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Emotional Intelligence By Joshua Nave Thanks to Netflix, I recently watched season 1 of the now cancelled TV show, Heroes. The show revolves around a diverse group of people that find themselves developing a range of special powers. Some of them use these powers for good, while others predictably follow a darker path. Much of the first season deals with the various characters learning to control their new found abilities. I kept expecting Peter Parker to swing in on a web and remind the cast that with great power comes great responsibility.

I don’t have super powers. It’s probably a good thing too, because I’d be far too tempted to use them for selfish gain. But I do have the same power and same issues that face everyone else in the world, and how we use our power and abilities affects how well we’re able to do our jobs. The characters in Heroes struggle to get control over their powers, either learning how to access them or how to control them when their emotions take over. How do you keep control of things when your emotions run hot? Are you able to contain them and deal with them at an appropriate time or do you allow them to boil over and affect your work or your relationships with colleagues? Emotional Intelligence, or the ability to recognize and control our own emotions or those of others, is one of the multiple types of intelligence recognized by researchers in the field of

intelligence. Some postulate that it is at least as important, if not more so, than IQ in predicting an individual’s ability to process new information. Learning to control or manage your emotional reactions to various stimuli is a key element of success in your career. For years I used the ‘’count to 10’’ method, until I started cheating and doing it almost instantly. I tried counting to 10 in various languages, but eventually I became too fast in all of them. Now when I start to feel emotional about something while working I stop and ask myself why I’m letting it control me instead of taking control of it, and that generally puts it aside for me to deal with at a later time. What methods do you use to keep your emotions in control?

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Emotional Intelligence