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Inside

B Y T H E L AWA I ‘A E D I TO R I A L B O A R D

ISSUE SIXTEEN FALL 2014

VOTE TODAY TO FISH TOMORROW

Publisher Pacific Islands Fisheries Group

Hawaii’s Premiere Alaska Fishing Destinations

Editor Pacific Islands Fisheries Group pacificfisheries@gmail.com

• Anchor Point Lodge • Shelter Lodge

Design Darin H. Isobe > Art Director darini@hawaiiantel.net Contributing Writers Gary Beals, Kyle Castro, John Clark, Gabe Iaea, Kurt Kawamoto, Brian Kimata, Aunty Kwong, Garrett Lee, Jeremy Lee, John Madrigal, Bill Newton, Tyler Okimoto, Ed Sugimoto, Ed Watamura Advertising Inquiries pacificfisheries@gmail.com Letters and Comments pacificfisheries@gmail.com Lawai‘a Magazine Every attempt is made to publish Lawai‘a 4 times a year. Printed by Journal Graphics Portland, Oregon USA

GO ON AN

Alaska Reel Adventure!

www.Lawaia.net

Reservations & Info (808) 551-1993 info@alaskareel.com

$3.95

ISSUE NO.

16

barbless 12/0 VMC

eta’s MitchelULUAl Tak ON PG. 14 21 LB.

Display until

Salmon • Halibut • Black Cod • Rockfish Dungeness Crab • Alaskan Spot Shrimp

January 31,

2015

O-NO

IZAKI MEET GARY HASH SIDENT MAUI CASTING

CLUB PRE

ON THE COVER: MitchellTaketa’s 21 lb. ulua, caught baitcasting using fresh tako, barbless circle hook and 125 lb. leader.

8

LAWAI‘A MAGAZINE

Photo: John Johnson

ONO FOR AKI-N

One of the great things about publishing Lawai‘a magazine is receiving the wonderful fishing stories and seeing memorable photos going into each publication. There’s so much culture and tradition to be grateful for here in Hawaii and to share and celebrate these with our readers is truly rewarding. Lawai‘a magazine was born out of concern for the future of fishing in Hawaii. There are many areas throughout Hawaii where our coastal environment and local marine resources have mutated into the highly impacted shorelines we see today. Population growth, housing construction, stream channelization, erosion, shoreline hardening, nutrient loading, introduced species, resorts, commercial water tour activities, golf courses and much, much more all factor into our current land and seascapes. However, too often fingers are wrongly pointed at our fishing community as the scapegoat to Hawaii’s marine resource ills. To help inform the community about fishing in Hawaii and perpetuate our fishing and seafood eating heritage, we try to share with our readers today’s great fishing people-stories and images, in particular, those that exemplify the values of responsible fishing and caring for our resources. We choose to celebrate everything that makes fishing and seafood in our island communities great. But we must not take for granted the things we value today, otherwise they may not be there tomorrow. Currently, there are many issues out there with the potential to threaten the continuation of our fishing and seafood practices and traditions. If you enjoy fishing and local seafood like many of us do, be responsible and informed and do your part when issues or problems arise that impact your way of life. Today, there are many of these issues on the horizon but, if you just take a moment to understand them, you can help assure our resources will continue to be healthy and sustainable for our children’s children. Together we will be able to preserve our fishing and seafood eating opportunities for them and future generations to come. Here’s a snapshot of some of the issues that deserve your immediate attention as they may have a negative impact on your way of life. Links have been provided for you to learn more and do your part! AND, DON’T FORGET TO VOTE!!!

• Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument – President Obama announced a plan to close almost 50% of the US waters in the US Pacific Islands to fishing on June 17th. Despite outcries from the Pacific Island fishing communities, fishing organizations, Fishery Council, Governors from American Samoa, Guam and CNMI and others, President Obama established the world’s biggest marine reserve in the south-central Pacific Ocean on September 25, 2014. The new reserve enlarges the existing 50 mile no-fishing closures, created by the Bush Administration in 2009, to 200 miles around Johnston Atoll, Jarvis Island and Wake Island. The President’s original proposal also included expanded closures around Howland and Baker Islands, Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef, but these were dropped in his final announcement. Two thirds of the Hawaiian archipelago was also previously closed to fishing with the creation of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Monument. (for more info www.wpcouncil.org and www.fpir.noaa.gov) • Hawaiian Monk Seals – NOAA has yet to issue a final decision on determining critical habitat for this endangered species. Monk seal populations continue to rise in the main Hawaiian islands while NWHI populations decline. (for more info www.fpir.noaa.gov) • Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary – NOAA plans to release their draft management plan that will feature a new ecosystem approach and potentially new species. The fishing community provided significant input during public meetings and comment periods on the initial drafts that suggested including other marine mammals, sea turtles and coral reef species. (www. hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov) • Coral listing under the Endangered Species Act – NOAA lists 20 new corals as threatened under the ESA, of which 9 are thought to occur in the US Pacific Islands. Although none occur in Hawaii, the rationale for listing establishes a new precedent by including “impacts related to climate change and ocean acidification as the primary threat,” in addition to “ecological effects of fishing and poor land-use practices.” (for more info www.fpir.noaa.gov) • Bottomfish Restricted Fishing Areas (BRFAs) – The State Department of Land and Natural Resources unveiled a proposal in January 2014 to remove half of the 12 BRFAs that were established in 1998 and revamped in 2007. Since then, there has been no movement through the Chapter 91 public rule making process to initiate removal of the six BRFAs. (for more info www.dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar) • Implementation of the Billfish Conservation Act – Congress passed the Billfish Conservation Act in 2012 to prohibit the retention and sale of billfish or marlin in the United States. Through congressional support, the Pacific Islands, including Hawaii, were able to garner support for an exemption to this prohibition as we fish for and eat billfish here in the islands. If you want to keep marlin on the menu, keep an eye on this issue as strong recreational and sport groups will continue to encourage the US to eliminate the Pacific Island exemption. Also, Pacific Striped marlin has recently been listed as overfished by the international management organization. This will trigger the US to explore management changes for US domestic vessels who harvest this species. (for more info www.hfact.org) • New Bag Limits on Maui for Uhu and Kumu – DLNR recently took final action to approve new bag limits of two uhu and two kumu per person per day on Maui. The rule package must now be signed by the Governor to be implemented into law (www.dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar).

ISSUE SIXTEEN 2014

9

Profile for Lawai'a Magazine

Lawai'a Issue 16  

Lawai'a Issue 16