of receipts collected to the fund, too. These additional fundraisers are a definite benefit for the students, but just having them is not enough. The students are responsible for promoting the special nights around the Raintree campus. They create posters and flyers to make sure families are aware of the special fundraising nights and encourage participation to help reach their goals. The students raise anywhere from $6,000-$8,000, but they also develop their personal skills in dealing with customers, keep track of the dollars and funds raised, and take pride in helping pay for their trip. When graduates reminisce about their Raintree experience, it is often the trip to Chicago that continues to resonate. Many often return to the Windy City with their parents, the original trip itinerary in hand, to recapture the memories of a time when at a young age, they were given the opportunity to create businesses, earn money and reap the rewards. Contributors to the article were Julia Barton, Zoey Chi, Maddie Dean, Siren Holland, Walker Koberlein, Justin Lee, and Morgan Crabtree. ■


L MH- ON ELITE LIST LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (LMH) was recently named one of the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals® by Truven Health Analytics, formerly the healthcare business of Thomson Reuters. While this achievement has long been a goal, it is the first time LMH has been recognized with this honor, for which hospitals do not apply, and winners do not pay to market. I am especially proud to report that no other hospitals in Kansas or Missouri (or for that matter, Arkansas and Oklahoma) made the 2013 list. This prestigious annual award has been using objective research and independent public data to recognize the best hospitals in the United States for 20 years. The winning hospitals were announced in the February 25 edition of Modern Healthcare magazine. The Top 100 Hospitals award is based on a set of measures that reflect highly effective performance across the whole organization over a three- to five-year time period. These measures include patient outcomes and safety, national treatment standards (core measures), patient satisfaction, operational efficiency, and financial stability.

The 10 measures used to select the 2013 winners are: Patient safety Medical complications In-hospital mortality Adherence to clinical standards of care Inpatient expense per discharge 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, and pneumonia 30-day risk-adjusted readmission rate for AMI, heart failure, and pneumonia Average patient length of stay Adjusted operating profit margin Patient satisfaction rating of overall hospital performance The Truven Health 100 Top Hospitals study evaluated 2,922 acute care hospitals in five categories: major teaching hospitals, teaching hospitals, and large, medium, and small community hospitals. LMH was one of 20 winners in the medium community hospitals category (100-249 beds).

To learn more about the 100 Top Hospitals study or see the list, visit www.100tophospitals.com. According to the study, 100 Top Hospitals outperform their peers by demonstrating balanced excellence —operating effectively across all functional areas of their organizations. The study found that when compared to their non-winning peers: Patients treated at 100 Top Hospitals have better survival rates. Patients treated at 100 Top Hospitals have fewer complications. 100 Top Hospitals follow accepted care protocols and patient safety standards more closely. Patients treated at 100 Top Hospitals have better longer-term outcomes. 100 Top Hospitals hold down expenses. Patients treated at 100 Top Hospitals return home sooner. Patients treated at 100 Top Hospitals report a better overall hospital experience.

We are so proud to share this recognition with our community. It takes a hospital-wide commitment to excellence and an unwavering focus on patients to realize these achievements. These are not easy times to practice medicine or be engaged in the business of health care. Now more than ever it’s essential to be not just a good hospital but a great hospital. I want to personally thank our Board of Trustees, Medical Staff, leadership staff, associates, volunteers and donors for lending their support and sharing their expertise to make LMH the BEST community hospital in the country.

Gene Meyer President and Chief Executive Officer, Lawrence Memorial Hospital

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N E WS M A KERS

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE. GARRETT HARPER WINS MULTIPLE AWARDS, INCLUDING NEW ASSOCIATE OF THE YEAR Wichita, KS. - January 18, 2013Garrett Harper, Licensed Agent with New York Life, won the 2012 New Associate of the Year Award, Rookie of the Year Award, New Agent Life Case Rate, and New GARRETT HARPER Agent Investment Annuity Leader, awarded by New York Life Kansas General Office. Harper was chosen from a group of over 40 talented agents due to his business production during his first full calendar year at New York Life. He continues to provide exceptional customer service with tailored products that his customers appreciate. Harper has the skill and ability to network and works closely with other seasoned professionals in the business, this partnership allows his customers to have access to exclusive products.

STEPHENS REAL ESTATE WELCOMES NEW AGENT Lawrence resident of 20 years, Jan Miller has the privilege to call Lawrence her home. Growing up and graduating college in Wichita, Jan and her husband Sean, moved to Lawrence in 1993 to attend KU. Jan worked professionally in JAN MILLER higher education for nearly 10 years prior to raising their two children. Jan has always followed the Lawrence home market closely and enjoys a real passion for houses, architecture, and home design. Working in real estate has always been a dream of Jan’s, and she is ready to put that passion and dedication to work for you. Whether you are in the market to purchase a new home, or you are selling an existing home, give Jan a call.

LAWRENCE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL NAMED ONE OF THE NATION’S 100 TOP HOSPITALS Lawrence Memorial Hospital (LMH) this week was named one of the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals® by Truven Health Analytics, formerly the healthcare business of Thomson Reuters. Truven Health Analytics, based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is a leading provider of information and solutions to improve the cost and quality of healthcare. This is the first time LMH has been recognized with this prestigious award. No other hospitals in Kansas or Missouri made the 2013 list. The winning hospitals were announced in the February 25 edition of Modern Healthcare magazine. The Truven Health 100 Top Hospitals® study evaluates performance in 10 areas: mortality; medical complications; patient safety; average patient stay; expenses; profitability; patient satisfaction; adherence to clinical standards of care; post-discharge mortality; and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), heart failure, and pneumonia. The data reflects five-year performance in most of the categories, and three years for others, including length of stay, complications and mortality. The study is celebrating its 20th year, and has been conducted annually since 1993.

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NEWSMAKERS


KERN GROUP MARKETING ADDING NEW MEMBERS TO CREATIVE TEAM

RORY HARMS

KERN Group is proud to announce the addition of Art Director, Rory Harms and Graphic Designer, Charles Lewer to their creative team. “We are excited to have both Rory and Charlie here,” KERN Group partner and Creative Director, Ann Frame Hertzog, announced. “They bring solid design skills and also add to our range of abilities that will allow us to continue to grow while taking care of our current clients. Their new ideas and creative points of view are an asset to our creative process.” Before joining KERN, Rory was an art director at JNA Advertising in Overland Park where he was responsible for local, regional and national advertising campaigns. He also worked as a designer at Visual Fusion, Pioneer Balloon, and Wichita Sample Library.

Rory is a 3-time recipient of the Buck Family Scholarship and a graduate of Wichita State University with a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Graphic Design. A Kansas native, Rory grew up in rural Harvey county and now, with his wife Randi, calls Lawrence home.  Prior to joining KERN Group, Charles was a designer with Grandstand Sports and Glassware and a dedicated volunteer designer for Just Foods. Charles graduated with an Associates of Applied Science degree in Graphic Design from JCCC and is skilled in photography, illustration, and digital design. He grew up in Louisburg Kansas and, with his rescued puppy, resides in Lawrence.

CHARLES LEWER

NEW BUSINESSES IN DOUGLAS COUNTY JANUARY - MARCH 2013 A&P HOLDINGS LLC 1333 NORTH BROADWAY WICHITA, KS 67214 ACE LAWN SERVICE INC. 2400 FRANKLIN RD LAWRENCE, KS 66046 ADAMOVICH & M LLC 2451 CROSSGATE DR LAWRENCE, KS 66047 ADVOCACY RESEARCH INSTITUTE, LLC 351 E 1950 RD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006

ALLTASK SERVICES, LLC 3125 CREEKWOOD DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049

BIEMICK UNLIMITED, LLC 404 PASADENA DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049

BROO, KS ELECTRIC, INC. 1107 N 1712 RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049

ANSWERDOWNLOAD.COM, LLC 2136 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST LAWRENCE, KS 66046

BLACKBIRD ENGINEERING LLC 1520 CROSSGATE DR LAWRENCE, KS 66047

ASH INVESTMENT INC. 501 ELDRIDGE ST LAWRENCE, KS 66049 BENGALI COMMUNITY OF LAWRENCE INC 2525 VIA LINDA LAWRENCE, KS 66047

BLUEJACKET TECHNOLOGY LLC 1022 WILDWOOD DR LAWRENCE, KS 66044

BUILDERMAKER, LLC RR 1029 LAWRENCE, KS 66046 BUTLER PETROLEUM LLC 407 MICHIGAN ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

BRAND ADVANCE LLC 2104 PIKES PEEK LAWRENCE, KS 66044

CALLAWAY RENTALS LLC 2008 JENNY WREN ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66047

CANOPY DISTRIBUTION LC 712 WALNUT ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 CAPITOL RESEARCH LLC 505 ROCKLEDGE ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 CINNABAR CORPORATION 3514 CLINTON PARKWAY LAWRENCE, KS 66047 CMJ LC 1501 KASOLD DR LAWRENCE, KS 66047

LLC

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CNG DEVELOPMENT LLC 1605 COG HILL CT LAWRENCE, KS 66047 COBBLESTONE, LLC 3736 SW COBBLESTONE PL TOPEKA, KS 66610

GEEK DOJO INSTITUTE PO BOX 815 BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006

LAWRENCE FITNESS ACADEMY LLC 1719 W 20TH ST TERR LAWRENCE, KS 66046

GOLDEN STONE, LLC 2513 PRAIRIE ELM DR LAWRENCE, KS 66047

LAWRENCE PODIATRY CENTER LLC 5100 BOB BILLINGS PARKWAY LAWRENCE, KS 66049

CODY’S APPLIANCE REPAIR LLC 1619 E 18 TERRACE LAWRENCE, KS 66044

GOLIATH LLC 1701 W 4TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

COLD HANDS WARM HEART LLC 625 FOL, KS RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049

GREEN CONCEPTS LAWN & LANDSCAPE LLC PO BOX #627 LAWRENCE, KS 66044

CORE ONE CONSTRUCTION LLC 1058 FIRETREE AVE BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006

H2M LLC 308 N CARVER DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049

COUNCIL ON AMERICAN ISLAMIC RELATIONS - KANSAS, INC. 1113 ANDOVER ST LAWRENCE, KS 66049 COX COMMERCIAL, LLC 6309 SW 28TH ST TOPEKA, KS 66614 CSI STORM CHASING, INC. 710 E 22ND ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 DAVE JENSEN PAINTING, LLC 850 E. 13TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66046 D-BOX MOBILE ADVERTISING LLC 2900 BOB BILLINGS PKWY LAWRENCE, KS 66049 DECAN PROPERTIES, LLC 4833 NEVADA RD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 DIGNIFIED DOGGIES LLC 2529 CRESTLINE COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66047 ELKHORN VALLEY RAILCAR CO. 215 AMES ST BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 EUPHORIA LLC 4405 STONE MEADOWS CT LAWRENCE, KS 66049 EVERYDAY MAINTENANCE SOLUTIONS LLC 3307 WEST 26TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66047 FREESTATE FIREBIRD FOOTBALL PARENTS GROUP INC. 413 SIERRA DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049 FYIFK, LLC 520 OHIO ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

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HANDBUILT PRODUCTIONS LLC 822 MASSACHUSETTS ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 HAPPY TAILS LLC 2027 N 1100 ROAD EUDORA, KS 66025 HAVAN, LLC 646 INDIANA ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 HEARTLAND VAC SERVICE LLC 1900 CROSSGATE DR LAWRENCE, KS 66047 HERNDON VENTURES INC. 1617 MATTHEW CIRCLE LAWRENCE, KS 66044 HUDY’S SPORTS PERFORMANCE LLC 1036 STONECREEK DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049 INSPECTION READY INC. PO BOX 1711 LAWRENCE, KS 66046 INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AFRICAN EDUCATORS 4214 W 12TH LAWRENCE, KS 66049 J & B CHANG, LLC 2201 W 25TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66047 JAY ELLE COMPANY LLC 3818 WESTLAND PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 KANSAS CITY SHOOTING MASTERS, INC. 714 E 22ND ST EUDORA, KS 66025 KAW PADDLER LLC PO BOX 442621 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 LACONIC CONSULTING LLC 2104 PIKES PEEK PLACE LAWRENCE, KS 66044

LAWRENCE UNITED, LLC 123 WEST 8TH ST, SUITE 204 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 LIVE AGAIN INV LLC 571 E. 1000 RD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 MANAGE MY INFO, LLC 2310 ORCHARD LN LAWRENCE, KS 66049 M-CON ELECTRIC LLC 5815 HARVARD RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 MERMAL ENTERPRISES, LLC P.O. BOX 156 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 MICKEY REALTY, LLC 717 HICKORY ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 MJSHIP, LLC 601 KASOLD DR STE D105 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 MRM CONTRACTING, LLC 172 E 1000 ROAD BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 MUSCLE AND MIND, LLC 1008 NEW HAMPSHIRE SUITE 200 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LETTER CARRIERS, BRANCH 104 PO BOX 104 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 OLD MILL APARTMENTS, LLC 905 EMERY ROAD, APARTMENT, 2A LAWRENCE, KS 66044 PEGASUS PROPERTIES LLC 4000 W 6TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66049 PERFECT FIT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC 4501 WIMBLEDON DR SUITE F3 LAWRENCE, KS 66047 PJEM INC PO BOX 152 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 PRAIRIE SHELTER, LLC 1184 E 1087 RD LAWRENCE, KS 66047

QUALITY LAWN CARE, LLC 1349 N. 1000 ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66046

SUMMER MOON, LLC 2500 W 31ST ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

QUEEN LIZZYS LLC 1211 W 5TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

SUSTAINABILITY COMMONS INSTITUTE 1230 WAGON WHEEL LAWRENCE, KS 66049

RAA HOLDINGS LLC 2008 JENNY WREN ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66047 RADI8R LLC 1141 VERMONT ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

SYMBIOTIC BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT CENTER, INC. 2140 HASKELL AVE. LAWRENCE, KS 66047

RED HAT CONSULTING, LLC 4701 BALTUSROL COURT LAWRENCE, KS 66044

TEAM GP VELOTEK, LLC 2512 KENSINGTON ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66046

RINGNECK REMODELING & MAINTENANCE LLC 914 PINE ST EUDORA, KS 66025

THE BIRDFEEDER LLC 1108 S OHIO ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044

ROCK ‘N’ L TRUCKIN’ INC. 2264 N 1300 ROAD EUDORA, KS 66025 ROCKHAVEN FILMS LLC 1926 MAINE LAWRENCE, KS 66046 ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONSULTING LLC PO BOX 442601 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 SALSA LIFE, LLC 2902 ATCHISON CIRCLE LAWRENCE, KS 66047 SCHNEIDER SPORTS PERFORMANCE AND FITNESS LLC 1226 NEW JERSEY ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 SCRATCH BAKERY LLC 923 ANNA TAPPAN WAY LAWRENCE, KS 66044 SEEDCO STUDIOS LLC 1828 ATHERTON CT LAWRENCE, KS 66044 SHUTTERMASTER PHOTOGRAPHY LLC 3901 STETSON DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049 SLEEPINGCOWS LLC 1117 S SOMERSET CIRCLE LAWRENCE, KS 66049 SLIDE ROCK, LLC 1711 E. 1000 RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 SNAP FUNDRAISING, LLC 3208 W 19TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66047 SPROCKET MARKETING, LLC PO BOX 1520 LAWRENCE, KS 66044

THE ELKHORN VALLEY RAIL CAR COMPANY 215 AMES BALDWIN CITY, KS 66006 THE FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TEAM, LLC 1719 W 20TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66046 THE ROOST, LLC 419 LYON ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 VARGUDO INCORPORATED 4000 W 6TH ST LAWRENCE, KS 66049 VASAUSA LLC 796 N 1750 RD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 VICTOR&LOUISE LLC 640 OHIO ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 WALNUT ST, LLC 646 WALNUT ST LAWRENCE, KS 66044 WHEELER CORNER, LLC 208 ARIZONA ST LAWRENCE, KS 66049 WHEN IT RAINS, LLC 1329 STONECREEK DR LAWRENCE, KS 66049 WRIGHT STUFF, LLC PO BOX 941 LAWRENCE, KS 66044 WRONG KATA TRIO, LLC 2516 YALE ROAD LAWRENCE, KS 66049 ZEPPELIN PROPERTIES LLC 2217 RIVIERA DR LAWRENCE, KS 66047


WH OS E

DE SK ?

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Kansas People – Kansas Values

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Hospital in Kansas and Missouri

Among the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals® Thanks to the unwavering dedication of our leadership, physicians, nurses, staff and volunteers, Lawrence Memorial Hospital has been named one of the top 100 hospitals in the United States. We are proud to be the only hospital in Kansas and Missouri – and one of only 20 mediumsized community hospitals in the country – to receive the highly esteemed 2013 Truven Health 100 Top Hospitals® award.

Now in its 20th year, the 100 Top Hospitals program by Truven Health Analytics (formerly the health care division of Thomson Reuters) objectively evaluates 10 clinical and financial measures over a three- to five-year period of time. As a 100 Top Hospital, LMH has demonstrated that our patients have better survival rates, fewer complications, better long-term outcomes, shorter hospital stays and superior overall hospital experiences. When you choose LMH, you’re choosing a hospital that outperforms thousands of other hospitals nationwide. To learn more about what makes LMH a top U.S. hospital, visit www.lmh.org/qualitymatters.


Lawrence Business Magazine