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LAUREN MARSHALL ARCHITECTURE, URBANISM, LANDSCAPE, AND DESIGN


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

ACADEMIC PROJECTS D O O V E R I S L A N D SAUNA

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S U B U R B A N C O UNTER CULTUR E 2 4

WOR K (SPACE) I N PRO G RESS

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V IVAR IUM

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KI TCH ENS I N TH E PA RK

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PROFESSIONAL PROJECTS C O N E S T O G A C O LLEGE

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GEOR GE B R OWN CO LLEG E

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U O I T N O R TH CA MPUS

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LAUREN MARSHALL

DOOVER ISLAND SAUNA A N O RT H E R N BAT H I N G R I T UA L University of Toronto Lauren Marshall Sarah Martos

The Doover Island Sauna design is motivated by its structural strategy: a monolithic Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) structure that allows for a continuous structure to flow between the sauna interior and exterior. The charred exterior wraps around the soft pine interior; this material contrast accentuates the disparate conditions of interior and exterior climates, the Bowick’s city and cottage life, and the dynamic between solitary and sociable environments. The Doover Island Sauna design embraces its contrasting envelope and contents, its relationship to the surrounding landscape, and provides the Bowick family with a space for ritual and retreat. The charred pine exterior is a technique borrowed from the traditional Japanese method of burning timber surfaces to catalyze oxidation and thereby enhance the wood’s resistance to fire, water, weathering, and insects. The NLT structure is appropriate for the scale of this small project and allows for strength, durability, sustainability, and energy efficiency to complement the project’s function and form. Additionally, the prefabrication process of NLT structures allows for a lightness and efficiency in the construction of the curved massing on the remote island site. The deck walkway to the sauna provides a sense of procession and transforms into a plunging deck at the water’s edge as one descends from the cottage towards the water. The ‘floating’ sauna appears to hover above the water and positions itself as an intermediary element juxtaposed between the ground and water conditions.

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Project Graduate Academic course work; completed for Professor Shannon Hilchie of Blackwell Engineering Location Doover Island, Northern Ontario Structural strategy Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) Site strategy Prioritizes the best light and views from the island site. The project orientation provides privacy from neighbouring properties Environmental strategy NLT provides significant insulation for this northern Ontario cold region; the structure can be manufactured off site to minimize damage to the remote island and rural environment. Software Revit, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator


DOOVER ISLAND SAUNA

Above . Render The soft pine interior is ideal for the dry sauna heat. The panoramic window takes advantage of the breathtaking view and minimizes heat loss.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Bowick Cottage 20m

Section 2

Seating for 4 - 6 people

Structural Wall (exterior)

Structural Wall (interior)

Structural Wall (exterior)

Section 1 Vestibule and Changing Area Sauna Stove Compartment

Structural Wall (exterior) Plunging Deck Lake Nipissing

North

Above . Floor Plan The simple design allows for the monolithic NLT structure to seamlessly enclose the two private spaces: the seating and changing area.

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DOOVER ISLAND SAUNA

Doover Island Sauna Lavigne 5.2km

Existing Bowick Cottage

Lake Nipissing

Proposed Outhouse

North Bay 50km

Proud Island

Proposed Boathouse and Launch

Toronto 300km

North

Above . Site Plan The existing Bowick Cottage rests in the centre of the island. The accompanying structures to the north and south of the island are oriented for efficiency and privacy.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . Render As one approaches the sauna, the colour, depth, and richness of Lake Nipissing are reflected in the dark charred facade texture.

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DOOVER ISLAND SAUNA

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LAUREN MARSHALL

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A

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A

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4 6

ROOF PLAN

1:25

7% SLOPE DOWN

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7% SLOPE DOWN

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ROOF PLAN

1:25

Roof Plan 6

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A 1

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ISOMETRIC JUNCTIONISOMETRIC DETAIL JUNCTION DETAIL

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FLOOR PLAN

Above . Structural Plans See opposite page for structural annotations

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B

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2X6 NLT WALL ASSEMB

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OPENING IN NLT WALL FOR EXTENT OF HATC REFER TO SECTION

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2 1/4” DEEP NOTCH IN ASSEMBLY, TO RECEIV PERPENDICULAR NLT ASSEMBLY. REFER TO JUNCTION DETAIL

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TEPERED 2X6 LUMBER FOR NLT WALL ASSEM CURVED SECTIONS

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2X6 NLT WALL ASSEMB 2X6 NLT FLOOR ASSEM

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OPENING IN NLT WALL FOR EXTENT HATC STEEL PLATESOF BOLTED REFER TO SECTION UNDERSIDE OF NLT FL ASSEMBLY, REFER TO 2 1/4” DEEP NOTCH IN ASSEMBLY, TO ASSEMB RECEIV 2X6 NLT ROOF PERPENDICULAR NLT SLOPED TO DRAIN, ASSEMBLY. REFER TO REFER TO SECTION JUNCTION DETAIL

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8 4 9 5

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B

2X6 NLT WALL ASSEMB TEPERED 2X6 TO LUMBER ROOF, REFER SECT FOR NLT WALL ASSEM CURVED SECTIONS 2 1/4” DEEP NOTCH IN ASSEMBLY, TO RECEIV 2X6 FLOOR ASSEM NLTNLT ROOF ASSEMBLY

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STEEL PLATES BOLTED UNDERSIDE OF NLT FL ASSEMBLY, REFER TO

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2X6 NLT ROOF ASSEMB SLOPED TO DRAIN, REFER TO SECTION

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2X6 NLT WALL ASSEMB ROOF, REFER TO SECT

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2 1/4” DEEP NOTCH IN ASSEMBLY, TO RECEIV NLT ROOF ASSEMBLY

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6 2

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ANNOTATIONS

1:25

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FLOOR PLAN

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Floor Plan

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ANNOTATIONS

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DOOVER ISLAND SAUNA

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2x6 NLT wall assembly

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opening in NLT wall assembly for extent of hatched section, refer to section

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2 1/4” deep notch in NLT wall assembly, to receive perpendicular NLT wall assembly. Refer to isometric junction detail

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tempered 2x6 lumber used for NLT wall assemble at curved sections

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2x6 NLT floor assembly

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steel plates bolted to underside of NLT floor assembly, refer to section

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2x6 NLT roof assembly, sloped to drain, refer to section

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2x6 NLT wall assembly below roof, refer to section

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2 1/4” deep notch in NLT wall assembly, to receive sloped NLT assembly

A

9

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ISOMETRIC JUNCTION DETAIL

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1

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6

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Annotations

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1

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Roof

Vestibule and Changing Area

2900

2

2600

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2X6 NLT WALL ASSEMBLY

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OPENING IN NLT WALL ASSEMBLY FOR EXTENT OF HATCHED SECTION, REFER TO SECTION

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2 1/4” DEEP NOTCH IN NLT WALL ASSEMBLY, TO RECEIVE PERPENDICULAR NLT WALL ASSEMBLY. REFER TO ISOMETRIC JUNCTION DETAIL

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TEPERED 2X6 LUMBER USED FOR NLT WALL ASSEMBLY AT CURVED SECTIONS

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2X6 NLT FLOOR ASSEMBLY

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STEEL PLATES BOLTED TO 4080 UNDERSIDE OF NLT FLOOR ASSEMBLY, REFER TO SECTION

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1

819

Floor

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Structural Wall (exterior)

3990

2440

6 2

1

1

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Structural 5 Wall (exterior)

ANNOTATIONS

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Isometric Junction Detail

A 1

3

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East Elevation

2X6 NLT ROOF ASSEMBLY, 3440

east

SLOPED TO DRAIN, REFER TO SECTION

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2X6 NLT WALL ASSEMBLY BELOW ROOF, REFER TO SECTION

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2 1/4” DEEP NOTCH IN NLT WALL ASSEMBLY, TO RECEIVE SLOPED NLT ROOF ASSEMBLY

north

Deck

320

1870 1650

Section 1 Above . Annotations, Section, Elevations The isometric junction detail illustrates the simple and prefabricated structural strategy.

West Elevation

west

south

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LAUREN MARSHALL

WORK(SPACE) IN PROGRESS O N W R I G H T ’ S C O N T R I B U T I O N S T O T H E W O R K S PA C E Howarth Wright Fellowship 2017-2018 University of Toronto Lauren Marshall

Work(space) In Progress, an exhibition, public presentation, and publication, documents research on the intersections of Frank Lloyd Wright’s workspace designs and conceptualizations of gender. This investigation highlights the work of Nancy Willey, an influential client who shaped the open concept kitchen in Wright’s designs. In the early 20th century Frank Lloyd Wright participated in the movement to liberate the housewife from the confines of cooking duties by merging the kitchen with the living and dining room. This new domestic model did not appear independently with Wright’s designs, but it progressed from earlier kitchen adjacency models, European architectural trends and demands from both feminist and non-feminist women’s organizations. The female client who occupied the workspace was often the catalyst for changes to Wright’s domestic architecture and yet, he stifled progressive attitudes of domesticity by maintaining that her designated spaces were dominated by the male gaze. Wright’s open concept kitchen, or the ‘workspace’ as he labelled it, was canonized in his Usonian home designs and catalyzed by the style-mediating project, The Willey House. Investigation into the spatial adjacencies, context, and scale of domestic architecture before and after Wright merged the workspace with social spaces is one way to understand the possibility of an alternate future within the contemporary open concept workspace.

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Primary Research I visited more than 35 of Frank Lloyd Wright’s buildings across Japan and the United States. In numerous instances I interviewed the occupants of the residences; in one remarkable visit to the Reisley House I was able to meet with Roland Reisley, a Wright client himself. Archival Research: Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York City; Steve Sikora, Minneapolis Minnesota; Lynnette Widder, Columbia University, New York City. Curatorial strategy The exhibition shelf display system is illustrative of The Willey House kitchen strategy in that the shelves partition space and display exhibition materials. Location & Site strategy The exhibition is centred in the primary student corridor at 1 Spadina Crescent, The Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto. This location was strategically located to envelop students in the history of work as they travel to and from their open concept work/studio space. Material strategy The plywood material provided sturdy construction, a memory of Wright’s material palette and harmonized with the existing plywood present at the architecture school. The angles of the exhibition mimicked the geometry of the site corridor. Professional Development Frank Lloyd Wright’s Graphic Design with Ellen Lupton at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City: a brief design course aimed at understanding Wright’s graphic design techniques, patterns and colours. Smart Craft Studio, Hida, Japan: a design build studio focused on combining new technologies with traditional craftsmanship in order to investigate a new aesthetic functionalism.


W O R K ( S PA C E ) I N P R O G R E S S

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Top . Photograph An exhibition detail illustrates the various elements of archival material and representational objects that I used to curate the exhibition.

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Bottom . Photograph An exhibition detail illustrating the Nakoma sculptures present in each of Wright’s residences. These sculptures depict the female form as subservient to Wright’s architecture

and as a reductive form of fertility and domestic labour.


W O R K ( S PA C E ) I N P R O G R E S S

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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Carport Workspace Living Room Entry Rug Gallery Bedroom Study Bath

‘WORKSPACE’, House for Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm Willey, Scheme 2, 1934 Minneapolis, Minnesota; Plan (representation) The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Nakoma (1923, Madison Wisconsin) As featured in various Frank Lloyd Wright designed homes and gardens. The generic details illustrate Wright’s ideals of ‘Indianness’ and feminine forms.

Sprite I (1913, Chicago, Illinois)

Top . Drawing, The Willey House Plan Wright labels the Willey House kitchen ‘Workspace’ and in doing so he redefines the spatial relationships between domestic labour, work habits and gender.

Centre . Archival Drawing, The Willey House The Willey House marks the first open-concept kitchen for a middle-income family in North America. Wright’s design is catalyzed by the influential client, Nancy Willey.

Bottom . Drawing, Nakoma sculptures A drawing exploration of the Nakoma sculptures in their reductive forms.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

KITCHENS IN THE PARK A ‘ T O W E R I N T H E PA R K ’ R E D U X University of Toronto Lauren Marshall

Kitchens in the Park challenges the Greater Toronto Area downtown guidelines in an urban and architectural form that connects tower sites across deep parcels. This progressive urban model redefines space adjacent to a prospective pedestrianized street to offer an alternative solution to typical street walls. Hurontario Street in Mississauga is preparing for the construction of a new LRT which will transform the neighbourhood in population density, built form and street life activity. Two pressing challenges Hurontario Street will encounter include the accommodation of post-war tower residences and connecting the existing neighbourhood amenities, such as park networks, employment zones and residents to the forthcoming Hurontario Street activity. Kitchens in the Park embraces the existing tower residences by creating a series of pedestrian streets that link the tower structures through program and built-form. These paths extend from the residential towers to the adjacent ravine networks and community amenities beyond. I tested this urban strategy at the north-east boundary of Hurontario Street and Burnhamthorpe Road at a site of 16 tower residences cater-cornered to Square One mall. This urban strategy is prepared to be deployed at several nodes along the north-south axis of Hurontario Street. The new street-wall is offset from Hurontario Street with a heavily treed buffer which celebrates the existing ‘tower in the park’ phenomenon and offers a new urban strategy that recognizes the importance of existing suburban built forms.

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Project Graduate thesis research completed under the direction of Professor Michael Piper. Recognition ERA Toronto the Good, Exhibition Location Hurontario and Burnhamthorpe intersection, Mississauga, Ontario Site strategy The project hugs the boundaries of residential tower property lines in order to add meaningful program to an already dense neighbourhood. The project pathways delineate an intimate front yard schema and a sprawling backyard. Preservation strategy The ground floors of the existing tower structures are renovated to accommodate commercial activity as recommended by the Tower Renewal Partnership. New Kitchens in the Park mid-rise mixed-use residential buildings continue this retail activity along the north-south axis parallel to Hurontario Street. Architecture Strategy This project retrofits and maintains the existing concrete towers and connects them programmatically and structurally to new proposed low to mid-rise housing blocks. Urban Strategy Kitchens in the Park redefines the relationship between large-scale residential towers and forthcoming pedestrian activity along Hurontario Street. The project celebrates suburban built forms to ensure that typical street wall forms do not define the future of suburbia as a heterogeneous copy of urban mixed-use corridors.


K I T C H E N S I N T H E PA R K

Above . Interior Library Perspective Community programs take the form of playgrounds, town squares, community kitchens and flexible gathering spaces where east-west paths intersect with existing tower entrances.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

403

S q u a re O n e Mall

Exi sti ng Towers B u r n h a m t h o r p e R o ad

Kitchens in the Park C e n t r a l P a r k way

New Resi denti al Forms G O Tr a i n

D u n d a s S t re et

N ew Resi denti al & C ommerci al Forms

Queensway

Q u e e n E l i z a bet h Way N ew Pathways Left . Contextual Site Plan The east west pathways (as indicated by the dotted lines) connect communities adjacent to Hurontario Street across deep, inaccessible lots.

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Right . Design Process Diagrams Kitchens in the Park grows between the property lines of the existing residential towers and their infrastructure.


K I T C H E N S I N T H E PA R K

2 - L ow Rise Resident ial Or Com m unit y Hub Built On Ex ist ing Par king Gar ages

3 - Re s i de nt i a l And Com m e rc i a l M a s s e s a re Bui l t Adj a c e nt To Ne w P a t hwa y s

Kitchens in the Park Existin g Site BURNHAMTHORPE

4 - P a t hwa y s Conne c t F rom Huront a r i o To Ra v i ne And O ppor t uni t y Z one s Be y ond

Kens i ngton Market, by contras t

DRIVE

MAJOR STREET

1 - N ew C ommercial St reet Wal l A d j acen t To Huront ar io

COLLEGE STREET

250M AUGSUTA STREET

LIPPINCOTT STREET

KANEFF CRESCENT

450M

100M BELLEVUE AVENUE

150M

150M OXFORD STREET

100M

NASSAU STREET

100M

DUNDAS STREET

DENISON STREET

250M

KENSINGTON AVENUE

ST.ANDREW STREET WALES AVENUE

ELM DRIVE

SPADINA AVENUE

LEONARD STREET

BATHURST STREET

HURONTARIO STREET

100M BALDWIN STREET

175M

250M

CENTRAL PAR

KWAY

N

Populat ion ~10,000

Top . Strategic Massing Added massing is placed strategically along the Kitchens in the Park pedestrian corridors. Massing corresponds to the adjacent existing built structure and the vastly unused landscape.

N

1:5000

Bottom Left . Comparative Neighbourhoods The population density of Kitchens in the Park illustrates the need for greater commercial and community interaction opportunities. A street grid of ~100m, similar to that of Kensington

P opul a t i on ~3,000

1:5000

Market, suggests the ideal distances between walkable and accessible Kitchens in the Park pathways.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . Pathway Perspective Kitchens in the Park creates intimate front yards and opportunity for life to breathe into the human scaled attributes of the neighbourhood.

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K I T C H E N S I N T H E PA R K

Above . Site Plan The street wall massing is offset from Hurontario in an effort to find an alternative massing strategy that suits the ‘tower in the park’ phenomenon.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Top . Conceptual Section The juxtaposed front and back yard typologies are reminiscent of the single-family home segregation of private and public spaces.

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Bottom . Exterior Perspective The suburban street wall is buffered from Hurontario Street activity by a dense row of trees.


K I T C H E N S I N T H E PA R K

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LAUREN MARSHALL

SUBURBAN COUNTER CULTURE A DOMESTIC DISRUPTION University of Toronto Lauren Marshall

Suburban Counter Culture considers the implications of progressive trends in domestic habits through the design of a residential settlement, community amenities, and an urban strategy. Located in Cooksville Mississauga adjacent to a forthcoming mobility hub, this project provides a new residential form that bridges the gap between tower residences and the low-rise sprawling forms of suburbia. This project gives emphasis to ground floor activity which provides the neighbourhood with community kitchens within a domestic setting. Suburban Counter Culture shifts domesticity to the public realm as a strategy to reimagine the suburban narrative as a prescient built environment for shared living practices. The unassuming architectural forms knit into a small site that complete a pedestrian corridor between residential neighbourhoods and the Cooksville GO transit hub. Each residence centres around a semi-public rentable kitchen and a shared private kitchen accessible to the residents of the site. Each unit is autonomous with minimal individual kitchen-specific space, making the ground floor the focus of domestic labour. Domestic labour and affective labour are activities that have become normalized and as a consequence taken for granted. There is an urgency to address spatial and social domestic practices in order to prioritize domestic labour as a valued vocation to continue human existence. Suburban Counter Culture challenges the typical private space of domestic labour and establishes the suburban narrative as a landscape for a contemporary public realm. Above . Contextual Site Axo Suburban Counter Culture occupies a strip of high-density residential development surrounded by one-storey commercial strip malls and single family homes. The juxtaposition

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between high-rise and low-rise development is accentuated by the sprawling landscapes and parking lots. The new LRT (pictured) along Hurontario will transform the Cooksville GO station into a major transit node. The resultant

Project Graduate thesis project completed under the direction of Professor Michael Piper Recognition Irving Grossman Thesis Prize University of Toronto, 2018 Canadian Architect Thesis Project Award Shortlisted, 2018 Location Cooksville Community, Hurontario and Dundas Street, Mississauga, Ontario Urban strategy The implementation of a new LRT on Hurontario Street will connect the suburb to greater transit networks and create a transformed transit node, the Cooksville GO station. In contrast to the auto-centric Hurontario Street, this new pedestrian prioritized network runs parallel to Hurontario Street and operates at a human scale. The pedestrian network connects residential neighbourhoods lacking pedestrian friendly options for access to community amenities and the Cooksville GO station. Site strategy The series of mid-rise buildings offer a porous landscape for pedestrian access along the north-west axis of the site. Architectural strategy This residential project operates on variations of the ground floor design. Ad-hoc use and function is encouraged to allow for programmatic supply to shift based on the community needs. Rental units are designed to provide for flexible programming and varied numbers of occupants dependent on the household trends. Software ArcGIS, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Rhino, V-Ray

urban growth requires progressive planning with a focus on a public realm that foreshadows social trends.


S U B U R B A N C O U N T E R C U LT U R E

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LAUREN MARSHALL

403

Square One Mall

Burnhamthorpe Road

Central Parkway

Go Train

Suburban Counter Culture Dundas Street

Suburban Counter Culture path

Queensway

Queen Elizabeth Way Left . Context Site Plan The proposed site is located in the southwestern portion of Cooksville. The dotted lines indicate proposed pathways that allow for greater pedestrian access parallel and adjacent to the

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Hurontario corridor. The western pedestrian pathway connects each of the east-west streets, the project site, and the forthcoming Cooksville GO transit hub.

Right . Perspective looking North The pathway connecting the Suburban Counter Culture residential block to the Cooksville GO station is illustrated in red.


TO CITY CENTRE

S U B U R B A N C O U N T E R C U LT U R E

DALE NEX T STAT ION ERIN

NEX

CP RAILWAY COOKSVILLE GO STATION

N D IX

IE

JOH N STRE ET

SGT DAVID YAKICHUK PARK

JOHN C. PRICE PARK

KIRWIN AVE

WY AT ION PK

KIRWIN STREET

NUE HILL CRE ST AVE HURONTARIO STREET

CO NF ED ER

COOKSVILLE GO STATION

T ST A T IO

AGN ES STR EET

EET DUN DAS STR EET DUN DAS STR

CAM

SH EP AR

IL L A RD

D AV E

TO PORT CREDIT

KIN G STR EET

Suburban Counter Culture path

Above . Community Plan The Suburban Counter Culture site is inserted into the Cooksville Community Official plan.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Lake Simcoe

Lake Ontario Hurontario LRT

US

Lake Eerie

Cook Street

Top . Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) The Hurontario LRT connects the Mississauga City Centre to an adjacent UGC. Ontario has identified several UGCs which, over time, will transform the urban/suburban/rural landscapes.

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Bottom . Site Section The community amenities and shared kitchens are highlighted on the ground floor.


S U B U R B A N C O U N T E R C U LT U R E

Above . Interior Library Perspective The public kitchens are an extension of the Mississauga Public Library. These kitchens are aligned with the Cooksville Official Plan, and shifting trends in eating and cooking habits.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Ag

nes

Str

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k oo

C

Above . Perspective The revealed first floor plan illustrates two variations on the semi-public/private dining rooms and kitchens.

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t

ee

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Cook Street

S U B U R B A N C O U N T E R C U LT U R E

Agnes Street

Left . Ground Floor Plan The apartment units are configured as a series of repeated structures with slight variations. The ground floor is prioritized as the site of eating, dining, and publicized domestic labour.

Right . Design Process Diagrams A 3m x 3m grid was established at the outset of the design process. Suburban Counter Culture’s massing strategy prioritized access to light and porosity to increase pedestrian access.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . Interior Perspective The apartment units are designed as a system of rooms without specific functions; each apartment can adapt to the needs of its users.

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S U B U R B A N C O U N T E R C U LT U R E

Typical Second Floor Plan

Typical Ground Floor Plan

Top . Unit Second Floor Plan A kitchenette is placed in the central area of the apartment. The kitchenette is offset from the gridded plan to highlight its significance to the overall apartment scheme.

Bottom . Unit Ground Floor Plan The building structure is supported by the concrete core and steel beams on a simple 3m x 3m grid. The glazed facade allows for activity to pass between the interior and exterior spaces.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

VIVARIUM

AN EXHIBITION OF LIFE University of Toronto Genevieve Simms Lauren Marshall

Vivarium is a result of ‘The Comprehensive Studio’ semester which demanded that I centre four distinct courses, Building Science, Structures, Environmental Systems and Design Studio, around one design solution. With a given program of a Toronto Transit (TTC) Museum, this studio challenged me to resolve many facets of one architectural scheme while determining a clear landscape, urban and architectural strategy across an urban site. Vivarium presents the TTC user and the active transportation network as the curatorial interest of this museum. The soaring atria provide an above-ground expression of underground activity through the exposition of TTC activity traditionally hidden from street life. Here, the intimate relationship between the above and below ground environments illustrates the interconnectedness of the city and emphasizes that the people of Toronto are the fundamental building blocks of the city. Vivarium is composed of two main building parts: the bar-building which contains community space at a residential scale and the atria space which contains the exhibition space at an urban scale. The excavated volume conceptually links together the three datums of the transportation system: the street, the subway, and the forthcoming LRT. From the main exhibition space all three of these elements are visually linked and they create the sectionally-captivating experience that is at the core of the Vivarium architectural strategy.

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Project Graduate coursework completed under the direction of Professor Pine Petricone Location Ben Nobleman Park, Allen Road and Eglinton Street Intersection, Toronto, ON Structural strategy Hollow-core concrete and steel tensile structures are the driving forces of this project. Prefabricated concrete architectural wall systems and an engineered curtain wall act as the two primary facade systems. Curatorial strategy This museum showcases the activity of people and motive transit as the primary objects of exhibition. Displays of transportation history and projected transportation trends envelop the tertiary exhibition spaces. The dramatic heights and depths of each space transform this TTC station into a living museum. Site strategy The bar-building and finger-like atria preserve and frame the existing Ben Nobleman park. The atria are grand and physically in line with oncoming traffic of Allen Road. The bar building is low and residentially scaled to its adjacent singlefamily neighbourhood. Environmental strategy The south facing louvred facade and narrow building proportions enhance the passive heating and cooling strategies. Software Revit, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Rhino Physical Models laser cut, CNC machine, hand modelling


V I VA R I U M

Above . Exploded perspective The structure, circulation and exterior facade elements are isolated from one another to illustrate the relationship between the comprehensive building components.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

oad

Allen R

treet

ton S

Eglin

hearn

Strat Road

ad

en Ro

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Everd

e

venu

ett A

Winn

Above . Site Plan The building frames Ben Nobleman Park along the east-west axis, while the atria are in dialogue with the existing Eglinton West Station along the north-south axis.


V I VA R I U M

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20m 10m

First Floor Plan

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14 Below Grade Plan -1

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West Atrium East Atrium Cafe Restaurant Auditorium Small Exhibition Bookstore

Top . First Floor Plan The narrow bar-building contains the community space programming, while the atria offer light, dynamic views, and connection to street life from all perspectives.

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Mechanical Kitchen Lobby TTC Station Connection Bookstore Library Community Space

Centre . Ground Floor Plan The building is integrated with landscaped contours that provide access to Vivarium on several levels.

Bottom . Below Grade Plan -1 The bar-building is embedded into the landscape, while the atria spaces plummet four levels below grade in order to connect with various underground transit networks.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . South Elevation Oblique An illustration of Vivarium’s relationship to the existing and new park spaces, the residential scale, and Eglinton West Station.

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V I VA R I U M

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . Sectional Perspective The section illustrates the contrast between the atria and bar-building. The below grade exhibition space is dramatic and light filled while the bar-building is intimate and modest.

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V I VA R I U M

Above . Sectional Perspective The exhibition space below the atrium is celebrated through its scale and connection to life above and below grade.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . Technical Details Section through glazed facade, sequential details and section through atrium connection to bar-building.

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V I VA R I U M

A 140

EXTERIOR

W1

5 13

APARTMENT 110

298

16

15

F1

13 19 2 19

100.00 top of floor sheathing

4 22

31

64

19

32

89

261

H1 435

356 152

6 5 4 22

3

14

23 16

138 48

5

FN2 7

8

127

1

9

13 10

6

G1

473

5% slope 99.37

38

140

2

top of finished grade 12 105

80

APARTMENT B10

25 200

60

305

89

13

FN1

467

100

11 address:

haus auf dem berg 2000 Somerset Street Ottawa Ontario

drawn by:

Shane Dalke

drawing title:

section detail at typical exterior wall at ground floor and foundation wall scale:

date:

October 26 2012 Peteris Lazovskis

1:5

Lauren Marshall

drawing number:

A1 1 of 3

Above . Technical Detail Section through atrium connection to ground; Sobotec, Ltd. Architectural Wall System facade, floor, ground and foundation.

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LAUREN MARSHALL

CONESTOGA COLLEGE

W E L C O M E C E N T R E A D D I T I O N & I N T E R I O R R E N O VAT I O N Architecture Counsel Inc. Oliver Beck Amanda McLeod Lauren Marshall

Recognizing that prospective students and their parents form an impression of a school within the first 10 to 15 minutes of their arrival, Conestoga College sought to create a new Welcome Centre that would foster community and leave a nurturing impression. As such, the mandate for this new Welcome Centre was to align the college’s intended strategic messaging and service delivery model with the flow, look and feel of a new renovation and addition. The ACI team sought space adjacencies that would bring together prospective and existing members of the college community, with special attention to creating student service and operational efficiencies. The Welcome Centre includes a large entry hall, lounge, bookable meeting rooms and a number of student service desks and offices. The project takes advantage of a unique wooded landscape that forms the backdrop for light-filled flexible spaces. The addition and renovation inject vibrant colours and extend an authentic message of welcome

Location Kitchener, ON, 2014 Client Conestoga College Executive Board Design process I was involved in the schematic design, millwork drawings, design development, site visits and construction administration for this project. Total Construction Cost $2 million Project Size 2000m2, one storey Software skills ArchiCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator

ADDITION

ROOF STRUCTURE T.B.C. -OPEN WEB STEEL JOIST -STEEL DECK -BRU

EXISTING

EXISTING STAIR BEYOND

EXISTING 2ND FLOOR OFFICE

GWB BULKHEAD

INTERIOR LIGHTING

WOOD SOFFIT EXTERIOR LIGHTING - AT UNDERSIDE OF SOFFIT

EXISTING BRICK

WOOD CLADDING

FIRST POINT OF CONTACT DESK

EXTERIOR LIGHTING - AT BASE OF BENCHES SLAB ON GRADE THERMAL BREAK

Above . Schematic Section The prominent Welcome Centre canopy extends an invitation to all Conestoga College visitors.

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EXISTING ACT

NEW OPEN ACCESS COMPUTER TABLE


CONESTOGA COLLEGE

Above . Interior Photographs Carefully curated furniture selection and extensive millwork drawings create a sense of welcome and provide functional work spaces for students.

45


LAUREN MARSHALL

GEORGE BROWN COLLEGE C A S A L O M A C A M P U S S T U D E N T C E N T R E R E N O VAT I O N Architecture Counsel Inc. Oliver Beck Amanda McLeod Lauren Marshall

George Brown College and the Student Association of George Brown (SA) commissioned and developed this renovation through extensive end user consultations and stakeholder reviews. This project aimed at improving the quality of student life on the Casa Loma campus. The project resulted in a design that focused on creating a number of efficient, active, open, and light-filled flexible student and food services. The renovation scenarios focused on improving furniture, lighting, layout, function and aesthetics of the existing Student Centre space of approximately 3, 000 m2 at the Casa Loma Campus. The design reflects programmatic function and form that suit student expectations for a supportive, social and relaxing environment.

Location George Brown College, Casa Loma Campus, Toronto, ON, 2014 Client George Brown College Student Association Design process I was involved in the schematic design, millwork drawings, design development, site visits and construction administration for this project. Total Construction Cost $3 million Project Size 3000m2, one storey Software skills ArchiCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator

Above . Implementation Plan The basement location of the renovation required that various lighting and furniture strategies were implemented to maximize a sense of openness, vibrancy, and community.

46


GEORGE BROWN COLLEGE

Above . Interior Photographs Bold colour schemes and built-in millwork details bring a sense of warmth and openness to the basement level student lounge.

47


LAUREN MARSHALL

UOIT NORTH CAMPUS S T U D E N T I N N O VAT I O N & L E A R N I N G C E N T R E Architecture Counsel Inc. Oliver Beck Lauren Marshall

The Student Innovation and Learning Centre (SILC) is located on a gateway site to the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) North Oshawa campus. The building program includes an expansion of the learning commons, a new welcome centre, classrooms, and research spaces as well as study, food service, and social spaces. The building plan is based on an efficient and economical “L�-shape with a number of glass articulations to reinforce entrances and campus pedestrian circulation patterns. The ACI team produced several schematic iterations to develop the program and massing in parallel with the client needs and the targets required by the Strategic Investment Fund bodies - Infrastructure Canada, and Federal Development Canada.

Infrastructure Canada

Shared

Federal Development Canada

Above . Massing Studies Massing studies and schematic designs for several UOIT North campus sites illustrate different strategies targeting shifting project objectives.

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Location UOIT North Oshawa Campus, ON, 2014 Client UOIT Board of Directors Design process I developed several schematic designs, campus master plans and space adjacency studies for dynamic funding and programmatic needs. Estimated Construction Cost $60 million Project Size 11,000m2 Software skills ArchiCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator


UOIT NORTH CAMPUS

FUTURE BUILDING

N

FUTURE BUILDING

25 M

83 M

S IM

E.R.C

SIMCOE STREET NORTH

CO

BUSINESS BUILDING

T ES

23 M

STUDENT CENTRE BUILDING

17 M

BUSI NESS

F OUND ERS D RIVE

22 M

H

63 M 25 M

FOUNDERS DRIVE

E.R.C

RT

35 M

NO

74 M

36 M

ET

85 M

17 M

P OLONS KY COMM ONS

RE

96 M SCIENCE BUILDING

SCIENCE

T EN S CE

UD ST RVI SE

Top . Exterior SILC Perspective The ACI team prioritized increasing the pedestrian realm while embracing the suburban infrastructure of the UOIT campus.

M CE EN CLE M M CIR CO

EN

T

Bottom . Massing Studies Massing studies and schematic designs for several UOIT North campus sites illustrate different strategies targeting shifting project objectives.

49


LAUREN MARSHALL

Above . Exterior Perspective Trent University, UOIT, and Durham College collaborated to expand the SILC massing strategies and developed a Centre for Integrated Health and Community Studies.

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This facility aims at preparing professionals to enter complex, diverse, and increasingly collaborative, patient-centred models of practice.


UOIT NORTH CAMPUS

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Lauren Marshall - Selected Works  

A compilation of architecture, landscape, urbanism, and design projects from academic and professional endeavours.

Lauren Marshall - Selected Works  

A compilation of architecture, landscape, urbanism, and design projects from academic and professional endeavours.