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Building the Student Center, 1980. LA students helped.

faculty chairs all went the way of the desks; the only remaining artifact of that era is the lectern, which, beautifully restored, now graces the stage in the theatre. Walking down the ramp from the Study Hall, past the furnace room on the left, you would pass an open area on the same side that served as a coat room for the day students, who were few in number in those years; beyond that, where the bookstore is now, were a couple of classrooms, one of which, according to a veteran faculty member, was originally a smoking room. The three science labs were on the other side of the hall, pretty much as they are today; they comprised the whole department until the classrooms behind them were added in the mid-1970s. If you continued all the way down the ramp to the area under the Study Hall, you would find the bookstore on your right and the original McDonald Library on your left, in the space now occupied by the IT department and the physics classroom (i.e., the whole righthand side of the corridor). Student mailboxes occupied the space now used for the computer system’s servers. If you look closely at the photo of the library, you’ll see some furniture that hung around for many years after the facility moved — not to mention the bust of Albert Pillsbury, which has had at least 10 homes over the last 50 years.

bathroom. Francis Head showed a movie every Saturday night (200 kids crammed in that room on hard, blue steel folding chairs!), pausing between reels to sell candy from the window of the bookstore. Manly John Wayne films were the rule in those boys-only days; deviations from the norm weren’t warmly welcomed, as Mr. Head found out one night when he screened a movie about the über-manly Royal Canadian Mounted Police — starring Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald, who spent most of the film singing to each other on horseback. His puzzlement at selling out his stock of Good and Plenty candies at the break didn’t last long: Eddy and MacDonald were soundly pelted with them when the second reel started! The opening of the Ansin Academic Building in 2004 meant repurposing much of the Schoolhouse. The science wing remains, while most of the upstairs classrooms became offices; some have been subdivided into smaller spaces. The ground floor, too, might confuse an older alumnus who has not visited campus in a while. The language lab, which moved around on that floor before being relocated upstairs, is now in Ansin. More recently, the Head’s Office moved down the hall from its original area to make room for an expanded admissions reception area. Outdoors, recent changes have been dramatic: The gracefully winding new entrance road opens onto an expanded parking area, while Powderhouse Road is now for pedestrians only, except for emergency vehicles. The new turf Murbach Field has been completely redesigned and re-landscaped; and to the south, the apple orchard is now part of the campus. Across Main Street, recent

Across the hall from the library, where the physics lab is now, was a single long room known as the Audio-Visual Room, probably so named because everyone had to have one in the 1950s. The entire inventory of audio-visual equipment consisted of one 16mm movie projector and a CinemaScope screen that covered the end wall facing the Stone Athletic Center dedication, 1993.

2002: Elm Tree Hall constructed • 2003: The Ansin Academic Building built 8 LAWRENCE ACADEMY FALL 2018

Profile for Lawrence Academy

Academy Journal, Fall 2018  

Lawrence Academy's annual alumni magazine.

Academy Journal, Fall 2018  

Lawrence Academy's annual alumni magazine.