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lawrence MANONGDO ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


table of CONTENTS


civic waterfront GARDEN DIAMONDBACK CITY

artist PAVILION DIAMONDBACK CITY

urban INFILL BALTIMORE, MD

urban DWELLING WASHINGTON, D.C.

pigmental STUDIOS GEORGETOWN, D.C.

baseball STADIUM COLLEGE PARK, MD

infrastructure innovation CENTER COLLEGE PARK, MD

study abroad SCANDINAVIA DENMARK, FINLAND, SWEDEN

study abroad ITALY

FLORENCE, ROME, VICENZA, COMO

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civic waterfront GARDEN DIAMONDBACK CITY

Course: ARCH 400 Studio I Duration: 3 weeks Faculty: Brian Kelly; Paul Mortensen Critic: Matt Miller

Located in the theoretical site of Diamondback City, the garden serves to connect the city to its waterfront. Through the process of additive and subtractive space-making, the garden focuses on the inter-relationship of architectural promenade and discrete figural spaces. Initially, the site was divided into four quadrants, but I decided to blur the lines between the quadrants by adding a central element that focuses on the idea of interconnection. This central belvedere acts as an observatory with views towards the garden and waterfront.


COMMERCE STREET

LAKE SHORE DRIVE


CENTRAL ELEMENT

Focal point of the garden blurs the lines between quadrants and provides visual access to the garden and waterfront.

SECTION

A cascading waterfall is integrated into the site to adapt to the elevation change between quadrants, providing a gradual slope down towards the waterfront.

CIRCULATION

Movement through the site is defined by a series of water elements.


PRIVATE SPACES

Discrete spaces diverge out of the path of circulation.

PLAN


artist PAVILION DIAMONDBACK CITY

Course: ARCH 400 Studio II Duration: 4 weeks Faculty: Brian Kelly; Paul Mortensen Critic: Matt Miller

As an extension to the previous project, a proposal to incorporate a building within the garden was proposed that would house a gallery and artist’s studio along with a modest residence for the artist. Given that the building had to be a cube, I decide to focus my design on the compositional whole of the pavilion in relation to the garden. To develop on the previous projects idea of a central element, I put an emphasis on creating an edge that continued throughout the center of the garden, which in hand, enforces the importance of the central axis and the placement of the building. This edge also emphasizes the transition from public to private, where the residence house is located.


FORM MAKING PROCESS

STU

GA

DIO

LLE

RY

SECT

PLAN


A

B

B A

TION B-B

The form of the building is organized such that the service areas are pushed to the sides to allow visual transparency through the building. The central axis is further emphasized by the free-standing columns, creating a hard edge throughout the garden. The entance of the building is expresse by a loggia, which also extends out to the residence house. The loggia also serves as an edge that further defines spaces. SECTION A-A


urban INFILL BALTIMORE, MD

Course: ARCH 402 Studio III Duration: 4 weeks Faculty: Jason Winters

Located in Baltimore, Maryland just north of the Washington Monument is the site of a performing arts center designed for The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts. The program consists of a performance theater, gallery, workshops, offices, and studios. Due to the site conditions, daylighting was an essential part in the design process. To maximize daylighting, I did a series of sun studies that allowed the form of the building to take shape. Through these studies, I was able to design a clerestory window that provided natural sunlight down into the buildings core. The form of the building also serves as a sculpture itself as it appears to be lifted from the ground.


51° ALTITUDE

EQ

27.5° ALTITUDE

WS

SS

74.5° ALTITUDE


STRUCTURE CONCRETE STEEL

The sun angles in plan shows that a semicircular object will allow for maximum lighting into the building.

CIRCULATION

PRIMARY STAIR SECONDARY STAIRS

The combination of both sun studies in plan and section allowed the form to take shape.

PROGRAM

STUDIO OFFICE EXHIBIT WORKSHOPS PERFORMANCE

W N The sun angles in section shows how much light can get through to the bottom when half a semicircular object is applied.

S E


A

B

B

A

SECTION A-A


SECTION B-B


urban DWELLING WASHINGTON, D.C.

Course: ARCH 402 Studio III Duration: 4 weeks Faculty: Jason Winters

This mixed-use apartment building is located in the outskirts of the Adam’s Morgan district. Situated at the intersection of 18th St and California St, the building serves as a transitional point from commercial to residential. Responding to the commercial nature of 18th St, retail was placed at the base of the building. The building consists a total of 41 units with access to an outdoor terrace on each floor. At the height of the terrace is a larger public area geared towards community gathering.


E S

CAL

IFO

RNI

AS

T TH

18

N

ST

W


C

NIA

OR

IF AL

18 TH

ST

ST

Program responds to existing site conditions

Push building in for residential entance and outdoor amenities

Extrusion through the building to accommodate neighboring sky bar view

The facades of the building was designed with the human scale in mind. Wooden features provides a sense of warmth that a home signifies.

CALIFORNIA ST FACADE

Total of 41 units


Circulation reinforced by its structure

Series of terraces on the roof for the public

18TH ST FACADE

Wooden vertical panels that draw people to the rooftop


Extruded to the right is half of a typical floor massing of a fairly symmetrical building. The units are organized such that, the two bedroom apartments are oriented north and studios oriented south with the one bedroom in between.

At its core, the building includes a series of terraces that orient south for maximum sun exposure and great views towards Washigton D.C. As the terraces move down, the space has the ability to extend indoors. To provide privacy for home owners from the public terrace, the glazing of the hallways are scattered with wooden louver panels, while still providing natural light into the hallway.

Section through a hallway showing ho


ow light is filtered through the louvers.

TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT 900 SF

ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT 700 SF

STUDIO APARTMENT 400 SF


pigmental STUDIOS GEORGETOWN, D.C.

Course: ARCH 600 Comprehensive Design Studio V Duration: 8 weeks Faculty: Garth Rockcastle Collaborators: Yoel Alemayehu & Robert Grooms Pigmental Studios is an animation studio dedicated to creating an interactive environment between the artists and the community. Located next to the intersection of Key bridge and the Whitehurst freeway in Georgetown, is the design of an animation studio/museum for Pigmental Studios. Problems of the site included vibration, noise, topograph and integration. flooding, circulation, topography, The design of the building is geared towards creating a place for community engagement. The building mass is lifted and supported by a family of columns, creating the connection from north and south that the site was missing. By lifting the structure, the building serves two functions; a workplace and an outdoor amenity - an animated plaza under the building as an extension to the underside of the Whitehurst freeway; and a theater to the park in the north, using the facade as a projection screen. To keep the integrity of the company, a building mass was created to house all the production studios that needed the privacy. Where the program asked for more collaboraion, the building becomes more transparent.

MASSING CONCEPT BUILDING MASS

LIFT

SEPERATE

PENETRATE


structural SYSTEMS The building is held up by a family of columns, each having their own individual function and aesthetic. The hanging element in the atirum is not a column, yet it serves the same function by transferring structural loads through tension. The mechanical column is the lungs of the building, providing a comfortable working environment for the employees and visitors. The elevator column provides vertical circula tion while also providing panoramic views. The lightwell column provides natural daylighting and and also serves as a funnel for water collection. The egress column is made of concrete to provide the building with the structural capacity to carry the loads of the cantilever.

The family of columns are a series of smaller columns created to make a much larger functional column. By interlocking the smaller columns, the overall structure becomes much stronger as it is now able to handle lateral loads, decreasing the shear stress that a vertical column would experience. The columns are attached to the floor through a steel ring channel.


mechanical SYSTEMS The mechanical stack is located in the middle of the building and serves as the lungs of the building. The mechanical stack runs vertically through the building and is exposed to the interior by glass. All heating, cooling, and ventilation runs through the stack and is distributed throughout the different floors. By using both a VRF system and Geothermal system, the HVAC system becomes more effiecient as both systems are able to complement each othe other. Using the components of an HVAC system, a VRF system was created to fit the top of the mechanical stack. This system is more efficient as it is able to use return air.

Geothermal (Winter)

Geothermal (Summer)

VRF System

Piezoelectric floors was used in the ground floor to convert mechanical enegy into electricity to animate the underside of the building.


facade SYSTEMS

Vertical Louvers

animate and change direction according to the weather

The building has two dynamic facades on the north and south. Kalwall is used in the north facade to provide high thermal performance and to function as a projection screen for the park. The north facade also is slightly curved to provide optimized viewing angles for the viewers. The south facade utilizes vertical louvers that animate and adjust according to the weather.

Exposed post-tension caps highlighting the importance of structure in the building

Post-tension concrete

allowed for smaller floor depth and longer spans

Spider glass curtain wall implies the idea that the building is being lifted

South Facade


East Facade

North Facade


baseball STADIUM COLLEGE PARK, MD

Course: ARCH 601 Topical Studio VI Duration: 8 weeks Faculty: David Cronrath, Brian Kelly, Hooman Koliji

The concept for the stadium design was to create a sense of transparency and intimacy between fans, athletes, and coaches by bringing them closer to the game of baseball. By creating a program that interacts with the fans, athletes, and coaches, the stadium is a place everyone can enjoy whether it's game day or just a regular school day. With most of the team oriented programs geared towards stadium drive, the glass facade allows fans to visually participate in the lives of the baseball team and see the process they go through everyday to put forth a winning environment. Here, the batting cages, weight room, and coaches offices are located in one dynamic space. Oriented on a slight o angle, the coaches offices are hung from the ceiling overlooking both the batting cages and the baseball field, bringing them closer to the athletes and the fans. Through the articulation of parts and materiality, the stadium stands out within the context of its surroundings. By using terra cotta as a material, the stadium is able to achieve a look similar to the brick used on campus, while also introducing a unique element to the campus that is bound to draw attention.


PHASE 1 PHASE 2 PHASE 3

PHASE 1 - the current stadium will stay in place while the new Bob “Turtle� Smith Stadium and residential building is being constructed. The entry plaza and the foundations for the bridge is laid.

PHASE 2 - the current baseball stadium will be demolished and the new baseball field will be laid. The connecting north-south bridge is constructed and a new service route is created to access both football and baseball stadiums. Educational buildings are added to the south and a new student union is added to complete the baseball stadium.

PHASE 3 - residential and educational buildings completes the master plan for the athletic complex. Landscape and park space creates communal and event spaces for pre/postgame activity.


Layers of Transparency - the lack of visual connection to the current stadium serves as a component for design. To increase the visual access to the stadium, a series of screens are introduced on the facade to create a transparent wall. To further expand the transparency of the stadium, the screens open up to allow full visual access while serving as a canopy over the sidewalk for pedestrians.


Roof Truss with Tieback Anchor

Steel Connection to Concrete Terra Cotta Panels Vertical Structural Mullions Secondary Horizontal Mullions Terra Cotta Baguettes

Glass Covered Canopy

Articulation of Parts - the components of the stadium are articulated and expressed throughout the stadium. Although each part is unique on its own, the parts come together as a whole to create a thoughtfully composed stadium design. The press box level is supported by a steel truss canopy that is tied back to the ground to allow a column free space for maximum viewing angles.


North Elevation

West Elevation


Stadium Entrance

Suite Plan

Bridge Approach

Concourse Plan

Clubhouse

Clubhouse Plan


Section through entrance

Section through batting cages / coaches offices

Batting Cages / Coaches Offices


infrastructure innovation CENTER COLLEGE PARK, MD

The IIC building is envisaged as an incubator for collaborative and innovative research center and laboratory facilites. The fundamental design concept is to develop transparent proximity and adjacency to researchers and students alike in an effort to nurture a culture where powerful ideas can emerge and excite the young minds of the tomorro The IIC engineering innovators of tomorrow. building concept study examines ways in which collaboration, excellence and leadership can be embodied in the architecture of a new facility that brings together research centers, research laboratories and state-of-the-art teaching facilities. The IIC building provides a unique architectural identity to the innovation, excellence and leadership of the A. James Clark School of Engineering. The architectural expression of the image/brand/aesthetics of this new center for innovation on the College Park campus will act as both a beacon and backdrop for recruitment and facult staff and students in retention activites for faculty, the creation of the new plaza between Kim Hall, Clark Hall and the new IIC building. The plaza facade is a distiguishing focal element of the design, acting as a major vertical surface in the presence and character of the new plaza.


Concept Study


study abroad SCANDINAVIA: CULTURE & PLACE DENMARK, FINLAND, SWEDEN summer 2014

Course: ARCH 478 F/Z Duration: 4 weeks Faculty: Peter Noonan Karl Du Puy A 4 week study abroad trip across Scandinavia during the summer of 2014. Analysis of Scandinavian architecture were examined through sketch studies. All sketches were done on site.

FINLANDIA HALL HELSINKI, FINLAND


STOCKHOLM PUBLIC LIBRARY STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

JYVASKYLA TAMPERE LAHTI TURKU

HELSINKI STOCKHOLM

GRUNDTVIG’S CHURCH COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

COPENHAGEN


study abroad ITALY: ARCHITECTURE, URBANISM, AN FLORENCE, ROME, VICENZA, COMO summer 2015

Course: ARCH 678 R/V Duration: 6 weeks Faculty: Brian Kelly Michael Ambrose A 6 week study abroad trip across Italy during the summer of 2015. Analysis of Italian architecture were examined through sketch studies, charcoal, and watercolor.

FORUM OF AUGUSTUS

TEMPLE OF VESASIAN AND TITUS


ND LANDSCAPE

TRAJANS MARKET

COMO VICENZA

VENICE

FLORENCE

ROME

NAPLES

TEATRO MARCELLO


PLAN / SECTION SANTA MARIA DELLA PACE, ROME

SANTI GIOVANNI E PAOLO, ROME


ARCH OF JANUS, ROME

PIAZZA DI MONTEVECCHIO, ROME

BASILICA PALLADIANA, VICENZA


Lawrence Manongdo

lmanongdo20@yahoo.com


Lawrence Manongdo Portfolio 2017