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Lauren Amador

Woodbury University School of Architecture


Steel Competition: Bridge Housing in Downtown: The Great Brick Wall W.U. SoA San Diego: Plug-In Housing Strathmore Apartments Intervention: The Rotating Bookshelf Site and Program: Four Studies of Human Occupation Fabric to Paper Exploration: MOCA Pavilion La Tourette Monestary: Silverlake Hotel Movement Study: The Bird Handshake Analysis: The Bicycle Rack Intervention Understanding the Section: Plaster Blob 4954 E. Meridian Street: A Set of Drawings Analysis to Representation: Birds at the LA Zoo Parking Lot Bus Terminal: The Intersection of Planes and Points Sound Construct: The Bells Digital Representation: Color and Line Study Farnsworth House Intervention: Glass and Water Concrete Exploration: The Bench Variability of Experience: Through the Non-Architect For Good Measure: The Lamp


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Studio 3b // Deborah Richmond // Project 2


Steel Competition: Bridge

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I

nitial research focuses on aspects of the site that have no boundaries, redefining the common understanding of the border . For example, air, water, animals, and any condition that might affect it like pollution, contamination, and migration. These areas of study pertinent to both COLEF and The Trans Border Institute respect no border, and see only themselves as part of a holistic region. The first and most apparent architectural move is the box truss. This structure transgresses the border, and holds both institutions as one building. It becomes not only the support but a differentiation between the programs on the interior. When the truss becomes compressed it supports program that is private, as it elongates slightly it supports semi-public spaces, and as it opens widest it supports public spaces. Since the two institutions take into Surrounding Figureground of Site US

MX

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1. Site Photographs 2. Plans: 1st and 2nd Floor

consideration both countries in the region, not just their own, the idea developed of exploiting moments where both can interact with each other while maintaining the political line. These three moments within the building became an interaction between both small lecture halls, a ha-ha moment between courtyards, and a mezzanine level. The small lecture halls are adjacent, allowing for a bigger space where lectures are

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given to both institutions. This lecture hall would still be divided with floor level changes and a glass wall. For example, when the Mexican side is giving a lecture, the U.S. side can be raised through sets of platforms giving them view of the presenter, and vise-versa. The ha-ha moment is a visual and experiential connection over a 10 foot gap between the two sides, and is only connected by exposed floor structure. The mezzanine

1. Truss Evolution 2. Building on Site

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Process Models Exploring Density, Program Arrangement, and Structure

is another visual connection that is accessed on an emerging second level. This gives views not only to each side but to the rest of their surroundings, like the San Ysidro Port entry and urban setting. The border is always recognized, respected, and finally emphasized. Within the box truss volume that ignores the border, the occupants are starkly aware of the separation and limit of their two countries.

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Sectional Model

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Midterm Presentation

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12 Private Offices

Outdoor courtyard

cafeteria

kitchen

Entrance lobby/Exhibition space

BR

archivalStorage

archivalStorage

open office

Outdoor courtyard

Private Offices

Film screening room

BR

LARGE AUDITORIUM


12’ 24’

1. Program Arrangement / Circulation Diagram 2. Long Section

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Outdoor courtyard

Entrance lobby/Exhibition space

kitchen

cafeteria

Private Offices

LARGE AUDITORIUM

bathroom

Film screening room

Outdoor courtyard

Private Offices

open office

archivalStorage

BR

small lecture hall

small lecture hall


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Studio 3b // Jay Nickles // Project 3


Housing in Downtown: The Great Brick Wall

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L

ocated on Hope Street at the intersection of Pico Boulevard, sits the site. The existing building in the center of the lot remains; the roof is removed, the structure stays, and the nature of the space pushes towards a great room moreso than a courtyard. The housing units line against and puncture the existing brick wall. Tenants access the parking from

Site Program Division

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Circulation and Program Densities

a sloped ramp, alley-side, to a subterrain level. The ground plane in the courtyard supplements that slope, creating a terraced rise within the open space. The circulation flows up through four stairwells from parking to the great room, then between the units on the exterior. Each unit, all 24, has a doubleheight space and a mezzanine level, with free arrangement around a centered wet zone including a kitchen and bathroom. Interior circulation corkskrews against the walls.

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1. Floorplate Density Model 2. Scheme Development Models

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Floor Plan at 34’

20’ 10’

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150’ 50’

20’ 10’

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Studio 3a // Jay Nickles // Project 2


WU SoA San Diego: Plug-in Housing

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1. From the Deck 2. Sunlight Studies of Existing Building

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retniw

- thgil gninrom


O

n the North side of the Woodbury University School of Architecture, San Diego studio, two apartment units are plugged in to the existing structure. The focus is privacy, specific breaches of privacy. The visiting professor lives in the apartment and the student lives at their desk. The professor has opportunity to let the student study how they live in the space. The architecture is a set, a laboratory, and a home. Materiality allows for the pervasion of eyes. The observation deck of perFrom the Interior Studio

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Content Caption

Intersection of Spaces

forated metal limits view from a closer distance to the upper story. The shelving attached to the mullions of the glass provide opportunity for cover, but only if the professor fills those shelves. The bedroom closet is behind a window, and with the occasional opening of the closet door privacy may be broken through the hanging clothing. The exterior side of the units is primarily open, with opportunity for shade systems such

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as sets of curtains and panels. Because the units are primarily inside the warehouse-like space of the studio, natural light comes primarily from the private north side. Visibility of the living space addition is minimal from the street to preserve the commercial nature of the region and the privacy of the tenants.

From the Exterior

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Studio 3a // Jay Nickles // Project 1


Strathmore Apartments Intervention: The Rotating Bookshelf

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R

ichard Neutra explored the architecture of housing in Los Angeles with the design and build of the Strathmore Apartments. The student studies the drawings and site, the documentation and the experience. “I see what he’s done”, says the student, slowly picking up on the intentions of the architecture. Now that the student is convinced of the legitamcay of this case study, they intervene. They study one action - taking a Figureground Strathmore Apartments

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200’ 100’


8’ 16’

1. Section Parallel to Street 2. Section Perpendicular to street 3. Original Photographs

book from the living room to the balcony. The intervention changes the action by adding two rotating doors where the ribbon windows once were. The bookshelves are extended to the full length of the glass wall. The user is now affected by a change in path of travel, visual asthetic, privacy in density of books, and light condition. The historic form of the housing is preserved, but the experience is altered. The subtlety of the rotating walls when closed heightens the effects of the reveal. One detail change can radically change a space.

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Reproduced Original Site Plan

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Original

Intervention

10’ 5’

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Studio 1b // Varies // Project 1-4


Site and Program: Four Studies of Human Occupation

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The Cliff

Content Caption

Above. The Hill Below. The Hole

Content Caption

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T

he Cliff provides space for reading. The occupant accesses the structure from either side of the cliff, one wide and buried in the land, the other narrow and precariously touching the edge. The reader can sit and lean against the walls or sit with feet dangling over the drop. The vertical covers are voluminous and inaccessible, each providing different light conditions from orientation and material. The reader is in a space with heightened awareness of surroundings such as sun, depth, and altitude.

T

he Hill provides space for writing. The architecture is carved into the earth, following the natural cut and angle of the hill. There are two textures of the wall, ceiling and ground: layered soft stone tiles and smooth concrete. The writer is the tagger, and his pen is a can of spraypaint. The spray paint covers the smooth wall first, and is only erased by more paint. Eventually the writer begins to paint the stone covered wall, which is eroded by the crumbling stone exposed to the elements. To write and rewrite, layer and uncover.

T

he Hole provides space for writing. Upon approach, the architecture is even with the skyline on flat land. Stairs follow the sloped walls of the inverted, truncated cone down to the open surface. The writer works at the depth of the space, with concentrated beams of light pouring in through apertures in the ceiling. The apertures follow a rotational, geometric pattern that focus all angles of sunlight throughout the year. The pattern is reflected in the hard clay floor. Each writer begins and completes their work, concluding the piece by engraving it into the walls of the space. Their movement is stamped and carved into the clay ground over time, a footprint of their time spent writing. The space accentuates that the occupation of writing is not static.

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T

he Tower provides a space for reading. The occupant enters with a short descent into the base of the structure. They ascend on ladders lined against the walls. Closer to the ground, the skin structure is a perfectly uniform diagrid, reflecting the gridded order of the city. As the reader gets closer to their space of fictional intake, the structure begins to widen and shift. The last ladder cuts across the top of the space with the twist of the last floor. The reader sits against short, leaning walls oriented with reference to the now completely disrupted diagrid.

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The Tower

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Studio 2a // Linda Chung // Project 2


Fabric to Paper Exploration: Moca Pavilion

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T

he wavelike forms of the leather intertwine and collapse ontop of itself creating a complex effect of endlessness to the strands. Every turn is intimately known through a magnified redrawing. This dress becomes the focus of reference for the MOCA pavilion. The student folds paper to paper, into paper endlessness. Pieces to a whole, a strategy is

Elevation and Section of Dress

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1. Dress Detail 2. Drawing Process 3. Unit Accumulation

established. Two units that vary in just one fold begin to communicate with eachother in contact, connecting without fasteners, i.e. glue. In alternating arrangement, the two pieces create a slight curve. With a doubling of one piece the trajectory changes. Each subsequent row can be stacked on top eachother to create height and in some cases cover. The pavilion accentuates the negative space between the folded units.

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Just as the negative space in the dress, the lining, begins to define the parts as opposed to the whole, the apertures of the pavilion gives definition to the form. Three major zones are defined: the arched entry, the intermediate area, and the threshold into the museum.

Negative space of dress and pavilion

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6’ 3’

1. Plan Studying Shadow 2. Elevation

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Studio 2a // Linda Chung // Project 2


La Tourette Monestary: Silverlake Hotel

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S

ainte Marie de la Tourette was completed by architect, Le Corbusier, in 1960. Heavy in the hillside, the monestary evokes questions of light and underlying geometry and proportion. The student sees consistencies and intentional disturbances in the principles set forth by Le Corbusier. There are mathematics and variations, variables and rhythm.

La Tourette Case Study

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LIVING

RELIGIOUS

WORKING

1. La Tourette Programmatic Arrangement 2. Analysis of Proportion in Plan

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With La Tourette at the front of the mind, the student begins design on a small hotel in Silverlake, CA. The massing is derived from proportion of program and arrangement of spaces in relationship to one another. There is variation in deployment of the golden ratio, from the form to the window detail. As observed in the case study, each program has a different wall application, and therefore different environments and relationship to natural light. Furthermore, the window system is not a thin plane, it is an extruded depth, creating privacy from the outside in Window Study

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91’

102’

FFStreet EF Effie

Silverlake Boulevard

1. Extents of Sight 2. Massing Model Exploring Interlocking of Program

as well as directed line of sight. The hotel in Silverlake includes an entry, a restaurant on the base floor, an outdoor patio on the second floor, and rooms on the second and third floor. The elevator, vertical circulation, is placed at the crux of the golden rectangle, while the horizontal circulation follows the exterior walls.

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1st Floorplan Effie Street

Garden

Lobby

Silverlake Boulevard

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Shop

Back of House

Restaurant

25’ 12.5’


Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Lobby Outdoor Garden Guestroom

Guestroom

2nd Floorplan

3rd Floorplan

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

Guestroom

4th Floorplan

Southeast Facade

Southwest Facade

20’ 10’

Northeast Facade

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Corner Detail

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Surface Study Model

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10’ 5’

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Studio 1a // Louis Molina // Project 1


Movement Study: The Bird

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Collaged Sequence of Movement

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Drawing of Compression and Registration Points of Movement


T

he project begins with a video of a bird flying in an upward trajectory. The video is broken down into twenty frames, and altered to create a collaged sequence of movement per fifth second. With this, the student drafts an analysis of the motion, including compression, expansion, radius, speed, and position. A series of studies are modeled to understand these dynamics in a third dimension. The final exploration is completed using three dimensions of wood: sticks, planes, and blocks. 1. Final Model: Sticks, Planes, and Blocks 2. Process Models: Searching Clarity

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Studio 1a // Louis Molina // Project 2


Handshake Analysis: The Bicycle Rack Intervention

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A collage is made using orthographic drawings of the bird construct. The collage is organized by studying the gesture of a dead fish handshake. The first key aspect of the handshake is the contrast between grounded and loose: the metal bike bolted to the ground and the wood pieces resting on top it’s frame. Second, the realization of the dead fish handshake is abrupt and is identified upon contact: the springy wire running through the wood is only seen once the user gets within it’s reach. Third, the stiffness of one hand compared to the malleable form

Collage Studying the Interaction of Two Systems

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Content Caption 1. Final Construct at Wire’s Visible Distance 2. Final Construct at Eye Level

of the dead fish hand: the stiffness of the wood compared to the bendable and ductile wire.

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Full Collage Studying the Interaction of Two Systems

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Design Communications I // Mark Ericson // Project 1


Understanding the Section: Plaster Blob

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P

laster is poured into a plastic bag and wrapped tight with string. Serial sections are taken from a wood frame by measuring from plaster to frame and plotting those points onto a grid. With translation comes loss of information, since a point is only plotted every quarter of an inch around each sectional circumference. Each section is then projected using forty-five degree line, to a collected axonometric. Half the sections are mistakingly projected with one forty-five degree turn which flips the information, and the other half is turned twice to keep the original orientation. The card model shows this flip of information, and became a way to understand the drawing process and capabilities of descriptive geometry.

Model derived from Sections

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Plaster Blob on Drafting

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Drafted Sections Projected to Axonometric

The drawings are on opalux papaer, two 24 x 36 sheets. The projection carries across one paper to the other, and is overlapped in order to fit onto the drafting table. The inversion of the image shows all information perceivable by the scanner, including the smudged and speckled graphite across the surface of the paper. This image becomes the final translation of the plaster blob.

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D

escriptive geometry allows the representation of three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional space. The box has eight points of registration, labeled A-H. The box then has a chamfered edge adding two extra points I and J. With two views of the object, the box can be manipulated in space. The two views serve as a ratio of distance between all sets of points. Each new orientation is based on the two before. The angle of the projection determines the rotation of the box.

Chamfered Box with Plane Slicing Through

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Fisrt Exploration of Rotation

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Professional Practice I // Robert Kerr // Project 1


4954 E. Meridian Street: A Set of Drawings

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T

his house is a Type V construction, single-family dwelling. On a 50 by 200 foot lot, there is a two car garage, a living room, kitchen, mezzanine, and a bathroom, all in a studio-like space. Group mates included Robbie Mehring, Christopher Hewett, and Kelly Ta. The annotation is per construction drawing and is not altered for the format change.

PROPERTY

A1-3.0

10’

40’

PROPERTY LINE

15’ REAR SETBACK

572

16’

570

A1-3.0 26’-6”

10

'4-3

/4

"

568

5’ SIDE SETBACK

5’ SIDE SETBACK

565

560

PAR K WAY

575

58

0

57

0

58

15’ REAR SETBACK

CONC

5

WALK

PROPERTY LINE

SITE PLAN

PROPERTY

SHORT SECTION

LONG SECTION

16

16

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TOP VIEW 16

PERSPECTIVE FROM NORTH/EAST FACADE 16


BOARD-FORMED CONCRETE

2”x4” STUDS @ 16” O.C.

BOARD-FORMED CONCRETE

STAINED WOOD FINISH

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x3 2x10

x3 2x12

2x8 @ 16" o.c.

4x6 King Stud x2 2x6 Jack Studs x3 2x12

x3 2x12

4x6 King Stud

17'-4"

x2 2x6 Jack Studs 2x6 Jack Studs

x2 2x6 King Stud 2x4 King Stud 2x4 Jack Studs

4x6 King Stud

4x6 King Stud 2x8 @ 12" o.c.

x2 2x6 Jack Studs 2x8 @ 16" o.c. 10'

x3 2x12

x2 2x6 Jack Studs 4x6 King Stud

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x2 2x6 Jack Studs


1” CORRUGATED METAL 2" X 12" RAFTER

5 WD-1.1

3/4" PLYWOOD 2" X 12" ROOF JOIST 2" X 14" FASCIA 1/2" X 12" CONCRETE PANELS

3/4" PLYWOOD CIELING

3/4" PLYWOOD

5/8" GYPSUM BOARD

VAPOR BARRIER

2X4 TOP SILL 5 / 8" GYPSUM WALL BOARD PAINTED

BATT INSULATION IN STUD CAVITY (R-13)

2- 2X4 HEADER

MORTAR

7

ALUMINUM WINDOW FRAME

WD-1.1

DOUBLE GLAZED WINDOW

6

2 X 4 SILL PLATE

WD-1.1

5 / 8" GYPSUM WALL BOARD PAINTED 3/4" FINISHED FLOOR

ALUMINUM WINDOW FRAME 3/4" PLYWOOD

3/4" PLYWOOD

1/2" X 12" CONCRETE PANELS

2" X 10" F.J. @ 16" O.C.

VAPOR BARRIER 2 X 4 SILL 2" X 10" BLOCKING

1'-6"

8"

2" X 6" MUD SILL 2" X 4" STUD @ 16" O.C. 6" STEM WALL

CONCRETE FOOTING

FRONT WALL SECTION - LA 3/4” 1-0’

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3/4"

BATT INSULATION IN STUD CAVITY (R-13)

1/2" X 12" CONCRETE PANELS MORTAR VAPOR BARRIER

5/8" GYPSUM BOARD

3/4" PLYWOOD

SEALANT

2 - 2X4 HEADER SHIM

METAL 'J' STRIP AROUND OPENING

METAL 'J' STRIP AROUND OPENING

2x4 ROUGH SILL

SEALANT

DOUBLE GLAZED WINDOW 5/8" GYP. BD. PAINTED BATT INSULATION IN STUD CAVITY (R-13)

WINDOW HEADER DETAIL - LA

6

WINDOW SILL DE

20.00

SCALE: 1-1/2" = 1'-0"

4.00

16.50

SCALE: 1-1/2" = 1'-0"

10.50

7

SOUTH SECTION

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WEST SECTION


ETAIL - LA

1” CORRUGATED METAL VAPOR BARRIER 3/4" PLYWOOD BATT INSULATION IN STUD CAVITY (R-13) DOUBLE GLAZED WINDOW

SHIM 3/4" PLYWOOD

2" X 14"FASCIA

VAPOR BARRIER

2" X 12" RAFTER

MORTAR

2" X 12" ROOF JOIST

1/2" X 12" CONCRETE PANELS

2X4 TOP SILL 1/2" X 12" CONCRETE PANELS 3/4" PLYWOOD

MORTAR

5/8" GYPSUM BOARD

VAPOR BARRIER

BATT INSULATION IN STUD CAVITY (R-13)

3/4" PLYWOOD

5

ROOF DETAIL - LA SCALE: 1-1/2" = 1'-0"

BOARD FORM CONCRETE KITCHEN

LIVING ROOM BATHROOM WOOD BEDROOM

INSET 1’ GARAGE

FLOOR PLAN

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Studio 2b // Frank Clementi // Project 1


Analysis to Representation: Birds at the LA Zoo Parking Lot

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A

precedent drawing is given to dissect: two photographs, a plan series, and a section series. A hampi, a traditional round boat used in India, is navigated downstream the Ganges River. The unknown author of the precedent diagrams the rotation, weight, speed, and propulsion of the movement. In the dissection, the lines are extracted and arranged into a kit of parts. With this, the overall meaning of the drawing is

Case Study Drawing

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Analysis: The Dissection of Parts

lost, but the method of construction is revealed. Lines and annotation gain meaning through repetition and organization. From this, the Los Angeles Zoo parking lot is studied in a similar way. Movement of vehicles, location of objects in space, movement of birds down a tree-lined walkway, and thumbnail pictures for understanding of environment and place. The parking lot is mapped in plan, with an additional spatial section taken of the birds movement, to highlight the change in elevation, similar to the change of elevation of the boat.

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9

8

5

6

9

6

2

2

9

1

92


5

8

3

93


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Studio 2b // Frank Clementi // Project 2


Bus Terminal: The Intersection of Planes and Points

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B

eginning with site observation and mapping, the main focus of the project becomes circulation and the obsession with a point cloud derived from wire modeling of sound. This sound cloud taken from the one road cutting through the site, spreads as a disease over the majority of the site. Each point becomes a registration marker for either

Site Mapping

30º

30º 60º 120º

60º 30º 30º

30º

45º

45º

30º

45º 30º

30º

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30º 45º


Content Caption 1. Study Models of Site Lanforms 2. Site Model with Physical Representaion of Mapping

the edge of a plate, or the centroid of a column. The materialization of this cloud is constrained and shaped by the proposed, ideal circulation for the program, a bus terminal. Pedestrian, bicycle, motor vehicle, and bus traffic do not intersect on the same plane once throughout the

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project. There is continous flow of traffic. Each level change is achieved with gradual slopes. This allows for ease of traffic, as well as wheelchair accessibility on every circulation path. Experientially however, the excessive and seemingly random placement of collumns throughout the building become cumbersome and contrast the extreme pragmatism of the circulation.

Plan and Sections

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45º

13

14

30º

RESTAURANT

CONCESSIONS

3

5

OFFICES

8

MECHANICAL

7

BATHROOMS

MAINTENANCE

6

BAGGAGE CLAIM

OUTDOOR SEATING

CONTROL ROOM

2

4

BUS TERMINAL NORTHWEST

12

MAGAZINE STAND

06

BUS TERMINAL SOUTHEAST

30º

12

10

11

INDOOR SEATING

1

13

10

06

TICKET BOOTHS

04

9

30º

30º 60º

01 08

03

30º

45º

60º

05

02

14

30º

11 07

09

45º 45º

03

45º

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Studio 1a // Louis Molina // Project 3


Sound Construct: The Bells

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E

xplore sound through architecture. With group mates Xandr Stack, Viviana Colin-Torres, and Joseph Fitzgerrells, a construct is designed and built. Four platforms lead up and around a central folded screen made of 2 by 4’s. Hanging at the top of each panel are steel tubes that shorten as the platforms step up. The steel pipes jangle against eachother like giant windchimes or become a playful opportunity for a

Scheme Collage

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Drawings for Construction and Spatial Understanding

sound jungle-gym. The decision to orient the 2 by 4’s on the platforms horizontally was made with no knowledge of wood’s natural structural properties. The entire construction is held together by hundreds of nails, with overdesigned walls and underdesigned standing surfaces. There is no bracing where the horizontal surface meets the vertical stilts. Without the folded screen locking the wood in place from the core, the

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104


1. Completed Construct 2. Interior Light Condition

construct would be in serious risk of failure by buckling. The steel was left untreated and with roughcut edges and would have rusted had the construct stayed up for more than the three days that it did. We did not consider most of this at the time.

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Design Communications II // Heather Peterson // Project 1


Digital Representation: Color and Line Study

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Reference

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Representation

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C

irculation, paintings, frames, color and arrangementt are mapped in room 204 at the Getty Museum. Every time a visitor takes a photograph of a painting, the primary color of that work appears on the map, some more than others. The circulation is analyzed for amount of traffic, trajectory and turning radius. Frames are sectioned but become imperceivable unless put under a microscope; below is that slide.

Frame Sections Room 204

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863_10

0_9

874_10

895_9

478_8

875_9 0_9

198_14

866_9

9204_15 864_10

399_7

0_8

0_10

0_6

668_11

0_22

0_8

871_10

867_11

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Design Communications II // Heather Peterson // Project 2


Farnsworth House Intervention: Glass and Water

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T

he Farnsworth House, by architect Mies van der Rohe, sits in a rural area 55 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. Designed and constructed between 1945-1951, the farnsworth house is a one room retreat known for it’s floor to ceiling glass and modern detail. Per the project, the house is 3d modeled in rhino, then intervened with a secondary skin. The drawings focus on this disruptance of the purely transparent

2007 Flood Level _ 48�

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exterior, with a curtain of foot tall perscription glasses. The reproduction of plans are cut at each level the floods rose to in the building’s lifetime. Renderings show the experience of the interior, with the glasses curtain and a flood.

1996 Flood Level _ 66�

115


Flood Level 2008 _ 102�

116


Exploded Axonometric cut at Flood Levels

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118


119


120


121


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Materials & Methods // Daniel Rabin // Project 1


Concrete Exploration: The Bench

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Concrete is condensed, strong in compression, versatile, stone-like, but most importantly, liquid before all the rest. Concrete takes the form and texture of its container, then cures and becomes a solid. It is a mixture of water, cement, and aggregate. The proportion of this mixture and any added ingredients produces concrete of different strengths, color, weight, and texture. Experiments are undergone to understand these properties, restraints and strengths. In a group with Jose Iglesias,

Finished Construct on Site with Existing Element

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Concrete Experiments

Robert Beltran, Robbie Mehring, Vahe Haretounian, and myself, a final construct is designed and built. The construct is designed in composition to a neighboring concrete bench. There are three slabs: the top slab a reinforced cementall trapezoid, the edge support a mix of cementall and quickcrete, and the span support a quickcrete form. The top slab rests on a lap joint of the edge support and the length of the other sup-

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Construct in Second Location

port. The top of the slab contrasts an ultra-smooth texture poured on plexi-glass with a rough texture poured on OSB. Two holes are placed in the top slab to aide in transportation, holds for hands or ties. Both supports are buried six inches into the ground for stabilization and evenness. The construct primarily acts as a bench.

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Corner Detail

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Theory of Architecture // Ewan Branda // Final


Variablilty of Experience: Through the Non-Architect

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‘M

icromegas’ (1979) is a series of line drawings by Daniel Libeskind. It is a pencil drawing on white paper within a rectangular boundary. The boundary is broken by the lines and becomes suggestive. The drawing provokes a sense of intentional disruption and manipulation of an underlying regular and consistent organization. The lines that follow an orthogonal grid are perceptively farther away than the upraised, skewed elements. The drawing elicits a sense of weightlessness and fragmentation, as if gravity has been turned off; elements have floated towards the eye in rotation, and then frozen in space. The voice is a strong, deliberate and calculated consciousness of spatial experience. It is not a drawing of existing form, it is not a construction document, and it is not a proposed architecture, but may be interpreted as all the above. It is notation of thought. It is, Daniel Libeskind says, “a radical elucidation of the original pre-comprehension of forms,” (Mallgrave 26). ‘Micromegas’ is the early exploration of a non- architect, Libeskind. The network of lines represents nothing, which only make reference to themselves. There is no building drawn, for the “drawing is more than the shadow of an object, more than a pile of lines, more than a resignation to inertia of convention” (Libeskind 15). The spatial experience created is a prospect of potential formalization. The non-architect gives the task of clarification and transmutation to the viewer. One searches for familiar architectural forms and meanings, but is repelled by the absence of such archetypal signifiers. And with the conclusion that the drawing cannot be analyzed and observed in this manner, it is pegged as abstract. It is the pre-comprehension of forms. “If there is true abstraction here (as opposed to generalization) it is not achieved by the elimination of contents through a gradual deployment of an increasing emptiness, but is rather an isolation of structural essence, whose manifestation in two dimensions illuminates all the sub-systems of projection (for example, three-dimensional space).” (Libeskind 15)

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Alois Martin Muller responds in “Daniel Libeskind’s Muses”, stating, “The lines in Daniel Libeskind’s drawings and architecture, the traditional ordering and constructional medium of geometry, land surveying and spatial mensuration, are used in ‘Micromegas’ to reveal a lack of measure, the hubris of the belief in the constructability of the world” (Libeskind 74). Boundaries of normality are permanently questioned and, indeed, contravened. This transgressed normality must be explored in the non-physical before the physical. From mind to drawing to mind, reduced and altered to physical manifestation. The drawing provokes a realization that the capabilities of the mind’s understanding or lack of realness in spatial experience is too complex to materialize; and so it can be understood that just as a physical spatial experience cannot be fully translated past the time of experience, images and narratives are created to attempt translation. Equally, as the spatial experience in the non-physical, conscious mind cannot be translated past one’s own circuitry of firing neurons, Libeskind draws to attempt translation. “An architectural drawing is as much a prospective unfolding of future possibilities as it is a recovery of a particular history to whose intentions it testifies and whose limits it always challenges” (Malgrave 14). The course from shifting from virtual architecture to physical architecture is unremitting; from pre-comprehended form, to formal archetypes, to the memory of form, the witness of form, the document of form. This is the discussion over one printed line drawing. Now, fast-forwarding from 1979, “[..] there will be still another virtual space created by the introduction of electronic media [..] Thus there will be no end to our spatial experiences as the real and virtual spaces overlap in our experience” (Ito 5). A drawing in the series ‘Micromegas’, LEAKAGE is scanned into the computer, and the experience that one has in the space as a digital blueprint begins. Zooming in, zooming out, selecting and highlighting, referencing the location of 2D space on the 3D coordinate system of the software. The computer becomes a microscope, scissor,

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filter for a virtual experience, letting the eyes search so far past the surface they hit a single pixel of color then ultimately inward to explore the depths of the observers own imagination. The ghost of a building shows itself through the lines then vanishes. Misread the digital blueprint and exploit it, for Libeskind himself says it is a prospective unfolding of the future. Before architecture is tangible it is now a virtual experience. The virtual space will never be the real space, nor will it be the experience; the drawing is, even when the building is not.

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Outside Class


For Good Measure: The Lamp

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W

ith a 3 by 3 sheet of 1/8th inch plywood, a laser cutter, rhino, and a lightbulb and chord, a lamp is made. The pieces are held together with fitted joinery, no glue necessary. The fixture hangs, with a tail off-center to spin gently with the wind. The top disc has a cut out space for the knuckle to go through when turning the switch.

Kit of Parts

2” 1/4”

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4”


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Lauren Amador Portfolio 2010-2013